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THE LIBRARY OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF

NORTH CAROLINA




THE COLLECTION OF
NORTH CAROLINIANA



C917.05

N87in
1963
C.4



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL

llllllllll 1111111111 lllll|llllllllMlllll|



00017482626



This book may be kept out one month unless a recall
notice is sent to you. It must be brought to the North
Carolina Collection (in Wilson Library) for renewal.



Form No. A-369



NORTH CAROLINA MANUAL

1963




Issued by

Thad Exjre

Secretary of State

Raleigh



19 6 3

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL

S M T \V T V S S .M T W T F S S .\I T W T F S S M T W T F S

1234 5 12 12 123456

(i 7 8 it 10 11 12 3 4 5 7 8 9 3 4 5 (i 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

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•'7 •>s -"t 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30

31

MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST

S M T W 1' F S S M T W T F S S .M T \V T F S S II T W T F S

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S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S 11 T W T F S S M T \V T F S

1234567 12345 12 1234567

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19 6 4

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL

S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S

1234 11234567 1234

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

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MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST

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12 123456 1234 1

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10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

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24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

31 30 31

SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER

S M T W T F >S S M T \^■ T F S S .M T W T F S S il T W T F S

12345 123 1234567 12345

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

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TO THE

1963 MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF NORTH CAROLINA



TO THK

STATE. COUNTY. CITY AND TOWN OFFICIALS



AND TO THK

PEOPLE OF THE OLD NORTH STATE
AT HOME AND ABROAD



THIS MANUAL IS RESPECTFULLY
DEDICATED




Secretary of State



^
Q

^



Printed by

OWEN G. DUNN CO.

New Bern, N. C, U. S. A.



CONTENTS

PART 1
HISTORICAL p^gt;

The State - - — 3

The State Capitol 17

The State Legislative Building 21

Chief Executives of North Carolina

Governors of Virginia ^^ 24

Executives under the Proprietors 24

Governors under the Crown 25

Governors Elected by the Legislature 25

Governors Elected by the People 27

List of Lieutenant Governors 29

The State Flag 31

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence 32

The Great Seal of North Carolina 34

The State Bird 37

The Halifax Resolution 38

Name of State and Nicknames 39

The State Motto 39

The State Colors 40

The State Flower 40

The State Song 40, 43

The State Tree 40

The State's Most Famous Toast 40

Public Holidays in North Carolina 41

Population of the State since 1675 42

The Constitution of North Carolina 45

The American's Creed 87

The American Flag

Origin 87-

Proper Display 89

Pledge to the Flag 94

The National Capitol : 95

Declaration of Independence 9S

Constitution of the United States 103

PART II

CENSUS
Eighteenth Census, 19 60

Population of State 127

Population of Counties _^ 128

Population of Cities and Towns

Incorporated places of 10,000 or more 12S

Incorporated places of 2,500 to 10,000 129

Incorporated places of 1,000 to 2,500 129

Incorporated places of less than 1,000 131

Population of United States, 1960 134

PART III

I'OI.ITK^AL

Congressional Districts 137

Judicial Districts ■ ^^^



VI North Cakoiina Manual

Pagk

Solicitorial Districts : — 139

Senatorial Districts and Apportionment of Senators 140

Apportionment of Members of the House of Representatives. 144

State Democratic Platform 145

Plan of Organization of the State 'Democratic Party 156

Committees of the Democratic Party

State Democratic Executive Committee 175

Congressional District Executive Committees 179

Judicial District Executive Committees 183

Senatorial District Executive Committees 188

State Democratic Solicitorial District

Executive Committees 191

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 196

County Vice-Chairmen 198

State Republican Platform 200

Plan of Organization of the State Republican Party 219

Committees of the Republican Party

State Republican Executive Committee 238

Congressional, Judicial, Senatorial and

Solicitorial District Committees .. 243

Chairmen and Vice-Chairmen of the County

Executive Committees 243

PART IV

ELECTION RETURNS

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1960 2"4 9

Popular Vote for President by States, 1944-1956 250

Vote for President by Counties, 1940-1960 2^52

Vote for Governor by Counties, Primaries, 1960 255, 257

Vote for Governor bv Counties,

General Elections, 1940-1960 258

Vote for State Officials,

Primaries, 1952-1960 261

Vote for State Officials bv Counties, Primary, 1960 263

Total Votes Cast — General Election, 1958-1962 268

Vote for Governor in Democratic Primaries. 1936-1960 270

Vote for State Officers by Counties,

General Election of 1962 271

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primaries, 1962 273

Vote for Congressmen in Republican Primary, 1962 274

Vote for Members of Congress, 1946-1960 275

Vote for Members of Congress.

