North Carolina. Secretary of State.

North Carolina manual [serial] (Volume 1961) online

. (page 1 of 52)
Online LibraryNorth Carolina. Secretary of StateNorth Carolina manual [serial] (Volume 1961) → online text (page 1 of 52)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


ii««ii.€&aOLI!m





THE LIBRARY OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF

NORTH CAROLINA



THE COLLECTION OF
NORTH CAROUNLVNA



C 917.05

N87m

c,2



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL



000



7482591



This book may be kept out one month unless a recall
notice is sent to you. It must be brought to the North
Carolina Collection (in Wilson Library) for renewal.



Form No. A-369



NORTH CAROLINA MANUAL

1961




Issued by

Thad Eiire

Secretary of State

Raleigh



19 6 1

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL

S M T W T F S S M T W T !•' S S M T W '1' F S S .M T W T F S

1 2 3 4 5 G 7 12 3 4 12 3 4 1

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

15 IG 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 12 13 14 15 16 17 IS 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

26 27 28 29 30 31 23 2 4 25 26 27 28 29
30

JULY AUGUST

15 M T \V T F S S M T W T F S

1 12 3 4 5

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 IG 17 18 19

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 31

30 31

SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER

S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S JI T W T F S S M T W T F S

1212 3 45 67 1234 12

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

31



29 30


31
MAY




26 27 28

JUNE




S .M


.,, ^y ,j.


F S


S .M T W T F


S


1

7 8

14 15

21 22

28 29


2 3 4

9 10 11

16 17 18

23 24 25

30 31


5 G
12 13
19 20
26 27


1 2

4 5 6 7 8 9

11 12 13 14 15 IG

18 19 20 21 22 23

25 26 27 28 29 30


3
10
17

24



19 6 2



JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL

S .\1 T W T F S S .M T AV T F S S JI T AV T P S S M T W T F S

12 3 456 12 3 1231234 5 G7

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 G 7 8 9 10 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30

MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST

S -M T W T F S S .M T \\ T F S « >[ T \V T F S 8 >1 T W T F S

12345 12 12 3 4567' 12 3 4

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 31

SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER

S M T W T F S S JI T W T F S 8 M T W T F S S M T \V T F S





1


12 3 4 5 6




1 2 3




1


2 3 4


5 6 7 8


7 8 9 10 11 12 13


4


5 6 7 8 9 10


2 3 4


5 6 7 8


9 10 11


12 13 14 15


14 15 16 17 18 19 20


11


12 13 14 15 IG 17


9 10 11


12 13 14 15


16 17 18


19 20 21 22


21 22 23 24 25 26 27


18


19 20 21 22 23 24


16 17 18


19 20 21 22


23 24 25


26 27 28 29


28 29 30 31


25


26 27 28 29 30


23 24 25


26 27 28 29


30










30 31





TO THE

1961 MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF NORTH CAROLINA



TO THE

STATE, COUNTY, CITY AND TOWN OFFICIALS



AXD TO THE

PEOPLE OF THE OLD NORTH STATE
AT HOME AND ABROAD



THIS MANUAL IS RESPECTFULLY
DEDICATED




Secretary of State



Printed by
OWEN G. DUNN CO.

New Bern, N. C, U. S. A.



