Oscar Wilde.

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taken as the best reflection we now have of his individuality.
He was bred by Lewis J. Sutton, of Warwick, Orange County,
New York, and was foaled 1852. Mr. Sutton had in 1851 a
good road mare that he had got at Carl Young's roadhouse in
Third Avenue, New York. This mare, Katy Darling, had been
quite a trotter, and had, it was said, won a match race on Union
Course. Her reputation as a trotter and her fine form caused
Mr. Sutton to buy her when, as he describes it, "she was stand-
ing on three legs," in the hope of getting a foal from her. He
took her home in March, 1851, and in August bred her to
Rysdyk's Hambletonian, then a two-year-old colt, and Septem-
ber 22, 1852, she produced the subject of this sketch. Two years
later Mr. Sutton sold Katy Darling to James W. Benedict, of
Warwick, from whom she was purchased by Hezekiah Hoyt, who
took her to Muscatine, Iowa, where she produced a chestnut colt
that was gelded, by Hector, son of La Tourrett's Bellfounder.



hambletonian's sons and grandsons. 295

This gelding was her only foal other than Alexander's Abdallah,
and Katy Darling died at Muscatine, the property of a Mr.
Stewart. A search was long kept up for the pedigree of this
mare, and for the full details of what is known of her history the
reader is referred to the different volumes of Wallace's Monthly.
The conclusion from all the evidence found is that she was prob-
ably by a son of Andrew Jackson.

As a foal by his dam's side Alexander's Abdallah attracted
much favorable attention by his fine trotting action, and his per-
sistency in cavorting around at that gait. Among those who
took great delight in watching the little fellow trot was Mr;
Hezekiah Hoyt, and when the youngster was seventeen months
old Mr. Hoyt, acting for, or in partnership with, Major Edsall,
bought the colt for five hundred dollars, a fine price at that time.
Major Edsall kept him until he was seven years old, and I am
under the impression that he won some local races during that
time, when he was known as Edsall's Hambletonian. He was
accorded a fairly liberal patronage in Orange County, and his
progeny showed so well that Major Edsall sold him for three
thousand dollars in 1859 to Joel F. Love and James Miller, of
Cynthiana, Kentucky. The Hambletonian family was just then
becoming popular, and the price paid indicates that this horse
was already regarded by good judges as one of Hambletonian's
best sons. That he was reganled, moreover, as quite a trotter is
indicated by the fact that at the close of his second season in
Kentucky — 18f)0 — Mr. Miller matched him against Albion, a
competing stallion, for two hundred and fifty dollars a side. The
affair caused quite a sensation at the time, the Cynthiana horsemen
going in crowds to Lexington to back Abdallah. The latter was
driven by -"Jim" Monroe, and Albion by Warren Peabody, and
Abdallah won in the hollowest fashion, distancing Albion in 2:4G.
As youngsters Abdallah's first progeny in Kentucky showed very
well, and in the spring of 18G3 he Avas purchased by R. A.
Alexander, and made the seasons of 1863 and 1864 at Woodburn.
On the evening of February 2, 1865, Marion's band of Confed-
erate guerrillas raided Woodburn and took away a number of
horses, among them Alexander's Abdallah and the then famous
young trotter. Bay Chief, by Mambrino Chief. Marion mounted
Bay Chief and, crossing the Kentucky River, the band encamped
on the farm of a Mr. Bush, in a rough, hilly region, twelve miles
from Woodburn. Here the next morning the Federal cavalry.



296 THE HORSE OF AMERICA.

that were sent in pursuit after the raid, came np with the raiders,
and after a sharp fight routed them. Marion, on Bay Chief, was
a conspicuous mark for Federal bullets during the skirmish.
Early in the fray Bay Chief was shot through the muzzle,
through both thighs, and one hock. In this condition he carried
his rider two miles in the retreat, when the horse was so weak-
ened by loss of blood that a Federal cavalryman overtook them.
His piece being empty, the soldier aimed a blow at Marion, but
missing him, lost his balance, and fell from his horse. The
guerrilla leader quickly saw his opportunity, jumped from Bay
Cliief, mounted the soldier's horse, and escaped. Bay Chief
died about ten days later, despite all efforts made to save him.
Meanwhile, Alexander's Abdallah had been found, safe and
sound, by a Federal soldier in Mr. Bush's stable. The soldier
refused to give him up to Mr. Alexander's men, and declared
he would send him North and keep him until he got a large re-
ward for his return. The horse was barefooted and in no condi-
tion for hard usage. And so they rode him off, and after going
some forty or fifty miles he gave out, and they turned him loose
on the road. He was found next day in a pitiable condition by
the roadside, and brought back as far as Lawrenceburg on his way
home, where he was taken with pneumonia and died a few days
later.

