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History of the Military company of the Massachusetts, now called the Ancient and honorable artillery company of Massachusetts. 1637-1888 (Volume 1) online

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disused, and the wards were designated by numbers only. There were also twelve
overseers of the poor, one for each ward. In the assignment of the overseers. Wards 2,
3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 11 were assigned to overseers who were members of the Artillery
Company.

In 173s, the town voted to erect a workhouse. Its total estimated cost was three
thousand five hundred pounds. The building erected was one hundred and forty-five
feet long, twenty feet wide, and sixteen feet high. It was completed in 1738, and stood
on Park Street, "contiguous to the Bridewell."

May 25, 173S, a subscription was made by citizens who were interested in the work-
house project. One hundred and twenty-three persons subscribed three thousand five
hundred and sixty-eight pounds ten shillings. Of these, thirty-six persons, who sub-
scribed one thousand and fifty-two pounds, were members of the Artillery Company, viz. :



Jacob Wendell . . .


(1733),


^'00


Benjamin Clarke .


• ('733),


;^5


John Hunt ....


('709),


100


Joshua Cheever . .


■ ('732),


50


Thomas Hubbard . .


('732),


100


John I'hillips . .


. ('725),


25


Benjamin Hallowell .


('733),


30


Joseph Sherburne .


. ('745),


'5


Thomas Gushing . .


(1691),


50


John Gerrish . .


• (■7'S),


30


William Downe . . .


('7'6),


50


John Wheelwright .


. ('7'4),


50


Caleb Lyman . . .


(1732),


30


Samuel Sewall . .


■ ('7-'o),


30


Daniel Henchman . .


('712),


25


Edward Marion


• ('727),


10


Ebenezer Storer . .


(1732),


30


William Warner


• ('733),


10


William Salter . . .


('733),


10


Edward Proctor


• (<699),


5



' Drake's Hist, of Boston, p. 670.



474



HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND



[1735-6



Hopestill Foster . . ,
Thomas Hutchinson ,
Jonathan Wilhams, Jr.
Joseph Hubbard . .
Edward Hutchinson
John Welch ...
Jeremiah Belknap .
John Wendell . .

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1735 were
and John Wendell, Jr.



(1694),


^6


Abiel Walley . .


(1694),


30


Jonathan Williams


(1729),


15


Daniel Pecker


(I7I7),


20


AVilliam Rand


(1702),


30


James Davenport


(1736),


15


Thomas Foster .


(1724),


10


Richard Bill . .


(1733),


30


John Goldthwait .



(1710),


£30


(1711),


15


(1720),


5


(1732),


10


(1727),


10


(1722),


6


(1707),


50


(1711),


IS



Abraham Belknap



Abraham Belknap (1735), of Boston, son of Joseph (1692) and .'\bigail (Buttolph)
Belknap, and brother of Jeremiah (1724) and of Nicholas (1725), was born in Boston,
March 2, 1705. Abraham Belknap (1735) and Magdalen Feurt were married Oct. 21,
1734, by Andrew Le Mercier. He was admitted to be a member of the engine company
in the westerly part of the town, Feb. 16, 1742, and continued his membership until
April 3, 1745. He did not hold any office in the town, nor does he appear identified
with any public matters.

John Wendell, Jr. (1735), of Boston, son of John Wendell, of Albany, N. Y., was
born in Albany, Feb. 8, 1708. He removed to Boston, and was probably engaged with
his uncle, Jacob (1733), and cousin, John (1733). He married, Nov. 11, 1731, Mary
Oliver. He was elected a clerk of the market in 1741, and was third sergeant of the
Artillery Company in 1738. He was not active in town affairs, but continued in the
business of his uncle, amassing considerable property. He was interested in the military,
and became major of the Boston regiment. He died in Boston in February, 1772,
leaving a will of which his wife was sole executrix. He was buried in the Granary
Burial-Ground, tomb No. 55.

The record of the Artillery Company for 1735 is as follows : —

"1735, April 4. Being under arms, the Company made choice of the Rev'd Mr.
Hull Abbot of Charlestown to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon ; and that the
present Commission officers, with the field officers of the Regiment and Capt Cheever
[1733] of Charlestown, be a committee to request it of him.

