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NORTH CAROLINA
MANUAL



THE LIBRARY OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF

NORTH CAROLINA



i^^
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THE COLLECTION OF
NORTH CAROLINIANA



N87m

1971
C.2



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL



00017482699



This book may be kept out one month unless a recall
notice is sent to you. It must be brought to the North
Carolina Collection (in Wilson Library) for renewal.



Form No. A-369



NORTH CAROLINA MANUAL

1971




Issued by

Thad Eure

Secretary of State

Raleigh



1971



JANUARY

S M T W T F S

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FEBRUARY

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MARCH

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APRIL
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JUNE
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JULY
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AUGUST
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SEPTEMBER

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OCTOBER

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NOVEMBER
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DECEMBER
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1972



JANUARY
S M T W T F S

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FEBRUARY

S M T W T F S

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MARCH
S M T W T F S

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APRIL

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MAY
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JUNE

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JULY
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AUGUST

S M T W T F S

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SEPTEMBER

S M T W T F S

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OCTOBER

S M T W T F S

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NOVEMBER
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DECEMBER
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TO THE

1971 MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF NORTH CAROLINA



TO THE

STATE, COUNTY, CITY AND TOWN OFFICIALS



AND TO THE

PEOPLE OF THE OLD NORTH STATE
AT HOME AND ABROAD



THIS MANUAL IS RESPECTFULLY
DEDICATED




Secretary of State



CONTENTS

PART I

HISTORICAL

Page

The State 3

The State Capitol 19

The Capitol 21

The State Legislative Building 25

Chief Executives of North Carolina

Governors of Virginia 28

Executives under the Proprietors 28

Governors under the Crown 29

Governors Elected by the Legislature 29

Governors Elected by the People 31

List of Lieutenant Governors 33

The State Flag 34

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence 36

The State Bird 38

The Great Seal of North Carolina 41

The Halifax Resolution 42

Name of State and Nicknames 43

The State Motto 43

The State Colors 44

The State Flower 44

The State Mammal 44

The State Shell 44

The State Song 44, 47

The State Tree 44

The State's Most Famous Toast 44

Public Holidays in North Carolina 45

Population of the State since 1675 46

The Constitution of North Carolina 49

The American's Creed 87

The American Flag

Origin 87

Proper Display 89

Pledge to the Flag 94

K The National Capitol 95



^

N

^



Declaration of Independence 98

Constitution of the United States 103



VI North Carolina Manual

PART II

CENSUS

Page

Nineteenth Census, 1970

Population of State 131

Population of Counties 132

Population of Cities and Towns

Incorporated places of 10,000 or more 133

Incorporated places of 2,500 to 10,000 134

Incorporated places of 1,000 to 2,500 135

Incorporated places of less than 1,000 136

Population of United States, 1970 139

PART III

POLITICAL

Congressional Districts 145

Judicial Districts (Superior and District Courts) 145

Solicitorial Districts 147

Senatorial Districts and Apportionment of Senators 149
Representative Districts and Apportionment of Members

of the House of Representatives 151

State Democratic Platform 154

Plan of Organization of the State Democratic Party 172

Committees of the Democratic Party

State Democratic Executive Committee 209

Congressional District Executive Committees 214

Judicial District Executive Committees 218

State Democratic Senatorial Executive Committees 223

House of Representative District Executive Committees 228

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 233

County Vice Chairmen 235

State Republican Platform 238

Plan of Organization of the State Republican Party 259

Committees of the Republican Party

State Republican Executive Committee 285

Congressional, Judicial, Senatorial and

Solicitorial District Committees 292

Chairmen of the County Executive Committees 292

County Vice Chairmen 294



Contents VII

PART IV

ELECTION RETURNS

Page
Popular and Electoral Vote for President by States, 1968 .... 299

Popular Vote for President by States, 1952-1964 300

Vote for President by Counties, 1948-1968 302

Vote for Governor by Counties, Primaries, 1968 305

Vote for Governor by Counties.

