Oliver Goldsmith.

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OLIVER GOLDSMITH



OXFORD EDITION

THE PLAYS

OF

OLIVER GOLDSMITH

TOGETHER WITH

THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD

EDITED, WITH GLOSSARIAL INDEX AND NOTES

BY

C. E. DOBLE, M.A.

WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF

G. OSTLER




WITH FORTY-SIX ILLUSTRATIONS

HENRY FROWDE

LONDON, EDINBURGH, GLASGOW, NEW YORK

TORONTO AND MELBOURNE

1909



OXFORD I HORACE HART
PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY



PREFATORY NOTE

THIS volume contains the best-known and most
popular of Goldsmith's prose writings, viz. The Good-
Natur'd Man, She Stoops to Conquer, and The Vicar of
Wakefield. It is intended to form a supplementary
volume to the Poetical Works edited by Mr. Austin
Dobson for the same Series. The texts of the plays are
based on the early editions. In the case of The Vicar of
Wakefield, the text is that of the second edition, in which
Goldsmith made several slight changes, as well as some
of more importance, as noted in the Appendix. A few
additional corrections have now been made, and the
readings of later editions adopted where there seemed
sufficient grounds for the change.

Of the editorial matter, the notes have been thrown
into the form of a Glossarial Index, as affording a ready
means of access to any given subject. In this will be
found many parallel passages gathered from Goldsmith's
miscellaneous prose works, showing incidentally the
frequency with which our author drew upon himself.
The passages, in most instances, have been quoted in
full, to obviate the necessity of reference to the original.
In the Appendix a short history of each of the works in
this volume has been given, together with a few notes
supplementary to the Glossarial Index.

C. E. DOBLE.



K/J830293



CONTENTS

PAGE

THE GOOD-NATUR'D MAN. A COMEDY.

Preface 3

Prologue. Written by Dr. Johnson . . . 4

Dramatis Personae ....... 6

Act I. Scene: An Apartment in Young Honeywood's

House . 7

Act II. Scene : Croaker's House .... 22

Act III. Scene : Young Honeywood's House . . 37
Act IV. Scene : Croaker's House . . . .51

Act V. Scene : An Inn . . . . . .66

Epilogue . . . . . ... .82

SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER; OK, THE MISTAKES OF
A NIGHT. A COMEDY.

Dedication to Dr. Samuel Johnson . . .87

Prologue. Written by David Garrick ... 88

Dramatis Personae 90

Act I. Scene: A Chamber in an old-fashioned House 91
Scene : An Ale-house Room (The Three

Pigeons) ....... 98

Act II. Scene : An old-fashioned House . . .104

Act III. Scene: An old-fashioned House . . 126

Act IV. Scene: An old-fashioned House . . 138

Act V. Scene : An old-fashioned House . . 153

Scene : The Back of the Garden . . 157

Scene : An old-fashioned House . .163

Epilogue. Written by Goldsmith . . . .169

Epilogue. Written by J. Cradock . . . .171

SCENE FROM ' THE GRUMBLER ' . 173



vi CONTENTS

PAGE

THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD.

Facsimile Title-page of the First Edition . . 181

Advertisement 183

Contents of the Chapters 185

Text 187

GLOSSARIAL INDEX .... . 417

APPENDIX.

Notes on The Good-Natur'd Man . . . .488
Notes on She Stoops to Conquer .... 499

Note on The Grumbler 505

Notes on The Vicar of Wakefield . . . .505



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PLATES

PORTRAIT OF OLIVER GOLDSMITH . . . Frontii
CROAKER THRASHING THE POSTBOY (Good-Natur'd Man).

From an engraving published in 1805 . . To face p. 72

MR. QUICK IN THE CHARACTER OF TONY -LUMPKIN (She

Stoops to Conquer). From the 1780 edition of Poems

and Plays . . . . . . .To face p. 158

WAKEFIELD. Engraved by J. Walker from an original

drawing by W. Turner ; published in 1798 To face p. 188
GEORGE'S DEPARTURE. From an engraving by Stothard;

published in 1792 To face p. 199

WAKEFIELD BRIDGE. Engraved by J. Rogers from a

drawing by N. Whittock ; published in 1829 To face p. 200
CHANTRY ON THE BRIDGE AT WAKEFIELD. Engraved by

J. Rogers from a drawing by N. Whittock ; published

in 1829 . . . . . . .To face p. 202

SANDAL CASTLE, NEAR WAKEFIELD. From an engraving

published in 1785 . . . . .To face p. 204

MR. BURCHELL READING THE BALLAD OF THE HERMIT.

