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The University of North Carolina
at Greensboro




I^S-




BocND AND Made Complete in the Establis

MENT OF THE EDWARDS AND BROUGHTON PRINTI!

Company, Raleigh, North Carolina



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THE

CAROLINIAN

1917



PuLlished by the

Senior Class

S^ate Normal College
Greensboro, N.C.



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill



http://www.archive.org/details/carolinian1917nort



FOREWORD

THE purpose of this our Year Book is to record

the events of the past year and to give a

true picture of the life at our College.

We hope that the following

pages will give you pleasure.





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rOfss Boddie




^r. Forney



DEDICATION

THIS VOLUME OF THE CAROLINIAN

IS DEDICATED

TO

THE FOUR CHARTER MEMBERS OF OUR FACULTY

MISS MELVILLE VINCENT FORT
MISS GERTRUDE MENDENHALL
MISS VIOLA BODDIE
MR. E. J. FORNEY

IN GRATEFUL RECOGNITION OF THEIR LOYAL SERVICES
TO OUR COLLEGE




Had^er Kennatte
a.Daniel Editor ia Chief i.Bouldin



CAROLINIAN BOARD




CAROLINIAN BOARD




SCENE IN PEABODY PARK




COLLECT



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JULIUS I. FOUST
President




BOARD OF DIRECTORS

T. B. BAILEY* Davie County

A. J. CONNER Northampton County

G. W. HINSHAW Forsyth County

E. E. BRITTON Wake County

J. Y. JOYNER Guilford County

C. H. MEBANE Catawba County

J. D. MURPHY Buncombe County

J. L. NELSON Caldwell County

JOE ROSENTHAL Wayne County



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD



J. Y. JOYNER. State Superintendent of Pub
Ex-Officio. President
A. J. CONNER, Secretary
E. J. FORNEY. Treasurer



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE



G. W. HINSHAW. Chairman
J. D. MURPHY J. Y. JOYNER



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OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION

JULIUS I. FOUST. LL.D.

President

WILLIAM C. SMITH. Ph.B.

Dean of the Faculty

WALTER CLINTON JACKSON. B.S.

Dean of the College

MARY M. PETTY. B.S.

Dean of the Home Economics Department

EMMA KING. B.A.

Director of Dormitories

ANNA M. GOVE, M.D.

Physician

E. J. FORNEY

Bursar

LAURA H. COIT

Secretary

MARY TAYLOR MOORE

Registrar

DAISY E. BROOKS

Dietitian

ESTELLE BOYD

Housekeeper

MARGUERITE BROOKS. A.B.

General Secretary Y. W. C. A.

ANNIE F. PETTY

Librarian

MARY MULLEN

Assistant Librarian

MARY TENNENT, P.B.