"May 5. The Committee appointed to acquaint the Rev. Mr. Hull Abbot the
choice of the Company made of him to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon,
returned answer, that it was accepted by him.

"June 2. Voted that the present Commission officers, with the field officers, be a
Committee to give the thanks of the Company to the Rev. Mr. Hull Abbot, for the
Sermon preached to them this day and desire a copy thereof for the press.

" Voted that the musicianers of the Company shall be paid out of the publick Stock
for their Services the year past."

Rev. Hull Abbot, who delivered the Artillery election sermon in 173S, was the
eldest son of Moses Abbot, of Boston, where he was born June 15, 1702. He graduated
at Harvard College in 1720, and July 27, 1731, he married Mary Bradstreet, daughter

John Wendell, Jr. (1735O Authority: Boston Records.



'736-7] HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 475

of Rev. Simon Bradstreet, of Charlestown. Feb. 5, 1723-4, Mr. Abbot was ordained as
a colleague of Mr. Bradstreet, and the pastorate of the former extended until his decease,
April 19, 1774 — a half century's service.

Col. John Alford (17 14) was one of his jiarishioners.



^ The officers elected were : John Chandler (1734), captain ; Joshua

I / ^0"/ . Cheever (1732), lieutenant; Ezekiel Cheever (1733), ensign. Sampson

' ^ ' Salter (1729) was first sergeant; Jonathan Williams, Jr. (1729), second

sergeant; Knight Leverett (1729), third sergeant; William Williams (1733), fourth

sergeant, and Bartholomew Gedney (1726), clerk.

A committee was chosen .April 28, 1736, to prepare instructions for the representa-
tives. Capt. Nathaniel Cunningham (1720) was chairman.

The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1736 were: .Aaron Bord man,
Nathaniel Thwing, Daniel Watts, Capt. John Welch, James Wright.

Aaron Bordman (1736), tinman, of Boston, son of Aaron and Klizabeth (Parker)
Bordman, of Cambridge, was born in Cambridge, at the homestead on Harvard Sijuare,
May 6, 171 1. In 1737, Aaron (1736) was a tin-plate worker in Boston. He was second
sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1741 ; ensign in the militia; constable of Boston
in 1738, and clerk of the market in 1747 and 1750. June 15, 1743, Mr. Aaron Bordman
(1736) was fined forty shillings "on account of his taking an Indian woman into his
house," and in 1745 Mr. Aaron Bordman (1736), "tin plate-worker," was one of the
sureties for the collector of taxes. He possessed considerable estate in Cambridge,
He died June 9, 1754, aged forty-three years, and his gravestone is on Copp's Hill.

Nathaniel Thwing (1736), baker, of Boston, son of John and Martha (Drew)
Thwing, was born Aug. 17, 1703. He married, (i) in 1727, Joanna Davis, of Boston,
who died Sept. 6, 1749 ; and, (2) in January, 1750, Martha Clap, of Woburn. Benjamin
(1678) was a brother of Major Nathaniel's (1736) grandfather, John Thwing.

Major Nathaniel (1736) was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1737. He
was elected constable in 1731 and 1733, but was excused the former year; was a tithing-
man in 1746; scavenger in 1750; fireward in 1751, and from 1753 to 1755, and select-
man three years, from 1763 to 1765 (but resigned May 15, 1765) ; also surveyor of
wheat in 1763 and 1764. He was connected with the militia for several years, being a
lieutenant in 1743, major of the Boston regiment from 1746 to 1751, and lieutenant-
colonel in 1756. His bakeshop was on Water Street, and was consumed in the fire of
1760. He served as captain of the third company of the Eighth Massachusetts Regi-
ment, — Col. John Choate, — against Louisburg, also major in the same, and was after-
wards promoted by Gov. Shirley to be lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of which
Richard Gridley had been colonel, for protection against the French at Crown Point
and upon Lake Champlain.

"April 17, 1768, Col. Thwing, of this town, was seized with an apoplectic fit, in the
street, as he was returning home from public worship, and now lies at the point of death."

Aaron Bordman (1736). Authorities: Nathaniel Thwing (1736)- AirrHORmics :

Boston Records; Paige's Hist, of Cambriilge. Boston Records; Thwing Family.



