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While Tweed, best pleased in chanting a blithe strain,
Saddens his voice again, and yet again.
Lift up your hearts, ye mourners ! for the might
Of the whole world's good wishes with him goes ;
Blessings and prayers, in nobler retinue
Than sceptered king or laurelled conqueror knows,
Follow this wondrous potentate. Be true,
Ye winds of ocean, and the midland sea,
Wafting your charge to soft Parthenope ! "



FRIENDSHIP IN ENGLISH POETRY. 593

Again, six years later, when musing in "Aqua-pendente,"
Wordsworth's thoughts went back to Scott, and to

" Old Helvellyn's brow,

Where once together, in his day of strength,
We stood rejoicing, as if earth were free
From sorrow, like the sky above our heads."

And then he reverts to that parting day at Abbotsford :

" Still in more than ear-deep seats,
Survives for me, and cannot but survive,
The tone of voice which wedded borrowed words
To sadness not their own, when, with faint smile,
Forced by intent to take from speech its edge,
He said, ' When I am there, although 'tis fair,
'Twill be another Yarrow.' "

And then he wonders that he himself, though Scott's elder,
should still be able to take pleasure in that loveliness of Italian
nature in art, which

"Failed to reanimate and but feebly cheered
The whole world's darling."

But the greatest, most substantial, most elaborate monument
ever reared by poetic hands to a deep affection and life-long
sorrow, is that which our own age has seen reared by the
Laureate to his friend, in " In Memoriam " :

" My Arthur! whom I shall not see,
Till all my widowed race be run ;
Dear as the mother to the son,
More than my brothers are to me."

Certainly English literature contains no other such monu
ment. It is rooted in actual fact, according to that well-known
saying of Goethe's that " all good poems are called forth by a
real occasion." The depth and permanence of affections and
of the sense of bereavement, are the first and central things, and
all else the poem contains feeling, thought, speculation, imagi
nation, broodings on human destiny flow out of that center,
are but the ever-expanding circles that orb over the expanse of
the poet's soul from that first central sorrow. To speak fully of
all that " In Memoriam contains, would require, not a few sen-



594: THE NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW.

tences, but a volume. There is, however, less need for this,
because the poem is so well known to all ; though most, if honest,
would confess that they find in it some things hard to be under
stood. "Without saying more, therefore, at present, I am glad to
shelter myself under the words of my friend, the late Dr. John
Brown, in his beautiful paper upon Arthur Hallam. He says :

" The purity, the temperate but fervent goodness, the firmness and depth
of nature, the impassioned logic, the large, sensitive, and liberal heart, the
reverence and godly fear of * That friend of mine who lives in God/ which
Arthur Hallam's ' Remains ' show, give to 'In Memoriam'the character of
exactest portraiture. There is no excessive or misplaced affection here ; it is
all founded on fact ; while everywhere and throughout it all, affection, a love
that is wonderful, meets us first and leaves us last, giving form and sub
stance and grace, and the breath of life and love, to everything that the
poet's thick-coming fancies so exquisitely frame. . . . Rising, as it
were, out of the midst of the gloom of the valley of the shadow of death, how
its waters flow on! carrying life, beauty, magnificence shadows and happy
lights, depths of blackness, depths clear as the very body of heaven. How it
deepens as it goes, involving larger interests, wider views, l thoughts that
wander through eternity,' greater affections, but still retaining its pure, living
waters, its unforgotten burden of love and sorrow. How it visits every
region ! ' the long, unlovely street, pleasant villages and farms, ' the placid
ocean plains,' waste howling wildernesses, green woods, informed with spir
itual peace, now within hearing of the minster clock, now of the college bells
and the vague hum of the mighty city. And overhead, through all its course,
the heaven with its clouds, its sun, moon, and stars ; but always and in all
places declaring its source ; and even when laying its burden of manifold
and faithful affection at the feet of the Almighty Father, still remembering
whence it came :

4 That friend of mine who lives in God,
That God who ever lives and loves.

One God, one law, one element,

And one far-off divine event,
To which the whole creation moves.'

The young man whose memory his fast friend has consecrated in the hearts
of all who can be touched by such love and beauty, was in nowise unworthy
of all this. It is not for us to say, for it was not given us the sad privilege to
know, all the hopes of unaccomplished years ; nor can we feel in its fullness
all that is meant by

'Such

A friendship as has mastered Time ;
Which masters Time, indeed, and is
Eternal, separate from fears:
The all-assuming months and years
Can take no part away from this.'"