General Election, 1962 287

Vote for United States Senators in Primaries, 1948-1960 291

Vote for United States Senators in

General Elections, 1948-1960 292

Vote for United States' Senator, Republican Primary, 1962 _ 293

Vote for United States Senator, General Election, 1962 2^94

Vote in Special Election on the Question of

Issuance of Bonds, November 7, 1961 295



Contents v 1 1



Pacjk

Vote on Constitutional Amendments by Counties, 1962 305

Vote on Prohibition, 1881, 1908, 1933 313

PART V
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES. BOARDS AND CX^MMISSIONS

Agencies, Boards and Commissions 317

North Carolina Institutions
Correctional

White 348

Negro 348

Educational

White 349

Negro 357

Mental

White 361

Negro 362

Hospitals

White 362

Confederate Woman's Home 364

Examining Boards .. 365

State Owned Railroads 373

PART VI
LEGISLATURE

The General Assembly

Senate

Officers .. 377

Senators (Arranged Alphabetically) 377

Senators (Arranged by Districts) 378

Rules 379

Standing Committees 391

Seat Assignments 405

House of Representatives

Officers 406

Members (Arranged Alphabetically) 406

Members (Arranged by Counties) 408

Enrolling and Indexing Departments 409

Rules .. 410

Standing Committees 426

Seat Assignments 442

PART VII
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Elective Executive Officials .. 447

Administrative Officials appointed by the Governor 457

Administrative Officials appointed by Department Heads,
Boards or Commissions (Subject to approval by

the Governor) 474

Administrative Officials appointed by Department Heads,

Boards or Commissions (With no approving authority) 4SS



VI 11 North Carolina Manual

Pagk

United States Senators 499

Representatives in Congress 502

Justices of the Supreme Court 511

Members of tlie General Assembly

Senators 518

Representatives .. 554

Occupational and Professional Classification 623

PART vin
OFFICIAI. REGISTEK

United States Government

President and VMce-President 631

Cabinet Members .. 631

North Carolina Senators and Representatives

in Congress 631

United States Supreme Court Justices 631

United States District Court

Judges 631

Clerks 631

District Attorneys 631

Governors of the States and Territories 632

State Government

Legislative Department 633

Executive Department .. 633

Judicial Department 633

Administrative Department 634

State Institutions 636

Heads of Agencies other than State 637

County Government .. 638

ILLUSTRATIONS

State Capitol 16

The State Legislative Building 2*0

State Flag 30

State Seal 35

State Bird 36

State Song (Words and Music) .. 43

Map of North Carolina 84

The American Flag 86

Map Showing Congressional Districts 142, 143

Organization Democratic Party of North Carolina 157

Map Showing Senatorial Districts 20 6, 20 7

Seating Diagram of Senate Chamber ' 404

Seating Diagram of House of Representatives 443

Pictures

Governor 446

State Officers 451

Senators and Congressmen .. 500, 505

Justices of the Supreme Court ' 512

State Senators .. 519. 530, 542

Members of the House of Representatives

555, 563, 576 584, 594, 603, 614. 621



PART I
HISTORICAL



THE STATE

North Carolina, often called the "Tar Heel" state, was the scene
of the first attempt to colonize America by English-speaking peo-
ple. Under a charter granted to Sir Walter Raleigh by Queen
Elizabeth, a colony was begun in the 1580's on Roanoke Island.
This settlement, however, was unsuccessful and later became known
as "The Lost Colony."