From an engraving in the Faris edition cf 1806.

To face p. 226
DISCOVERY OF OLIVIA. From an engraving by Stothard;

published in 1792 To face p. 330

PICKERING, YORKSHIRE. Engraved by J. Walker from an

original drawing by J. Hornsey ; published in 1797

To face p. 354
INTERIOR OF PICKERING CASTLE. Sketched and engraved

by W. Tombleson To face p. 364

THE VICAR AND HIS FAMILY. From an engraving by

Stothard; published in 1792 . . . To face p. 414
THE DEAF POSTILION. From an engraving by George

Cruikshank . . .To face p. 496



viii LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



ILLUSTRATIONS TO 'THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD '
By William Mulready, R.A., 1843

PAGE

The Wedding Dress 187

The Vicar's Dispute with Wilmot 192

Sophia rescued from Drowning 197

Flamborough and the Piper . . . . . . 205

Concert in the Arbour, and Approach of Thornhill . 210

Haymaking : Burchell and Sophia 215

Dispute between Moses and Thornhill .... 220

Dining in the Hay-field 225

Too late for Church 236

Fudge! 241

Moses going to the Fair 246

The Vicar showing his horse Blackberry . . . 252

Burchell's Pocket-book found 258

Nearly of a Size 263

The Elopement 270

The Vicar, the Stroller, and the entrance of Arabella Wilmot 276

George bribing the Servant ...... 283

Mr. Crispe's Office 292

George entertaining the Cottagers ..... 298

Olivia, Thornhill, and the young Baronet . . . 308

The Fire 324

Olivia's Misery 334

The Cattle driven for the Rent 339

Attempt to Rescue . . . . . * . . . 345

The Vicar paying his Footing 351

The First Exhortation 357

Reformation 363

Abduction of Sophia 368

Sermon in the Cell 380

Return of Sophia 386

Conviction of Thornhill 395

At the Altar . . 412



THE GOOD-NATTJR'D MAN

A COMEDY

AS PERFORMED AT THE

THEATRE-ROYAL, COVENT-GARDEN

[First printed in 1768]



GOLDSMITH. II



PREFACE

WHEN I undertook to write a comedy, I confess I was
strongly prepossessed in favour of the poets of the last
age, and strove to imitate them. The term, genteel comedy,
was then unknown amongst us, and little more was
desired by an audience, than nature and humour, in what-
ever walks of life they were most conspicuous. The author
of the following scenes never imagined that more would
be expected of him, and therefore to delineate character
has been his principal aim. Those who know any thing
of composition, are sensible, that in pursuing humour, it
will sometimes lead us into the recesses of the mean ;
I was even tempted to look for it in the master of a spung-
ing-house ; but in deference to the public taste, grown of
late, perhaps, too delicate, the scene of the bailiffs was
retrenched in the representation. In deference also to
the judgment of a few friends, who think in a particular
way, the scene is here restored. The author submits it
to the reader in his closet; and hopes that too much
refinement will not banish humour and character from
ours, as it has already done from the French theatre.
Indeed the French comedy is now become so very elevated
and sentimental, that it has not only banished humour
and Moliere from the stage, but it has banished all
spectators too.

Upon the whole, the author returns his thanks to the
public for the favourable reception which The Good-
Nat ur'd Man has met with : and to Mr. Colman in par-
ticular, for his kindness to it. It may not also be im-
proper to assure any, who shall hereafter write for the
theatre, that merit, or supposed merit, will ever be a
sufficient passport to his protection.