Assistant Registrar

JESSIE McLEAN
Trained Nurse

NELLIE McCOWAN

Assistant Nurse

ELIZA N. WOOLLARD

Assistant Nurse

BESSIE BELL
Assistant in Dining Hall

CORA MORTON

Stenographer
MINNIE QUEEN

Stenographer



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FACULTY



JULIUS L FOUST. LL.D.
President

WILLIAM C. SMITH. Ph.B.
English Language and Literature

WALTER CLINTON JACKSON. B.S.
History and Economics

GERTRUDE MENDENHALL. B.S.
Mathematics

EUGENE W. GUDCER. M.S.. Ph.D.
Biology and Geology

ANNA M. GOVE. M.D.
Physiology and Hygiene

CLARENCE HEWLETT. Ph.D.
Physics and Manual Arts

MARY M. PETTY, B.S.
Chemistry

MARY SETTLE SHARP
Expression

VIOLA BODDIE
Latin

HINDA T. HILL. A.M.
French

WADE R. BROWN
Piano and School Music

CHARLES J. BROCKMAN
Stringed Instruments and Piano

MELVILLE VINCENT FORT
Industrial Drawing and Art

MINNIE L. JAMISON
Extension Work in Domestic Science

E, J. FORNEY
Stenography, Typewriting and Bookkeeping

JOHN A. LESH, Ph.D.
Education

ALMA LONG
Domestic Art

E. E. BALCOMB, A.B.
Agriculture and Physical Geography



FAY DAVENPORT. A.B.
Physical Culture

CHRISTINE R. A. REINCKEN
German

JAMES A. HIGHSMITH, A.B.
Psychology

CHRISTINE N. SOUTH. A.B.. B.S.
Domestic Science

JULIA M. RAINES
Associate in Manual Arts

CORA STRONG. A.B.
Associate in Mathematics

MARTHA WINFIELD. B.S.
Associate in English

VIRGINIA RAGSDALE. Ph.D.
Associate in Mathematics

JULIA DAMERON, A.M.
Associate in Latin

HARRIET ELLIOTT. A.M.
Associate in History and Economics

VIVIAN HILL, A.M.
Instructor in French

MYRA A. ALBRIGHT
Instructor in Piano

NETTIE PARKER
Instructor in Mathematics

ANNIE F. PETTY
Library Methods

MARY ROBINSON. B.S.
Instructor in Biology

ALONZO HALL. A.B., A.M.
Instructor in English

ELEANORE D. ELLIOTT. A.B.
Instructor in English

ETHEL LEWIS HARRIS
Instructor in School Music

KATHRYN M. SEVERSON
Instructor in Voice Culture



^'r^



FRANCES V. WOMBLE
Instructor in English

CLARA BOOTH BYRD
Instructor in Commercial Departmer

GEORGE SCOTT-HUNTER
Harmony, Counterpoint, Organ

GERTRUDE SOUSLEY
Instructor in Piano

LOUISE McCLELLAN, A.M.
Instructor in German

DORA ROBINSON. A.M.
Instructor in English

ALLEINE RICHARD MINOR
Instructor in Piano

MAUDE BUNN
Instructor in Biology

RUBY BRYAN, A.B.
Instructor in English

EDITH HAIGHT, A.B.
Instructor in Physical Culture

ELMA BARROW, A.B.
Instructor in Chemistry

STEPHENS CARRICK, A.B.
Domestic Science

INA EDDINGFIELD, A.M.
Instructor in History

LORA SULSDORFF
Instructor in Voice Culture

ALICE KOEHLER. A.B.
Instructor in German

GRACE RIDDLE, A.B.
Instructor in French



MARY McGAVOC. B.S., A.M.
Instructor in English

MARY F. SEYMOUR. A.M.
Instructor in Physiology

LIZZIE McIVER WEATHERSPOON
Supervising Teacher in Training School

ETTA R. SPIER*
Supervising Teacher in Training School

lONE H. DUNN
Supervising Teacher in Training School

RUTH FITZGERALD
Supervising Teacher in Training School

SUE NASH
Teacher in Training School

JANE SUMMERELL
Teacher in Training School

MATTIE WILLIAMS
Supervising Teacher in Training School

ETHEL BROWN
Supervising Teacher in Training School

lOLA EXUM
Supervising Teacher in Training School

ELIZABETH FREAS, A.B.
Teacher in Training School

LAURA WARD, A.M.
Teacher in Training School

RUTLEDGE FEILD. B.S.
Teacher in Training School

GRACE LAWRENCE
Supervising Teacher in Training School

MAGGIE L. COBLE. B.P.
Supervising Teacher in Training School



*0n leave of absence



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DR. CHARLES DUNCAN McIVER
Founder and First President



^^'^^



TRIBUTE

List well to me, and I to thee

Will sing a wondrous lay.
Of a good fight made by a knight—

A knight of yesterday.

No glittering armor did he wear.

No shining blade he bore;
But just as valiantly he fought

As those good knights of yore.
Who in the days of chivalry.

Had nobly gone before.

His foe was not of humankind.

His fight was not with man.
But 'gainst the power of Ignorance

He boldly raised his hand.
And right and left did smite amain,

And fearlessly did stand.

He strove that every little child

Whate'er its lot might be.
Should not in mental darkness dwell.

But look abroad and see
The beauteous light that knowledge gives.

And giving, makes man free.