CONTENTS

PART I

HISTORICAL

Page

The State 3

The State Capitol 15

The State House 18

Chief Executives of North Carolina

Governors of Virginia 19

Executives under the Proprietors-l 19

Governors under the Crown 20

Governors Elected by the Legislature 21

Governors Elected by the People 22

List of Lieutenant Governors 25

The State Flag 27

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence 28

The Great Seal of North Carolina 30

The State Bird 33

The Halifax Resolution 34

Name of State and Nicknames 35

The State Motto 35

The State Colors . 36

The State Flower ^ 36

The State's Most Famous Toast 36

Public Holidays in North Carolina 37

Population of the State since 1675 ; 38

State Song 39

The Constitution of North Carolina 41

The American's Creed 81

The American Flag

Origin 81

Proper Displav 83

Pledge to the' Flag ^_ 88

The National Capitol 89

Declaration of Independence 92

Constitution of the United States . 97

PART II

CENSUS

Eighteenth Census, 19 60

Population of State 121

Population of Counties 122

Population of Cities and Towns

Incorporated places of 10,000 or more : 122

Incorporated places of 2,500 to 10,000 : 123

Incorporated places of 1,000 to 2,500 123

A Incorporated places of less than 1,000 125

?^ Population of United States, 1960 : 128



"VI Noinii Cai;()L1.\a Manual

I'Airr III

rOLlTlCAL Pagk

Congressional Districts 131

Juditial Districts 131

Solicitorial Districts 133

Senatorial Districts and Apportionment of Senators 136

Apiiortionment of Members of the House of Representatives^ 138

State Democratic Platform 139

Plan of Organization of the State Democratic Party 151

Committees of the Democratic Party

State Democratic Executive Committee 166

Congressional District Executive Committees 170

Judicial District Executive Committees 174

Senatorial District Executive Committees 179

State Democratic Solicitorial District

Executive Committees 182

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 186

County Vice-Chairmen 188

State Republican Platform 191

Plan of Organization of the State Republican Party 203

Committees of the Republican Party

State Republican Executive Committee 212

Congressional, Judicial and Senatorial

District Committees 215

Chairmen and Vice-Chairmen of the County

Executive Comijiittees 215

PART IV

ELECTION RETURNS

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1960 221

Popular Vote for President by States, 1944-1956 222

Vote for President by Counties, 1940-1960 224

Vote for Governor by Counties, Primaries, 1960 227, 229

Vote for Governor by Counties,

General Elections, 1940-1960 230

Vote for State Officials, Democratic

Primaries, 1952-1956 233

Vote for State Officials by Counties, Primary, 1960 235

Total Votes Cast, — General Election, 1956-1960 240

Vote for Governor in Democratic Primaries, 1936-1960 242

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primaries, 1960 243

Vote for Congressmen in Republican Primary, 1960 245

Vote for Congressmen in Special Election, 19 60 246

Vote for Members of Congress, 1946-1960 247

Vote for United States Senators in Primaries, 1944-1956 259

Vote for United States Senators in

General Elections, 1944-1958 260

Vote for United States Senator, Democratic Primary, 1960 261

Vote for United States Senator, General Election, 1960 263

Vote in Special Election on the Question of

Issuance of Bonds, October 27, 1959 264, 268

Vote on Prohibition. 1881, 1908, 1933 272



Contents ■ VII

PART V
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

Page

Agencies, Boards and Commissions 275

Nortii Carolina Institutions
Correctional

White 303

Negro 303

Educational

White 304

Negro 312

Mental

White 316

Negro 317

Hospitals

White 317

Confederate Woman's Home 319

Examining Boards 320

State Owned Railroads 329

PART VI
LEGISLATURE

The General Assembly

Senate

Officers 333

Senatoi-s (Arranged Alphabetically) 333

Senators (Arranged by Districts) 334

Rules 335

Standing Committees 349

Seat Assignments 355

House of Representatives

Officers 356

Members (Arranged Alphabetically) 356

Members (Arranged by Counties) 358

Enrolling and Indexing Departments 3 59

Rules 360

Standing Committees 376

Seat Assignments ■_ 391

PART VII
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Elective Executive Officials 397

Administrative Officials appointed by the Governor 408

Administrative Officials appointed by Department Heads,
Boards or Commissions (Subject to approval by

