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THE LIBRARY OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF

NORTH CAROLINA




THE COLLECTION OF
NORTH CAROLINIANA



C917.0£

1967
c.3



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL



00017482662



This book is due on the last date stamped
below unless recalled sooner. It may be
renewed only once and must be brought to
the North Carolina Collection for renewal.



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MAft-> £. ]Qp



'69



NORTH CAROLINA
MANUAL

1967



NORTH CAROLINA MANUAL

1967




Issued by

Tiiad Eure

Secretary of State

Raleigh



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TO THE

1967 MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

OF NORTH CAROLINA

TO THE
STATE, COUNTY, CITY AND TOWN OFFICIALS

AND TO THE

PEOPLE OF THE OLD NORTH STATE

AT HOME AND ABROAD

THIS MANUAL IS RESPECTFULLY
DEDICATED




Secretary of Stati



CONTENTS

PART I
HISTORICAL Page

The State 3

The State Capitol 21

The State Legislative Building 25

Chief Executives of North Carolina

Governors of Virginia 28

Executives under the Proprietors 28

Governors under the Crown ; 29

Governors Elected by the Legislature _ 29

Governors Elected by the People 31

List of Lieutenant Governors 33

The State Flag _ 35

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence 36

The Great Seal of North Carolina 38

The State Bird 1 1

The Halifax Resolution . 4 2

Name of State and Nicknames _ 4 3

The State Motto 13

The State Colors 4 4

The State Flower - 4 4

The State Shell __ 44
The State Song ___ _44, 4 7

The State Tree . 44

The State's Most Famous Toast _ 4 4

Public Holidays in North Carolina 45

Population of the State since 1675 .. 46

The Constitution of North Carolina 49

The American's Creed 91
The American Flag

Origin 91

Proper Display 93

Pledge to the Flag . 98
The National Capitol - 99

Declaration of Independence 102

Constitution of the United States 107

PART II
CENSUS
Eighteenth Census. 1960

Population of State 133

Population of Counties 134

Population of Cities and Towns

Incorporated places of 10,000 or more . 134

Incorporated places of 2,500 to 10,000 _ 135

Incorporated places of 1,000 to 2,500

Incorporated places of less than 1.000 -

Population of United States, 1960 140

PART m
POLITICAL

Congressional Districts

Judicial Districts (Superior and District Courts)

Solicitorial Districts

Senatorial Districts and Apportionment of Senator- 1 46



VI N'okth Carolina Manual

Page
Representativi Districts and Apportionment of Members

of the House of Representatives . 150
State Democratic Platform 153
Plan of Organization of the State Democratic Party . 169
Committees of the Democratic Party-
State Democratic Executive Committee . 189
Congressional District Executive Committees _ 193
Judicial District Executive Committees . 197
State Democratic Solicitorial District

Executive Committees 202

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees _ 207

County Vice Chairmen 209

siatc Republican Platform 211

Plan of Organization of the State Republican Party 234

Committees of the Republican Party

State Republican Executive Committee 253

Congressional, Judicial, Senatorial and

Solicitorial District Committees 257

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees . 257

County of Vice Chairmen 259

PART IV
ELECTION RETURNS

Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1964 263

Popular Vote for President by States, 1948-1960 _ 264

Vote for President by Counties, 1944-1964 266

Vote for Governor by Counties, Primaries, 1964 . _269. 271

Vote for Governor by Counties,



General Elections. 1944-1964 9



z I z



9



Vote for State Officials,

Primaries, 1952-1960 275
Vote for Lieutenant Governor by

Counties, Primaries, 1964 . 277, 279

v "" for State Officials by Counties, Primaries, 1964 28 o', 282

Total Votes Cast — General Election, 1960-1964 _ 284

Vote for Governor in Primaries, 1940-1964 286

Vote for state Officers by Counties,

General Election of 1964 287. 29a

General Election of 1966 ' 292

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primaries, 1966 . 295

Vote for Congressmen in Republican Primaries, 1966 _ 296

Vote for Congressmen, Second Primary, June 25, 1966 297
Vote for Congressmen, Special Primary, First District