The first permanent settlement was made about 1650 by immi-
grants from Virginia. In 1663 Charles II granted to eight Lords
Proprietors a charter for the territory lying "within six and
thirty degrees of the northern latitude, and to the west as far as
the south seas, and so southerly as far as the River St. Mattias.
which bordereth upon the coast of Florida, and within one and
thirty degrees of northern latitude, and so west in a direct line as
far as the south seas aforesaid; ..." and the colony was called
Carolina. In 1665 another charter was granted to these noblemen.
This charter extended the limits of Carolina so that the northern
line was 36 degrees and 30 minutes north latitude, and the southern
line was 29 degrees north latitude, and both of these lines extended
westward to the South Seas.

In 1669 John Locke wrote the Fundamental Constitutions as a
model for the government of Carolina. The Lords Proprietors
adopted these constitutions and directed the governor to put into
operation as much of them as was feasible. In 1670 there were
four precincts (changed to counties in 1739); Pasquotank, Per-
quimans, Chowan, and Currituck. North Carolina now has one
hundred counties.

Carolina on December 7, 1710, was divided into North Carolina
and South Carolina, and Edward Hyde, on May 12, 1712. became
the first governor of North Carolina.

In 1729 seven of the eight Lords Proprietors sold their interest
in Carolina to the Crown and North Carolina became a royal
colony. George Burrington was the first royal governor. Richard
Everard, the last proprietary governor, served until Burrington
was appointed.

North Carolina, on April 12, 1776, authorized her delegates in
the Continental Congress to vote for independence, and on Decem-
ber 18, 1776, adopted a constitution. Richard Caswell became the
first governor under this constitution. On November 21, 1789. the



4 Noitrii Cai!(iii.\a Manitai.

s^tale aduplt'd the United States Constitution, being tlie twelfth
state to enter the Federal Union. North Carolina, in 1788, had
rejected the Constitution on the grounds that certain amendments
were vital and necessary to a free people.

A Constitutional convention was held in 1835 and among several
changes made in the Constitution was the method of electing the
governor. After this change the governor was elected by the peo-
ple for a term of two years instead of being elected by the Legis-
lature for a term of one year. Edward Bishop Dudley was the first
governor elected by the people.

North Carolina seceded from the Union May 20, 1861, and was
readmitted to the Union in July, 1868.

A new State Constitution was adopted in 1868 and since that
date the governor has been elected by the people for four-year
terms and he cannot succeed himself. There has not been a new
constitution since 1868, but numerous amendments have been added
to it.

North Carolina has had a democratic administration since 1900,
during which period it has made its greatest progress.

North Carolina has had two permanent capitals — New Bern and
Raleigh — and there have been three capitol buildings. Tryon's
Palace in New Bern was constructed in the period, 1767-1770, and
the main building was destroyed by fire February 27, 1798. The
first capitol in Raleigh was completed in 1794 and was destroyed
by fire on June 21, 1831. The present capitol was completed in 1840.

The state in 1790 ceded her western lands, which was composed
of Washington, Davidson, Hawkins, Greene. Sullivan. Sumner, and
Tennessee counties, to the Federal government, and between 1790
and 1796 the territory was known as Tennessee Territory, but in
1796 it became the fifteenth state in the Union.

In 1738, the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act
authorizing the establishment of district courts which served as
appelant courts. These courts were authorized to be held in Bath,
New Bern, and New Town — now Wilmington. In 1746, the General
Assembly repealed the act of 1738 and established district courts
to be held at Edenton, Wilmington, and Edgecombe. From 1754
until 1790, other districts were formed as the state expanded in
territory and developed needs for these districts. By 1790, there
were eight judicial districts divided into two ridings of four dis-
tricts each. In 1806, the General Assembly passed an act estab-
lishing a superior court in each county. The act also set up judi-



The Statk 5

cial districts composed of certain continguous counties, and tliis
practice of expanding tlie districts lias continued from five districts
in 1806 until now there are thirty districts.

When North Carolina adbpted the Federal Constitution on Novem-
ber 21, 1789, she was authorized to send two senators and five rep-
resentatives to the -Congress of the United States according to the
constitutional apportionment. In 1792, when the first federal census
had been completed and tabulated, it was found that North Carolina
was entitled to ten representatives. It was then that the General
Assembly divided the state into ten congressional districts. In
1812, the state had grown and increased in population until it was
entitled to thirteen representatives in Congress. Between 1812 and
1865, however, the population decreased so much in proportion to
the population of other states of the Union that North Carolina was
by that time entitled only to seven representatives. After 1865
the population of the state showed a steady increase so that begin-
ning in 1943 North Carolina was entitled to twelve representatives
in Congress. The 1960 census showed that the state had nearly
a half million more people than in 1950, but this increase was not
nearly as much in proportion to that of some of the other states.
North Carolina is now entitled to only eleven representatives in
Congress.