FRIENDSHIP IN ENGLISH POETRY. 595

It is more than twenty years since Dr. John Brown wrote
these words, and time is not likely to reverse his verdict.

Perhaps I ought to close with " In Memoriam " as the culmi
nation of the poetry of a friendship beyond which affection can
hardly go. But even after it there are two poems which I am
loth to omit. One is Sir Henry Taylor's lines " In Remembrance
of the Hon. Edward Ernest Villiers." Aside from their own
intrinsic merit, I am the more glad to give these lines in hope
that some may be led by their rare and thoughtful beauty to
turn again to the rest of his poetry. For am I wrong in think
ing that, however much esteemed by a few, the poetry of
Henry Taylor has not received from his contemporaries its due
meed of honor ? The reason may be that, as he himself has
said, " in times of rapid movement, light pressures are not
easily felt." It may be that young men of poetical temper
at the present day have their eyes dazzled by the garish
coloring, and their ears filled with the cloying music, that are so
much in vogue, so that they cannot appreciate mellow but gentle
thoughtfulness, and that calmer, more feeling melody which
must be heard in quiet before it can be heard at all. Taylor has
habitually avoided too strong and pungent excitements, and has
studied a soberer standard of feeling and diction than pleases the
taste of this over-stimulated age. Yet the very tempers that
most require such a standard set themselves, in general, most de
cidedly against it. I should like, if possible, to give the whole
poem as it stands. He describes his lost friend in this way :

"A. grace though melancholy, manly too,
Moulded his being; pensive, grave, serene,
O'er his habitual being and his mien
Unceasing pain, by patience tempered, threw
A shade of sweet austerity. But seen
In happier hours and by the friendly few,
That curtain of the spirit was withdrawn,
And fancy, light and playful as a fawn,
And reason imp'd with inquisition keen,
Knowledge long sought with ardor ever new,
And wit love-kindled, show'd in colors true
What genial joys with sufferings can consist:
Then did all sternness melt as melts a mist,
Touched by the brightness of the golden dawn,
Aerial heights disclosing valleys green,
And sunlights thrown the woodland tufts between,
And flowers and spangles of the dewy lawn.



596 THE NORTH AMERICAN EEVIEW.

" His life was private ; safely led, aloof
From the loud world, which yet he understood
Largely and wisely, as no worldling could.
For he, by privilege of his nature proof
Against false glitter, from beneath the roof
Of privacy, as from a cave, surveyed
With steadfast eye its nickering light and shade,
And justly judged for evil and for good.
But whilst he mix'd not, for his own behoof,
In public strife, his spirit glow'd with zeal
For truth and justice as its warp and woof,
For freedom as its signature and seal.
His life thus sacred from the world, discharg'd
From vain ambition and inordinate care,
In virtue exercised, by reverence rare
Lifted, and by humility enlarged,
Became a temple and a place of prayer.
In later years he walked not singly there ;
For one was with him, ready at all hours
His griefs, his joys, his inmost thoughts to share,
Who buoyantly his burthens help'd to bear,
And deck'd his altar daily with fresh flowers.

' But farther may we pass not ; for the ground
Is holier than the Muse herself may tread;
Nor would I it should echo to a sound
Less solemn than the service for the dead.
Mine is inferior matter, my own loss,
The loss of dear delights for ever fled,
Of reason's converse by affection fed,
Of wisdom, counsel, solace, that across
Life's dreariest tracks a tender radiance shed.
Friend of my youth ! though younger yet my guide,
How much by thy unerring insight clear
I shaped my way of life for many a year.
What thoughtful friendship on thy death-bed died
Friend of my youth, whilst thou wast by my side
Autumnal days still breathed a vernal breath ;
How, like a charm, thy life to me supplied
All waste and injury of time and tide,
How like a disenchantment was thy death ! n

The other is a lyric by Arthur Clough, perhaps the most full
of impulse and of music of any he ever composed. A friend of
his, with whom he had long been one in heart and mind, had
left him and gone abroad for a time. During their separation
a change had come over this friend, so that when they again
met Clough felt as though he had become another man. Sen-



FRIENDSHIP IN ENGLISH POETRY. 597

sitive as Clough was, he deeply felt the change ; but, manly as
he also was, he did not succumb to morbid feeling, but looked
forward with a larger hope. And this is the way he felt and

sang:

"As ships, becalmed at eve, that lay

With canvas drooping, side by side,
Two towers of sail, at dawn of day
Are scarce, long leagues apart, descried;

"When fell the night, upsprung the breeze,

And all the darkling hours they plied,
Nor dreamt but each the self-same seas
By each was cleaving, side by side;

"E'en so but why the tale reveal

Of those whom, year by year unchanged,
Brief absence joined anew to feel,
Astounded, soul from soul estranged?