PROLOGUE
TO THE GOOD-NATUR'D MAN

WRITTEN BY DR. JOHNSOX

SPOKEN BY MR. BENSLEY

PREST by the load of life, the weary mind

Surveys the general toil of human kind ;

With cool submission joins the lab'ring train,

And social sorrow loses half its pain :

Our anxious bard, without complaint, may share

This bustling season's epidemic care,

Like Caesar's pilot, dignified by fate,

Tost in one common storm with all the great ;

Distrest alike, the statesman and the wit,

When one a borough courts, and one the pit.

The busy candidates for power and fame,

Have hopes, and fears, and wishes, just the same ;

Disabled both to combat, or to fly,

Must hear all taunts, and hear without reply.

Uncheck'd, on both loud rabbles vent their rage,

As mongrels bay the lion in a cage.

Th' offended burgess hoards his angry tale,

Tor that blest year when all that vote may rail ;

Their schemes of spite the poet's foes dismiss,

Till that glad night, when all that hate may hiss.

' This day the powder'd curls and golden coat,'

Says swelling Crispin, ' begg'd a cobler's vote.'

* This night, our wit,' the pert apprentice cries,

' Lies at my feet, I hiss him, and he dies.'

The great, 'tis true, can charm the electing tribe ;



PROLOGUE

The bard may supplicate, but cannot bribe.
Yet judg'd by those, whose voices ne'er were sold,
He feels no want of ill-persuading gold ;
But confident of praise, if praise be due,
Trusts without fear, to merit, and to you.



DRAMATIS PERSONAE



MEN.



Mr. Honeywood .

Croaker

Lofty ....

Sir William Honeywood

Leontine

Jarvis

Butler

Bailiff

Dubardieu .

Postboy



WOMEN.



Miss Richland

Olivia

Mrs Croaker

Garnet

Landlady



MR. POWELL.
MB. SHUTER.
MR. WOODWARD.
MR. CLARKE.
MR. BENSLEY.
MR. DUNSTALL.
MR. GUSHING.
MR. R. SMITH.
MR. HOLTAM.
MR. QUICK.



MRS. BULKLEY.
MRS. MATTOCKS.
MRS. PITT.
MRS. GREEN.
MRS. WHITE.



Scene, LONDON.



THE GOOD-NATTJR'D MAN

ACT I

SCENE, AN APARTMENT IN YOUNG HONEYWOOD's
HOUSE.

Enter Sir William Honeywood, Jarvis.

Sir Will. Good Jarvis, make no apologies for this
honest bluntness. Fidelity like yours is the best excuse
for every freedom.

Jarv. I can't help being blunt, and being very angry
too, when I hear you talk of disinheriting so good, so
worthy a young gentleman as your nephew, my master.
All the world loves him.

Sir Will. Say rather, that he loves all the world ; that
is his fault.

Jarv. I am sure there is no part of it more dear to him
than you are, though he has not seen you since he was a
child.

Sir Will. What signifies his affection to me ; or how
can I be proud of a place in a heart, where every sharper
and coxcomb find an easy entrance ?

Jarv. I grant you that he is rather too good-natur'd ;
that he 's too much every man's man ; that he laughs this
minute with one, and cries the next with another : but
whose instructions may he thank for all this ?

Sir Witt. Not mine, sure ? My letters to him during
my employment in Italy, taught him only that philosophy
which might prevent, not defend his errors.

Jarv. Faith, begging your honour's pardon, I'm sorry



8 THE GOOD-NATUR'D MAN [ACT i

they taught him any philosophy at all ; it has only
serv'd to spoil him. This same philosophy is a good horse
in the stable, but an arrant jade on a journey. For my
own part, whenever I hear him mention the name on 't,
I'm always sure he 's going to play the fool.

Sir Will. Don't let us ascribe his faults to his philo-
sophy, I entreat you. No, Jarvis, his good nature arises
rather from his fears of offending the importunate, than
his desire of making the deserving happy.

Jarv. What it arises from, I don't know. But to be
sure, every body has it that asks it.

Sir Will. Ay, or that does not ask it. I have been
now for some time a concealed spectator of his follies,
and find them as boundless as his dissipation.

Jarv. And yet, faith, he has some fine name or other for
them all. He calls his extravagance, generosity ; and
his trusting every body, universal benevolence. It was
but last week he went security for a fellow whose face he
scarce knew, and that he called an act of exalted mu mu
munificence ; ay, that was the name he gave it.

