North Carolina. Dept. of Public Instruction.

Biennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of North Carolina, for the scholastic years ... [serial] (Volume 1900/01-1901/02) online

. (page 39 of 46)
Online LibraryNorth Carolina. Dept. of Public InstructionBiennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of North Carolina, for the scholastic years ... [serial] (Volume 1900/01-1901/02) → online text (page 39 of 46)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


CALDWELL COUNTY.
Hudson —

Number of volumes in library, 88; value, $36.63; number of books
taken out during year, 196; number of months open, 9.
King's Creek —

Number of volumes in library, 86; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 105; number of months open. 10.
Globe-
Number of volumes in library, 84; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 127; number of months open, 10.
Hibriten —

Number of volumes in library, 81; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 101; number of months open, 10.

All the librarians report great benefits. General conversation has
been changed — people know of others to talk now, so do not have to
confine themselves to their neighbors. Hudson is the oldest; the
others came in about April.

Y. D. Moore.
CHEROKEE COUNTY.
Hiawassee —

Number of volumes in library, 86; value, $30; number of months
open, 12.

Culberson —

Number of volumes in library, 89; value, $30; number of months
open, 12.

Hanging Dog —

Number of volumes in library. 89; value, $30; number of months
open, 12.

Andrews —

Number of volumes in library, 105; value, $35; number of months
open, 12.

The first in the list was founded a year ago. The books have been
used very little. The other three were founded late last spring, and
are very successful. T. J. Hill.

CUMBERLAND COUNTY.
McPherson —

Number of volumes in library, 75; value, $35; number of books
taken out during year, 62; number of months open, 11.
Beaver Creek —

Number of volumes in library, 70; value, $32; number of books
taken out during year, 60; number of months open, 11.



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 385

Stedman —

Number of volumes in library, 69; value, $34; number of books
taken' out during year, 58; number of montbs open, 11.
King Hiram —
Number of volumes in library, 74; vlalue, $38; number of books
taken out during year, 60; number of months open, 11.
Glendale —
Number of volumes in library, 71; value, $39; number of books
taken out during year, 70; number of months open, 11.
Zander —
Number of volumes in library, 70; value, $40; number of books

taken out during year, 50; number of months open, 11.
The effect is to create a love for books, arouse interest in educa-
tion. S. D. Cole.
DAVIDSON COUNTY.

No. 1. — RendalL located at H. W. Turner's —

Number of volumes in library, 152; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 306; number of months open, 4 2-3.
No. 2. — Bagdad, at Hiram Berrier's —

Number of volumes in library, 91; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 86; number of months open, 3.

Patrons and chi'dren are well pleased, and are encouraged to read,
and are greatly benefited. P. L. Ledford.

DURHAM COUNTY.
East Durham School —
Number of volumes in library, 150; value, $55; number of books
taken out during year, 95; number of months open, 12.
West Durham School —
Number of volumes in library, 280; value, $125; number of books
taken out during year, 125; number of months open, 12.
Glenn's School —
Number of volumes in library, 142; value, $60; number of books
taken out during year, 105; number of months open, 12.
South Lebanon School —

Number of volumes in library, 191; value, $75; number of books
taken out during year, 100; number of months open, 8.
Rongemont School —

Number of volumes in library, 133; value, $40; number of books
taken out during year, 85; number of months open, 8.
White's Cross Roads School —

Number of volumes in library, 127; value, $45; number of books
taken out during year, 75; number of months open, 8.
25



380 Biennial Report of the

Patrick Henry School —

Number of volumes in library. 138; value, $50; number of books

taken out during year, 80; number of months open, 9.
The above includes 7 out of 35 libraries, valued at $1,150, con-
taining 4,733 volumes.

The books have met with popular favor by both children and pa-
rents. These libraries are but the beginning of what will be in the
not far-distant future — a good library for every school in the county.

C. W. Massey.
EDGECOMBE COUNTY.
Conetoe School —

Number of volumes in library, 93; value, $32; number of books
taken out during year, 222; number of months open, 6.

House No. 1, T'p. No. 10 —

Number of volumes in library, 87; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 74; number of months open, 5.

House No. 1, Tp. No. 3—

Number of volumes in library, 88; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 65; number of months open, 5.

Other three not installed in time for report.