the Governor) 424

Administrative Officials appointed by Department Heads,

Boards or Commissions (With no approving authority)- 439



VTTT Xoinii Cakoi.ina Manual

Page

I'liited States Senators 450

Rei>iesentatives in Congress 453

Justices of the Supreme Court 463

.Members of the General Assembly

Senators 469

Reprt^sentatives 505

Ociupational and Professional Classification 574

PAKT Mil
OFFICIAL REGISTER

United States Government

President and Vice-President 581

Cabinet Members 581

North Carolina Senators and Representatives in Congress 581

United States Supreme Court Justices 581

United States District Court

Judges 581

Clerks 581

District Attorneys 581

Governors of the States and Territories 58 2

State Government

Legislative Department 583

Executive Department 583

Judicial Department 583

Administrative Department 584

State Institutions 586

Heads of Agencies other than State 587

County Government 588

ILLUSTRATIONS

State Capitol 16

State Flag 26

State Seal 31

State Bird 32

State Song (Words and Music) 39

Map of North Carolina 78

The American Flag 80

Map Showing Congressional Districts 134, 135

Map Showing Senatorial Districts 198, 199

Seating Diagram of Senate Chamber 354

Seating Diagram of House of Representatives 392

Pictures

Governor : 396

State Officers : — 401

Senators and Congressmen __451, 456

Justices of the Supreme Court 462

State Senators 470, 480, 492

;\Iembers of the House of Representatives

506, 514. 526, 536, 546, 554, 566, 573



PART I
HISTORICAL



THE STATE

North Carolina, often called the "Tar Heel" state, was the scene
of the first attempt to colonize America by English-speaking peo-
ple. Under a charter granted to Sir Walter Raleigh by Queen
Elizabeth, a colony was begun in the 1580's on Roanoke Island.
This settlement, however, was unsuccessful and later became known
as "The Lost Colony."

The first permanent settlement was made about 1650 by immi-
grants from Virginia. In 1663 Charles II granted to eight Lords
Proprietors a charter for the territory lying "within six and
thirty degrees of the northern latitude, and to the west as far as
the south seas, and so southerly as far as the river St. Mattias,
which bordereth upon the coast of Florida, and within one and
thirty degrees of northern latitude, and so west in a direct line as
far as the south seas aforesaid; . . ." and the colony was called
Carolina. In 1665 another charter was granted to these noble-
men. This charter extended the limits of Carolina so that the
northern line was 36 degrees and 30 minutes north latitude, and
the southern line was 29 degrees north latitude, and both of these
lines extended westward to the South Seas.

In 1669 John Locke wrote the Fundamental Constitutions as a
model for the government of Carolina. The Lords Proprietors
adopted these constitutions and directed the governor to put into
operation as much of them as was feasible. In 1670 there were
four precincts (changed to counties in 1739); Pasquotank, Per-
quimans, Chowan, and Currituck. North Carolina now has one
hundred counties.

Carolina on December 7, 1710, was divided into North Carolina
and South Carolina, and Edward Hyde, on May 12, 1712, became
the first governor of North Carolina.

In 1729 seven of the eight Lords Proprietors sold their interest
in Carolina to the Crown and North Carolina became a royal
colony. George Burrington was the first royal governor. Richard
Everard. the last proprietary governor, served until Burrington
was appointed.

North Carolina, on April 12, 1776, authorized her delegates in
the Continental Congress to vote for independence, and on Decem-
ber 18, 1776, adopted a constitution. Richard Caswell became the
fii'st governor under this constitution. On November 21. ]7Sfl. the



4 North Carolina Manual

state adopted the United States Constitution, being tlie twelfth
state to enter the Federal Union. North Carolina, in 1788, had
rejected the Constitution on the grounds that certain amendments
were vital and necessary to a free people.

A Constitutional convention was held in 1835 and among several
changes made in the Constitution was the method of electing the
governor. After this change the governor was elected by the peo-
ple for a term of two years instead of being elected by the Legis-
lature for a term of one year. Edward Bishop Dudley was the first
governor elected by the people.

North Carolina seceded from the Union May 20, 1861, and was
readmitted to the Union in July, 1868.

A new State Constitution was adopted in 1868 and since that
date the governor has been elected by the people for four-year
terms and he cannot succeed himself. There has not been a new-
constitution since 1868, but numerous amendments have been added
to it.

North Carolina has had a democratic administration since 1900,
during which period it has made its greatest progress.

North Carolina has had two permanent capitals — New Bern and
Raleigh — and there have been three capitol buildings. Tryon's
Palace in New Bern was constructed in the period, 1767-1770, and
the main building was destroyed by fire February 27, 1798. The
first capitol in Raleigh was completed in 1794 and was destroyed
by fire on June 21, 1831. The present capitol was completed in 1840.

The state in 1790 ceded her western lands, which was composed
of Washington, Davidson, Hawkins, Greene, Sullivan, Sumner, and
Tennessee counties, to the Federal government, and between 1790
and 1796 the territory was known as Tennessee Territory, but in
1796 it became the fifteenth state in the Union.

In 1738, the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act
authorizing the establishment of district courts which served as
appelant courts. These courts were authorized to be held in Bath,
New Bern, and New Town — now Wilmington. In 1746, the General
Assembly repealed the act of 1738 and established district courts
to be held at Edenton, Wilmington, and Edgecombe. From 1754
until 1790, other districts were formed as the state expanded in
territory and developed needs for these districts. By 1790, there
were eight judicial districts divided into two ridings of four dis-
tricts each. In 1806, the General Assembly passed an act estab-
lishing a superior court in each county. The act also set up judi-



The State 5

cial districts composed of certain contiguous counties, and this
practice of expanding the districts has continued from five districts
in 1806 until now there are thirty districts.