Sir Will. And upon that I proceed, as my last effort,
though with very little hopes to reclaim him. That very
fellow has just, absconded, and I have taken up the
security. Now, my intention is to involve him in ficti-
tious distress, before he has plung'd himself into real
calamity. To arrest him for that very debt, to clap an
officer upon him, and then let him see which of his friends
will come to his relief.

Jarv. Well, if I could but any way see liim thoroughly
vexed, every groan of his would be music to me ; yet
faith, I believe it impossible. I have tried to fret him
myself every morning these three years ; but instead of
being angry, he sits as calmly to hear me scold, as he does
to his hair-dresser.

Sir Will. We must try him once more, however, and



^CT i] THE GOOD-NATUR'D MAN 9

I'll go this instant to put my scheme into execution : and
I don't despair of succeeding, as, by your means, I can
have frequent opportunities of being about him without
being known. What a pity it is, Jarvis, that any man's
good-will to others should produce so much neglect of
himself, as to require correction ? Yet, we must touch
his weaknesses with a delicate hand. There are some
faults so nearly allied to excellence, that we can scarce
weed out the vice without eradicating the virtue.

[Exit.

Jarv. Well, go thy ways, Sir William Honeywood.
It is not without reason that the world allows thee to be
the best of men. But here comes his hopeful nephew ;
the strange, good-natur'd, foolish, open-hearted And
yet, all his faults are such that one loves him still the
better for them.

Enter Honeywood.

Honeyw. Well, Jarvis, what messages from my friends
this morning ?

Jarv. You have no friends.

Honeyw. Well ; from my acquaintance then ?

Jarv. (Pulling out bills.) A few of our usual cards of
compliment, that 's all. This bill from your tailor ; this
from your mercer ; and this from the little broker in
Crooked-lane. He says he has been at a great deal of
trouble to get back the money you borrowed.

Honeyw: That I don't know ; but I'm sure we were
at a great deal of trouble in getting him to lend it.

Jarv. He has lost all patience.

Honeyw. Then he has lost a very good thing.

Jarv. There 's that ten guineas you were sending to
the poor gentleman and his children in the Fleet. I believe
that would stop his mouth, for a while at least.

Honeyw. Ay, Jarvis, but what will fill their mouths in
B3



10 THE GOOD-NATUR'D MAN [ACT i

the mean time ? Must I be cruel because he happens to
be importunate: and, to relieve his avarice, leave them
to insupportable distress ?

Jarv. 'Sdeath ! Sir, the question now is how to relieve
yourself. Yourself Havn't I reason to be out of my
senses, when I see things going at sixes and sevens ?

Honeyw. Whatever reason you may have for being
out of your senses, I hope you'll allow that I'm not quite
unreasonable for continuing in mine.

Jarv. You're the only man alive in your present situa-
tion that could do so Every thing upon the waste.
There 's Miss Richland and her fine fortune gone already,
and upon the point of being given to your rival.

Honeyw. I'm no man's rival.

Jarv. Your uncle in Italy preparing to disinherit you ;
your own fortune almost spent ; and nothing but pressing
creditors, false friends, and a pack of drunken servants
that your kindness has made unfit for any other family.

Honeyw. Then they have the more occasion for being
in mine.

Jarv. Soh ! What will you have done with him that
I caught stealing your plate in the pantry ? In the fact ;
I caught him in the fact.

Honeyw. In the fact ? If so I really think that we
should pay him his wages and turn him off.

Jarv. He shall be turn'd off at Tyburn, the dog ; we'll
hang him, if it be only to frighten the rest of the family.

Honeyw. No, Jarvis ; it 's enough that we have lost
what he has stolen, let us not add to it the loss of a fellow-
creature !

Jarv. Very fine ; well, here was the footman just now,
to complain of the butler ; he says he does most work,
and ought to have most wages.

Honeyw. That 's but just ; though perhaps here comes
the butler to complain of the footman.




ACT i] THE GOOD-NATUR'D MAN 11

Jarv. Ay, it 's the way with them aD, from the scullion
to the privy-counsellor. If they have a bad master they
keep quarrelling with him ; if they have a good master,
they keep quarrelling with one another.