476 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND ['736-7

"He died Monday, the 18"'. He was a gentleman well respected; formerly one of
the selectmen ; in the late war (old French War) colonel of a provincial regiment, and
in every action conducted with approbation." ^

Daniel Watts (1736). He was probably a farmer, and lived in what is now
Chelsea. March 27, 1732, when the lines were to be run and bounds examined between
Maiden and Bcrston, Daniel Watts (1736) was one of. the persons selected by the select-
men of Boston, and the entire committee of thirteen persons were notified, for the per-
forming said work, " to meet at the house of Mr. Daniel Watts [1736], at 8 oclk a. m. of
April 18, 1732." He never held any other town office, except that of hog-reeve at
Rumney Marsh in 1729.

He was first sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1743.

John Welch (1736), carver, of Boston, son of John and Hannah Welch, was born
in Boston, Aug. 19, 1711. He married (i) Sarah Barrington about 1734. She died in
1736, aged nmeteen years, and he married, (2) Oct. 29, 1741, Dorcas Gatcomb. Sarah
Barrington was a granddaughter of George Robinson (1710). Mr. Welch (1736) died
Feb. 9, 1789, aged seventy-eight years, and was buried in the King's Chapel Burial-
Ground, where, in the front range of tombs, is "John Welch, Tomb."

He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1740, ensign in 1751, lieu-
tenant in 1754, and its captain in 1756. He was also a captain in the militia.

Capt. Welch (1736) was chosen a constable in 1743, but was excused; a tithing-
man in 1746; collector of taxes in 1747; assessor in 1750, — excused; clerk of the
market in 1736 and 1752, and scavenger in 1737 and 1754.

May 2, 1733, "the Selectmen executed a lease to John Welch [1736], of Boston,
carver, of a wooden shop or building now in his possession, called number nine, situate
and being in Boston fronting on Dock Square." The shop was on the north side of the
square, with Mr. Bunker's shop on the west, and Mr. Billings's on the east. The rental
was twenty pounds per annum. His residence was on Green Lane, now Salem Street.
Oct. 10, 1739, he re-leased No. 9, and likewise leased No. 8, for five years, at a rental
of sixty pounds per annum. No. 9 was again leased by him in 1744.

Sept. I, 1756, "Mr Putnam, master of the Dock Engine applied to the Selectmen
for the premium, he being first with his engine at a fire at Mr John Welches [1736]
house in June last," which he received. John Welch (1736) gave up his shop in 1758,
and his name disappears from the records, except, July 12, 1758, fifteen beds were
carried to his house, by order of the selectmen, " for the use of the King's troops now
in Boston."

It was John Welch (1736) who carved the codfish which with public honors was
lately transferred from the old to the new hall of the Representatives in the State
House.

James Wright (1736), of Boston, son of James Wright (1715), of Woburn and
Boston, was born Oct. 23, 1703.

Daniel Watts (1736). Authority: Boston Records; MS. of Charles A.Welch, Esq., of Bos-
Records, ton, a great-grandson of John Welch (1736).
John Welch (1736). Authorities: Boston ' Extracts from Boston newspapers.




J^^Axurl ^oiiWUdT



■737-SJ HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY.



477



The record of the Artillery Company for i 736 is as follows : —

■' J 73''. April 5. Being under arms, The Company made choice of the Rev. Mr.
Peter Clarke of Salem Village to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon; and that
the present Commission officers, with Mr. Daniel Epos, Jr [1734], be a committee to
request it of him.

" May 3. The Committee appointed to acquaint the Rev'd ^[r. Peter Clarke of
the choice the Company made of him to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon,
returned answer that it was accepted by him.

"June 7. Voted, that the present Commission officers, with the field officers, be a
committee to give the thanks of the Company to the Rev. Mr. Peter Clarke for the
Sermon preached to them this day and desire a copy thereof for the press."

ReVi Petep Clarke, who delivered the anniversary sermon before the Company in
1736, son of Uriah and Mary Clarke, of Roxbury and Watertown, was born in the latter
place, March 12, 1694, and graduated at Harvard College in 1 712. On the seventh day
of August, 1716, he was invited to become the minister of Salem Village, now Danvers,
and on the 5th of June, 1717, he was settled as pastor, at a salary of ninety pounds per
annum. His principal distinction arose from a celebrated controversy with Rev. Samuel
Webster, of Salisbury, on the doctrine of original sin. It took a wide range, and sooner
or later involved most of the prominent clergymen of the time.