When North Carolina adopted the Federal Constitution on Novem-
ber 21, 1789, she was authorized to send two senators and five rep-
resentatives to the Congress of the United States according to the
constitutional apportionment. In 1792, when the first federal census
had been completed and tabulated, it was found that North Carolina
was entitled to ten representatives. It was then that the General
Assembly divided the state into ten congressional districts. In
1812, the state had grown and increased in population until it was
entitled to thirteen representatives in Congress. Between 1812 and
1865, however, the population decreased so much in proportion to
the population of other states of the Union that North Carolina was
by that time entitled only to seven representatives. After 1865
the population of the state showed a steady increase so that begin-
ning in 1943 North Carolina was entitled to twelve representatives
in Congress. The 1960 census showed that the state had nearly
a half million more people than in 1950, but this increase was not
nearly as much in proportion to that of some of the other states
so, therefore. North Carolina will be entitled to only eleven repre-
sentatives beginning with the 88th Congress which convenes in
1963.

Agriculture

Total realized gross agricultural income to North Carolina farmers
in 1959 amounted to $1,178 million. Although below the record
high total of $1,240 million realized in 1958, the State's agricultural
income in 1959 was second only to that for Texas among the
Southern States of the Nation.

Income from sales of crops in 1959 accounted for $671 million,
which figure was exceeded only by California, Texas and Illinois.
This accomplishment was realized despite the fact that 1959 yields
from some of the important cash crops were somewhat below pre-
vious levels.

Although income statistics are not yet available for 1960, it is
anticipated that gross agricultural income in that year exceeded
by a fairly substantial margin all previous records. For many of
the important cash crops produced in the State. 1960 was an
unusually good year. Record high per-acre yields were realized
for tobacco, corn, soybeans, and sorghum gains, while peanut yields



6 North Carolina Manual

were well above average. Of the major crops harvested in the State
during 19(j0, only cotton and small grains tailed to produce yields
up to past standards.

Record high yields of flue-cured tobacco contributed to a 19
percent increase in production during 1960 as compared with 1959.
Furthermore, prices received in 1960 averaged more than 3 cents
per pound above those received in 1959. The value of the 835
million pound crop produced in 1960, at $510.5 million, was more
than $100 million above the $407 million evaluation for the preced-
ing year.

Corn production in 1960 was at a record high level despite the
fact that acreage has been trending downward for a number of
years. This record high production resulted from a yield per acre
6 bushels above any previous record. Farmers harvested an average
of 50 bushels per acre from slightly more than 1.9 million acres,
giving a total production of approximately 97 million bushels. With
prices in 1960 about comparable with those in 1959, last year's
corn crop was worth approximately $12 million more than was the

1959 harvest.

Acreage devoted to production of soybeans continued to expand
and the record high total of 565,000 acres harvested for beans in

1960 exceeded by 110,000 acres the previous record for 1959. Yield
per acre was also kt a record high level, and the 1960 production
of soybeans was valued almost $5.2 million above that for 1959.

Last year's peanut crop, although not up to previous record high
levels, yielded substantially better than in 1959, and harvest of
311.5 million pounds was about 30 million pounds above the pre-
vious year. Value of peanuts harvested in 1960, at $34.2 million,
reflected a gain of slightly more than $4 million from the preced-
ing year.

Thanks to record high yields per acre of sorghum grains, total
production of sorghums in 1960 also exceeded all past records — the
crop being valued about a quarter million dollars above the 1959
harvest.

Last year's cotton crop yielded comparatively poorly, due to
damage from excessive moisture and insects. The harvested yield
of 288 pounds per acre was 107 pounds below that of the preceding
year. Total production amounted to only 235,000 bales, compared
with 322,000 in 1959. Although farmers realized a slightly higher
unit price for their 1960 cotton than in 1959, value of cotton and



The State 7

cottonseed produced in 1960 declined approximately $11 million
from the preceding year.

Last year's harvest of all small grains was also reduced quite
severely due primarily to much smaller acreages for harvest. Values
placed on production of wheat, oats, rye, and barley in 1960 at $23.7
million was $4.9 million below the preceding year.