Report from all of above was that interest in library was growing.

Robert M. Davis.
FORSYTH COUNTY.

No. 6— Middle Fork, T. S.—

Number of volumes in library, 115; value, $33.
Rural Hall —

Number of volumes in library, 79; value, $26.

District No. 3. — Belew's Creek —

Number of volumes in library, 86; value, $26.
District No. 2.— Winston, T. S —

Number of volumes in library, 98; value, $27.50.

District No. 4. — Vienna, T. S.—

Number of volumes in library, 90; value, $26.

District No. 2. — Abbott's Creek —
Number of volumes in library, 90; value, $26.

District No. 1 (colored). — Clemnionsville —
Number of volumes in library, 86; value, $26.

The children and patrons in districts where we have libraries
express themselves as being highly pleased. We never got these
libraries all placed until late last spring, and I have no report as
yet as to the number of books taken out, etc. Each library has a
good book-case that cost $5 each. We expect to establish a number
of libraries within the next five months.

W. O. Cox.



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 387

GRANVILLE COUNTY.

Geneva, Culbreth, N. C. —

Number of volumes in library, 64; value, $30; number of months
open, 4 to 6.

Berea Academy, Berea, N. C. —

Number of volumes in library, 64; value, $30; number of months
open. 4 to 6.

Knap of Reeds, N. C—

Number of volumes in library, 64; value, $30; number of months
open, 4 to 6.
North Side, N. C —

Number of volumes in library, 64; value, $30; number of months
open, 4 to 6.
Wilton, N. C—

Number of volumes in library, 64; value, $30; number of months

open. 4 to 6.
These libraries were not delivered until just about the time the
schools closed, hence no report on them. Children and parents seem
to be taking right much interest in them this session.

J. C. Howard.
GREENE COUNTY.
Snow Hill Academy —

Number of volumes in library, 123; value, $60; number of books
taken out during year, 96; number of months open, 12.
District No. 2 — Shine Township —

Number of volumes in library, 80; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 50; number of months open. 12.

District No. 3 — Shine Township —
Number of volumes in library, 80; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 185; number of months open, 12.
District No. 2— Snow Hill-
Number of volumes in library, 81; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 156; number of months open, 12.
Ormond's Chapel — No statistics.

There seems to be an increasing interest on the part of the chil-
dren here at Snow Hill and in Shine Township.

J. E. Debnam.
HARNETT COUNTY.
Lillington —
Number of volumes in library, 81; value, $30. They have had the
library only a few months.
Angier —
Number of volumes in library, 81; value, $30. They have had the
library only a few months.



3S8 Biennial, Report of the

Barbicue —

Number of volumes in library, 81; value, $30. They have had the
library only a few months.
Linden —

Order made, but books not received.

Buie's Creek —

Order made, but books not received.

We find it very difficult to have orders filled.

This is a very unsatisfactory report, but is the best I can make at
this time. Prof. J. D. Ezzell was appointed purchaser of the libra-
ries. He was delayed in his work by publishing houses failing to fill
his orders. J. S. B.

NEW HANOVER COUNTY.

WHITE SCHOOLS.

Acorn Branch, District No. 6 —
Number of volumes in library, 50; value, $15; number of books
taken out during year, no report; number of months open, 7.

Masonboro, District No. 4 —

Number of volumes in library, 107; value, $65.
Myrtle Grove, District No. 3 —

Number of volumes in library, 32; value, $10.
Middle Sound, District No. 13 —

Number of volumes in library, 40; value, $12.
Scott's Hill, District No. 11—

Number of volumes in library, 50; value, $15.
Wrightsville, District No. 5 —

Number of volumes in library, 65; value, $20.
Greenville. District No. 14 —

Number of volumes in library 98; value, $65.
Delgado Mills —

Number of volumes in library, 90; value, $40.

Total number of volumes in white libraries, 532.

COLORED SCHOOLS.

Castle Haynes, District No. 10 —

Number of volumes in library, 36; value, $10.
Acorn Branch, District No. 6 —

Number of volumes in library, 83; value, $35.
Rock Hill, District No. 12—

Number of volumes in library, 30; value, $8.
Carolina Beach, District No. 9 —

Number of volumes in library, 9; value, $4.



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 389

Masonboro, District No. 4 —
Number of volumes in library, 26; value, $8.

