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to their jurisdiction.

2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appro-
priate legislation.

(Proposed by the Thirty-eighth Congress on the 1st of February,
1865, declared ratified by the Secretary of State, December 18,
1865. It was rejected by Delaware and Kentucky; was condi-
tionally ratified by Alabama and Mississippi; and Texas took no
action/i

Article XIV

1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and
subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States
and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or en-
force any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of
citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any per-
son of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor
deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of
the laws.

2. Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States
according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number
of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when
the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for
President and Vice President of the United States, Representatives
in Congress, the executive and judicial officers of a State, or the
members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male
inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citi-
zens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for
participation in rebellion or other crime, the basis of representa-
tion therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number
of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citi-
zens twenty-one years of age in such State.

3. No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress,
or elector of President and Vice President, or hold any office, civil
or military, under the United States, or under any State, who,
having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as
an officer of the United States, or as a member of any State Legis-
lature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support
the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insur-



I 2 I Nortij Carolina Manual

rection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to
the enemies thereof. But Congress may, by a vote of two-thirds of
each House, remove such disability.

4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, author-
ized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and
bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall
not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State
shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of in-
surrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for
the loss of emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obliga-
tions, and claims shall be held illegal and void.

5. The Congress shall have power to enforce by appropriate
legislation the provisions of this article.

(The Reconstruction Amendment, by the Thirty-ninth Congress
on the 16th day of June, 1S66, was declared ratified by the Secre-
tary of State, July 28, 1868. The amendment got the support of 23
Northern States; it was rejected by Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland,
and 10 Southern States. California took no action. Later it was
ratified by the 10 Southern States.)

Article XV

1. The right of the citizens of the United States to vote shall
not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on
account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by
appropriate legislation.

(Proposed by the Fortieth Congress the 27th of February, 1S69,
and was declared ratified by the Secretary of State, March 30, 1870.
It was not acted on by Tennessee; it was rejected by California,
Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland and Oregon; ratified by the remaining
30 States. New York rescinded its ratification January 5, 1870.
New Jersey rejected it in 1870, but ratified it in 1871.)

Article XVI
The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on in-
comes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among
the several States, and without regard to any census or enumera-
tion.

(Proposed by the Sixty-first Congress, July 12, 1909, and declared
ratified February 25, 1913. The income tax amendment was ratified



Constitution oe the United States L25

by all the States except Connecticut, Florida, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, Utah, and Virginia.)

Article XVII

1. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two
Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six
years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each
State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most
numerous branch of the State Legislatures.

2. When vacancies happen in the representation of any State
in the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue
writs of election to fill such vacancies; Provided, That the Legis-
lature of any State may empower the Executive thereof to make
temporary appointments until the people fill the vacancies by
election as the Legislature may direct.

3. This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the
election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as
part of the Constitution.

(Proposed by the Sixty-second Congress on the 16th day of May,
1912, and declared ratified May 31, 1913. Adopted by all the States
except Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana,
Maryland, Mississippi, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah and
Virginia.)

Article XVIII

1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manu-
facture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the
importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United
States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for bev-
erage purposes is hereby prohibited.

2. The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent
power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been
ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the Legislatures
of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven
years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the
Congress.

(Proposed by the Sixty-fifth Congress, December 18, 1917, and
ratified by 36 States; was declared in effect on January 16, 1920.)



North (' vkom \ a M \ \ r ai



Article XIX



1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not
be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on
account of sex.

2. Congress shall have power, by appropriate legislation. t<-
enforce the provisions of this article.

( Proposed by the Sixty-fifth Congress. On August 26, 1920, it was
proclaimed in effect, having been ratified (June 19, 1919— August
18, 1920) by three-quarters of the States. The Tennessee House.
August 31st. rescinded its ratification, 47 to 24.)

Article XX

1. The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at
noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and
Representatives at noon on the 3rd day of January of the years
in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been
ratified: and the terms of their successors shall then begin.