Mr. Clarke married, Nov. 6, 17 19, Deborah Hobart, of Braintree. She died Feb.
28, 1765. Mr. Clarke died in June, 1768, and his funeral sermon was preached by Rev.
Thomas Barnard, of Salem. He was a faithful and popular preacher, and was eminent
among his brethren for forty years.



8 The officers elected were: Richard Saltonstall (1733), captain;

^ Samuel Adams (1729), lieutenant; John Darrell (1714), ensign. Thomas
' ^1 Pratt (1733) was first sergeant; Elnathan Jones (1734), second sergeant;

Samuel Jackson (1733), third sergeant; Nathaniel Thwing (1736), fourth sergeant, and
Bartholomew Gedney (1726), clerk.

The inhabitants of Boston seem to have had much trouble at different times in pro-
curing wood of proper quality and quantity. March 15, 1737, Hon. Elisha Cooke
(1699), Hon. Edward Hutchinson (1702), Thomas Hubbard (1732), Major Samuel
Sewall (1720), andCapt. Daniel Henchman (1712), were appointed to consider and report
some means whereby the inhabitants might be better and more effectually ])rovided
with wood.

April 5, 1737, the town again voted to erect a workhouse, and a committee was
chosen to have charge of the work, viz.: Hon. Elisha Cooke (1699), Hon. Jacob
Wendell (1733), Capt. Daniel Henchman (1712), Major Samuel Sewall (1720), Hon.
Edward Hutchinson (1702), Mr. Andrew Oliver, and James Bowdoin, Esq. This
workhouse was on Common Street, near where the granary building stood prior to its
removal to the corner of Tremont and Common streets. "The wall of the work

Rev. Petep Ctapke. AuTHORrriES: Fell's Annals of Salem; Sprague's Annals ol American
Pulpit; Barnard's Funeral Sermon.



478 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND ['737-8

house," the town voted, " be accordingly set at the distance of two feet, at least, from
the wall of the Burying-place."

The expense of the dinner at the installation of President Holyoke, at Cambridge,

on the 28th of September, 1737, will give a good idea of a dinner of the Artillery
Company at that time.

£ s. d.

24 loaves bread, 10^. ; eggs, iji- i 3 o

10 quarts milk, 4^-. 2d.; 7 pounds sugar, 10^. 6;/. o 14 8

2J ounces spice, \C)S.; 7 pounds flour, ^s. \d. o 14 i

7 pounds raisins, 9J-. 4^/. ; 6 pounds currants, 9 j o 18 4

15 pounds suet, 15^ o 15 o

Butter for the pans o i o

23 pounds pork, 34^. bd. ; neats' tongues, 30j- 3 4 6

28 fowls, boiled and roast 3 10 o

200 pounds boiled and roast beef, at 8r/. 6 13 4

7^ pounds roast pork o 7 6

22 pounds butter, 55 J^. ; cabbages, carrots, and turnips, 12 j- 3 7 o

Pepper, vinegar, and loaf-sugar, 4^ o 4 o

3 turkeys, iSi-. ; onions and cranberry sauce, 5 J' i 3 o

Dressing 711 9

8J pounds cheese, i2j-. 9^'. ; bread, 25 j'. 6;/. i 18 3

5 dozen plates of apple pie, and spice 3 o o

10 gallons wine 6 o o

Wood o 2 6



41 7



The members of the Artillery Company recruited in 1737 ^^^^^ '■ Joseph Blanchard,
Moses Deshon, and Thomas Drowne.