Middle Sound, District No. 13 —

Number of volumes in library, 60; value, $20.
Scott's Hill, District No. 11—

Number of volumes in librae, 17; value, $6.
Wrightsville, District No. 5 —

Number of volumes in library, 38; value, $15. •
Greenville, District No. 14 —

Number of volumes in library, 30; value, $12.

Total number of volumes in colored libraries, 329.

The books are eagerly read, and I think much benefit is derived.
We are still pushing the work. W. Catlett.

RANDOLPH COUNTY.
Randleman —
Number of volumes in library, 82; value, $30; number of months
open, 9.

Cedar Falls —
Number of volumes in library, 82; value, $30; number of months
open, 9.

Central Falls-
Number of volumes in library, 82; value, $30; number of months
open, 9.
Frar klinsville —
Number of volumes in library, S.2; -value, $30; number of months
open, 9.

Ramseur —

Number of volumes in library, 82; value, $30; number of months
open, 9.
Liberty —
Number of volumes in library, S2; value, $30; number of months
open, 9.

The libraries were sent out in April, and no report was required
last year. Outside of broadeniug the knowledge of the children by
reading, they have done a great deal to increase attendance and
interest patrons. We have eight other libraries. J. M. May.

RUTHERFORD COUNTY.
Rutherfordton —

Number of volumes in library, 100; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 75; number of months open, 8; estimated.
Ell en bo ro —

Number of volumes in library, 100; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 75; number of months open, 4; estimated.



390 Biennial Report of the

Henrietta —

Number of volumes in library, 426; value, $110; number of books
taken out during yeai\ 400; number of months open, 9.

Forest City —

Number of volumes in library, 175; value, $50; number of books
taken out during year, 100; number of months open, 12. Re-
ported by Prof. J. W. Smith.
Bostic —

Number of volumes in library, 48; value, $30. Reported by Miss
Fairy Clemmer.

Round Hill-
Number of volumes in library, 94; value, $16; number of books
taken out during year, 50; number of months open, 9. Re-
ported by Miss A. M. Livingston.
Caroleen —

Included in report from Henrietta. $80.00 contributed by people.

One of the best of all the laws of 1901. Would that its provisions
extended further. Can not adequately estimate its value. A private
library similar to above has been established at Sunshine Institute,
Sunshine, N. C.

A. L. Ruckee.

STOKES COUNTY.
Sandy Ridge —
Number of volumes in library, 119; value, $31; number of books
taken out during year, 329; number of months open, 9.
Germanton —

Number of volumes in library, 135; value, $32; number of books
taken out during year, 257; number of months open, 7.
Gideon —

Number of volumes in library, 120; value, $32; number of books
taken out during year, 100; number of months open, 9.
Seven Island —

Number of volumes in library, 132; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 153; number of months open, 6.
Mt. View —

Number of volumes in library, 128; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 185; number of months open, 7.
Danbury —

Number of volumes in library, 132; value, $35; number of books

taken out during year, 251; number of months open, 9.
People of all classes are induced to read. Some of the most ex-
tensive readers are people who have no books and are not able to
purchase any. W. B. Harris.



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 391

December 4, 1902.
Rupt. J. Y. Joyner, Raleigh, N. C.

Deap. Sik: — I beg leave to submit the following as my report of
the number of rural libraries in Union County, N. C, their location,
number of volumes, cost, etc. We have six rural libraries in the
county costing $30 each, and containing in the aggregate about 600
volumes. While the schools are in session, the libraries are kept at
the school-house; in the interval, at private houses near by. They
are open all the year, and well patronized and doing a great deal of
good, but can't give you the exact extent by circulation.

L. D. Andrews.

WAYNE COUNTY.

Pine Forest, Fork Township —

Number of volumes in library, 85; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 293; number of months open, 6.
Daniel's Chapel, New Hope Township —

Number of volumes in library, 75; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 231; number of months open, 6.

Walter, Fork Township —
Number of volumes in library, 75; value, $30; number of months
open, 6.

Brogden No. 1, Brogden Township-
Number of volumes in library, 74; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 110; number of months open, 6.

Woodland, Brogden Township —

Number of volumes in library, 75; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 185; number of months open, 6.
Grantham's, Grantham's Township —

Number of volumes in library, 75; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 121; number of months open, 6.