And God be praised, the yielding foe

He ever backward drove.
Nor turned aside, nor e'er forgot

The end for which he strove.
Strong in the strength that always comes

From an abiding love.

—A Knight of Yesterday, by R. D. Douglas, in the State Normal
Magazine, 1906.



^^<i><J



A SHORT HISTORY OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF
OUR COLLEGE



At this milepost in our journey, the twenty-hfth anniversary of the founding of our
College, it is interesting to review the splendid progress made from time to time, and to
note the forces at work from year to year in the evolution of our institution into a real
college whose name we mention with a feeling of pride. Perhaps the most satisfactory
way of making this review at least in regard to the essential facts, is to make a chrono-
logical study of events and their significance.

1891

The North Carolina State Normal and Industrial School was established by an act
of the General Assembly. This was accomplished only after a hard struggle of ten years'
duration.

Greensboro, with her favorable location, her offer of thirty thousand dollars and ten
acres of land, donated by R. S. Pullen, R. T. Gray, E. P. Wharton, and others, was chosen
as the school home.

1892

On October 5th the school first operied its doors for the reception of students, with
Dr. Charles Duncan Mclver as President. During this year two hundred twenty-three
students were enrolled. Out of this number there was a graduating class of eleven, all of
whom, with one exception, were graduates of other colleges for women in the State. To
train the minds of these two hundred twenty-three students, coming from sixty-eight out
of the ninety-six counties, there was a faculty force of fifteen members.

The dormitory capacity and equipment this first year were very meager, there being
room for only one hundred fifty boarders. On the whole campus there were only six
buildings.

1893

The school received its first appropriation since the ten thousand dollars donated in
1891. This appropriation amounted to twelve thousand five hundred dollars.

This year the Young Women's Christian Association and the Cornelian and Adel-
phian Societies were established.

1894

Was notable as being the year in which a young Nebraskan, William Jennings Bryan,
delivered the Commencement address. This was the first appearance of the young Con-
gressman in North Carolina.



WT^



1895

The enrollment had increased from two hundred twenty-three during the first year to
four hundred forty-four in 1895. To accomodate the ever increasing number of students
making application each year, two wings were added to the dormitory, a brick dining hall
was erected, and a seven-room infirmary built. There was also a purchase of one hundred
twelve acres of land north of the campus during this year.

Perhaps the most remarkable addition was the establishment of a new public school
consisting of six grades in charge of expert teachers, used as a practice and observation
school.

1897

One of the conspicuous changes of this year had to do with the name of the school.
It was now changed to the North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College.

The first edition of the College Magazine came out in March of this year.

More improvements were made. This year witnessed the erection of a new barn, a
dairy building, and a greenhouse.

1899

The College was closed from November 21st through January 30th, on account of a
typhoid epidemic.

The Sarah and Evelyn Bailey Memorial fund was established by Mr. and Mrs. T. B.
Bailey. They gave, also, one thousand dollars to furnish a memorial room in the contem-
plated Students' Building. This room was to be used at the discretion of the Young
Women's Christian Association.

1901

In June, 1901, a fifteen thousand dollar practice school building was erected.

June also was the month in which the college received a gift of ten thousand dollars
from George Foster Peabody of New York. Five thousand dollars of this money was to
be used on an educational park, consisting of one hundred twenty-five acres.

1902

The Students' Building fund was started in 1902, and the corner stone of this building
was laid.

1904

The event in the year that stands out most vividly is the fire which occurred on the
early morning of January 21st, when the old brick dormitory, the kitchen, the dining
room, and the laundry — eighty thousand dollars worth of property — were totally destroyed.
However, a modern brick laundry was built during this year to replace the one destroyed
by fire, and plans were made for other new buildings.



^^



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1905

Dr. Mclver was elected President of the Southern Educational Conference.

1906

The death of Dr. Mclver on September 17th caused a deep shadow of gloom to be cast
over the entire State.

From the beginning, the two main buildings were heated by steam, but it was not
until 1906 that the other buildings on the campus were heated from a central heating
plant.

1907

Dr. Julius I. Foust, after filling the place of Acting President for one year, was elected
President in the early summer.

