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THE LIBRARY OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF

NORTH CAROLINA




THE COLLECTION OF
NORTH CAROLINIANA



C917.05
N87m
1949
C.4




7482476



This book may be kept out one month unless a recall
notice is sent to you. It must be brought to the North
Carolina Collection (in Wilson Library) for renewal.



Form No- A-369



NORTH CAROLINA

MANUAL

1949



NORTH CAROLINA MANUAL

1949




Issued by

Thad Eure

Secretary of State

Raleigh



1949



JANUARY

S M T W T F S

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ryj'.



TO THE

1949 MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF NORTH CAROLINA

TO THE

STATE, COUNTY, CITY AND TOWN OFFICIALS

AND TO THE

PEOPLE OF THE OLD NORTH STATE
AT HOME AND ABROAD

THIS MANUAL IS RESPECTFULLY
DEDICATED




Secretary of State



^
^

^



CONTENTS

PART I
HISTORICAL

Page

The State 11

The State Capitol 19

Chief Executives of North Carolina

Governors of Virginia 21

Executives under the Proprietors 21

Governors under the Crown 22

Governors Elected by the Legislature 22

Governors Elected by the People 24

The State Flag 27

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence 28

The Great Seal of North Carolina 30

The State Bird 33

The Halifax Resolution 34

Name of State and Nicknames 35

The State Motto 35

The State Colors 36

The State Flower 36

The State's Most Famous Toast 36

Legal Holidays in North Carolina 36

Population of the State since 1675 37

State Song 38

The Constitution of North Carolina 39

The American's Creed 77

The American Flag

Origin 77

Proper Display 79

Pledge to the Flag 83

The National Capitol 85

Declaration of Independence 88

Constitution of the tlnited States 93

PART II

CENSUS

Sixteenth Census, 1940

Population of State 117

Population of Counties 118

Population of Cities and Towns 118



6 North Carolina Manual

PART III
POLITICAL

Page

Congressional Districts 127

Judicial Districts 127

Senatorial Districts and Apportionment of Senators 128

Apportionment of Members of the House of Representatives. . 131

State Democratic Platform 132

Plan of Organization of the State Democratic Party 139

Committees of the Democratic Party

State Democratic Executive Committee 154

Congressional District Executive Committees 159

Judicial District Executive Committees 163

Senatorial Executive Committees 167

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 170

State Republican Platform 172

Plan of Organization of the State Republican Party 181

Committees of the Republican Party

State Republican Executive Committee 186

Congressional, Judicial and Senatorial District Committees 188

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 188



PART IV

ELECTION RETURNS

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1948. . . . 193

Popular Vote for President by States, 1932-1944 194

Vote for President by Counties, 1928-1948 196

Vote for Governor by Counties, Primaries, 1948 199

Vote for Governor by Counties, General Elections, 1928-1948 . 202
Vote for State Officials, Democratic Primaries, 1940 and 1944. 205

Vote for State Officials by Counties, Primary, 1948 206

Total Votes Cast— General Election, 1948 211

Vote for Governor in Democratic Primaries, 1920-1948 212

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primary, May 29, 1948 . 213

Vote for Congressmen in Second Primary, June 26, 1948 215

Vote for Congressmen in Republican Primary, May 29, 1948 . . 216

Vote for Members of Congress, 1934-1948 217

Vote for United States Senator, Primary, May 29, 1948 231

Vote for United States Senator, General Election,

November 2, 1948 233

Vote on Constitutional Amendments by Counties, 1948 235

Vote on Prohibition, 1881, 1908, 1933 240



Contents



PART V
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

Page

Agencies, Boards and Commissions 243

North Carolina Institutions
Correctional

White 264

Negro 264

Educational

White 265

Negro 272

Hospitals

White 275

Negro 278

Confederate Woman's Home 278

Examining Boards 279

State Owned Railroads 285

PART VI

LEGISLATIVE

The General Assembly
Senate

Officers 289

Senatoi's (Arranged Alphabetically) 289

Senators (Arranged by Districts) 290

Rules 291

Standing Committees 306

Seat Assignments 313

House of Representatives

Officers 314

Members (Arranged Alphabetically) 314

Members (Arranged by Counties) 316

Rules 319

Standing Committees 335

Seat Assignments 347

PART VII
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Executive Officials 351