Enter Butler, drunk.

But. Sir, I'll not stay in the family with Jonathan, you
must part with him, or part with me, that's the ex-ex-
exposition of the matter, Sir.

Honeyw. Full and explicit enough. But what's his
fault, good Philip ?

But. Sir, he 's given to drinking, Sir, and I shall have
my morals corrupted, by keeping such company.

Honeyw. Ha ! ha ! He has such a diverting way

Jarv. 0, quite amusing.

But. I find my wine 's a-going, Sir ; and liquors don't
go without mouths, Sir ; I hate a drunkard, Sir.

Honeyw. Well, well, Philip, I'll hear you upon that
another time, so go to bed now.

Jarv. To bed ! Let him go to the devil !

But. Begging your honour's pardon, and begging your
pardon, master Jarvis, I'll not go to bed, nor to the devil
neither. I have enough to do to mind my cellar. I for-
got, your honour, Mr. Croaker is below. I came on
purpose to tell you.

Honeyw. Why didn't you show him up, blockhead ?

But. Shew him up, Sir ! With all my heart, Sir. Up
or down, all 's one to me. [Exit.

Jarv. Ay, we have one or other of that family in this
house from morning till night. He comes on the old
affair, I suppose. The match between his son that's
just return'd from Paris, and Miss Richland, the young
lady he 's guardian to.

Honeyw. Perhaps so. Mr. Croaker, knowing my



12 THE GOOD-NATUR'D MAN [ACT i

friendship for the young lady, has got it into his head that
I can persuade her to what I please.

Jarv. Ah ! if you loved yourself but half as well as
she loves you, we should soon see a marriage that would
set all things to rights again.

Honey w. Love me ! Sure, Jar vis, you dream. No, no ;
her intimacy with me never amounted to more than
friendship mere friendship. That she is the most lovely
woman that ever warm'd the human heart with desire,
I own. But never let me harbour a thought of making
her unhappy, by a connexion with one so unworthy her
merits as I am. No, Jarvis, it shall be my study to serve
her, even in spite of my wishes ; and to secure her happi-
ness, though it destroys my own.

Jarv. Was ever the like ! I want patience.

Honeyw. Besides, Jarvis, though I could obtain Miss
Richland's consent, do you think I could succeed with
her guardian, or Mrs. Croaker his wife ? who, though
both very fine in their way, are yet a little opposite in
their dispositions, you know.

Jarv. Opposite enough, heaven knows ; the very
reverse of each other ; she all laugh and no joke ; he
always complaining and never sorrowful ; a fretful poor
soul that has a new distress for every hour in the four
and twenty

Honeyw. Hush, hush, he's coming up, he'll hear you.

Jarv. One whose voice is a passing bell

Honeyw. Well, well, go, do.

Jarv. A raven that bodes nothing but mischief ; a
coffin and cross bones ; a bundle of rue ; a sprig of deadly
night-shade ; a (Honeywood stopping his mouth, at last
pushes him off.) [Exit Jarvis.

Honeyw. I must own my old monitor is not entirely
wrong. There is something in my friend Croaker's con-
versation that quite depresses me. His very mirth is an



ACT i] THE GOOD-NATUR'D MAN 13

antidote to all gaiety, and his appearance has a stronger
effect on my spirits than an undertaker's shop. Mr.
Croaker, this is such a satisfaction

Enter Croaker.

Croak. A pleasant morning to Mr. Honeywood, and
many of them. How is this ? you look most shockingly
to-day, my dear friend. I hope this weather does not
affect your spirits. To be sure, if this weather continues
I say nothing But God send we be all better this day
three months.

Honeyw. I heartily concur in the wish, though I own
not in your apprehensions.

Croak. May be not. Indeed what signifies what
weather we have in a country going to ruin like ours ?
taxes rising and trade falling. Money flying out of the
kingdom, and Jesuits swarming into it. I know at this
time no less than an hundred and twenty-seven Jesuits
between Char ing -cross and Temple-bar.

Honeyw. The Jesuits will scarce pervert you or me, I
should hope.