General Elections, 1948-1968 307

Vote for State Officials,

Primaries, 1960-1968 310

Vote for State Officials by Counties, Primaries, 1970 314

Total Votes Cast— General Election, 1964-1968 316

Vote for Governor in Primaries, 1944-1968 319

Vote for State Officers by Counties,

General Election of 1970 320

Vote for Congressmen in Democratic Primaries, 1970 323

Vote for Congressmen in Republican Primaries, 1970 324

Vote for Members of Congress, 1948-1960 325

Vote for Members of Congress,

General Elections, 1962-1964 337

General Elections, 1966 343

General Elections, 1968-1970 347

Vote for United States Senators in Primaries, 1956-1968 353

Vote for United States Senators in

General Elections, 1956-1968 354

Vote on One Per Cent (%) Local Option Sales and

Use Tax Election, November 4, 1969 355

Vote on Constitutional Amendments by Counties,

November 3, 1970 357

PART V
GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES, BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

Agencies, Boards and Commissions 371

North Carolina Institutions

Correctional 433

Educational 434

Mental 448

Centers for the Retarded 449



VIII North Carolina Manual

Page

Alcoholic Rehabilitation Centers 449

Centers for Mentally Disturbed Children 450

Hospitals 450

Confederate Woman's Home 451

Examining Boards 452

State Owned Railroads 463

PART VI

LEGISLATURE

The General Assembly
Senate

Officers 467

Senators (Arranged Alphabetically) 467

Senators (Arranged by Districts) 468

Rules 469

Standing Committees 487

Seat Assignments 497

House of Representatives

Officers 498

Members (Arranged Alphabetically) 498

Members (Arranged by Districts) 500

Rules 502

Standing Committees 520

Seat Assignments 536

PART VII

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Elected Executive Officials 541

Administrative Officials appointed by the Governor 552

Administrative Officials appointed by Department Heads,
Boards or Commissions (Subject to approval by

the Governor) 568

Administrative Officials appointed by Department Heads,

Boards or Commissions (With no approving authority) 579

United States Senators 592

Representatives in Congress 594

Justices of the Supreme Court 605



Contents IX

Page

Judges of the Court of Appeals 612

Members of the General Assembly-
Senators 620

Representatives 659

Occupational and Professional Classification 750

PART VIII
OFFICIAL REGISTER

United States Government

President and Vice President 757

Cabinet Members 757

North Carolina Senators and Representatives

in Congress 757

United States Supreme Court Justices 757

United States District Court

Judges 757

Clerks 757

United States Attorneys 757

United States Circuit Court of Appeals

Judge Fourth District 758

Governors of the States and Territories 758

State Government

Legislative Department 759

Executive Department 759

Judicial Department 759

Administrative Department 763

State Institutions 764

Heads of Agencies other than State 767

County Government 768

ILLUSTRATIONS

State Capitol 18

The State Legislative Building 24

State Flag 35

State Bird 38

State Seal 40

State Song (Words and Music) 47



X North Carolina Manual

Page

Map of North Carolina 48

The American Flag 86

Map Showing Congressional Districts 142, 143

Map Showing Senatorial Districts 160, 161

Organization Democratic Party of North Carolina 173

Map Showing Representative Districts 244, 245

Seating Diagram of Senate Chamber 496

Seating Diagram of House of Representatives 537

Pictures

Governor 540

State Officers 545

Senators and Congressmen 594, 601

Justices of the Supreme Court 607

Judges of the Court of Appeals 612

State Senators 623, 635, 649

Members of the House of Representatives

661, 671, 685, 697, 711, 725, 737



PART I
HISTORICAL



THE STATE

North Carolina, often called the "Tar Heel" state, was the scene
of the first attempt to colonize America by English-speaking peo-
ple. Under a charter granted to Sir Walter Raleigh by Queen
Elizabeth, a colony was begun in the 1580's on Roanoke Island.
This settlement, however, was unsuccessful and later became
known as "The Lost Colony."