September 12th of this year saw the completion of the South Wing of Spencer Building
at a cost of thirty thousand dollars.

In July the Alumnae Association started the Mclver Loan Fund.

Ninety-one counties were represented this year at the College, and the total enroll-
ment, including the children of the Training School, amounted to nine hundred thirty.

1908

On December 3d occurred the dedication of the new science building known as the
Mclver Memorial building. This handsome building was erected on the site of the burned
building at a cost of fifty-four thousand dollars. The Students' Building was also com-
pleted during this year at a cost of sixty thousand dollars.

There were forty-seven graduates this year, only seven of whom received degrees.
The others received the regular College Diploma.

1909

This year is remarkable as being the year of full fledged bachelor graduates. This
class began with nineteen Freshmen and ended with nineteen Seniors.

1910

The College Song was composed in 1910 by Miss Laura B. Weill.

This year also witnessed the establishment of Founder's Day and the extension de-
partment.

On September 22d the election of members to the Students' Council took place. This
Students' Council was to confer with the Faculty Council in matters pertaining to the
government of the student body. This election was important as marking the estaTDlish-
ment of a new form of government.

On November 25th occurred the first inter-society debate.



T^'g'MT



1911

The new Infirmary, as we know it today, was first opened for inspection on March
18th.

1912

The College Chorus was organized.

The completion of Senior Hall, now known as Woman's Building, was accomplished in
the fall of 1912. This is a handsome building, modern and convenient in every respect.

In the spring of this year the first Old English Pageant was given with much success.

1913

Nineteen hundred thirteen witnessed the building of another brick dormitory. Kirk-
land Hall, similar in every way to Woman's Building.

1914

A new pipe organ was installed in the Chapel of Students' Building during this year.

The standard of the College was raised. Heretofore the number of units required for
entrance was eleven and a half. This year the number was raised to twelve and a half.

Perhaps the event bearing most on the lives of the students was the beginning of a new
form of government, known as "Student Government." This was a great onward step,
and the students, as well as the faculty were justly proud of the achievement. The adop-
tion of this new form of government occurred in the spring.

1915

The College authorities, determined to make the College a first-class institution, again
raised the number of units required for entrance. This year the number was increased
another half unit.

1916-1917

Pageant year again.

At last the goal for which those interested in the work of the College have been look-
ing forward so long has been reached. We now have a fourteen-unit entrance basis. This
makes us rank among the first-class colleges of the South.

This year we have seven hundred twenty-five students enrolled, and a Senior class
consisting of eighty-two members. The Faculty Council has a membership of eighty-
eight.

There are now fourteen buildings on the campus, in contrast with the six of 1892.
All of these buildings are fitted up with modern conveniences.




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FACULTY 1893-1894




CHAPEL IN 1893



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CLASS OF 1893




CLASS OF 1917



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VIEW OF CAMPUS IN 1893




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LATER VIEW OF CAMPUS



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DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS BY COUNTIES IN 1893




DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS BY COUNTIES IN 1917



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REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION IN 1893-1894

1. As to scholarship, the applicants, in order to be admitted to the Freshman Class,
must be able:

(a) To analyze any ordinary arithmetical problem;

(b) To read any ordinary English page fluently at sight;

(c) To answer fairly well questions on English Grammar, Geography, History of
the United States, and History of North Carolina.

2. They should be sixteen years old and in good health.

3. They should send with their applications, which they themselves should write,
statements from their last teacher as to scholarship and character.



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION IN 1916-1917

1 . Candidates for admission must be prepared to offer fourteen units as follows, a
unit being the equivalent of a preparatory subject of five periods weekly throughout an
academic year:

English 3 units

Mathematics 3 units

Foreign Languages 3 units

(Latin, French, or German)

History 2 units

Science 1 unit

Electives 2 units

2. Applicants for admission should be sixteen years old, and in good health.

3. They should send with their applications, which they themselves should write,
statements from their last teacher, as to scholarship, conduct, and habits of study.



Siiiliiiliii



IN MEMOmAM



MARJORIE MERRITT

1913-1916

Class Mascot



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SENIOR CLASS



Motto: Persevere



Norma Styron

Sadie Fristoe

Annie Simpson Pierson

Sallie Conner

Hope Watson.