December 18, 1965 . 298
Vote for Congressmen, Special Election, First

District, February 5, 1966 299

Vote for Members of Congress, 1948-1960 _ 300
Vote for Members of Congress,

General Elections. 1962-1964 312

aeral Elections. 1966 31^

Vote for Inited States Senators in Primaries, 1950-1962 322
Vote for United States Senators in

Genera] Elections. 1950-1962 300



Contents VII

I'.U.I

Vote for United States Senator, Democratic

Primary, 1966 324

Vote for United States Senator, General

Elections, 1966 3 25

Vote in Special Election on Question of issuance of

State of North Carolina Highway Bonds,

November 2, 1965 326

Vote on Constitutional Amendment by Counties,

November 2, 1965 3 2s

Vote on Prohibition, 1881, 1908, 1933 329

PART V
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

Agencies, Boards and Commissions 333
North Carolina Institutions

Correctional __ 375

Educational 376

Mental 390

Centers for the Retarded . 391

Alcoholic Rehabilitation Centers 391

Hospitals 392

Confederate Woman's Home 394

Examining Boards 395

State Owned Railroads 404

PART VI
LEGISLATURE

Tbe General Assembly
Senate

Officers 40 9

Senators (Arranged Alphabetically) 409

Senators (Arranged by Districts) . 410

Rules 411

Standing Committees . 4 28

Seat Assignments 4 40

House of Representatives

Officers 441

Members (Arranged Alphabetically) 4 41

Members (Arranged by Districts) . 443

Enrolling and Indexing Departments . 444

Rules 445

Standing Committees __ 46 2

Seat Assignments t~ : '

PART VII
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Elective Executive Officials n I s 1

Administrative Officials appointed by the Governor _ 4 9 2
Administrative Officials appointed by Department Heads,
Boards or Commissions (Subject to approval by

the Governor) 508

Administrative Officials appointed by Department Heads,

Boards or Commissions (With no approving authority) 520

United States Senators 533



V 1 1 I XoH'i ii C \i;"i.i\ \ M \M".\i.

Page

[Representatives in Congress 536

Justices of the Supreme Court 546

Members of the General Assembly

Senators 553

Represental ives - 58 S

Occupational and Professional Classification '17 1

PART \ III
OFFICIAL REGISTER

! uited States < rovernment

Presideni and Vice President 679

Cabinel Members 679
North Carolina Senators and Representatives

in Congress 679

! nited States Supreme Court Justices 679

United stales District Court

Judges - 679

Clerks 679

District Attorneys 679
United States Circuit Court of Appeals

Judge Fourth District 679

Governors of the States and Territories 680
State < lovernmenl

Legislative Department 681

Executive Department 681

Judicial Department 681

Administrative Department 683

State Institutions 684

Heads of Agencies other than State 686

County Government 687

ILLUSTRATIONS

State Capitol 20

The state Legislative Building 24

Slate Flag 34

siate Seal 39

state Bird 40

Slate Song i Words and Music) 47

Map of North Carolina 89

The American Flag 90

Map Showing Congressional Districts 148. 149

Organization Democratic Party of North Carolina . 170

Map Showing Senatorial Districts _ 158, 159

Vlap Showing Representative Districts . _21S. 219

Seating Diagram of Senate Chamber 439

Seating Diagram of House of Representatives _ 476

Pictures

Governor 480

Stale Officers 4S5

Senators and Congressmen 535. 541

Justices of the Supreme Court 549

State Senators 557. 567. 577

Members of the House of Representatives

591, 600. 613. 625. 637. 649. 663



PART I
HISTORICAL



THE STATE

North Carolina, often called the "Tar Heel" state, was the scene
of the first attempt to colonize America by English-speaking peo-
ple. Under a charter granted to Sir Walter Raleigh by Queen
Elizabeth, a colony was begun in the 1580's on Roanoke Island.
This settlement, however, was unsuccessful and later became
known as "The Lost Colony."