The first permanent settlement was made about 1650 by immi-
grants from Virginia. In 1663 Charles II granted to eight Lords
Proprietors a charter for the territory lying "within six and
thirty degrees of the northern latitude, and to the west as far as
the south seas, and so southerly as far as the River St. Mattias,
which bordereth upon the coast of Florida, and within one and
thirty degrees of northern latitude, and so west in a direct line as
far as the south seas aforesaid; . . ." and the colony was called
Carolina. In 1665 another charter was granted to these noblemen.
This charter extended the limits of Carolina so that the northern
line was 36 degrees and 30 minutes north latitude, and the south-
ern line was 29 degrees north latitude, and both of these lines ex-
tended westward to the South Seas.

In 1669 John Locke wrote the Fundamental Constitutions as a
model for the government of Carolina. The Lords Proprietors
adopted these constitutions and directed the governor to put into
operation as much of them as was feasible. In 1670 there were
four precincts (changed to counties in 1739) : Pasquotank, Per-
quimans, Chowan, and Currituck. North Carolina now has one
hundred counties.

Carolina on December 7, 1710, was divided into North Carolina
and South Carolina, and Edward Hyde, on May 9, 1712, became
the first governor of North Carolina.

In 1729 seven of the eight Lords Proprietors sold their interest
in Carolina to the Crown and North Carolina became a royal
colony. George Burrington was the first royal governor. Richard
Everard, the last proprietary governor, served until Burrington
was appointed.

North Carolina, on April 12, 1776, authorized her delegates in
the Continental Congress to vote for independence, and on Decem-
ber 18, 1776, adopted a constitution. Richard Caswell became the
first governor under this constitution. On November 21, 1789, the
state adopted the United States Constitution, being the twelfth



4 North Carolina Manual

state to enter the Federal Union. North Carolina, in 1788, had
rejected the Constitution on the jri'ounds that certain amendments
were vital and necessary to a free people.

A Constitutional convention was held in 1835 and among; several
chang'es made in the Constitution was the method of electing the
governor. After this change the governor was elected by the peo-
ple for a term of two years instead of being elected by the Legis-
lature for a term of one year. Edward Bishop Dudley was the first
governor elected by the people.

North Carolina seceded from the Union May 20, 1861, and was
readmitted to the Union in July, 18G8.

A new State Constitution was adopted in 1868 and since that
date the governor has been elected by the people for four-year
terms and he cannot succeed himself. Numerous amendments were
added to this Constitution and it was completely revised and
amended by a vote of the people in 1970.

North Carolina has had a democratic administration since 1900,
during which period it has made its greatest progress.

North Carolina has had two permanent capitals — New^ Bern and
Raleigh — and there have been three capitol buildings. Tryon's
Palace in New Bern was constructed in the period, 1767-1770, and
the main building was destroyed by fire February 27, 1798. The
first capitol in Raleigh was completed in 1794 and was destroyed
by fire on June 21, 1831. The present capitol was completed in
1840.

The state in 1790 ceded her western lands, which was composed
of Washington, Davidson, Hawkins, Greene, Sullivan, Sumner, and
Tennessee counties, to the Federal government, and between 1790
and 1796 the territory was known as Tennessee Territory, but in
1796 it bcame the fifteenth state in the Union.

In 1738, the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act
authorizing the establishment of district courts which sex'ved as
appellant courts. These courts were authorized to be held in Bath,
New Bern, and New Town — now Wilmington. In 1746, the General
Assembly repealed the act of 1738 and established district courts
to be held at Edenton, Wilmington, and Edgecombe. From 1754
until 1790, other districts were formed as the state expanded in
territory and developed needs for these districts. By 1790, there



The state 5

were eight judicial districts divided into two ridings of four dis-
tricts each. In 180G, the General Assembly passed an act estab-
lishing a superior court in each county. The act also set up judi-
cial districts composed of certain contiguous counties, and this
practice of expanding the districts has continued from five dis-
tricts in 1806 until now there are thirty districts.