2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and
such meeting shall begin at noon on the 3rd day of January, un-
less they shall by law appoint a different day.

3. If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the
President, the President elect shall have died, the Vice President
elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been
chosen before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if
the President elect shall have failed to qualify, then the Vice
President elect shall act as President until a President shall have
qualified; and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein
neither a President elect nor a Vice President elect shall have quali-
fied, declaring who shall then act as President, or the manner in
which one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall acl
accordingly, until a President or Vice President shall have qualified.

4. The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death
of any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives
may choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have
devolved upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the
persons from whom the Senate may choose a Vice President when
the right of choice shall have devolved upon them.



Constitution of the United States 12,

5. Sections 1 aud 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of October
following the ratification of this article.

6. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been
ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures
of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the
date of its submission.

(Proposed by the 72nd Congress, First Session. On February 6,
1933. it was proclaimed in effect, having been ratified by thirty-nine

states. I

Article XXI

1. The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution ol
the United States is hereby repealed.

2. The transportation or importation into any State, Territory,
or possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of
intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby
prohibited

3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been
ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by convention in the
several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years
from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.

(Proposed by the 72nd Congress, Second Session. Proclaimed
in effect on December 5, 1933, having been ratified by thirty-six
States. By proclamation of the same date, the President proclaim-
ed that the eighteenth amendment to the Constitution was repealed
on December 5. 1 933. )

Article XXII
1. No person shall be elected to the office of the President more
than twice, and no person who has held the office of President,
or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which
some other person was elected President shall be elected to the
office of the President more than once. But this article shall not
apply to any person holding the office of President when this
article was proposed by the Congress, and shall not prevent any
person who may be holding the office of President, or acting as
President, during the term within which this article becomes op-
erative from holding the office of President or acting as President
during the remainder of such term.



128 \oim 11 (' \i;oi i \ \ M \ \i \i

2. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been
ratified as an amendment to the constitution by the legislatures
of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the
date of its submission to the States by the congress.

(Proposed by the 80th Congress in 1947 and became effective on
Feb. 26, 1951, having been ratified by thirty-six States.)

Article XXIII

1. The District constituting the seat of Government of the United
States shall appoint in such manner as the Congress may direct:

A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to
the whole number of Senators and Representatives in Congress to
which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but in no
event more than the least populous State; they shall be in addition
to those appointed by the States, but they shall be considered, for
the purposes of the election of President and Vice President, to be
electors appointed by a State; and they shall meet in the District
and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article of
amendment.

2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by
appropriate legislation.

(Proposed by the 86th Congress in June of 1960 and ratified by
the 38th State, March 29, 1961 and proclaimed a part of the Con-
stitution, April 3, 1961.)

Article XXIV

1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any
primary or other election for President or Vice President, for
electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Repre-
sentative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the
United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll tax
or other tax.

2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by
appropriate legislation.

(Proposed by the 87th Congress, August 27, 1962 and ratified by
the 38th State, January 23, 1964.)

Article XXV
1. In case of the removal of the President from office or of
his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become Presi-
dent.



Constitution of the United States L29

1. Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice Presi-
dent, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall
take office upon confirmation hy a majority vote of hoth Houses
of Congress.

3. Whenever the President transmits to the Presidenl pro
tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Repre-
sentatives his written declaration that he is unable to discharge
the powers and duties of his office, and until he transmits to them
a written declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties
shall be discharged by the Vice President as Acting President.

4. Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the
principal officers of the executive departments or of such other
body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President
pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Repre-
sentatives their written declaration that the President is unable
to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President
shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as
Acting President.