The first permanent settlement was made about 1650 by immi-
grants from Virginia. In 16 63 Charles II granted to eight Lords
Proprietors a charter for the territory lying "within six and
thirty degrees of the northern latitude, and to the west as far as
the south seas, and so southerly as far as the River St. Mattias.
which bordereth upon the coast of Florida, and within one and
thirty degrees of northern latitude, and so west in a direct line as
tar as the south seas aforesaid; ..." and the colony was called
Carolina. In 1665 another charter was granted to these noblemen.
This charter extended the limits of Carolina so that the northern
line was 36 degrees and 30 minutes north latitude, and the south-
ern line was 2 9 degrees north latitude, and both of these lines ex-
tended westward to the South Seas.

In 1669 John Locke wrote the Fundamental Constitutions as a
model for the government of Carolina. The Lords Proprietors
adopted these constitutions and directed the governor to put into
operation as much of them as was feasible. In 16 70 there were
four precincts (changed to counties in 1739): Pasquotank. Per-
quimans, Chowan, and Currituck. North Carolina now has one
hundred counties.

Carolina on December 7. 1710, was divided into North Carolina
and South Carolina, and Edward Hyde, on May 9. 1712. became
the first governor of North Carolina.

In 17 29 seven of the eight Lords Proprietors sold their interest
in Carolina to the Crown and North Carolina became a royal
colony. George Burrington was the first royal governor. Richard
Everard, the last proprietary governor, served until Burrington
was appointed.

North Carolina, on April 12, 1776, authorized her delegates in
the Continental Congress to vote for independence, and on Decem-
ber 18. 1776, adopted a constitution. Richard Caswell became the



Nonru Carolina .Manual

first governor under this constitution. On November 21, 1789, the
state adopted the United States Constitution, being the twelfth
-tat. in enter the Federal Union. North Carolina, in 1788, had
rejected the Constitution on the grounds that certain amendments
were vital and necessary to a free people.

\ Constitutional convention was held in 1835 and among several
changes made in the Constitution was the method of electing the
governor. After this change the governor was elected by the peo-
pl< for a term of two years instead of being elected by the Legis-
lature for a term of one year. Edward Bishop Dudley was the first
governor elected by the people.

North Carolina seceded from the Union May 20, 1861. and was
readmitted to the Union in July, 1S6S.

A new state Constitution was adopted in 1868 and since that

date the governor has been elected by the people for four-year

terms and he cannot succeed himself. There has not been a new

constitution since 1868, but numerous amendments have been

dded to it.

North Carolina has had a democratic administration since 1900,
during which period it has made its greatest progress.

North Carolina has had two permanent capitals — New Bern and
Raleigh — and there have been three capitol buildings. Tryon's
Palace in New Bern was constructed in the period, 1767-1770, and
'he main building was destroyed by fire February 27, 1798. The
first capitol in Raleigh was completed in 1794 and was destroyed
by tire on June 21. 1831. The present capitol was completed in
1 8 10

The Man in 17 90 ceded her western lands, which was composed
of Washington. Davidson, Hawkins. Greene. Sullivan, Sumner, and
Team ssi . .(unities, to the Federal government, and between 1790
and 1796 the territory was known as Tennessee Territory, but in
1796 it In came the fifteenth state in the Union.

In 1738, the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act
authorizing the establishment of district courts which served as
ppelant courts. These courts were authorized to be held in Bath.
New Bern, and New- Town — now Wilmington. In 1746, the General
Assembly repealed the act of 1738 and established district courts
to l«e held at Edenton. Wilmington, and Edgecombe. From 17f>4



The State 5

until 17 90. other districts were formed as the state expanded in
territory and developed needs for these districts. By 1790, there
were eight judicial districts divided into two ridings of four dis-
tricts each. In 180 6, the General Assembly passed an act estab-
lishing a superior court in each county. The act also set up judi-
cial districts composed of certain contiguous counties, and this
practice of expanding the districts has continued from five dis-
tricts in 1806 until now there are thirty districts.