The children and the patrons of the schools were delighted with
the books. Putting the libraries in these schools is the best thing
that ever happened to them. E. S. Atkinson.

WILKES COUNTY.
Boomer —

Number of volumes in library, 118; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 150; number of months open, 12.
Trap Hill-
Number of volumes in library, 118; value, $30; number of months
open, 12.

Parsonville —
Number of volumes in library, 118; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 104; number of months open, 12.



302 Biennial Report of the

Hayes —

Number of volumes in library, 118; value, $30; number of books
taken out during year, 49; number of montbs open, 12.

Tliese rural libraries bave been a great help to the communities
in which they are located. Patrons have been interested and chil-
dren given a taste for literature. C. C. Wright.

WILSON COUNTY.
Rock Ridge —

Number of volumes in library, 71; value, $24.60.
Lucama —

Number of volumes in library, 41; value, $20.59.
Black Creek —

Number of volumes in library, 62; value, $20.59.
Stantonsburg —

Number of volumes in library, 63; value, $20.59.
Wilbanks —

Number of volumes in library, 60; value, $20.59.
Elm City-
Number of volumes in library, 300; value, $100.

Schools were closed last spring on account of small-pox.

Since the opening of the schools this fall, children have taken
great interest in reading. In No. 1, books have been donated. In
No. 6, located at Elm City, the old library contained over 250 books
at first. James W. Hays.






Superintendent of Public Instruction. 393



Reports of State Institutions.



NORTH CAROLINA INSTITUTION FOR THE EDUCATION OF
THE DEAF AND DUMB AND THE BLIND.

To the Board of Directors.

Gentlemen: — The record of the .conduct of the affairs of our
School for the past two years is in many ways a very gratifying
one. There has been a steady growth along all lines and quite a
number of improvements in nearly all the departments of the School.
The last General Assembly very considerately made provision for
the maintenance of a larger number of scholars, and the Principal
has put forth well-nigh every possible effort to induce every eligible
child in the State to take advantage of the privileges offered them
by our great Commonwealth. No State in all the Southland, and
but few in the whole nation, have made more ample provision for
the education of their deaf and blind children. There is room in
our two institutions for every blind and colored deaf child in
North Carolina and with a very little larger appropriation for main-
tenance, we could educate every child who needs the benefits offered
by these schools. And it should be a source of congratulation that
there are more deaf and blind children taught in our schools now,
in proportion to the population, than in any other State in the
Union. There are but three schools for the blind in the whole
United States which has a larger enrollment than we have. Our
large attendance has been brought about by very systematic efforts,
both in writing letters and in canvassing. Besides thousands of let-
ters written to all parts of the State, the Principal, at the request
of our "educational Governor." and by direction of the Board, has
Tisited in person many sections and has seen a large number of
persons who have blind and deaf children. He has been present
at a large number of educational and religious gatherings in nearly
every part of North Carolina, and has been accorded the most hearty
reception in all these bodies, whose members have heard patiently
and interestedly statements of the work and progress of the School.
They have all alike shown the greatest desire to aid in inducing
ehildren to accept the invitations to be educated.

The following statement of the attendance for the past two years
may prove interesting:



394 Biennial Report of the

Number of students present December 1, 1900 266

New students since admitted , 164

Number re-admitted 17

Total increase in two years 181

Total enrollment for two years 447

Graduated during the two years 7

Died during the two years 2

Suspended 7

Time expired 15

Removed from State 2

Relieved by Ophthalmologists 24

Returned home as feeble-minded 7

Voluntarily remained at home 56

Total decrease 115;

Number present December 1, 1902 328

This is a decided advance over the enrollment of any like period
in the history of the School and the present* attendance is the larg-
est ever registered. And yet there are more than a hundred other
children who sorely need the advantages of the institution, whom
the Principal has not been able to induce to accept the offer made
by the State of an education without price. This will seem strange
to many, but it is a serious fact. Some of these persons are already
nearly past the school age limit. In not a few instances they will
remain in helpless ignorance and hopeless darkness — unable to care
for themselves; and unless they are so fortunate as to have rela-
tives of means and humanity, they will eventually become permanent
charges upon the counties in which they live.