Thereafter, when the President transmits to the President pro
tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Repre-
sentatives his written declaration that no inability exists, he shall
resume the powers and duties of his office unless the Vice Presi-
dent and a majority of either the principal officers of the execu-
tive department or of such other body as Congress may by law
provide, transmit within four days to the President pro tempore
of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives
their written declaration that the President is unable to dis-
charge the powers and duties of his office. Thereupon Congress
shall decide the issue, assembling within forty-eight hours for
that purpose if not in session. If the Congress, within twenty-
one days after receipt of the latter written declaration, or, it
Congress is not in session, within twenty-one days after Congress
is required to assemble, determines by two-thirds vote of both
Houses that the President is unable to discharge the powers and
duties of his office, the Vice President shall continue to dis-
charge the same as Acting President; otherwise, the President
shall resume the powers and duties of his office.

(Submitted to the Legislatures of the fifty States July 6. L965.
Ratified bv the 38th State (Nevada) February 10 f 1967.1



PART II
CENSUS



POPULATION OF THE STATE OF
NORTH CAROLINA

Eighteenth Census of the United States: 1960

The population of North Carolina's urban places continued to
grow faster than that of the rural areas between 1950 and 1960,
according to the eighteenth decennial census, issued by Robert W.
Burgess, Director of the Bureau of the Census, Department of
Commerce.

Final figures show that the urban population increased from
1,368,101 in 1950 to 1,801,921 in 1960, or 31.6 per cent, while the
rural population increased from 2,693,828 in 1950 to 2,754,234 in
1960 or an increase of only 2.2 per cent. The final count of the
Eighteenth Census for the State on April 1, 1960, was 4,556,155
compared to 4,061,929 in 1950, or an increase of 12.2 per cent.
Urban residents accounted for 39.5 per cent of the State's popula-
tion in 1960 as compared with 33.7 per cent in 1950. Rural areas
in 1960 accounted for 60.5 per cent of the total population. The
Census Bureau considers as urban areas the incorporated places of
2,500 or more, or unincorporated places of 2,500 or more located
outside urbanized areas. The remaining territory is classified as
rural.

There were 35 incorporated places of 10,000 or more in 1960.
Five of these (Chapel Hill, Jacksonville, Lenoir, Lumberton and
Roanoke Rapids) reached that size since 1950. Charlotte remains
the State's largest city with a population of 201,564, followed in
order by Greensboro with 119,574 and Winston-Salem with 111,135.

According to final figures of the 1960 census 63 of the counties
gained in population. Onslow County showed the greatest gain
with an increase of 96.7 per cent. Cumberland County placed
second with an increase of 54.6 per cent, while Mecklenburg was
third with a 3 8.1 per cent gain.

The first census of North Carolina was taken in 1790, returning
a population of 393,751. The population has shown an increase
at every census since that time. The population passed 1,000,000
between 1860 and 1870, 2,000,000 between 1900 and 1910, 3,000,-
000 between 1920 and 1930, 4,000,000 between 1940 and 1950,
and 4,500,000 between 1950 and 1960. The present population
represents a density of 8 6.4 inhabitants per square mile. North
Carolina's total area in square miles is 52,712. Land area is
49,142 square miles; water area is 3.57(1 square miles.

Table 1 presents the figures for counties and for incorporated
places of 10,000 or more, and Table 2 for incorporated places of
less than 10.000. 133



m



Xmh mi ( ' \i;ui i \ \ M \ \ i \ i



TABLE 1. POPULATION OF COUNTIES AND OF INCORPO-
RATED PLACES OF 10,000 OR MORE IN NORTH CAROLINA

1960



County or Place

Thb Statk . ..

Urban...
Rural
Per Cent Urban



lounties:
Alamance
Alexander

Alleghany

Anson.
Ashe .



Population



Avery

Beaufort
Bertie...
Bladen
Brunswick

Buncombe

Burke

Cabarrus
Caldwell.
Camden .



Carteret. .
Caswell...
Catawba.
Chatham.
Cherokee



Chowan...

Clay

Cleveland.
Columbus.
Craven . .



Cumberland.

Currituck

Dare. _.

Davidson

Davie... ..