OFFICERS
Fall Term



President

. Vice-President
Secretary

. . . .Tr

Cr



Frances Morri President

Annie Folger Vice-President

Grace Crumpler Secretary

Juanita Puett Treasurer

Lois Campbell Critic

Margaret BIythe Historian

Martha Biggers 1 estator

Katie Pridgen Prophet

Sadie Fristoe Statistician

Alice Vaiden Williams Poet



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ETHEL ARDREY,
Fort Mill, S. C.



House Vice-Presiaent '15-' 1 6; Proctor '16-' 17.

Mount of Character: Her hand tells us that she
will continue to do big things such as the one she did
the night Forest House burned. We expect to hear
of these.

Heart line: Seriously affected by the showers of
blessings since the fire.



h.Ji



WINIFRED BECKWITH, A.B.

Rosemary, N. C.

Cornelian

Member of Students' Board '13-'I4: House Presi-
dent '15-'16: Class President, Spring Term '16;
President Classical Club '16-'17; Y. W. C. A. Cabi-
net '15-' 16.

Mount of Character: In the distribution of gifts
this, our Madam Toastmistress of the Junior-Senior
banquet, was deprived of none, from the classical to
the dramatic. She hasn't spent all of her time dur-
ing the last three years studying; but then she hasn't
found it necessary; so the result is the same.

Destiny: She will continue to "strike" those she
meets with her overpowering dignity.



^^



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„^„mm^







MARTHA BIGGERS, B.M.

Ridgecrest, N. C.

Cornelian

Chorus; Proctor. Spring '16; Literary Editor of

Carolinian ■ 16-' 1 7; Class Testator.

Mount of Character: A package of ingenuity and
originality. This she keeps distinctly to herself. We
found it out finally, and have been making good use
of her ideas ever since.

Destiny: Happiness in which the chief constituents
are a piano. Caroline, and some more dates like the
"first date."



MARGARET BLYTHE. A.B.

Brevard, N. C.

Adelphian

Class Critic. Fall 1915; Inter-society Debater 1915
and 1916; Hockey Team 15'. '16. '17; Member of
Students' Board '15-'16; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '15-
'16; Magazine Editor '15-'I6, •\b-]7: Class His-
torian; Debating Club '16-'I7.

Mount of Character: She struck the debate trail
early, and now she has become an orator of consider-
able fame. Once during her Freshman year she for-
got herself and studied quite diligently. Since then,
however, she has adjusted herself better to college
life. She makes good grades, but never lets work
interfere with her college activities.

Destiny: Davidson holds great charms for her.
We would not be surprised if she made it her home.




^T^




RUTH BLYTHE, B.E.
Huntersville, N. C.
Cornelian
Chorus: Proctor '14.
Mount of Character: A brilHant head
spects. A good student and comradi



all



One who
tands at attention awaiting any command from ' 1 7.
Kindness and usefulness characterize her nature.
Life line: Eventful years-26. 35. 44.



ISABEL BOULDIN, B.E.

Greensboro, N. C.

Cornelian

Class Historian '15; Chorus; Editor Magazine '15-
'16; Literary Editor Carolinian '16-' 17; House Presi-
dent '16-' 17.

Mount of Character: "To my mind" she is one
of our number who possesses industry, cheerfulness,
and sympathy. She has a big heart, a large part of
which Alice Vaiden and brother "Vanderford" oc-
cupy. Methinks I see a man— who is he?

Destiny: Life in "Ole Virginia. "






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Mount
Leafy, fc
takes liff
loafing,
severance

Life 111



LEAFY BROWN. B.E.

Statesville. N. C.
Adelpfiian

of Character: We don't see
one who sticks to close, steady
rather seriously doesn't spend n



She does her
le: Mec



displaying her per-
iterest.
Eventful years- 15. 24. 33.



LOIS CAMPBELL. B.E.
Salisbury. N. C.
Cornelian
Basketball Team '14, '15, '16, '17; Editor of Caro-
linian '15; Dramatic Club; Chorus; Proctor '15. '16;
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '16-'! 7; House Vice-President
'16-'17; Class Critic. Spring '17; Athletic Vice-
President. Spring '17.