Agriculture

With its multiplicity of soil types, a wide range of temperatures,
and an abundant rainfall. North Carolina produces a wide variety
of agricultural commodities. Almost half of the Stale's total
land area of 31.4 million acres is devoted to farming. According
to the 19 59 U. S. Census, farm land and buildings in North Caro-
lina were valued at 2.8 billion dollars.

According to the 1960 U. S. Census of population. North Caro-
lina ranked first in the Nation in farm population and 11th in
total population. North Carolina ranks second to Texas in the
number of farms.

The progress made by Tar Heel farmers during recent years
has enhanced North Carolina's position as one of the leading
agricultural states of the Nation. Although acreages planted to
many of the crops have been trending downward due primarily
to smaller acreage allotments, farmers in the State are generally
producing more efficiently than in earlier years, with the result
that total agricultural income has continued to increase. Income



6 NoKi H (\\i<()i.i.\A Manual

statistics are not yet available for 1962; however, it is expected
that s''0'>'> agricultural income will exceed that in 1961 by ono
or two percent.

In 1961, the most recent year tor which complete agricultural
income statistics are available, cash receipts from farm market-
ings and government payments to North Carolina farmers totaled
$1,154,600,000. This total of almost 1.2 billion dollars is higher
than any previous year and was exceeded by only ten other
states — Texas in the South, California in the West and eight
north central states. Of the total cash receipts, $322,300,00
came from farm marketings of livestock and livestock products,
$800,300,000 came from marketings of all crops and $3 2,012,000
came from government payments. North Carolina ranked 19th
in total cash receipts from livestock and livestock products and
ranked fourth in total cash receipts from crops — exceeded only by
California, Texas and Illinois.

All tobacco accounted for $556.3 million, or 49.6 percent, of
the total cash receipts from farm marketings of all commodities.
Marketings of poultry and eggs totaled $166.5 million, meat ani-
mals $85.0 million, dairy products $69.0 million, peanuts and soy-
beans $65.5 million, cotton and cottonseed $52.2 million and
feed crops $42.3 million.

The highest cash receipts from 1961 marketings of major
field crops, in the order named, came from tobacco, cotton, corn,
peanuts, soybeans, wheat, and potatoes. The highest cash re-
ceipts from marketings of livestock and livestock products, in the
order named, came from commercial broilers, milk, eggs, hogs,
cattle and calves, and turkeys.

The downward trend in the total harvested acreage of major
crops continued into 1961. The harvested acreage of major crops in
1961 totaled 4.8 million acres — 4.6 percent below 1960 and 15.1
percent below the 1951-60 average. Corn for grain acreage de-
clined from 1.750,000 acres in 1960 to 1,383,000 acres in 1961.
The acreage in sorghum grain declined from 8 4,000 acres in 19 60
to 55,000 acres in 1961. The reduction in the acreage of both corn
and sorghum grain was due to participation in the Feed Grain
Program. The 1961 harvested acreage of potatoes, sweet-potatoes
and commercial vegetables was also below 19 60. Other major
crops such as wheat, oats, cotton, tobacco, lespedeza for seed,
soybeans and all hay showed a combined increase in 1961 over



The State 7

196 u of 144,400 acres — less than half of the decline in the acreage
of corn for grain.

Record high per acre yields were realized in 1961 for small
grains — wheat, oats, barley and rye. The average yield of flue-
cured tobacco was slightly below 1960; however, an increase of
5,5 00 acres harvested along with higher prices pushed the value
of the 1961 Tar Heel flue-cured crop to $541.5 million — about
$29 million above 1960. An increase in the per acre yield of cotton
from 284 pounds in 1960 to 337 pounds in 19 61 combined with a
higher average price raised the value of the 19 61 cotton crop to
about $12.5 million above 1960. The value of the 1961 Tar Heel
soybean crop totaled $29.5 million as compared with $24.6
million in 1960.