4,556,155
1,801,921
2,754,23-1

39.5



Ho. 674

15,625

7,734

24,962
19,768

12,009
36,014
24,350
28,881
20,278

130,074

52,701

68,137

19,552

5,598

30,940
19,912
73,191
26,785
16,335

11,729
5,526
66,048
48,973
58,773

118,418

6,601

5,935

79,493

16,728



County or Place I Population

Counties— Cont.

Duplin 40,270

Durham 111,995

Edgecombe 54,226

Forsvth 189 428

Franklin 28,755



Gaston

Gates

Graham

Granville...
Greene



Guilford...

Halifax

Harnett...
Haywood..
Henderson.



Hertford .
Hoke..
Hyde....
Iredell . . .
Jackson . .



Johnston.

Jones

Lee

Lenoir

Lincoln .



Macon

Madison

Martin ..

McDowell...
Mecklenburg



Mitchell

Montgomery

Moore

Nash

New Hanover



127,074

9,254

6,432

33,110

16,741

246,520
58,956
18,236
39,711
36,163

22,718
16,356
5,765
62,526
17,780

62,936
11,005
26,561
55,276
28,814

14,935
17,217
27,139
26,742
272,111

13,906
18,408
36,733
61,002
71,742



County or Place I Populatioi



Counties- Cont,
Northampton.

Onslow

Orange... ....

Pamlico

Pasquotank

Pender..

Perquiman*

Person .

Pitt .

Polk . .



Randolph.
Richmond. .

Robeson

Rockingham
Rowan



Rutherford
Sampson. .
Scotland .

Stanly

Stokes



Incorporated Places of 10,000 or More



Albemarle .

Asheville

Burlington

Chapel Hill...
Charlotte... .
Concord

Durham

Elizabeth City
Fayetteville..

Gastonia

Goldsboro

Greensboro



12,261
60,192
33 199
12,573
201,564
17,799

78,302
14,062
47,106
37,276
>,»:.:
119,574



Greenville..
Henderson..

Hickory

High Point.
Jacksonville.



22,860
12,740
19,328
62,063
13,491
Kinston | 24,819



Surry . .

Swain...
Transylvania.

Tyrrell

Union... .

Vance . . .

Wake

Warren

Washington. .
Watauga . . .

Wayne

Wilkes

Wilson

Yadkin

Yancey ..



Lenoir

Lexington..
Lumberton.

Monroe

New Bern. .
Raleigh



10,257
16,093
15,305
10,882
15,717
93,931



26. Ml
82,706
12.970
'< S5n
25,630

18.508
9.178
26.394
69,942
11 ,395

61,497
39,202
89,102

-,'i 029
82,817

45,091
48,013
25,183

in v;;;

22,314

48,205
8,387

16,372
4.520

11.670

32,002
169,082
19,652
13,488
17,529

82,059

45,269
57,716
22,804
14.008



Reidsville 14,267

Roanoke Rapids. 13,320

Rocky Mount.. .J 32,147

Salisbury. - 21,297

Sanford. i 12,253

Shelby.... 17,698

Statesville. . .... 19,844

Thomasville j 15,190

Wilmington.. ... | 44,013

Wilson j 28,753

Winston-Salem...! 111,135



Population of Cities and Towns



135



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF
LESS THAN 10,000 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1960

2,500 to 10,000



City or Town



Ahoskie

Asheboro

Ayden

Beaufort

Belmont

Bessemer City..

Boone

Brevard

Canton

Cary

Cherry ville

Clayton

Clinton

Dallas

Davidson

Draper

Dunn

Edenton

Elkin

Enfield

Farmville

Forest City

Fuquay Springs.

Garner

Graham

Granite Falls

Hamlet

Henderson ville..

Kernersville

Kings Mountain

Laurinburg

Leaksville

Lincolnton

Longview

Louisburg

Lowell



County



Hertford..
Randolph.

Pitt

Carteret..
Gaston



Gaston

Watauga

Transylvania.

Haywood

Wake.



Gaston

Johnston

Sampson

Gaston.