"At dead of night their sails were filled,
And onward each rejoicing steered
Ah ! neither blame, for neither willed,
Or wist what first with dawn appeared

"To veer, how vain! on, onward strain,

Brave barks ! in light, in darkness, too !
Through winds and tides one compass guides
To that, and your own selves, be true.

"But, O blithe breeze! and O great seas,

Though ne'er, that earliest parting past,
On your wide plain they join again,
Together lead them home at last.

"One port, methought, alike they sought,

One purpose held, where'er they fare,
O bounding breeze, O rushing seas,
At last, at last, unite them there ! n

Thus it is that poetry finds a voice for some of the many
tones of human affection ; and, by doing so, strengthens, refines,
spiritualizes them. It emphasizes that conviction which all true
men feel, that in the exercise of affection only lies their true
happiness. " The outward world," says the great preacher, " is
found not to be enough for a man, and he looks for some refuge
near him, more intimate, more pure, more calm and stable. . . .
There is no rest for us except in quietness, confidence, and



598 THE NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW.

affection." We need centers, even in the visible world, to which
our feelings may cling, and from centers such as the love of
family and the love of friends all other good feelings spring.
Without these they have no root, and philanthropy is an empty
name. We begin with loving our friends about us, and thence
enlarge the circle till it reaches wider and wider toward all
men. Affection is first concentrated, then it is expanded.

Human friendship and affection is a main source of re
ligion. The most affectionate natures are the most truly and
beautifully religious. There may, indeed, be persons who are
religious yet not affectionate, but their religion has a great
want j it is unsympathetic, unattractive. The affections, when
warm and vivid, do, by their very nature, drive men back
upon an eternal world, in the faith and hope that the hindrances
they here find to their hearts 7 full expansion may there be
removed. As the late Frederick Maurice says, "Friendships
sadly and continually interrupted suggest the belief of an
unalterable friendship." Not that we are to imagine that in the
one divine friendship human friendships are to be lost or
absorbed. Rather we may trust and hope that friendship that
has here been true and pure may there be renewed under hap
pier conditions; that "What here is faithfully begun," there
" will be completed, not undone."

J. C. SHAIRP.



INDEX



TO



HUNDRED AND THIRTY- NINTH VOLUME



01- THE



American Kebuov



ACKERMAN, WILLIAM K. Notes on
Railway Management, 531.

African, The, Problem. 417.

American Element. Tne, in Fiction,
164.

America, Why I Wish to Visit, 310.

Ancestry, Our Remote, 246.

Annexation, The, of Canada, 42.

ARMSTRONG, S. C. The Future of the
Negro, 95.

BENDER, P. The Annexation of Can
ada, 42.

Benefits of the Tariff System, 372.

CAMPBELL, JAMES V. The Encroach
ments of Capital, 101.

Canada, The Annexation of, 42.

Capital, The Encroachments of, 101.

Capital, Labor and, before the Law,
503.

Centralization, The Drift toward,
125.

Chinese, The Exclusion of the, 256.

Comets, The Origin of, 109.

CONGDON, CHARLES T. Private Ven
geance, 67 ; Over-illustration, 480.

Conversion, The Philosophy of, 324.

COOLEY, T. M. Labor and Capital
Before the Law, 503.

CREIGHTON, C. The Origin of Yellow
Fever, 335.

CURTIS, GEORGE TICKNOR. The Brit
ish House of Lords, 547.

DAVIS, NOAH. Marriage and Divorce,
30.

DENSLOW, VAN BUREN. American
Economics, 12.

DINGLEY, NELSON, JR. Benefits of
the Tariff System, 398.

Divorce, Marriage and, 30.

Divorce Laws, The Need of Liberal,
234.

VOL. CXXXIX. NO. 337.



DOUGLASS, FREDERICK. The Future
of the Negro, 84.

Dow, NEAL. Prohibition and Per
suasion, 179.

DURST, JOHN H. The Exclusion of
the Chinese, 256.

Economics, American, 12.

EMERSON, J. A. The Future of the
Negro, 98.

Encroachments of Capital, The,
101.