When North Carolina adopted the Federal Constitution on No
vember 21, 1789, she was authorized to send two senators and five
representatives to the Congress of the United States according to
the constitutional apportionment. In 1792, when the first federal
census had been completed and tabulated, it was found that North
Carolina was entitled to ten representatives. It was then that the
General Assembly divided the state into ten congressional dis-
tricts. In 1812, the state had grown and increased in population
until it was entitled to thirteen representatives in Congress. Be-
tween 1812 and 1865, however, the population decreased so much
in proportion to the population of other states of the Union that
North Carolina was by that time entitled only to seven repre-
sentatives. After 18 65 the population of the state showed a steady
increase so that beginning in 194 3 North Carolina was entitled
to twelve representatives in Congress. The 1960 census showed
that the state had nearly a half million more people than in 1950,
but this increase was not nearly as much in proportion to that of
some of the other states. North Carolina is now entitled to only
eleven representatives in Congress.

Agriculture

Following several successive years of mounting surpluses of
tobacco in storage, production of flue-cured tobacco came under
the acreage-poundage program for the first time in 1965. Com-
pliance by North Carolina farmers with the terms of this pro-
gram coupled with unfavorable climatic conditions resulted in ;i
1965 reduction from the previous year of 259 million pounds of
flue-cured leaf. Climatic conditions in 1966 were also not favor-
able for optimum yields of tobacco, and marketings were only
(54 million pounds above the 1965 level. Since tobacco is, by



'I XoKTlI (' VROLINA M-VNUAT.

far, i In largest individual agricultural commodity produced in
the State, the loss of poundage was bound to have had its impact
upon ih" agricultural economy of North Carolina.

The loss in quantities sold was offset to some degree by higher
unit prices. Nevertheless, the $455 million value placed on all
tobacco in 1965 was short of the 1964 value by $107 million.
i'.m Heel farmers recovered about $59 million of this loss in their
L966 marketings, but returns from sales of flue-cured tobacco
during the two-year span were $155 million below income at the
196 1 level.

The 1965 corn crop in North Carolina produced an average
yield of 70 bushels per acre to exceed the previous record by 11
bushels per acre. Due to severe drought in June and July, the
yield of the 1966 crop declined to 45 bushels per acre - the
smallest yield since 1959. Production of 61 million bushels of
com for grain in 1966 was only about two-thirds as large as
the 1965 production. Despite higher unit prices in 1966. the
value of the corn crop declined $24 million in 1966.

Climatic conditions were also unfavorable for production of
niton, both in 1965 and 1966. Furthermore, a substantial
proportion of the 1966 acreage was lost through freezing temper-
atures in the spring. Production of 93,000 bales of cotton in
1966 was only about two-fifths as large as the comparatively short
l 965 crop.

On the brighter side is the continuing increase in production
of soybeans and peanuts. The 1966 production for each of these
crops exceeded the previous records established in 1965 by sub-
stantial margins. Also, higher prices received for many of the
agricultural commodities contributed to an increase of $26 mil-
lion over 1965 in the value of all crops harvested in 1966.

Production of livestock and livestock products continue to gain
in their contribution to the agricultural income of the State. The
total of $410 million realized from sale of these commodities in
1965 exceeded 1964 by $41 million. Although the 1966 figures
are not yet available, there is every reason to anticipate an addi-
tional increase of some $50 million.

('ash receipts from marketings of all agricultural commodities
in 1965 amounted to $1,190 million, falling $4S million below



The State 7

the record of $1,238 million realized in 1964. With a slight in-
crease expected in receipts from sale of cultivated crops in 1966
and a substantial increase in receipts from sales of livestock and
livestock products, total receipts from agricultural marketings
in 1966 should establish a new record.

