N. A. (Newton Allen) Strait.

Alphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl online

. (page 32 of 34)
Online LibraryN. A. (Newton Allen) StraitAlphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl → online text (page 32 of 34)
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in three divisions, in single file, at the side of each a soldier with fixed bayonet. The
signal of death was given, and all were instantly lifeless.

San Jacinto, Texas, March 22, 1836. Fought and won by 783 Texans, under Gen
eral Houston, against over 1,500 Mexicans, under Santa Anna. Loss: Texa?i, 2 killed
and 23 wounded; Mexican, 630 killed, 208 wounded, and 730 prisoners, among the
latter, Santa Anna.

San Patricia, Texas, November 4, 1835. Between a detachment of 30 Texans and
about double their number of Mexicans; Mexican loss, 28 killed and wounded.

In June, 1841, an expedition was fitted out by President Lamar, the object of which
was the annexation of New Mexico to Texas. Commissioners from that State had
given out intimation that the appearance of a force of Texans at Santa Fe would be
a signal for rebellion and the dismemberment of the State from Mexico. Their hard
ships, privations, betrayal, brutal treatment, and long imprisonment are matters well
known to every reader of American periodicals.

THE MEXICAN WAR, APRIL 24, 184G-MAY 30, 1848.

The causes of this war were the neglect of the Mexican Government to pay the
stipulated indemnities due to American citizens and the annexation of Texas.

Buena Vista, Coahuila, February 22, 23, 1847. Fought between 4,759 Americans,
under General Taylor, and 18,OOO^Mexicans, under Santa Anna. The Mexicans were
repulsed. Loss: American, 267 killed, 456 wounded; Mexican, unknown.

Cerro Gordo, Puebla, April 17, 1847. Fought between 8,000 Americans, under
General Scott, and 15,000 Mexicans, under General Santa Anna. Mexicans routed
with terrible loss, 6,000 taken prisoners. Loss: American, about 42 killed and 250
wounded.

^ El Embubo, New Mexico, January 29, 1847. Fought between 180 Americans, under
Captains Burgwiii and St. Vrain, and a small force of Mexicans. Loss: American,
1 killed, 1 wounded; Mexican, 20 killed, 60 wounded.

La Canada, New Mexico, January 24, 1847. Fought between 290 Americans, under
Colonel Price, and nearly 2,000 Mexicans. The Mexicans were defeated. Loss:
American, 3 killed and 6 wounded; Mexican, 36 killed.

Los Angeles, Gal., January 8, 1847. Fought between 600 Americans, under General
Kearney, and about the same number of Mexicans. The latter were defeated. Loss:
American, 20 killed and wounded; Mexican, 80 killed and wounded.

Monterey, New Leon, storming of, September 21-23, 1846. The town and works were
armed with 42 pieces of cannon and manned with a Mexican force of 7,000 troops of
the line and from 2,000 to 3,000 irregulars, under General A^mpudia. General Taylor



BATTLES OF THE OLD WARS, 1754-1848. 237

attacked the place and took it with an American force of 6,645 men. Loss: Mexican,
700 killed and wounded; American, 120 killed and 368 wounded.

Palo Alto, Coahuila, May 8, 1846. Fought and won by 2,288 American regulars,
under General Taylor, against 6,000 Mexicans, under General Arista. Loss: Mexican,
400 killed and wounded; American, 9 killed, 44 wounded, and 2 missing.

Resaca de la Palma, Coahuila, Ma;/ 9, 1846. Fought between 6,500 Mexicans, under
General Arista, and 1,700 United States Regulars, under General Taylor. The Mexi
cans were totally routed. Loss: Mexican, 600 killed and wounded; American, 39
killed and 82 wounded.

Sacramento, Chihuahua, February 28, 1847. Fought between 924 Missouri volun
teers, under Colonel Doniphan, and 3,700 Mexicans. The Americans were victorious.
Loss: American, 1 killed, 11 wounded; Mexican, 300 killed, 500 wounded.

8an Pasqual, Upper California, Decembers, 184<>. Fought between 100 United States
dragoons, under General Kearney, and 160 Mexican lancers, under Colonel Andrea
Pico. Mexicans routed with heavy loss. Loss: American, 19 killed and 6 wounded.