No reason is assigned for their unwillingness to attend school, ex-
cept that they do not wish to leave home, or their parents love them
too well to be willing to part from them. In a few instances county
authorities make small appropriations for the care of such children
at their homes. Can it be possible that those who have charge of
them care more for the money involved than for the real welfare of
the children? The worst feature of it all is that many of those who
are still out of school are those who need an education more than
even those here.

What more are we to do? Shall we cease to make efforts and
leave them to dense darkness, abject poverty, cheerless ignorance
and moral degradation? Or shall we appeal to our noble Governor
and law-makers to make some provision by which these children can
be rescued from the hands of those who profess to love them, while
they are really their worst enemies? Would a compulsory education



S UP E E 1 N T E N 1 > E N T O F P U B L 1 C IlSTS T K U C TION. i i ! 1 5

tow meet the emergency? More than once this has been urged upon
the General Assembly of the State. Once a former President of our
Board went so far as £o frame such a bill, present it to the General
Assembly, and secure its passage through one branch of legislation,
but to see it killed in the other. One is again tempted to ask, What
shall be done?

Not an Asylum.

As our people become more enlightened it is less difficult for them
to -understand that this institution is simply and purely a school,
and in ho sense an asylum. Only educatabie children are received,
and they are retained only so long as they can be taught either lit-
erary or industrial branches, or both. It is true that there are
oculists and regular physicians employed by the school, who do
everything possible to relieve the physical disability, bodily disease,
and to restore sight, where such things can be done; and yet no per-
son is received for medical or surgical treatment only, but to be
educated.

Improvements.

The last General Assembly was asked for an appropriation of
$31,905.58, to meet a deficit which had accumulated on account of the
increased attendance, without a corresponding increase in the cur-
rent fund, and to make some improvements, the lack of which has
handicapped the operations of the school very seriously for the past
years. Owing to the stringency in the condition of the State treas-
ury, the Legislature felt that they could appropriate only $20,000.00
for the purposes named. Of this amount only $10,000.00 has been
turned over by the Treasurer, on account of the depleted condition
of the treasury.

Soon after the adjournment of the Legislature the Board met, let
contract for some of the improvements — those most needed — and set
to work to relieve the embarrassments against which the school has
had to labor for years past. Being anxious to provide for the taking
up of the deficit, the Board first set aside $877.58 of the $10,000.00.
which was expected the first year, meaning to appropriate the whole
of the second $10,000.00 towards liquidating this deficit. With the rest
of the amount the most urgent of the improvements for which appro-
priation was asked were undertaken, and they have been completed
as follows:

The plumbing in the second story of both wings of the girls' build-
ing has been renewed and rendered entirely sanitary. The toilet
rooms upon this story were in such condition two years ago that they
were kept locked, to prevent contamination and disease.

The dining and music hall has been finished and we now have
ample school-room facilities for all our classes, thoroughly modern



396 Biennial Report of the

practice rooms for piano practice, and a well-lighted, well-heated,
well arranged dining-room for officers and students.

The deep we'.ls, referred to two years ago as in process of boring,
cave been completed and both schools are now supplied with clear,
pure, healthful water, and at the simple expense of pumping.

The sidewalk upon Jones Street, immediately south of the prem-
ises, has been neatly and durably paved, and six new pianos have
been purchased for the music department.

With the annual appropriation of $50.00 granted two years ago, the
nucleus for a library of books for the use of teachers in reading to
the various classes of the school has been begun. This will in time
become one of the most important improvements, as the years pass.
The gymnasium is showing itself more and more beneficial each
month. Great physical benefit is derived from its use, many of the
students who were very frail having become much stronger by ex-
ercise taken therein. As stated above, the school has not received
the second $10,000.00 with which to pay off the balance of the deficit,
and hence that amount still remains against the school.

A Few More Needs.

The disposition has been to ask for nothing foi- which there was
not a serious need, to relieve some pressing necessity of a growing
school. The report of two years ago gives in detail most of the
things then needed; and if needed then, very much more necessary
now. A mere reference is again made to them in. passing, hoping
that this is all that is needful. They are these:



Online LibraryNorth Carolina. Dept. of Public InstructionBiennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of North Carolina, for the scholastic years ... [serial] (Volume 1900/01-1901/02) → online text (page 39 of 46)