The value of agriculture to the State's economy cannot be too
strongly emphasized. In addition to one and one-quarter billion
dollars annual farm income, consideration must be given to the
value added to agricultural commodities through processing,
packaging, and merchandizing. North Carolina farmers spend
more than one-half billion dollars annually for feed, seed, fert-
ilizer, petroleum fuel and oil. and other items essential to agri-
cultural operations.

Conservation and Development

North Carolina moved forward by leaps and bounds during
1965 and 1966, setting the pace for the New South, and press-
ing forward with Governor Dan Moore's program for Total De-
velopment of our State's resources to the best advantage of its
citizens.

Once again, all existing records were shattered in capital in-
vestments announced for new and expanded manufacturing facil-
ities. North Carolina's thriving travel industry set another in-
come record in 19 65, and final 1966 figures are expected to be
even higher. Our State Parks enjoyed new records in attendance
and use by the public. Products manufactured from North Caro-
lina's vast forest resources continued to yield more than $1 bil-
lion annually.

Expansion and development of the technical programs of the
Divisions of Mineral Resources and Geodetic Survey resulted in
more knowledge of our State's resouces, and assistance to many
facet? of the industrial community.

Research and development of North Carolina's valuable ma-
rine and estuarine resources under the supervision of the Division
of Commercial and Sports Fisheries moved ahead at a fast pace,
highlighted by the beginning of construction on a specially-de-
signed research ship named in honor of Governor xMoore.



S North Carolina Manual

The orderly growth and expansion of many of our State's
communities was assured during the past two years, due to
assistance provided by the Division of Community Planning. For
the first time, a training program was established aimed at filling
the critical need for experienced community planning experts in
North Carolina.

In 1965, $482,430,000 was earmarked for the construction of
It',.", new plants and the expansion of 373 existing facilities. The
Qi w and expanded plants created 37,000 new jobs, a record total
for recent years, and additions to industrial payrolls of $136,-
951,000, another all-time high.

Capital investments in new and expanded manufacturing plants
in L965 were 21 percent over the previous high of $398,983,000
recorded in 1964. New jobs created rose 28 percent over the 1964
total and the gain in industrial payrolls in 1965 increased 30
percent over 1964 figures.

Capital investment in new and expanded manufacturing plants
in L966 set an all-time high at $613,581,000, breaking the half-
billion dollar mark for the first time in history. This record-
breaking total created 37,455 new jobs for our State's citizens,
and added another all-time high of $141,812,000 to industrial
payrolls.

The 1966 capital investment registered an increase of 27.2
pi i cent over 1965 figures.

A breakdown of the 19 65 total shows textiles led all indus-
trial classifications in numbers of new projects. 146; in new and
expanded investment, $176,012,000; in employees added, 13,600;
and in payroll additions, $49,063,000.

Total investments in new and expanded chemical projects in
L965 totalled $85,909,000. Rubber and plastics registered a
L965 total capital investment for new and expanded facilities
of $27,917,000.

In 1966, textiles held its lead in total capital investment with
.$216,252,000 for new and expanded facilities, addition of $34,-
2oi', iMHi i n industrial payrolls, and the creation of 9,083 new jobs.

The Apparel Industry also registered significant gains in 1966.
Capital investments in new and expanded apparel plants totalled



The State 9

$18,351,000, with added payrolls of $27,567,000 and the creation
of 8,908 new jobs.

In total capital investments for new industries alone, chemicals
and allied products registered the biggest gain with $105,910,000.
The total investment for new and expanded manufacturing facil-
ities in the chemicals and allied products classification totalled
$126,276,000. Added payrolls totalled $7,150,000 and a total
of 1,24 9 new jobs were created.

These new and expanded manufacturing facilities during 19 65
and 19 66 were the direct result of unprecedented cooperation
and teamwork at the local, State and Federal levels. The De-
partment of Conservation and Development continued to work
closely with North Carolina's industrial development organiza-
tions, chambers of commerce, banks, railroads, utility companies,
trucking industry and many other groups to strengthen and



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