Evils of the Tariff System, 274.

Fiction, The American Element in,
164.

FROTHINGHAM, O. B. The Philoso
phy of Conversion, 324.

GARDINER, CHARLES A. The Future
of the Negro, 78.

GILLIAM, E. W. The African Prob
lem, 417.

Government Telegraphy, 51.

GREENER, RICHARD T. The Future
of the Negro, 88.

HALE, E. E. Half-time in Schools,
443.

HAYNE, ROBERT Y. Shall the Jury
System be Abolished ? 348.

HARRIS, JOEL CHANDLER. The Future
of the Negro, 87.

HAWTHORNE, JULIAN. The Ameri
can Element in Fiction, 164.

House of Lords, The British, 547.

HUME, JOHN F. Are We a Nation of
Rascals? 127; Responsibility for
State Roguery, 563.

Illustration, Over, 480.

Industrial Spirit, The Demand of the,
209.

Inspiration and Infallibility, 224.

JESSOPP, AUGUSTUS. Why I Wish to
Visit America, 310.

a 43



600



THE NOETH AMEEICAN REVIEW.



JOHNSON, OLIVER. The Future of the
Negro, 93.

Juries and Jurymen, 1.

Jury System, Shall the, be Abol
ished? 348.

Kings of Tiryns, The Palace of the,
517.

Labor and Capital Before the Law,
503.

LEWIS, Dio. Prohibition and Per
suasion, 185.

Lords, The British House of, 547.

LORING, EDWARD G. The Drift To
ward Centralization, 155.

Machine Guns, The Development of,
362.

Man and Brute, 145.

.Marriage and Divorce, 30.

Maud, The Genesis of Tennyson's,
356.

MEANS, D. McG. Government Tele
graphy, 51.

Moral Character in Politics, 301.

MORGAN, JOHN T. The Future of the
Negro, 81.

Naval Armament, Progress in, 431.

Negro, The Future of the, 78.

Palace, The, of the Kings of Tiryns,
517.

PASHA, HOBART. Progress in Naval
Armament, 431.

Philosophy, The, of Conversion,
324.

PITMAN, ROBERT C. Juries and Jury
men, 1 ; Woman as a Political
Factor, 405.

Poetry, Friendship in Ancient, 453 ;
Friendship in English, 580.

Political Factor, Woman as a, 405.

Politics, Moral Character in, 301.

Popular Government, The Basis of,
199.

Private Vengeance, 67.

PROCTOR, RICHARD A. The Origin
of Comets, 109.

Prohibition and Persuasion, 179.

Railway Management, Notes on, 531.

Rascals, Are We a Nation of ? 127.

Restriction of the Suffrage, 492.

ROACH, JOHN. Benefits of the Tariff
System, 372.

Roguery, Responsibility for State,
563.

ROMANES, GEORGE J. Man and Brute,
145.



RYLANCE, J. H. Inspiration and In
fallibility, 224.

SARGENT, J. B. Evils of the Tariff
System, 288.

SCHLIEMANN, HENRY. The Palace of
the Kings of Tiryns, 517.

Schools, Half-time in, 443.

SCRUGGS, WILLIAM L. Restriction of
the Suffrage, 492.

SEELYE, JULIUS H. Moral Character
in Politics, 301.

SHAIRP, J. C. Friendship in Ancient
Poetry, 453 ; Friendship in Eng
lish Poetry, 580.

SHEARMAN, THOMAS G. Evils of the
Tariff System, 282.

SHEPHERD, RICHARD HERNE. The
Genesis of Tennyson's Maud, 356.

SLEEMAN, C. The Development of
Machine Guns, 362.

SPALDING, J. L. The Basis of Popu
lar Government, 199.

Spencer's, Herbert, Latest Critic,
472.

STANTON, ELIZABETH CADY. The
Need of Liberal Divorce Laws, 234.

State Roguery, Responsibility for,
563.

Suffrage, Restriction of the, 492.

SUMNER, W. G. Evils of the Tariff
System, 293.

Tariff System, Evils of the, 274;
Benefits of the, 372.

Telegraphy, Government, 51.

Tennyson's Maud, The Genesis of,
356.

THOMPSON, ROBERT ELLIS. Benefits
of the Tariff System, 391.

Tiryns, The Palace of the Kings of,
517.

VANCE, Z. B. The Future of the Ne
gro, 86.

Vengeance, Private, 67.

WALWORTH, J. H. The Future of
the Negro, 96.