Just how great a loss this was to the trotting breed was not
realized until long after — until in fact Goldsmith Maid had con-
quered all before her, and made a record as a campaigner never
equaled, and until his two great sons, Almont and Belmont,
rose to pre-eminent places in the list of great sires. Other sons
of this remarkable progenitor have taken rank as sires, and his
daughters proved of the highest excellence as brood mares; but
Almont and Belmont have each established such large, impor-
tant, and popular sub-families that this work would be incomplete
without some brief sketch of each.

Alexander's Abdallah got Goldsmith Maid, 2:14, Rosalind,2:21f,
Thorndale, 2:22^, Major Edsall, 2:29, and St. Elmo, 2:30. Four-
teen of his sons have produced one hundred and fifty-five stand-
ard performers, and twenty-nine of his daughters have produced
forty-four standard performers, among them being the noted
campaigners, Favonia, 2:15, and Jerome Eddy, 2:1G|, the latter
also a successful sire. The following table gives the families of
his most prominent sons:



hambletonian's sons and grandsons.



297



LEADING SONS OP AI.EXANDER'S ABDALLAH.









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Almont, 2 -391


1864
1864

1858
1859


1884
1889

1885
1886


37

58

24

3


95
63

12
6


72

48

13

3


609

560

49

87


646


Belmont


618


Hauibletonian (Wood's)


73


Major Ed sal 1,2 139


90


Thorndale 2-22^


1865
1861


1894
1882


10

8


8
5


14
17


47
38


57


Jim Munro


46


Abdallah Pilot


1865


1881


3


1


1


17


20







Almont was bred. at Woodburn Farm, was foaled 1864, and was
by Alexander's Abdallah out of Sally Anderson, by Mambrino
Chief; grandam Kate, a wonderfully fast pacer by Pilot Jr.
Colonel E. P. Pepper informed me that he kneAv Kate as well as
any of his own horses, and that her speed at the pace was "sim-
ply terrific.'' Kate, whose dam was called the Pope mare, pedi-
gree unknown, had several foals, among them the "catch filly"
that was the dam of Clay Pilot, sire of The Moor, that got the
great brood mare Beautiful Bells, 2:29^, and Sultan, 2:24, the sire
of the world-famous Stamboul, 2:07-j. Thus the blood of this
pacing Pilot Jr. mare figures in three great sub-families, the
Almont family, the Beautiful Bells family, and the Sultan family.
Almont was a beautiful cherry bay, very rich in shade, and with-
out any white Avhatever. He was fifteen hands two and one-
quarter inches high at the wither, somewhat higher behind, and
stoutly and symmetrically made all over. He could not be called
a handsome or highly finished horse, but he was emphatically a
well-made one. He had very excellent feet and legs, and these
he reproduced with great uniformity, as well as his very intelli-
gent and even disposition. He was trained early at Woodburn,
and, like his sire, started but once and distanced his competitor
in 2:39f, this being in his four-year-old form. He soon after
showed 2:32 over the slow Woodburn track, and was sold to the
late Colonel Eichard West for eight thousand dollars and put in
the stud. In 1874 the late General W. T. W^ithers, Lexington,
Kentucky, bought him for fifteen thousand dollars, and a half



298 THE HORSE OF AMERICA.

dozen of years later he was very generally regarded as the greatest
of living sires, and his prestige made the name of Fairlawn Farm
of world-wide renown, and made his owner rich. The fact that
ninety-five of his sons have sired standard performers, a greater
number of producing sons than is to the credit of any other
horse, Hambletonian alone excepted, indicates the high rank
Almont must be accorded as a progenitor. In considering his
success it is well for breeders particularly to note that good
judges considered Almont capable of showing a 2:20 gait any
day, and that, like Electioneer, he always was daily given regu-
lar and ample track exercise. His gait has been described as bold
and open, without an excess of knee action, but with immense
display of power behind. Almont died of spasmodic colic, July 4,
1884, in the fullness of his fame, and at an age when, had he been
more discreetly used in the stud, he should have been at his
prime as a stock horse.