Administrative Officials 359

United States Senators 375

Representatives in Congress 378

Justices of the Supreme Court 387

Members of the General Assembly

Senators 394

Representatives 426

Occupational and Professional Classification 486



8 North Carolina Manual

PART VIII

OFFICIAL REGISTER

Page
United States Government

President and Vice-President 493

Cabinet Members 493

North Carolina Senators and Representatives in Congress 493

United States Supreme Court Justices 493

United States District Court

Judges 493

Clerks 494

District Attorneys 494

United States Circuit Court of Appeals

Judge Fourth District 494

State Government

Legislative Department 495

Executive Department 495

Judicial Department 495

Administrative Department 496

State Institutions 497

Heads of Agencies other than State 498

County Government 499

ILLUSTRATIONS

State Capitol 18

State Flag 26

State Seal 31

State Bird 32

State Song (Words and Music) 38

Map of North Carolina 75

The American Flag 77

Map Showing Congressional Districts 144, 145

Map Showing Senatorial Districts 176, 177

Map Showing Judicial Districts 208, 209

Seating Diagram of Senate Chamber 312

Seating Diagram of House of Representatives 346

Pictures

Governor 350

State Officers 355

Senators and Congressmen 377, 383

Justices of the Supreme Court 388

State Senators 395, 401, 409

Members House of Representatives 427, 435, 443

451, 459, 467, 475



PART I
HISTORICAL



THE STATE

North Carolina, often called the "Tar Heel" state, was the scene
of the first attempt at colonization in America by English-speak-
ing people. Under a charter granted to Sir Walter Raleigh by
Queen Elizabeth, a colony was begun on Roanoke Island. This
settlement, however, was unsuccessful and later became known
as "The Lost Colony."

The first permanent settlement was made about 1650 by immi-
grants from Virginia. In 1663 Charles II granted to eight Lords
Properietors a charter for the territory lying "within six and
thirty degrees northern latitude, and to the west as far as the
South seas, and so southerly as far as the river St. Matthias,
which bordereth upon the coast of Florida, and within one and
thirty degrees of northern latitude, and so west in a direct line
as far as the South seas aforesaid . . ." and the colony was called
Carolina. In 1665 another charter was granted to these noblemen.
This charter extended the limits of Carolina so that the northern
line was 36 degrees and 30 minutes north latitude, and the south-
era line was 29 degrees north latitude, and both of these lines ex-
tended westward to the South seas.

In 1669 John Locke wrote the Fundamental Constitutions as a
model for the government of Carolina, The Lords Proprietors
adopted these constitutions and directed the governor to put into
operation as much of them as was feasible. In 1670 there were
four precincts (changed to counties in 1739) : Pasquotank, Per-
quimans, Chowan, and Currituck. North Carolina now has one
hundred counties.

Carolina on December 7, 1710, was divided into North Carolina
and South Carolina, and Edward Hyde, on May 12, 1712, became
the first governor of North Carolina.

In 1729 seven of the eight Lords Proprietors sold their interest
in Carolina to the Crown and North Carolina became a royal
colony. George Burrington was the first royal governor. Richard
Everard, the last proprietary governor, served until Burrington
was appointed.

North Carolina, on April 12, 1776, authorized her delegates in
the Continental Congress to vote for independence, and on Decem-
ber 18, 1776, adopted a constitution. Richard Caswell became the

11



12 North Carolina Manual

first governor under this constitution. On November 21, 1789, the
State adopted the United States Constitution, being the twelfth
state to enter the Federal Union. North Carolina, in 1788, had
rejected the Constitution on the grounds that certain amendments
were vital and necessary to a free people.