Taos, New Mexico, February 4, 1847. About 300 Americans, under Colonel Price,
assaulted and defeated a considerable body of Mexicans and Indians, who were for
tified in the houses and churches of El Pueblo de Taos. Loss: American, 15 killed,
38 wounded; Mexican, 150 killed and wounded.

Vera Cruz, Vcra Cruz, bombardment of, March 19, 20, 21, 1847. Invested on land
by General Scott, with 11,000 Americans, and on water by Commodore Perry, in
command of United States squadron. Capitulates after a bombardment of three and
one-half days. Loss: American, 15 killed and 57 wounded; Mexican, 500 killed and
wounded.

CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF THE MEXICAN WAR.

March, 1845, Congress passed a joint resolution for the annexation of Texas. Almonte,
the Mexican minister at Washington, demanded his passports and announced that
this act would be considered as a declaration of war by his Government.

1845.

JULY.

4. Texas accepts the terms of annexation proffered by the United States.
25. General Taylor arrives with a considerable force at St. Josephs Island ( Aransas
Inlet), and soon after encamps at Corpus Christ!.

184,6.

MARCH.

9. General Taylor takes up his line of march for the Rio Grande.
24. The prefect of Tamaulipas protests against Taylor s advance. General Garcia, in
command of 280 Mexicans, fires the custom-house at Point Isabel and evacuates
the place.
28. General Taylor arrivesiopposite Matamoras.

APRIL.

11. General Ampudia arrives at Matamoras with 1,000 cavalry and 1,500 infantry.

1 3. Ampudia orders General Taylor to leave his position in twenty-four hours. Taylor
refuses, and blockades the Rio Grande so as to cut off the supplies to the Mexi
can army.

19. Lieutenant Porter and 4 men killed by the Mexicans. Colonel Cross murdered.
First blood shed.

23. Captain Thornton s scouts cut off. Two hundred Mexicans cross the Rio Grande.

28. Skirmish between Walker s Texas Rangers and a large body of Mexican troops.

MAY.

3. General Taylor makes a forced march to Point Isabel with 2,300 men.

4. Fort Brown attacked by the Mexicans and Major Brown killed.

8. Battle of Palo Alto. Major Ringgold slain. Mexicans retreat.

9. Battle of Resaca de la Palma. General Vega taken prisoner by Captain May.



238 BATTLES OF THE OLD WARS, 1754-1848.

184rO.

11. President Polk sends a war message to Congress. War bill passed by the House.

12. War bill passes the Senate.

17. Burrita taken by Colonel AVilliams and 7 companies of United States troops.

18. General Taylor takes possession of Matamoras. Yera Cruz blockaded by Com

modore Connor.
27. General Taylor promoted to rank of major-general by Congress.

JUNE.

8. Battle of Tampico. The />?. Mary* demolishes the forts opposite that city.

JULY.

6. Monterey (California) taken and a United States government established.

25. Santa Fe expedition starts, under General Kearney, with 1,500 men, from Inde
pendence, Mo.

AUGUST.

5. China taken by Texas Rangers, under Captain McCulloch.

8. President Polk asks for $2,000,000, to be used in bringing about peace with
Mexico. Congress adjourns on the 10th without granting it.

16. Revolution in Mexico. Paredes is exiled, and Santa Ana takes command of the

Mexican army.
18. Santa Fe captured by General Kearney. General Armijo retires, with 4,000

Mexicans, and the United States government established.
27. Commodore Stockton takes formal possession of the California*.

SEPTEMBER.

17. Santa Ana, having been recalled from exile, enters the City of Mexico.

2] . Storming of Monterey by General Taylor. City capitulates. Mexicans per
mitted to retire with their arms. Armistice agreed upon to allow the leaders
to consult their Governments.

25. Santa Ana starts for the seat of war, in order to concentrate 30,000 men at San

Luis Potosi. General Wool s division leaves San Antonio for Coahuila.

26. Colonel Stevenson s California regiment sails from New York.

OCTOBER.

7. The United States sloop-of-war Cyane, Captain Du Ponte, bombards Guaymas,

and cuts out the Mexican brig Condor from under the guns of that town.

16. The United States squadron makes an abortive attack on Alvarado.
23. Blockade of Yucatan ordered by the United States Government.

NOVEMBER.