Croak. May be not. Indeed what signifies whom they
pervert in a country that has scarce any religion to lose ?
I'm only afraid for our wives and daughters.

Honeyw. I have no apprehensions for the ladies, I
assure you.

Croak. May be not. Indeed what signifies whether
they be perverted or no ? the women in my time were
good for something. I have seen a lady drest from top
to toe in her own manufactures formerly. But now-a-
days the devil a thing of their own manufacture 's about
them, except their faces.

Honeyw. But, however these faults may be practised
abroad, you don't find them at home, either with
Mrs. Croaker, Olivia, or Miss Richland.



14 THE GOOD-NATUR'D MAN [ACT I

Croak. The best of them will never be canoniz'd for
a saint when she 's dead. By the bye, my dear friend,
I don't find this match between Miss Richland and my
son much relished, either by one side or t'other.

Honeyw. I thought otherwise.

Croak. Ah, Mr. Honeywood, a little of your fine serious
advice to the young lady might go far : I know she has
a very exalted opinion of your understanding.

Honeyw. But would not that be usurping an authority
that more properly belongs to yourself ?

Croak. My dear friend, you know but little of my
authority at home. People think, indeed, because they
see me come out in a morning thus, with a pleasant face,
and to make my friends merry, that all's well within.
But I have cares that would break an heart of stone.
My wife has so encroached upon every one of my privi-
leges, that I'm now no more than a mere lodger in my
own house.

Honeyw. But a little spirit exerted on your side might
perhaps restore your authority.

Croak. No, though I had the spirit of a lion ! I do
rouse sometimes. But what then ! always haggling and
haggling. A man is tired of getting the better before his
wife is tired of losing the victory.

Honeyw. It 's a melancholy consideration indeed, that
our chief comforts often produce our greatest anxieties,
and that an increase of our possessions is but an inlet to
new disquietudes.

Croak. Ah, my dear friend, these were the very words
of poor Dick Doleful to me not a week before he made
away with himself. Indeed, Mr. Honeywood, I never
see you but you put me in mind of poor Dick. Ah,
there was merit neglected for you ! and so true a friend ;
we lov'd each other for thirty years, and yet he never
asked me to lend him a single farthing.



Acn] THE GOOD-NATUR'D MAN 15

Honeyw. Pray what could induce him to commit so
rash an action at last ?

Croak. I don't know, some people were malicious
enough to say it was keeping company with me ; because
we used to meet now and then and open our hearts to
each other. To be sure I lov'd to hear him talk, and
he lov'd to hear me talk ; poor dear Dick. He us'd to
say that Croaker rhym'd to joker : and so we us'd to
laugh Poor Dick. [Going to cry.

Honeyw. His fate affects me.

Croak. Ay, he grew sick of this miserable life, where we
do nothing but eat and grow hungry, dress and undress,
get up and lie down ; while reason, that should watch
like a nurse by our side, falls as fast asleep as we do.

Honeyw. To say truth, if we compare that part of life
which is to come, by that which we have past, the pros-
pect is hideous.

Croak. Life at the greatest and best is but a fro ward
child, that must be humour'd and coax'd a little till it
falls asleep, and then all the care is over.

Honeyw. Very true, Sir, nothing can exceed the vanity
of our existence, but. the folly of our pursuits. We wept
when we came into the world, and every day tells us why.

Croak. Ah, my dear friend, it is a perfect satisfaction
to be miserable with you. My son Leontine shan't lose
the benefit of such fine conversation. I'll just step home
for him. I am willing to show him so much seriousness
in one scarce older than himself And what if I bring my
last letter to the Gazetteer on the increase and progress
of earthquakes ? It will amuse us, I promise you. I
there prove how the late earthquake is coming round
to pay us another visit, from London to Lisbon, from
Lisbon to the Canary Islands, from the Canary Islands
to Palmyra, from Palmyra to Constantinople, and so
from Constantinople back to London again. [Exit.



16 THE GOOD-NATUR'D MAN [ACT i

Honeyw. Poor Croaker ! his situation deserves the
utmost pity. I shall scarce recover my spirits these
three days. Sure, to live upon such terms is worse than



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