A Constitutional convention was held in 1835 and among several
changes made in the Constitution was the method of electing the
governor. After this change the governor was elected by the peo-
ple for a term of two years instead of being elected by the Legis-
lature for a term of one year. Edward Bishop Dudley was the
first govei-nor elected by the people.

North Carolina seceded from the Union May 20, 1861, and was
readmitted to the Union in July, 1868.

A new State Constitution was adopted in 1868 and since that
date the governor has been elected by the people for four-year
terms and he cannot succeed himself. There has not been a new
constitution since 1868, but numerous amendments have been
added to it.

North Carolina has had a democratic administration since 1900,
during which period it has made its greatest progress.

Noi'th Carolina has had two permanent capitals — New Bern
and Raleigh — and there have been three capitol buildings. Tryon's
Palace in New Bern was constructed in the period, 1767-1770, and
the main building was destroyed by fire February 27, 1798. The
first capitol in Raleigh was completed in 1794 and was destroyed
by fire on June 21, 1831. The present capitol was completed in
1840.

The State in 1790 ceded her western lands, which was com-
posed of Washington, Davidson, Hawkins, Greene, Sullivan, Sum-
ner, and Tennessee counties, to the federal government, and be-
tween 1790 and 1796 the territory was known as Tennessee Terri-
tory, but in 1796 it became the fifteenth state in the Union.

In 1738, the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act
authorizing the establishment of district courts which served as
appelant courts. These courts were authorized to be held in Bath,
New Bern, and New Town — now Wilmington. In 1746, the General
Assembly repealed the Act of 1738 and established district courts
to be held at Edenton, Wilmington, and Edgecombe. From 1754
until 1790, other districts were formed as the State expanded in



The State 13

territory and developed needs for these districts. By 1790, there
were eight judicial districts divided into two ridings of four dis-
tricts each. In 1806, the General Assembly passed an act establish-
ing a superior court in each county. The Act also set up judicial
districts composed of certain contiguous counties, and this practice
of expanding the districts has continued from five districts in
1806 until now there are twenty-one districts.

When North Carolina adopted the Federal Constitution on Nov-
ember 21, 1789, she was authorized to send two senators and five
representatives to the Congress of the United States according to
the constitutional apportionment. In 1792, when the first federal
census had been completed and tabulated, it was found that North
Carolina was entitled to ten representatives. It was then that
the General Assembly divided the State into ten congressional dis-
tricts. In 1812, the State had grown and prospered until it was
entitled to thirteen representatives in Congress. Between 1812 and
1865, however, the population decreased so much in porportion to
the population of the other states of the Union that North Car-
olina was by 1865 entitled only to seven representatives. Since
1865 the population of the State has shown a slow but steady
increase, and now there are twelve congressional districts. The
State, therefore, has two senators and twelve representatives in
the Congress of the United States.

North Carolina supports a nine-month school for every child of
school age and maintains a fleet of 5,113 busses by which it trans-
ports 359,143 children to school each school day in the year. Dur-
ing a nine months term these 5,113 busses travel approximately
33,809,564 miles.

The State also maintains approximately 50,448.3 miles of county
rural roads and 1,123.8 miles of county municipal roads, totaling
51,572.1 miles. The State also maintains 10,330.1 miles of State
rural roads and 1,032 miles of State municipal roads. This totals
62,934.2. These roads are maintained from gasoline tax, drivers'
licenses and licenses for automobiles, trucks, and busses. From
March 4, 1921, to June 30, 1948, the State of North Carolina has
spent $922,777,759.02 for the construction, betterment, upkeep,
debt service, and salaries of employees of the State Highway
Commission and other employees connected with road construc-
tion and maintenance. This sum includes all items spent on the
highways during this period.