11. Tampico taken by the American squadron. First American flag hoisted by Mrs.
Chase, the heroic wife of the United States consul.

17. War Department calls for more troops.

26. Brig Creole cut out from under the guns of San Juan de Ulna by one American

boat s crew.

27. Midshipman Rodgers taken prisoner while making a daring recomioissance of

the defenses at Yera Cruz.

30. Major-General Scott and staff sail for New Orleans, on his way to Mexico to
take command of the army.

DECEMBER.

6. Battle of San Pasqual.

8. The U. S. brig tiomers capsizes off Yera Cruz; 36 seamen drowned.
16. General Taylor takes possession of Saltillo without resistance.

23. Santa Ana ^chosen President and Gomez Farias Vice-President by the depart
ments of Mexico.

25. Captain Stone, with 70 men, captures Captain Caution, with 200 Mexicans, at

Ranco, with letters of instruction from Generals Ampudia and Paredes.

26. Gomez Farias takes the oath of office as Vice-President. Almonte, Secretary of

State, reports to the Mexican Congress that the public treasury is empty.

28. General Scott arrives at the Brazos.



BATTLES OF THE OLD WAKS, 1754-1848. 239



JANUARY.

2. Blockade of Laguna taken off.

4. President Polk sends a special message to Congress, recommending an increase
of the Regular Army and the appointment of a lieutenant-general.

7. A bill passes the Mexican Congress authorizing a sale of church property to the

amount of $13,000,000, to furnish means for prosecuting the war.

8. Battle of Los Angeles, in California.

9. General Taylor enters Victoria.

17. Governor Bent and 20 other American citizens massacred at Taos, New Mexico,

by Mexican rebels.

24. Battle of La Canada, New Mexico. General Patterson arrives at Tampico with

4,500 men.

25. Major Borland, with 50 men, and Major Gaines and Capt, Cassius M. Clay, with

80 men, captured at Encarnacion by 500 Mexican cavalry.
29. Battle of El Embudo, New Mexico.

FEBRUARY.

>. An American newspaper press establishd at Tampico The Sentinel.
11. The act to raise ten new regiments approved by the President.

18. President Polk sends a special message to Congress, recommending a tax on tea

and coffee and a reduction of the price of public lands, to raise money for
expenses of the war.

19. General Scott arrives at Tampico.

21. General Taylor breaks up his camp at Agua Nueva and falls back to Buena Vista.

22, 23. Battle of Buena Vista, Santa Ana, repulsed, retreats toward Mexico.

28. Battle of Sacramento (Chihuahua).

29. The National Guard of the City of Mexico, incited by the church party, and

headed by General Panay Barregan, pronounce against the Government and
proclaim a new plan. Severe gale in the Gulf; 81 vessels driven ashore on
Sacrificios.

MARCH.

7. Generals Quitman, Fields, .Tcssup, and Surgeon-General Lawson leave Tampico

for Vera Cruz.
9. The last of General Scott s command leave Tampico for Vera Cruz; the American

army commences landing near Vera Cruz.
11. General Scott lands in person; the American forces commence throwing up

breastworks, opening trenches, and planting mortars.
18. Trenches opened at night.
22. The city summoned, but refuses to surrender.

26. The Mexican garrison proposes to surrender.

29. The garrison capitulates; American forces enter Vera Cm/.

APRIL.

2. Alvarado and Fla-co-tal-pam surrender to Lieutenant Hunter, L T . S. S. /Scourge.
11. Orders given for the Army of Vera Cruz to advance on the road to Mexico.
17. Battle of Cerro Gordo; Mexicans routed; Santa Ana iinds safety in flight.

20. Jalapa occupied by the American troops.

22. General Worth, with the American advance guard, takes possession of Perote,

Ampudia, with 3,000 cavalry, falling back on Puebla.
24. Tuspan taken by the squadron under Commodore Perry.



The Americans continued their advance toward the capital of the Mexican
Republic, and entered Puebla, a city of 80,000 inhabitants, where they rested
until August, after a series of victories almost unparalleled in the annals of war.

AUGUST.

After having received reenforcements Scott left Puebla on the 7th of August,
1847, and resumed his march toward the Mexican capital, and on the 10th the
American troops saw the extensive valley of Mexico before them. Lakes,
plains, cities, and cloud-capped mountains burst upon their gaze. Away in the
distance was seen the great city of the Montezumas, with its lofty domes and
towers. But between that city and the American army were strong fortifica
tions and a Mexican army of 30,000 men under Santa Ana to be overcome.