Mount of Character: Happy-go-lucky "Pink" al-
lows no "blues " around her. A healthy combina-
tion of ability and lovableness is she. Another of
our brilliant "headlights."

Heart line: Likes nothing better than a game of
basketball except a pile of magazines.




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GLADYS CHADWICK, A.B.
Beaufort. N. C.
Cornelian
Proctor 'IS-' 16.

Mount of Character: While studious she is not
over-serious, for she takes life calmly with a quiet,
happy way and doesn't let things worry her.

Destiny: An energetic and efficient newspaper re-
porter. This work for the Senior Class has afforded
her good training.



SALLIE CONNER. B.S.
Rich Square, N. C.
Adelphian
Proctor '16: Class Treasurer, Fall '16.
Mount of Character: fCeeps up her work



Skillful in the art of handling money, this resulting
from the amount of practice she received as Senior
Class Treasurer.

Destiny: Success in scientific achievements. She
already goes into raptures over the dissection of a
frog.



^^



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HATTIE MAE COVINGTON. B.M.

Wadesboro, N. C.

Cornelian

Secretary Athletic Association '15; Vice-President

Athletic Association '16; Students' Board '15-' 16;

Chorus

Life line: Medium length, great vitality— see ' 1 7's
athletic record.

Mount of Character: What would we do without
her musical ability and extraordinary common sense?
Destiny: Pink cheeks, bright eyes, and a sunny
smile help along in the search after happmess. With
such means should not the result be just whatever
she would like most?



OLIVERA COX, B.M.
Winterville, N. C.
Adelphian
Chorus.

Mount of Character: The quality and quantity
of her work inspire the awe of the other B.M. stu-
dents. Her ability is shown by the fact that she
can drop out for two months and still keep in the

Life line: Short. Wonderful "recuperative" abil-



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GRACE CRUMPLER. B.E.

Clinton, N. C.

Cornelian

Chorus; Class Secretary. Spring '17.

Mount of Character: Grace has the gift of doing

things well. Especially is she skillful with her

hands. Behold what records show:

Sophomore Sewing 1

Junior Manual Arts I

Senior Manual Arts I

Life line: Medium. Vocal organs wear out soon.

Destiny: Author of brilliant novel entitled "The
Gift of Gab."



ANNIE DANIEL, B.E.
Salisbury, N. C.
.^delphian
Hockey Team 'B-'M. ■15-'16; Basketball Team
'14, '15. '16. '17; Students' Board ']5-lb: Athletic
Vice-President '14; Dramatic Club; President Ath-
letic Association "1 6-' 17; Assistant Business Manager
Carolinian '16-' 17.

Mount of Character: An athlete of ability, pre-
siding with great "boosting" force as president of
the Athletic Association.

Destiny: Will outrival the Penny Brothers as
auctioneers on account of the carrying quality of her





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^SisS ^ SHS^





ESTELLE DILLON. B.E.
Tuscarora. N. C.
Cornelian
President Class. Spring '15; Marshal ■15-' 16; Legis-
lative Board ■I4 - 15: Hockey Team '14. '15. '16, '17;
Basketball Team '14-' 15; Orchestra; Vice-President
Student Government Association '1 6-' 17.

Mount of Character: Clear interpretation of
"Roberts' Rules of Order." Has an "uncommon
fine" tendency toward nodding at such exciting
times as Observation Period in the Training School.
A woman of immovable convictions, a real Chester-
field in her manners, we honor the president of our
Sophomore year.



GLADYS EMERSON. B.S.

Salisbury. N. C.

Cornelian

Chorus; Dramatic Club; Vice-President Athletic

Association '16-' 17; Cheer Leader Class. Fall '16;

Proctor '15-' 16; Hockey Team 14. '15. '16. '17.

Mount of Character: This robust lass hails from
Salisbury! Happy-go-lucky, good-natured, easy-go-
ing, and an athlete of no mean ability.

Life line: Very long. Strong constitution. Event-


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