14 North Carolina Manual

North Carolina extends from the sea coast to the mountains
and is approximately 550 miles from East to West. It is approxi-
mately 250 miles wide. The highest peak east of the Mississippi
is Mount Mitchell, extending 6,684 feet above sea level.

North Carolina from its earliest time has always been an agri-
cultural state. In the early period the chief exports were beef,
pork, tobacco, corn, and of course, naval stores such as tar, pitch,
and turpentine, which the farmers developed for additional in-
comes. Some of the principal agricultural products are corn, cot-
ton, tobacco, wheat, barley, oats, peanuts, soya beans, various
types of hay, potatoes, garden truck, dairy products, beef, pork,
poultry, and fruits. The production of flu-cured tobacco in 1948
totaled 746,300,000 pounds. During the same year North Carolina
produced 350,000,000 pounds of peanuts, which was an average
yield of 1,225 pounds per acre. The cotton crop for 1948 amounted
to 680,000 bales of 500 pounds gross weight. The production of
hay, including all types, amounted to approximately 1,284,000
tons. The corn crop for 1948 amounted to 69,006,000 bushels. The
amount of corn was produced from 2,226,000 acres. The Irish
potatoes for 1948 amounted to 10,508,000 bushels. These potatoes
were produced from a total of 71,000 acres. Sweet potatoes pro-
duced during the year amounted to 5,635,000 bushels produced
from 49,000 acres. Soya bean production during the year
amounted to 3,500,000 bushels. North Carolina produces much
fruit and nuts. During 1948, 976,000 bushels of apples, 1,646,000
bushels of peaches, 209,000 bushels of pears, 5,600 tons of grapes,
and 2,500,000 pounds of pecans were produced.

In addition to the agricultural products produced in North Car-
olina, the State is becoming to be known as an industrial State.
The State manufactures furniture, textiles, tobacco, and almost
any kind of manufacturing done in any other section of the Na-
tion. There are in North Carolina eight tobacco manufacturing
establishments, not including stemmeries, which employ 16,000
persons whose annual income is $37,722,000.00. The value of the
tobacco products produced during the year of 1948 was $912,875.-
000.00. The tobacco factories manufactured cigarettes, cigars,
smoking tobacco, chewing tobacco, and snuff.

There are in the State 300 furniture manufacturing establish-
ments which employ 31,500 persons whose salaries amount to



The State 15

$40,000,000.00. The value of the furniture manufacturing in North
Carolina during- 1948 was $95,445,000.00.

There are approximately 900 textile manufacturing plants in
the State. These plants employ 222,000 persons whose gross earn-
ings are approximately $400,000,000.00. During 1948 these 900
plants produced products valuing at approximately $1,000,000,-
000.00. Some of the products manufactured are cotton, yarn,
thread, twine, cordage, cotton woven goods, both broad and nar-
row; silk and rayon thread, yarn and woven goods, woolen and
worsted yarn, hosiery, both seamless and full-fashion made of cot-
ton, silk, and nylon.

The citizens of North Carolina have ever been patriotic when
the call for military service to the State was made. During the
War Between the States approximately 125,000 persons saw mili-
tary service in some capacity. In World War I, 86,457 persons
saw service in the several branches of the military services of the
country, including the Navy, the Army, and the Marines. Of this
number there were 195 nurses who participated in the war. Dur-
ing World War II, 373,324 persons had active service in the several
branches of the armed forces of the country. Approximately 18
per cent of the persons in the service were Negroes. There were
4,328 women in the several branches of armed services. During
World War II, many camps were erected in the State for the
training of persons for active combat duty. Most of these have
been disposed of by the Federal Government, but the Federal Gov-
ernment still maintains Fort Bragg, one of the largest military
camps of its kind in the world. Camp Lejeune for the training
of the Marines, and Cherry Point for training Marines for air
services.