Almont was hardly a sensational horse in his day, the perform-
ance of Westmont at Chicago in 1884, when he paced a mile with
running mate in 2:01f, being the one sensational performance to
the credit of his progeny. This lightning streak of pacing speed
that so often crops out in the Almont family can be readily
accounted for by the student of breeding. As has been noted, his
grandam Kate, by Pilot Jr., was a phenomenally fast pacer, and,
as we have indicated, her blood proved potent in more than one
line. In addition to this there was a strong tendency to pace
among the progeny of Alexander's Abdallah. St. Elmo was first
shown at fairs in Kentucky under saddle and as a pacer, and
many others of Abdallah's get were known to naturally pace.
When we reflect that in Almont this Alexander's Abdallah blood
with its pacing predilection was united with the blood of the old
lightning pacer, Kate, we need not be surprised at the great
number of fast pacers that came from Almont and his sons.
Belmont, too, has shown a tendency to get the pacing gait with
great frequency, but not in such frequency or at such high rates
as his son Nutwood. As there could not be traced any known
pacing blood in Belmont's dam, and as the fact that Alexander's
Abdallah transmitted an inclination to pace has been generally
not known or ignored, some writers have been unable to under-
stand why the Belmonts paced. He got pacers because he in-
herited that capacity from his sire, and Nutwood got more and
faster pacers than Belmont, because in him the pacing inclina-



hambletonian's sons and grandsons.



299



tion inherited from Alexander's Abdallah was reinforced by the
strong pacing inheritance of his dam. Miss Kussell, the grand-
daughter of Old Pacing Pilot.

As shown in the table of Alexander's Abdallah's sons, Almont
got thirty-seven standard performers, ninety-live of his sons sired
five hundred and three standard performers, and seventy-two of
his daughters produced one hundred and six standard performers.
His most successful sons are embraced in the following table:



LEADING SONS OF ALMONT.



Name.



Almont Jr. (1829), 2:26.

Altamont, 2:26f

Atlantic, 2:21

Piedmont, 2:17^

Almont Jr. (1764), 2:29
King Almont, 2:21^...

Pasacas, 2;43

Almonarch, 2:24f . ...

Allie Gaines

Harbinger

*Allie West, 2:25

Abdallah Mambrino. . .





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1872


39


1875


39


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1878


24


6


12


22


1871


19


3


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18


1871


19


11


11


51


1874


14




1


1


1870


14.


4


6


13


1875


13


2


3


7


1875


12


5


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17


1879


10


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1870


7


4


10


24


1870


13


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83
49
46
37
70
15
27
20
29
13
31
37



Died at 6 years old.



This line is Justly regarded with growing favor as one of our
very best and most productive sub-families, and one that is
breeding on excellently, generation after generation.

Belmont was a bay horse of very superior form and finish,
bred at Woodburn Farm, and foaled there in 1864. He was by
Alexander's Abdallah, out of Belle (that also produced McCurdy's
Hambletonian, 2:20^, and Bicara, the dam of Pancoast, 2:21|) by
Mambrino Chief; gran dam Belle Lupe, by Brown's Bellfounder.
Belmont and Almont Avere of the same age, and, perhaps because
of his finer appearance, Belmont seems to have been the preferred
one at Woodburn, and was retained while Almont was sold.
Though Belmont was a successful horse and established a great



300



THE HORSE OF AMERICA.



family, no thinking man can contend that he was the equal of
Almont as a sire, when all the circumstances are considered.
Almont spent almost his entire stud career at Fairlawn^, where
there never were five mares worthy in blood to be in a great trot-
ting stud, where there were scores of mares of all kinds of poor
and freakish pedigrees, even to "Arabs," and where none of the
stock was ever trained, Belmont, on the other hand, was all his
life at the head of the most famous, and, in his younger years,
unquestionably the best collection of trotting brood mares in the
world, and where a training department was always maintained.
Eemembering these conditions, and contemplating the statistics
of the two families, it is interesting to speculate as to how the
records would stand had Belmont been at Fairlawn, and Almont
at Woodburn.

LEADma SONS OF BELMONT.



Name.



Nutwood, 2:18f

King Rene, 2:30i

Efjiuont

Wedgewood, 2:19. . .