Joseph Blanchard (1737), of Dunstable, now Nashua, N. H., son of Capt. Joseph
and Abigail (Hassell) Blanchard, was born Feb. 11, 1704. He married Rebecca
Hubbard. Col. Blanchard (1737) became identified with the Artillery Company, prob-
ably, through the purchase of the Company's land in Dunstable, which he bought about
1737. He was a speculator in New Hampshire lands. In 1740, he was appointed a
mandamus councillor, and held that office until his decease. He was prominently con-
nected with matters, both civil and mihtary, in New Hampshire. He was appointed a
judge of the Superior Court of New Hampshire in 1749, which office he held until his
death. He commanded a regiment of five hundred men, ten companies raised in New
Hampshire in 1755, and saw active service in the French war at Crown Point. Mr.
Bancroft says, " A regiment of five hundred foresters of New Hampshire were raising a
fort at Coos, on the Connecticut ; but, under a new summons, they made the long march
through the pathless region to Albany. Among them was John Stark, then a lieutenant
of a rugged nature, but of the coolest judgment."

Mr. Blanchard (1737) died April 7, 1758, aged fifty-four years.

Joseph Blanchard (1737). Authorities; Fox's Hist, of Nashua; Whitman's Hist, A. and
H, A, Company,' Ed, 1842,



'737-8] HONORABLE ARTILLERV COMl'ANY.



479



Moses Deshon (1737), a carver by trade, but also an auctioneer, of Hoston, was
born in 1709. His wife's name was Persis . She died July 21, 1738, aged twenty-
six years. He was third sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1741, and first sergeant
in 1755. He served the town of Boston as constable in 1745; scavenger in 1752 and
»753. andwas elected clerk of Faneuil Hall Market the latter year, but was excused,
and assessor in 1769 and 1770.

March 14, 1743-4, he presented a memorial to the town, saying, " 'fhat he by the
Encouragement of Several Gentleman about Fourteen Months since began to Cut the
Arms of their Late Generous Benefactor, Peter Faneuil Esq, and soon after his Death
the same was Compleatly Finished & Gilt, and that he was at a Considerable Expence
of Time and Money to Cut & Gild the said Arms, and as the Fixing of it in Faneuil
Hall will not only be a great Ornament to the Room but a means of Perpetuating the
Memory of the Worthy & Generous Donor," desired the town to purchase it at a reason-
able compensation. The town then instructed the selectmen to purchase the said arms
at the expense of the town, which they did for the sum of forty pounds.

Major Deshon (1737) was a member of the Masonic Fraternity. He died Sept. 29,
1779, aged seventy years.

Thomas Drowne (1737), tradesman, of Boston, son of Shem and Katherinc
Drowne, was born in Boston, Dec. 14, 1715. Sept. 18, 1765, a committee was appointed
by the town "to liquidate the several accounts of the tradesmen concerned in the repairs
of Faneuil Hall." March 10, 1766, the committee reported that Thomas Drowne (1737)
was entitled to ;£^i2 t8s. 5^;/.

He was fourth sergeant of the Artillery Company in 1741, ensign in 1753, lieutenant
in 1756, and was also a lieutenant in the militia.

The record of the Artillery Company for 1737 is as follows : —

" 1737, April 4"". Being under arms, the Company made choice of the Rev'd
Mr. William Williams of Westown, to preach the next Artillery Election Sermon, and
that the present commission officers, with Mr. William Williams, Junior [1733], be a
committee to request it of him.

" May 2'^. The committee appointed to wait on the Rev'd Mr. William Williams,
to acquaint him of the choice the Company had made of him, to preach the next
Artillery Election Sermon, returned answer, that it was accepted by him.

" June 6"". Voted, that the present Commission officers, with the field officers, be
a Committee to give the thanks of the Company to the Rev'd Mr. William Williams for
the Sermon preached to them this day, and desire a copy thereof for the press.

" i737j June 6"'. Voted, that the Clerk shall wait on the committee of the Com-
pany for the selling of lands and desire them to lay before the Company at their next
meeting, their account of the lands lately sold at Rutland, for the Company's Considera-
tion. Also, voted, at the same time, that the Sermon preached to them this day, by
the Rev'd Mr. William Williams shall be printed, the charge thereof to be jiaid out of
the income of the lands sold at Rutland, but in case that should not be sufficient, then

Moses Deshon (1737). Authorities: Bos- Thomas (1737), as Mr. Whitman (1810) supposes,

ton Records; Conlincnhil Journal. who made the gilt-bronzed figure of an Indian which

Thomas Drowne (1737). Authority: Bos- surmounted the Province House. Deacon Shem

ton Records. Drowne also made the grasshopper on Faneuil Hall.