Rural electrification began in Noi'th Carolina in 1917, but very
little progress was made until 1935. Cleveland County, however,
in 1925 built approximately 90 miles of rural electric lines to
serve the farmers of that county. In 1935, there were in North
Carolina 1,884 miles of rural lines serving 11,558 farms. The last
report of the Rural Electrification Authority in North Carolina,
July 1, 1947, showed there were 39,394 miles of rural lines serv-
ing 240,534 consumers. Of this number, it was estimated that
157,580 customers were farmers. North Carolina has made its
greatest progress in agricultural development and rural electri-



16 . North Carolina Manual

fication of the farms during the last quarter of a century. When
rural electrification first began in the State, it consisted chiefly
of lights for the home produced by some type of battery system.
Now farms are electrified and stoves, ranges, washing machines,
lights, sweet potato curers, milkers, hay curers, motors for grind-
ing grain, and many other items are in use. It is one of the many
good labor-saving devices for the rural homes and farm activities.




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THE STATE CAPITOL

The original State Capitol of North Carolina was destroyed by
fire on June 21, 1831.

At the session of November, 1832, the Assembly resolved to re-
build on the old site, and $50,000 was appropriated for the pur-
pose. Commissioners were appointed to have the work done. The
rubbish was cleared away, the excavations made and the founda-
tions were laid. On July 4, 1833, the cornerstone was set in place.

After the foundations were laid the work progressed more
slowly, and it was so expensive that the appropriation was ex-
hausted. The Legislature at its next session appropriated $75,000
more. To do the stone and finer work many skilled artisans had
been brought from Scotland and other countries. The Building
Commissioners contracted with David Paton to come to Raleigh
and superintend the work. Mr. Paton was an architect who had
come from Scotland the year before. He was the buildei', the archi-
tect, and designer.

The Legislature was compelled to make appropriations for the
work from time to time. The following is a table of the several
appropriations made:

Session of 1832-33 $ 50,000.00

Session of 1833-34 75,000.00

Session of 1834-35 75,000.00

Session of 1835 75,000.00

Session of 1836-37 120,000.00

Session of 1838-39 105,300.00

Session of 1840-41 31,374.46

Total $531,674.46

The stone with which the building was erected was the property
of the State. Had the State been compelled to purchase this ma-
terial the cost of the Capitol would have been considerably in-
creased.

In the summer of 1840 the work was finished. At last, after
more than seven yeai's, the sum of $531,674.46 was expended. As
large as that sum was for the time, when the State was so poor

19



20 North Carolina Manual

and when the entire taxes for all State purposes reached less than
$100,000, yet the people were satisfied. The building- had been
erected with rigorous economy, and it was an object of great pride
to the people. Indeed, never was money better expended than in
the erection of this noble Capitol.



Description of the Capitol, Written by David Patton,

the Architect

"The State Capitol is 160 feet in length from north to south
by 140 feet from east to west. The whole height is 97^/2 feet in the
center. The apex of pediment is 64 feet in height. The stylobate
is 18 feet in height. The columns of the east and west porticoes
are 5 feet 2^/^ inches in diameter. At entablature, including block-
ing course, is continued around the building, 12 feet high.

"The columns and entablature are Grecian Doric, and copied
from the Temple of Minerva, commonly called the Parthenon,
which was erected in Athens about 500 years before Christ. An
octagon tower surrounds the rotunda, which is oranamented with
Grecian cornices, etc., and its dome is decorated at top with a
similar ornament to that of the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates,
commonly called the Lanthorn of Demosthenes.

"The interior of the Capitol is divided into three stories: First,
the lower story, consisting of ten rooms, eight of which are appro-
priated as offices to the Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, and Comp-
troller, each having two rooms of the same size — the one contain-
ing an area of 649 square feet, the other 528 square feet — the two
committee rooms, each containing 200 square feet, and four
closets; also the rotunda, corridors, vestibules, and piazzas, con-
tain an area of 4,370 square feet. The vestibules are decorated
with columns and antse, similar to those of the Ionic Temple on the



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