240



BATTLES OF THE OLD WARS, 1754-1848.



184,7.

20. On the 20th of August, 1847, the American army, after a bloody struggle, carried
the Mexican camp of Contreras by assault. On the same day the Americans
took the strong fortress of San Antonio, and gained a brilliant victory over the
Mexicans at Churubusco. Santa Ana s army, virtually annihilated, fled to
the capital. During this bloody day the Mexicans lost" 4,000 men killed and
wounded, and 3,000 were made prisoners by the victorious Americans. Scott
now offered the Mexicans peace. Santa Ana asked for an armistice, which
Scott granted, but when informed that the treacherous Mexican general was
improving the time by strengthening the defenses of the capital the American
commander declared the armistice at an end, on the 7th of September.

SEPTEMBER,

8-14. Fall of the capital: The victorious Americans took by storm the strong posi
tion of Molino del Rev on the 8th of September, and the lofty fortified hill of
Chepultepec on the 13th of the same month, and on the 14th Scott entered the
Mexican capital in triumph, and by his orders the Stars and Stripes were
placed on the national palace. Order was soon restored in the city. Santa
Anna and the authorities of the Mexican Republic had fled.

184r8.

FEBRUARY.

2. Peace of Guadaloupe Hidalgo: A treaty of peace between the Governments of
the United States and Mexico was made at Guadaloupe Hidalgo on the 2d of
February, 1848, and submitted to the United States Senate, who madelnaterial
amendments, which were finally ratified by the Mexican Senate May 23, 1848,
and President Polk proclaimed peace on the 4th of July of the same year. By
the treaty of Guadaloupe Hidalgo, New Mexico and California became Terri
tories of the United States, while the United States Government agreed to pay
to Mexico $15,000,000 for the ceded territory, and to assume the debts due by
the Mexican Government to American citizens.

LIST OF PRESIDENTS.



President.


Born.


Inaugurated.


In office.


George Washington


Feb. 22, 1732
Oct. 19, 1735
Apr. 13,1743
Mar. 16,1751
Apr. 2, 1759
Julv 11,1767
Mar. 15,1767
Dec. 5, 1782
Feb. 9, 1773
Mar. 29,1790
Nov. 2,1795
Nov. 24,1784
Jan. 7, 1800
Nov. 23,1804
Apr. 22,1791
Feb. 12,1809

Dec. 29,1808

Apr. 27,1822
Oct. 4, 1822
Mar. 19,1831
Oct. 5, 1830

Mar. 18,1837
Aug. 20,1833
Mar. 18,1837
Feb. 26,1844


Apr. 30,1789
Mar. 4, 1797
Mar. , 1801
Mar. , 1809
Mar. , 1817
Mar. , 1825
Mar. 4, 1829
Mar. ,1837
Mar. , 1841
Apr. 6, 1841
Mar. 4,1845
Mar. 5, 1849
July 10,1850
Mar. 4, 1853
Mar. 4, 1857
Mar. 4,1861

Apr. 15,1865

Mar. 4, 1869
Mar. 4, 1877
Mar. 4, 18S1
Sept. 20, 1881

Mar. 4, 1885
Mar. 4, 1889
Mar. 4,1893
Mar. 4, 1897


Eight years.
Four years.
Eight years.
Do.
Do.
Four years.
Eight years.
Four years.
One month.
Three years eleven months.
Four years.
One year four months.
Two years eight months.
Four years.
Do.
Four years one month ten
days.
Three years ten months
twenty days.
Eight years.
Four years.
Six months sixteen days.
Three years five months lif-
teen days.
Four years.
Do.
Do.


John Adams


Thomas Jefferson


James Madison


James Monroe


John Quincy Adams


Andrew Jackson


Martin Van Buren


William Henry Harrison


John Tyler


James K. Polk


Zachary Taylor 1


AIi Hard Fillmore


Franklin Pierce


James Buchanan


Abraham I ancoln


Andrew Johnson . ...