The contribution of Tar Heel farmers to the total economy of
the State is not limited to the production of food and fiber alone.
Tar Heel farmers spent more than a half billion dollars for items
such as feed, seed, fertilizer, petroleum fuel and oil and other
miscellaneous items in the operation of their farms during 1961.
In addition, many thousands of people are employed by industries
processing the raw products and by industries manufacturing
goods primarily for use on farms. Regardless of the measurement
used, we reach the inevitable conclusion that agriculture in North
Carolina is "big business."

Conservation and Development

North Carolina's national leadership in the textile, tobacco
and furniture industries was enhanced during the biennium by
the addition of more than 1,000 new and expanded plants in
these and other industries. Capital investments by North Carolina
firms adding to their facilities and by new enterprise entering our
state from outside was $498 million. New payrolls totaled $212
million for 64,000 workers.

The trend toward industrial diversification was accentuated
under the leadership of the Department of Consei'vation and De-
velopment which worked in close cooperation with more than
200 local and area development organizations and state and fede-
ral agencies.

The following table compiled for 19 61 by The Hecord of Soiitli-
crn Progress reveals not only the increasing diversity of North
Carolina's industrial production, but the rapid growth of the food



8 Ndurii Carolina Manual

processing business. Value of our iiianufaetured goods in this
year — over $9 billion — represcMits an increase of 655% over
193 7 when the Division of Commerce and Industry was established
as a unit of the Department of Conservation and Development.

Industry No. Plants %

1. Textiles 1,097 14.7

2. Tobacco Products 63 0.8

3. Food Products 938 12.5

4. Furniture 475 6.3

5. Paper Products 72 1.0

I). Cliemicals 205 2.7

7. Apparel 252 3.4

8. Electrical Machinery 60 0.8

9. Lumber 2,510 33.5

10. Machinery 372 5

11. Stone, Clay, Glass 317 4.1

12. Primary Metals 53 0.9

13. Fabricated Metals 235 3.1

14. Printing-Publishing 550 7.3

15. Transportation Equip 93 1.2

16. Rubber-Plastics 25 0..".

17. Miscellaneous Mfg 129 1.7

18. Leather Products 36 0.5

19. Petroleum Products 16 —

20. Instruments 10 —

ALL .MANUFACTURING 7,508

Emphasis on food processing that was a feature of the 1960-62
biennium is continuing with increased force into the future. This
industry, benefitting from research programs at N. C. State College
and private laboratories, is adding greater value to our agri-
cultural product through processing, and also providing em-
ployment for workers freed by ever-increasing mechanization of
farming.

In this biennium, records of the Department of Conservation
and Development show that more than 3 4,0 00 persons were em-
ployed in 938 food processing plants whose output was valued
at approximately a billion dollars. Meat, sweet potatoes, beans,
peaches, white potatoes and seafood are principal products. Re-
search is going forward with tomatoes and seafood.

The commercial fishing industry, important during the last
biennium to the extent that the value of its catch exceeded $15
millions and that more than 6,000 commercial fishing boats were



Workers


%


Output Sold


%


220,900


42.0


.$2,725,000,000


29.8


48,800


9.3


2,501,000,000


27.4


34,200


6.5


860,000,000


9.4


45,500


8.7


480,000,000


5.3


13,300


2.5


422,000,000


4.6


13,500


2.6


373,000,000


4.1


35,200


6.8


356,000,000


3.9


24,400


4.7


324,000,000


3.5


34,300


6.5


282,000,000


3.1


11,200


2.1


155,000.000


1.7


10,100


1.9


139,000,000


1.5


2,200


0.4


119,000,000


1.3


8,700


1.8


118,000,000


1.3


10,100


1.9


116,000,000


1.3


4,800


0.9


69,000,000


0.8


2,400


0.5


48,000,000


0.5


2,200


0.4


23,000,000


0.3


1,000


0.2


21,000,000


0.2


300


0.1


9,000,000





800


0.2


7,000,000





523,900


$9,147,000,000





The State 9

engaged in it, has barely scratched the surface. Research aimed
both at increasing production of fin and shellfish and in processing
and marketing the catch is laying the foundation for greatly ex-
panded production in years ahead.

North Carolina's employable work force of nearly 525,000 in



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