Mecklenburg.

Rockingham..

Harnett

Chowan

Surry

Halifax



Pitt

Rutherford .

Wake

Wake

Alamance..



Caldwell 2,644



Richmond.
Henderson.
Forsyth . . .
Cleveland.



Popula-
tion



Scotland

Rockingham

Lincoln

Catawba

Franklin

Gaston



4,583
9,449
3,108
2,922
5,007

4,017
3,686
4,857
5,068
3,356

3,607
3,302
7,461
3,270
2,573

3,382
7,566
4,458
2,868
2,978

3,997
6,556
3,389
3,451
7,723



4,460
5,911
2,942
8,008

8,242
6,427
5,699
2,997
2,862
2,784



City or Town



Marion ..

Mooresville

Morehead City.

Morgan ton

Mount Airy



Mount Holly

Mount Olive

Murfreesboro

Newton

North Wilkesboro...



Oxford

Plymouth

Raeford

Red Springs .
Rockingham.



Roxboro

Rutherfordton.
Scotland Neck.

Selma

Siler City



Smithfield

Southern Pines.

Spencer

Spindale

Spray



Spring Lake Cumberland



Spruce Pine.

Tarboro

Valdese

Wadesboro .



Wake Forest.
Washington..
Wayn es ville .
Whiteville...
Williamston.



County



McDowell.
Iredell....
Carteret...

Burke

Surry



Gaston...
Wayne...
Hertford.
Catawba.
Wilkes...



Granville

Washington.

Hoke

Robeson

Richmond...



Person

Rutherford.

Halifax

Johnston...
Chatham...



Johnston

M oore

Rowan

Rutherford

Rockingham



Mitchell.
Edgecombe.

Burke

Anson



Wake

Beaufort..
Haywood..
Columbus.
Martin



Popula-
tion

3,345
6,918
5,583
9,186
7,055

4,037
4,673
2,643
6,658
4,197

6,978
4,666
3,058
2,767
5,512

5,147
3,392
2,974
3,102
4,455

6,117
5,198
2,904
4,082
4,565

4,110
2,504
8,411
2,941
3,744

2,664
9,939
6,159
4,683
6,924



1,000 to 2,500



Aberdeen.
Andrews .

Angier

Apex

Archdale .

Aulander.
Belhaven.
Benson...
Bethel...
Beulaville



Moore

Cherokee.
Harnett..

Wake

Randolph

Bertie

Beaufort .
Johnston .

Pitt

Duplin...



1,531
1,404
1,249
1,368
1,520

1,083
2,386
2,355
1,578
1,062



Biltmore Forest.

Biscoe

Black Mountain
Boiling Springs..
Bryson City

Burgaw

Burnsville

Carolina Beach.

Carrboro

Carthage



Buncombe

Montgomery.

Buncombe

Cleveland

Swain

Pender

Yancey

New Hanover

Orange

Moore



1,004
1,053
1,313
1,311
1,084

1,750
1,388
1,192
1,997
1,190



l.",.;



Noktii Carolina Manual



TABLE 2. POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLACES OF
LESS THAN 2,500 IN NORTH CAROLINA: 1960— Continued

1,000 to 2,500— Continued



City or Town



Chadbourn . .
China Grove.

Coats

Columbia

Conover



Cornelius

Drexel

East Spencer...
Elizabethtown.
Elon College...



Fair Bluff...

Fairmont

Four Oaks..

Franklin

Franklinton.



Fremont.
Gaston...



Gibsonville

Granite Quarry.
Grifton



Havelock

Hazelwood..

Hertford

Hillsborough.
Hope Mills, .



Hudson

Huntersville.
Jamestown. .

Jones ville

Kenly



La Grange.

Landis

Liberty

Lillington . .

Littleton. .



Madison..

Maiden

Mars Hill..
Marshville.
Maxton...



Mayodan.
Mebane. .



Mocks ville

Mount Gilead...
Mount Pleasant.



County



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