It was Deacon Shem Drowne, and not Lieut.



48o HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND ['737-8

to be paid by the Society; and that Capt Daniel Henchman [1712] forthwith print
350. — 50 whereof a present to the Rev'd Mr. Williams.

"September 5"'. The Company being under arms, The Committee appointed by
them to sell the lands at Rutland, according to their desire, rendered their account
thereof; which was accepted by the said Company, and the balance of ^40. 2. 6. due
to sd Company (as by their account on file), and now remaining in their hands, they
are still to be accountable for. Voted, also, that Capt. Downe [1716], Capt Adams
[1729] and Capt. Lyman [1732] be a Committee to examine the outstanding accounts
of the Clerks of said Company, viz The Clerk for the time past, and also the present
Clerk and make report thereof in October next ; also voted, that said Committee setde
Mr. Thomas Johnson's account for painting the Drums, & make report in October next."

Rev. William Williams, of Weston, who delivered the anniversary sermon before
the Company in 1737, was a son of Rev. William Williams, of Hatfield, and was born
May II, 1688. He graduated at Harvard College in 1705, and was ordained minister
at Weston in 1709. He married a Miss Stoddard, sister of his father's second wife.
Mr. Williams was esteemed a scholar and a good preacher. He delivered, besides the
Artillery sermon in 1737, the election sermon in 1741, which, with several other of his
discourses, was published. He died March 6, 1760, aged seventy-two years.



The foregoing pages indicate the activity and prominence of members of the Mili-
tary Company of the Massachusetts, now called the Ancient and Honorable Artillery
Company, in the civil, military, and religious life of the first towns in the Colony of
Massachusetts Bay. The following tables present the same or similar facts in a more
concise form.

"The selectmen of the town, as the uniform custom of New England witnesseth,
were chosen from the citizens of the highest repute. They exercised very considerable
powers. They were chosen by the free vote of the governed, and it is evident from
many sources that they were the recognized leaders of the community." ■"

From 1634 to 1646 inclusive, there were elected, for a term of six months,
persons called " managers of the affairs of the town." Thirty different persons were
elected to this office, of whom the following were members of the Military Company
of the Massachusetts : —

Robert Keayne (1637), Edward Gibbons (1637), William Tyng (1638), Atherton
Hough (1643), John Oliver (1637), Valentine Hill (1638), Edward Tyng (1642), Capt.
John Underhill (1637), Robert Harding (1637), John Coggan (1638), William Aspinwall
(1643), Thomas Fowle (1639).

Selectmen of Boston were first elected, to serve for one year, " i8th of ist mo.
1647." During the ninety years prior to 1738, the following persons, members of the
Mihtary Company of the Massachusetts, were elected to serve one year or more on the
board of selectmen : —

Anthony Stoddard (1639), William Davis (1643), Edward Tyng (1642), Jeremiah
Howchin (1641), Thomas Clarke (1638), Richard Parker (1638), John Eeverett (1639),
Adam Winthrop (1642), Thomas Savage (1637), Edward Hutchinson (1638), James
Oliver (1640), Samuel Cole (1637), Peter Oliver (1643), William Paddy (1652), Joshua

' Mr. William H. Whitmore, in Mem. Hist, ot Boston, Vol. I., p. 561.



HONORABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. 48 1

Scottow (1645), John Hull (1660), Thomas Lake (1653), Jacob Sheafe (1648), Heze-
kiah Usher (1665), Nathaniel Williams (T6"44T,'^Trn"RicIiards (1644), Thomas Brattle
(1675), Henry Allen (1658), Theophilus Frary (1666), Daniel Turell (1674), Elisha
Hutchinson (1670), Penn Townsend (1674), James Hill (1677), Adam Winthrop (1692),
John Foster (1679), Bozoun Allen (1676), Jeremiah Dummer (1671), Joseph Bridgham
(1674), Samuel Checkley (1678), Timothy Thornton (1691), Ephraim Savage (1674),
Nathaniel Williams (1667), John Eyre (1682), Edward Bromfield (1679), Thomas Hunt
(1685)^ John Marion, Jr. (1691), Joseph Front (1674), Simeon Stoddard (1675), Tim-



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