When North Carolina adopted the Federal Constitution on No-
vember 21, 1789, she was authorized to send two senators and five
representatives to the Congress of the United States according to
the constitutional apportionment. In 1792, when the first federal
census had been completed and tabulated, it was found that North
Carolina was entitled to ten representatives. It was then that the
General Assembly divided the state into ten congressional dis-
tricts. In 1812, the state had grown and increased in population
until it was entitled to thirteen representatives in Congress. Be-
tween 1812 and 1865, however, the population decreased so much
in proportion to the population of other states of the Union that
North Carolina was by that time entitled only to seven repre-
sentaives. After 1865 the population of the state showed a steady
increase so that beginning in 1943 North Carolina was entitled
to twelve representatives in Congress. The 1960 census showed
that the state had nearly a half million more people than in 1950,
but this increase was not nearly as much in proportion to that of
some of the other states. North Carolina is now entitled to only
eleven representatives in Congress.



Agriculture

North Carolina agricultural producers set several new records
in 1969. Realized gross farm income totaled a record $1,628 mil-
lion, and was constituted as follows: cash receipts from farm
marketings $1,406 million, govenrement payments $70 million,
value of home consumption $51 million, and gross rental value of
farm dwellings $101 million.

Farm production expenses rose to a record $941 million in 1969,
exceeding the previous 1968 record of $888 million by six percent.
Realized net farm income amounted to $687 million, averaging $4,-



6 North Carolina Manual

206 per farm, up $820 over 1908. The number of farms for the
State is estimated at 101,000.

The $1,400 million in cash receipts from marketings of crops
and livestock products was an all time high — up 12 percent from
1908 and 9 percent from the previous record set in 1907. It was
almost twice the nation's 7 percent gain. Cash receipts from all
crops produced by Tar Heel farmers during 1909 is estimated at
a record $812 million, up $09 million over 1908. Advances in pro-
duction of three major crops — tobacco, corn and soybeans —
accounted for a major portion of the increase in farm income in
1909. In addition, higher prices received by producers of tobacco
and corn contributed to the higher income.

Cash receipts from marketing livestock and livestock products
reached a record $594 million during 1909 — an increase of $80
million over 1908. Improved prices coupled with increased produc-
tion for most species accounted for the increase. The top six species
or commodities in order of importance were broilers, eggs, hogs,
milk, cattle and calves, and turkeys. Receipts from 281 million
broilers raised in 1909 were $159 million — $19 million more than
in 1908 and ranks fourth in the Nation. Receipts from broilers
were second in the State in value — exceeded only by tobacco in
value. Cash value from eggs in 1909 rose sharply to $127 million —
fourth in the Nation. The 3.4 billion eggs were produced by 15.3
million layers, averaging 222 eggs per layer during the year.

The 601 million pounds of hogs and pigs produced in 1909 ranks
eleventh in the Nation. Cash value of marketings from hogs were
$119 million — $27 million more than in 1908. Receipts from milk
marketings in 1909 were $92 million — up $0 million from the
previous year. Marketings from cattle and calves in 1909 were
valued at $40 million compared with $45 million in 1908. Production
of turkeys has increased sharply in recent years. The 9.4 million
head produced in 1909 ranks third in the Nation. Cash value rose
from $33.5 million in 1908 to $37.1 million in 1909 for a new record
high.

Commei-cial production of fruits and vegetables in the State had
a combined value of about 47 million dollars. Of this, vegetables
represented 02 percent and fruits 38 percent. About 80,000 acres
of vegetables were grown. Cucumbers for pickles, snap beans,
green peppers and watermelons lead the list.



The State 7

Production of apples, blueberries, grapes and pecans have been
increasing in North Carolina, while peaches are trending down-
ward. The 1969 commercial apple crop was the largest ever re-
corded — 204 million pounds with a value of $8.3 million. Leading
counties in production are Henderson, Wilkes, Haywood, Alexan-
der, Mitchell and Lincoln. Peach production was 56 million
pounds with a value of $3.8 million. Pecans, grapes, blueberries,
strawberries, and other miscellaneous berries and nuts had a
value of $6.7 million.