Vat can, 2:29J

Warlock

Monaco

Waterloo, 2:19^

Meander, 2:26i

Manibritonian, 2:20^.
Herscliell



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1870
1875
187:}
1871
1879
1880
1878
1882
1879
1883
1883


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136
35
34
31
14
12
11
10
10
10
10


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17
13
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Standard perform-
ers produced by
sons and daugh-
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69

16

11

9


432
55
38
60








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568
90
72
91
14
12
18
11
17
10
10



Belmont, besides having the advantage of excellent individual-
ity was also a trotter of no mean speed. He was driven a mile
over the working track at Woodburn in 2:28^, and was, there-
fore, a quite well-developed trotter. He never appeared in
public, and has, therefore, no public history. The most success
ful of his sons has been Nutwood, whose dam was Miss Russell,
the dam of Maud S. This horse was himself a fast trotter in his
day, taking a record of 2:18f, and rose to great popularity and
success in the stud. Daughters of Belmont, being nearly all out



hamblktoxian's soxs axd gkandsons. 301

of producing mares, are greatly and justly esteemed as brood
mares. Belmont died at Woodburn November 15, 1889. Bel-
mont got fifty-eight standard performers, sixty-three of his sons
sired four hundred and eighty-nine standard performers, and
forty-eight of his daughters produced seventy-one standard per-
formers. The rank of his best sons is shown on the preceding
page; all having ten or more in the list of standard performers
being included in the table.

Volunteer stands pre-eminent among trotting sires as the
one horse against not one of whose get the epithet "quitter"
was, as far as I am aware, ever hurled. He did not get speed
with remarkable uniformity, nor did his progeny develop speed
«arly or rapidly. They required persistent training, but when
speed was developed in a Volunteer you had with it every other
quality of a resolute, enduring race horse. They were hardy,
rugged, good-limbed horses, and uniformly possessed stamina
and resolution in the highest degree. Volunteer had the advan-
tage of being owned by Alden Goldsmith, an ambitious and
experienced horseman, and the father of two of the most success-
ful trainers of our day. The Volunteers had, therefore, every
advantage that training could give, and his rise to fame was
largely due to Mr. Goldsmith's constantly developing and racing
his progeny.

In 1853 Mr. Joseph Hetzel, Florida, Orange County, New
York, bred the bay mare Lady Patriot to Hambletonian, 10, and
Volunte*^r was foaled May 1, 1854. This mare, Lady Patriot,
was by a horse called Young Patriot, and out of Mr. Lewis
Hulse's trotting mare, and that is all that is known of her pedi-
gree. Her sire's pedigree is wholly unknown. She produced a
numerous family, among them being Sentinel, 2:29f, and Green's
Hambletonian, brothers of Volunteer, and of some rank as sires,
and Marksman, by Thorndale, that is also in the table of sires,
while her daughter Heroine, sister to Volunteer, produced
Shawmut, 2:'26.

Volunteer was a bay horse, with a little white around the left
hind coronet, fifteen hands three inches at the wither, and six-
teen hands measured at the coupling. He has been considered
by many good judges to have been the handsomest of all the sons
of Hambletonian. He was a horse of superb form and of great
elegance of carriage. With sufficient of muscle and substance,
he was built on graceful, finished lines, with a beautiful head



302 THE HORSE OF AMEiaCA.

loftily carried, a long and graceful neck, a body stout but finely
molded, and all set off by a handsome mane and tail. His feet and
legs were of superb quality, and despite his great age they were,
it is said, without fault or blemish to the last. His temper and
disposition were good, though he was very high-spirited, and in
harness he was especially attractive. As a four-year-old Volun-
teer was sold to Mr, E. C. Underhill, of Brooklyn, after he had
won a premium at the Orange County fair. In April, 18G1,
Mr. Underhill sent him to Tim T. Jackson, of Jamaica, Long
Island, and in Wallace'' s Mo?Hhly for December, 1880, Mr. Jackson
gave his experiences with Volunteer, making among others this
specific statement:

" I bad liim at Union Course one day, and met Mr. Alfred M. Tredwell
there, and I got biin to bold tbat watcb on bim. Had bim in quite a beavy
single-seated wagon, weighing probably one hundred and twenty-five or one
liundred and thirty pounds. On the first trial be trotted in 2:33. I said to
Mr. Tredwell tbat be could beat tbat, and he trotted the next mile in 2:'Sli."

He had previously been trained by William Whelan, at
Union Course. It was June 26, 1862, while he was in Jackson's
hands, that Alden Goldsmith, in partnership with Edwin
Thorne, purchased this horse, then called Hambletonian Jr.,
and he soon afterward became the sole property of Mr. Gold-
smith. Mr. Rysdyk greatly resented his having been called
Hambletonian Jr., and early regarded him as a possible rival
of Hambletonian, and there was war from the start between
the adherents of sire and son. The Civil War was just then at
its height, and the patriotic and military spirit rampant, and Mr.
Goldsmith aptly named his horse Volunteer. Mr. H. T. Helm,
who wrote a very detailed history of Volunteer twenty years ago,
credits him with having trotted in 2:36 to wagon at the Goshen
Fair in the fall of 1862, beating Winfield, Grey Confidence and
others. At Hartford, Connecticut, in August, 1867, he beat
George M. Patchen Jr., in a single dash in 2:37. He Avas, like
nearly all the other great sires, a developed trotter.