WARNER, CHARLES DUDLEY. The De
mand of the Industrial Spirit, 209.

WELLS, DAVID A. Evils of the Tariff
System, 274.

WINCHELL, ALEXANDER. Our Re
mote Ancestry, 246.

Woman as a Political Factor, 405.

Yellow Fever, The Origin of, 335.

YOUMANS, E. L. Herbert Spencer's
Latest Critic, 472.



SEVENTIETH YEAR.



THE



NORTH AMERICAN
REVIEW.



-z



s - v f T i>

EDITED BY ALLEN THOENDIKE RICE.



July, 1884,



I. Juries and Jurymen Judge ROBERT C. PITMAN.

II. American Economics Prof. VAN BUREN DENSLOW.

III. Marriage and Divorce Justice NOAH DAVIS.

IV. The Annexation of Canada Dr. P. BENDER.

V. Government Telegraphy Prof. D. McG. MEANS.

VI. Private Vengeance CHARLES T. CONGDON.

VII. The Future of the Negro ( Prof ' CHARLE * A - GARDINER,

( and others.



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Volume 138 of the North American Review

NOW READY, COMPLETE.



JANUARY.

Ecclesiastical Control in Utah.. President JOHN TAYLOU; Governor ELI H. MURRAY,
Tribulations of the American Dollar. Senator JOHN I. MITCHELL.
Theological Re-adjustments. Rev. Dr. J. H. RYLANCE.
Alcohol in Politics. Senator HENRY W. BLAIR.
The Day of Judgment. Part II. GAIL HAMILTON.
Evils Incident to Immigration. EDWARD SELF.
Bribery by Railway Passes. CHARLES ALDRICH ; Judge N. M. HUBBARD.

FEBRUARY.

Corporations, their Employe's, and the Public. CARL SCHURZ.
Henry Vaughan, Silurist. Principal J. C. SHAIRP.
John Brown's Place in History. Senator J. J. INGALLS.
Must the Classics Go ? Prof. ANDREW F. WEST.
Race Progress in the United States. J. R. TUCKER, M. C.
Defects of the Public School System. Rev. M. J. SAVAGE.
Rival Systems of Heating. Dr. A. N. BELL ; Prof. W. P. TROWBRIDGE.

MARCH.

Is our Civilization Perishable? Judge J. A. JAMESON.
Agricultural Politics in England. WILLIAM E. BEAR.
A Defenseless Sea- Board. Gen. H. A. SMALLEY.
Neither Genius nor Martyr. ALICE HYNEMAN RHINE.
The Story of a Nomination. W. O. STODDARD.
Literary Resurrectionists. CHARLES T. CONGDON.
How to Improve the Mississippi. ROBERT S. TAYLOR.
The Constitutionality of Repudiation. D. H. CHAMBERLAIN; JOHN S. WISE, M. C.

APRIL.

The Decline of American Shipping. N. DINGLEY, JR., M. C.; JOHN CODMAN.
Shall our Civilization be Preserved ? Judge J. A. JAMESON.
The Development of Religious Freedom. Rev. Dr. PHILIP SCHAFF.
Changes in the Climate of North America. Dr. FELIX L. OSWALD.
A Plea for Modern languages. Prof. C. A. EGGERT.
Literature for Children. JULIAN HAWTHORNE.
Recent Criticisms of the Bible. Rev. A. G. MORTIMER ; Rev. Dr. R. H. NEWTON.

MAY.

Defective Naturalization Laws. Justice WILLIAM STRONG.
Matthew Arnold. EDWIN P. WHIFFLE.
A Zone of Worlds. RICHARD A. PROCTOR.
The Railway and the State. GERRIT L. LANSING.
Illusions of Memory. Prof. HENRY F. OSBORN.
The Meaning of Song. HELEN KENDRICK JOHNSON.
Workingmen's Grievances. WILLIAM GODWIN MOODY; Prof. J. L. LAUGHLIN.

JUNE.

Harboring Conspiracy. Prof. HENRY WADE ROGERS.
Lords of Industry. HENRY D. LLOYD.

The Struggle for Immortality. ELIZABETH STUART PHELPS.
Sociological Fallacies. Prof. W. G. SUMNER.
The Rise and Fall of Authority. President J. C. WELLING.
Walt Whitman. WALKER KENNEDY.

Expert Testimony. ROSSITER JOHNSON ; Dr. W. W. GODDING ; T. O'CONOR SLOANE ; Dr. CHARLES
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