Ulysses S. Grant


Rutherford B. Hayes


James A Garfield


Chester A Arthur


Grover Cleveland


Benjamin Harrison


Grover Cleveland


William McKinley





1 Folk s term of office expired at 12 o clock on Sunday, March 4, 1849, and Taylor was not inaugu
rated as President till noon of the next day. Meanwhile the Hon. David R. Atchison, President of
the Senate pro tempore, was in effect President of the United States for one day.



BATTLES OF THE OLD WARS, 1754-1848. 241

PRESIDENTS WHO HAVE DIED IN OFFICE.

William Henry Harrison died at 12.30 a. in., April 4, 1841, of a disease of the lungs
and liver.

Zachary Taylor died at 10.30 p. in., Sunday, July 9, 1850, at the White House, of
cholera morbus.

Abraham Lincoln was assassinated by J. Wilkes Booth, at 10.30 p. m., April 14,
1865, while at Ford s Theater, on Tenth" street, witnessing the performance of "Our
American Cousin." He was carried to the home of Mr. Peterson, No. 516 Tenth
street, w r here he died at 7.22 a. m., April 15, 1865.

James A. Garfield was assassinated by Charles J. Guiteau at 9.30 a. m., July 2,
1881, while passing through the Baltimore and Potomac depot at Washington, D: C.,
to take the train for Long Branch. He lived for eighty days, suffering intensely most
of the time, and died at Elberon, N. J., Monday, September 19, 1881, at 10.35 p. m.

WHERE THE PRESIDENTS ARE BURIED AND DATE OF DEATH.

George Washington died December 14, 1799; buried at Mount Vernon, Va.

John Adams died July 4, 1826; buried at Quincy, Mass.

Thomas Jefferson died July 4, 1826; buried at Monticello, Va.

James Madison died June 28, 1836; buried at Montpelier, Va.

James Monroe died July 4, 1831; buried at Richmond, Va.

John Quincy Adams died February 23, 1848; buried at Quincy, Mass.

Andrew Jackson died June 8, 1845; buried at Hermitage, Term.

Martin Van Buren died July 24, 1862; buried at Kinderhook, N. Y.

William H. Harrison died April 4, 1841; buried at North Bend, Ohio.

John Tyler died January 18, 1862; buried at Richmond, Va.

James K. Polk died June 15, 1849; buried at Nashville, Tenn,

Zachary Taylor died July 9, 1850; buried at Louisville, Ky.

Millard Fillmore died March 8, 1874; buried at Buffalo, N. Y.

Franklin Pierce died October 8, 1869; buried at Concord, N. H.

James Buchanan died June 1, 1868; buried near Lancaster, Pa.

Abraham Lincoln died April 15, 1865; buried at Springfield, 111.

Andrew Johnson died July 31, 1875; buried at Greenville, Tenn.

Ulysses S. Grant died July 23, 1885; buried at Riverside, N. Y.

Rutherford B. Hayes died January 17, 1893; buried at Fremont, Ohio.

James A. Garfield died September 19, 1881; buried at Cleveland, Ohio.

Chester A. Arthur died November 18, 1886; buried at Albany, N. Y.

696800 16



242



BATTLES OF THE OLD WARS, 1754-1848.



HIGHEST NUMBER OF ORGANIZATIONS FROM EACH STATE AND TERRITORY IN
THE MILITARY SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES APRIL 15, 1861-1866.



States, etc.


Infantry.


Cavalry.


Artillery.


Batteries.


Alabama


4




1




Arkansas


4


^




I


California


8


2






Colorado


3


3




~ .


Connecticut


30


1


" 2


3


Dakota




1






Delaware


9


1


1 1


. . .


District of Columbia




1






Florida




2






Illinois


156


17


..


Q


Indiana


156


13


I


26


Indian Territory


3








Iowa


48


9




"4


Kansas . .


13


19




o


Kentucky


55


17


2


I


Louisiana


12


2


-^


3


Maine


39


,)


-,




Maryland


13


3




- 4


Massachusetts

Michigan


62
30


5
11


4
I


16
14


Minnesota


11


2


I


3


Mississippi


6


1






Missouri


51


16


2




Nebraska




2







Nevada


1


1







New Hampshire


18


2


1


1


New Jersey


40


3






New Mexico


5


1






New York


194


26


16


34


North Carolina


3




1




Ohio


198


13


2


Ofi


Oregon


1


1






Pennsylvania


215


22


f.