It is said that his early stud opportunities were so limited that
at ten years old he had but eighteen living foals. The first of
his get entered the 2:30 list in 1871, but from that time on his
list rapidly grew, and the great campaigners Gloster, Alley,
Driver, Bodine, Huntress, the great three-miler, and finally St.
Julien, 2:lli, then the fastest trotter in the world, so spread the



hambletonian's sons and grandsons. 303

fame of Volunteer that when his- sire died in 1876 he was re-
garded as the greatest living sire of trotters. In 1882 Mr. K. S.
Veech, probably the most intelligent breeder in all Kentucky,
while on a visit to New York, telegraphed Mr. Goldsmith to
know whether it was worth while for him to visit Walnut Grove,
with a view to buying Volunteer, and Mr. Goldsmith's answer
reveals the regard in which he held his horse. The pith of his
admirably written letter was in this paragraph:

" While there is no person that would be more welcome at the farm than
yourself, if the only object of your visit would be the purchase of Volunteer,
then your trip would not be a profitable or successful one, as no breeder in
Kentucky has money enough to buy him. ... I have as high a regard
for money as the most of men for the uses it may subserve, but there are cer-
tain things which money cannot buy, as the Teacher of old taught Simon the
Samaritan."

And SO Volunteer remained at Walnut Grove, and ''lagged
superfluous on the stage" long after his owner had passed away,
and died December 13, 1888, at the extraordinary age of thirty-
four years, seven months and twelve days.

Volunteer sired thirty-four standard performers, and forty of
his sons and forty-eight of his daughters produced an aggregate
of two hundred and twenty-one standard performers. The most
successful of his sons is the Michigan sire, Louis Napoleon, that
was out of the Harry Clay mare, Hattie Wood, dam also of Victor
Bismarck and Gazelle, 2:21. Louis Napoleon has twenty-seven
in the standard list, and fourteen of his sons and twenty-two of
his daughters are producers, his best son being Jerome Eddy,
2:16^, sire of Fanny Wilcox, 2:10^, and twenty-seven other stand-
ard performers.

Dictator very early in his career attracted attention as the
full brother to the famous Dexter, who was his senior by five
years, and Avho was king of the trotting turf, and the most
famous trotter in all the world just at the time Avhen Dictator
was merging from colthood to maturity. Dictator had thus from
the very start the advantage of splendid stud opportunities. He
was bred by Jonathan Hawkins, of Walden, Orange County, New
York, and was foaled in 18G3. He was got by Hambletonian out
of the famous Clara, the dam of Dexter, 2:17^, Alma, 2:28f,
Astoria, 2:29^, etc., by Seely's American Star; grandam the Mc-
Kinstry mare, breeding unknown, but that produced Shark with



304 THE HORSE OF AMERICA.

a saddle record of 2:27f. Dictator was a seal-brown horse with
a white rear ankle, and stood scant fifteen hands and one inch.
He was made on a small but a fine model, and was, all in all, a
handsome little horse, and most of his get partook of his fine
quality of structure, though many were unsound. Shortly after
Dexter made his dehut on the turf, Dictator was bought by Mr.
Harrison Durkee, a wealthy New York gentleman who had an
extensive stock farm at Flushing, Long Island. The colt was
then but eleven months old and was left at the Hawkins farm
until two years old. Then he was sent to Mr. Alden Goldsmith's
place, at Washingtonville, to be broken, after which he was taken
to Mr. Durkee 's farm. The colt was very fast, but the fame of
Dexter was already wide, and, no great importance being at-
tached to development of stallions in that day, he was considered
of more value for breeding than for racing. He was worked
considerably at Mr. Durkee's farm, and Colonel John W. Conley
and H. C. Woodnut, who at different times had charge of him,
have both declared that they knew him to be one of the fastest
trotters of his day. In 1874 Colonel Richard West sold Almont
to General Withers, and to fill his place leased Dictator in the
autumn of 1875, and he made the seasons of 1876 and 1877 at
Colonel West's Edgehill farm, Georgetown, Kentucky. Stand-
ing at a higher fee than Almont or George Wilkes, he attracted
little outside patronage, and he was returned to Long Island. It
has been stated that when at Colonel West's, George Brasfield
drove Dictator quarters as fast as thirty-four and one-half
seconds. After his return to Flushing he sank from public
notice until the appearance of Director as a great three-year-old



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