Forestry and nursery products accounted for about 52 million
dollars of cash receipts to North Carolina farmers.

The average monthly supply of farm labor in the State during
1969 was 5.0 percent less than 1968. The number of hired workers
dropped 7.4 percent while family workers declined 4.2 percent.
Declines were less severe during the busiest farm months of June-
August when both segments were down about 3.7 percent. Farm
wage rates rose 7.4 percent from 1968 to 1969.



Conservation and Development

The search for creative solutions to meet the needs of North
Carolina characterized the Department of Conservation and De-
velopment as it began 1971.

Under the leadership of Director Roy G. Sowers Jr., the
agency has systematically re-evaluated its service during 1970.
and was ready with a major legislative package to implement its
conclusions when members of the 1971 General Assembly arrived
in Raleigh in January. Such items as a major request for funds
to acquire new park lands, to permit an expansion of pilot projects
to implement a plan for protecting the State's valuable marshes
and estuaries, to improve the State's reverse investment program
were high on its list of priorities.

The agency also stood ready to seek support for a proposed plan
to assist small businessmen operate their businesses on a sounder
basis, and solidly supported recommendations of the North Caro-
lina Mining Council to regulate mining operations in the State to
prevent environmental disasters.



8 North Carolina Manual

III terms of socking- to build on its record of public support, the
C&D agency continued to vigorously pursue its "open door" policy;
or as Sowers put it: "We have made a special effort, and vv^ill con-
tinue to do so, to remember that the world does not bep:in and end
at the C&D doorsteps, and we want to keep our doors open to all
who wish to enter."

1970 was a year of solid achievement for the Department. Some
of the hig'hlig'hts follow:

The Depai'tment sponsored an industrial development mission
to Europe in November to discuss investment opportunities in the
State with some 200 businesses in six European countries: Great
Britian, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, France and The Nether-
lands.

In State Parks activities, a 1,400 acre tract, lying' along the
Yadkin River was added to the Pilot Mountain State Park. This
was a major acquisition for the park system and came about pri-
marily because of local interest centered in Davie, Guilford, For-
syth, Stokes and Yadkin counties. The people there raised $115,000
as the State's share to match $45G,971 in federal grants. No State
funds were available to help in acquiring the property.

The historically significant area known as Boone's Cave in David-
son County was donated to the State by the Daniel Boone Associa-
tion in Lexington. The 103-acre site will be used by C&D's Parks
Division as a pilot project aimed towards the development of smaller
recreational areas below the 400-acre minimum now required for
a full-fledged State Park.

In another "protection" area of C&D activities, the Department
undertook an experimental program to halt beach erosion in
Brunswick and Carteret Counties. With the aid of a special $50,000
grant secured with the help of Governor Scott, experimental groins
will be installed on beaches in those two counties which have been
severely ravaged by ocean storms. The important estuarine pro-
gram, authorized by the 1969 General Assembly, proceeded during
1970, with the beginning of Phase II, a pilot estuarine study in New
Hanover County. This pilot study, conducted in great detail, will
serve as model for other coastal counties. The pilot project is



The State 9

based on a study completed in September which laid out the frame-
work for a comprehensive and enforceable plan to protect the
State's estuaries and shorelines.

The Department's forestry program continued its vigorous pro-
gram of assisting small landowners in converting unused lands into
forestry nurseries. Under this new forestation effort, authorized by
the 1969 General Assembly, C&D foresters have worked with land-
owners in planting some 15,000 acres in seedlings.

The Department cooperated very closely with the North Carolina
Mining Council in formulating its proposals for the protection
against mining disasters in our State. Those proposals are expected
to be enacted into law by the 1971 Legislature.

In addition, the Mineral Resources Division, in cooperation with
the U. S. Geological Survey, conducted a topographic mapping pro-
gram covering 2,000 square miles in our State. A geologic map-
ping program, covering 780 square miles is currently underway in
cooperation with the Tennessee Valley Authority.

An active program of assistance to the State's smaller communi-



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