Smaller quantities of hay also cost farmers about $4 million as
compared to 1959, while smaller acreages and lower prices for
potatoes and sweet potatoes resulted in values for these crops about
$2.6 million below the preceding year.

Prices received by farmers for beef animals in 1960 averaged
somewhat below 1959, but marketings were quite heavy. Pork
prices averaged slightly above the 1959 level, also, with very heavy
marketings.

Broiler production of 154,300,000 birds was the highest of record,
and prices received for broilers in 1960 exceeded those in 1959 by
a small margin. Last year's broilers were valued at $81.5 million
compared with $68.9 million in 1959.

Marketings of eggs and milk also are expected to have produced
incomes equally as large as in 1959. Although estimates of income
from livestock and livestock products in 1960 have not been com-
pleted, it is expected that the total will exceed by a fairly substantial
margin the $297 million received from these commodities in 1959.

COXSERVATIOX AND DEVELOPMENT

Notable progress continues to be made in the conservation, devel-
opment and promotion of fuller and wiser use of North Carolina's
large store of natural resources. Dividends are being realized in
all sections of the State as a result of the more profitable ultiza-
tion of these resources, particularly in the renewable forestry field
where pulp and paper products continue to mount in importance.

While progress is noted in the conservation and development and
wiser use of these resources, it is realized by those engaged in these
fields of endeavor that the greatest potential of these natural
resources remains to be reached and that continuing efforts must
be made without abatement if satisfactory results are attained.

More than 200 area and local development groups are making
valuable and lasting contributions in state-wide efforts to provide
more industrial jobs for the people of North Carolina and thus bring



8 XniMii ('Ai;oi.i.\A ^Iamai.

about a better balMiico in tho State's economy and a higher per
capita income.

During the 195S-(iO biennium investments in new and expanded
manufacturing plants in North Carolina totaled $503,876,000; 64.567
new jobs were created; and 1209,833,000 added in new payrolls.
Investments in new and expanded manufacturing establishments
during the 1956-58 biennium totaled $381,880,000; 36,140 new jobs
created, and payrolls added amount to $112,994,000.

A State long noted for its leadership in the production of textile,
tobacco, and furniture products. North Carolina is becoming re-
nowned for the many diversified goods its approximate 7,300 manu-
facturing plants produce with tlaeir more than 500.000 employees
for the markets of the nation and world.

Value of the industrial output in North Carolina in 1959 was
listed by Industrial Development and Manufacturers Record, At-
lanta, Ga., at $9,161,000,000 as compared with $7,409,000,000 in 1958.
As a further illustration of the remarkable growth of industry
and its ability to produce products having high value, it is interest-
ing to note the output value of manufactured products in the State
in 1939 was only $1,421,000,000.

Textiles, tobacco products, food, and furniture continue to lead
in output and sales volume in North Carolina, but there is a steady
increase being shown in the modern science industries now operat-
ing in the State. The emphasis being placed upon research in
electronic, metallurgical, food processing and chemical industries
is receiving national and international attention. The number of
plants for processing of the several species of seafood taken from
State-controlled waters is increasing and there is mounting interest
being shown in the State's mineral resources, especially in the
periodical searches for oil in the coastal area.

North Carolina's more than 500,000 workers in industry in the
State continue to give industrial development groups the best kind
of ammunition to use in the continuing efforts to bring more in-
dustries to North Carolina and to expand existing plants.

It is a matter of record that almost half of the total amount
announced for investment in new and expanded plants in 1960 went
for expansion of existing facilities, thus adding weight to the con-
tention that North Carolina is a place where industry grows.

The adaptability, productivity and willingness of North Carolina
workers to learn their assigned tasks and to give a day's work for



The Statk 9

a day's pay give the State the best kind of advertising directed at
industrialists seeking new site locations in a State also noted for
good government, fair and equitable tax laws, and generally good
relations between management and labor.

As an illustration of the growth of industry in North Carolina
of the value of output of the State's manufacturing plants, the fol-
lowing table is submitted:

1959 1958 1957 1939

Textiles $3,104,000,000 $2,586,000,000 $2,080,000,000 $549,700,000

Tobacco 2,321,000,000 1,957,000,000 1,843,000,000 538,400,000

Food 723,000,000 555,000,000 552,000,000 69,200,000



Online LibraryNorth Carolina. Secretary of StateNorth Carolina manual [serial] (Volume 1961) → online text (page 1 of 52)