2 ()


Rhode Island


12


3


3 14


2 10


South Carolina


4








Tennessee


10


14


2




Texas










Vermont


17


1


1


3


Virginia




1






Washington Territory


1








West Virginia


17


f




2 8


Wisconsin


53


4


]




United States Armv


45


10


K




United States Volunteers


6









United States Veteran Volunteers


9









United States Sharpshooters


2








United States Colored Troops


138


6


14


-j


Corns d Afrioue...


25


1


1





United States Veteran Reserve Corps



Battalion,
companies in Second Battalion.



1 Companies.

2 Batteries lettered, not numbered.

;i The Fourteenth Rhode Island Heavy Artillery was colored, and known as the Eleventh United
States Colored Heavy Artillery.

Early Pension Legislation.

It will be of interest to know that the foundation of our present pension system is
older than the Declaration of Independence.

The first national pension law was passed August 26, 1776, before our independence
was established. But prior to this, early in the history of colonial legislation, many
of the English colonies in America had provided for the relief of wounded and
maimed soldiers.

In 1636 the Pilgrims at Plymouth enacted in their courts that any man who should
be sent forth as a soldier and return maimed should be maintained competently by
the colony during his life. This was probably the first pension law passed in America.
In 1676 a standing committee of the general court of Massachusetts Bay held regular
meetings in "Boston toune house" to hear the applications of wounded soldiers for
relief. After the union of Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth colonies under the
charter of 1691, the province continued to make provision for the relief of disabled
soldiers out of the public treasury.



BATTLES OF THE OLD WARS, 1754-1848. 243

In 1644 the Virginia assembly passed a disability pension law, and later provision
for the relief of the indigent families of soldiers who should be slain. Similar acts
are found in the colonial statutes of Maryland and New York in the latter part of the
seventeenth century. In 1718 Rhode Island enacted a pension law, which provided
that every officer, soldier, or sailor employed in the colony s service, who should be
disabled by loss of limb or otherwise from getting a livelihood for himself and family
or other dependent relatives, should have his wounds carefully looked after and
healed at the colony s charge, and should have an annual pension for the mainte
nance of himself and family or other dependent relatives. The law further provided
that if any person, who had the charge of maintaining a wife, children, parents, or
other relatives, should be slain in the colony s military service, these relatives should
l)e maintained while unable to provide for themselves.

The above shows that the custom of pensioning soldiers is as old as the English
settlement.

The first national pension law, that of August 26, 1776, promised half pay for life
or during disability to every officer, soldier, or sailor losing a limb in any engage
ment, or being so disabled in the service of the United States as to render him inca
pable of earning a livelihood.

On August 24, 1780, a resolution was adopted extending the above half-pay provi
sion to the widows or orphan children of such officers as had died, or should die in
the service. This was the first national pension law in behalf of widows and orphans.

On April 23, 1782, Congress provided that soldiers who were sick or wounded or
unfit for duty should receive a discharge and be pensioned at the rate of 5 per
month. It is further shown that history is repeating itself, as Congress was as unable
at that time as at the present to enact pension laws that were in all respects satis
factory to the masses. The money was not always in the Treasury to pay the pensions
after the same had been granted, much being promised but little realized. Many
were paid in commutation certificates payable to them or bearer and drawing interest
at 6 per cent, but no provision was made for paying either. Many of these were
compelled to part with their certificates as low as 12J cents on the dollar.



PENSIONS TABLE OF RATES.

BATINGS FOR DISABILITIES INCURRED IN THE MILITARY OR NAVAL SERVICE

AND IN LINE OF DUTY.

For simple total (a disability equivalent to the anchylosis of a wrist) provided by section
4695, Revised Statutes, United States.

ARMY.

Per month.

Lieutenant-colonel and all officers of higher rank 30. 00

Major, surgeon, and paymaster 25. 00

Captain, provost-marshal, and chaplain 20. 00



Online LibraryN. A. (Newton Allen) StraitAlphabetical list of battles, 1754-1900 : war of the rebellion, Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, and all old wars, with dates; summary of events of the war of the rebellion, 1860-1865; Spanish-American war, Philippine insurrection, 1898-1900; troubles in China, 1900, with other valuabl → online text (page 32 of 34)