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February 6, 1953



THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW



13



STATISTICS ON CANAL TRAFFIC

For the purpose of comparison between pre war and post-war traffic through the Panama Canal, statistics
the fiscal year 1938 are used in this section, as being more nearly normal for peace time than those for 1



cs for
939.



Canal Shipping Heads
Toward New Records
For Fiscal Year 1953



Shipping through the Panama Canal,
which has been breaking records steadily

for some time now, is headed for another
new record this fiscal year if the present
volume continues.

A total of 336 more commercial vessels,
large and small, went through the Canal
during the second quarter of fiscal year
1953 than in the corresponding quarter of
fiscal year 1952. For the first two quarters
this fiscal year 3,597 large (300 tons or
over) commercial vessels have transited,
compared to 3,065 for the first two quarters
in fiscal year 1952.

Tolls are correspondingly high. For the
first two quarters of 1953 a'tota^l of $15,575,-
000 has been collected, as compared to
$12,902,000 for the same period in 1952.

Statistics just released by the Manage-
ment Division indicate a number of interest-
ing trends in Canal shipping.

Intercoastal Traffic Up

Although intercoastal shipping is still
considerably lower than in fiscal year 1938,
last normal pre- World War II year, it is
again on the increase.

During the quarter just concluded, there
were 65 more large commercial transits in
the intercoastal trade than during the
corresponding period in fiscal year 1952.

Other main trade routes which also show
a marked increase are those between the
United States East Coast and South Amer-
ica, the United States East Coast and the
Far East, and the route between Europe
and the United States and Canadian
West Coast.

Some decline in traffic appears this past
quarter, as compared to fiscal year 1952,
in the following routes: United States East
Coast to Central America, United States
East Coast to Australasia, and between
Europe and Australasia.

The United States continues to hold the
No. 1 spot as the nation whose flag transits
the Canal most frequently. Great Britain
and Norway follow, in that order, as they
did in the corresponding period last year
and in the first quarter this year.

Panamanian-registered ships moved into
the No. 4 spot, with Honduran vessels,
which had been fourth, moving back to
No. 5.

German Shipping Increases

The increase in Japanese shipping con-
tinued, with that nation which had only
29 vessels transiting in the second quarter
last year now in sixth place with 81 ships.
Another marked increase was in the number
of German ships, 50 this past quarter, as
compared to only one during the correspond-
ing period last year. Other national
increases were in the numbers of Liberian,
Irish, Italian, Spanish, and Venezuelan
registered vessels.

Mineral oil continued as the prime com-
modity carried on the Atlantic-Pacific
routes, although it is slightly less this quar-
ter than the last. On the Pacific-Atlantic
routes ores now rank first in number of tons
carried through the Canal.

The only commodities showing a decline
in the Atlantic-Pacific trade are sulphur and
cement, while a marked increase appears in
the number of tons of coal, iron and steel
manufactures, sugar, phosphates, and
machinery.

In the Pacific-Atlantic routes, ores out-
stripped lumber this quarter as the No. 1
commodity, although lumber, wheat, ni-
trates, and bananas all show a marked
upswing in amount from the previous
quarter. Sugar shipped on these routes
was considerably less than in the first
quarter of fiscal year 1953.



Principal commodities shipped through Canal

(All figures in long tons)

Figures in parentheses in 1938 and 1952 columns indicate

relative positions in those years

ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC



Commodity



Mineral oils.

Coal and Coke

Manufacturers of iron and steel

Sugar

Phosphates

Paper and paper products

Machinery

Sulphur

Automobiles

Raw cotton

Tinplate

Cement

Canned food products

Ammonium compounds

Ores, various

All others

Total



Second Quarter — Fiscal Year



1953



1,155,677

679,396

405,089

177,715

100,529

88,629

81,764

72,283

64,879

63,564

59,342

46,596

34,997

13,062

9,573

1,278,046



1952



909,773

410,689

381,639

124,311

187,657

107,185
70,287
68.856
97,693
98,985(10)
67,395 (12)
57,850 (9)
26,810 (21)
30,964 (18)
7.109 (28)

952,169



4,331.141 3.599,372



1938



287,537 (3)
37.108(14)

479,661 (1)

971 (31)

71,763 (6)

94,572 (5)

40,773(10)

101,599 (7)
81,751 (9)
18,155(13)
54,507 (8)
37,256(11)
38,451 (15)
15,806(22)
24,366(18)

902,124



2,286,400



PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC



Commodity


Second Quarter, Fiscal Year


1953


1952


1938




883,220
864,238
792,428
340,142
330,603
220,649
195,835
179,513

126,844
86,715
63,065
55,107
49,481
48,714
32,769

583,290


936,585 (1)
829,215 (2)
413,053 (3)
285,351 (5)
370,334 (4)
182,532 (7)
204,389 (8)
158,607 (6)

95,533 (9)
166,515 (10)
66,016 (13)
44,176(14)
38,963 (17)
38,368 (16)
7,517 {ii)
779,083


524,191 (3)




671,973 (2)


Wheat


217,658 (7)




303,166 (6)




306,890 (5)




4,911 (29)




179,591 (8)




302,617 (4)


Refrigerated food products (ex-


64,079(10)




665,884 (1)




33,454(18)




33,884(16)




120,664 (12)




32,369 (20)




1,928 (*)




920,582






Total


4,852,613


4,616,237


4,383,841



MONTHLY COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC AND TOLLS

Vessels of 300 tons net or over
By fiscal years





Transits


Tolls
(In thousands of dollars)




1953


1952


1938


1953


1952


1938


July


529


463


457


$2,343


$1,981


$2,030




533


490


505


2,288


2,103


2,195








615


516


444


2,636


2,188


1,936








674


544


461


2,917


2,230


1,981








620


502


435


2,611


2,053


1,893








626


550


439


2,679


2,347


1,845










522


444




2,121


1,838












507


436




2,082


1,787












613


506




2,512


2,016








\ r'l




601


487




2,423


1,961








May




622


485




2,481


1,887












594


445




2,401


1,801


Totals for first 6 months of


3.597


3,065


2,741


$15,474


$12,902


$11,880







14



THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW



February 6, 1953



THIS MONTH'S CALENDAR



FEBRUARY

7th — Track Foreman No. 2741, Balboa

B & B Shops.
8th Sheetmetal Workers, Balboa Club-
house, 9:30 a. m.
Plumbers No. 606, Balboa Lodge Hall,
9:30 a. m.
9th— Machinists No. 699, K. of C. Hall.
Margarita, 7:30 p. in.
American Legion Post 1, Legion Home,
7:30 p. m.
10th — Pipefitters, Margarita Clubhouse,
7:30 p. m.
Electrical Workers No. 397, Wirz

Memorial, 7:30 p. m.
VFW Post 100, Old Boy Scout Building,

Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion Post 7, Fort Clavton,

7:30 p. m.
Legion Auxiliary Unit 1, Balboa
Legion Home, 7:30 p. m.
11th — Carpenters and Joiners, Balboa
Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m.
Pacific Civic Council, Board Room,

Administration Building, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion Post 2, Legion
Home, Old Cristobal.
13th Blacksmiths No. 400, Boilermak-
ers Nos. 463 and 471, K. of C. Hall,
Margarita, 7:30 p. m.
15th CLU-MTC, Balboa Lodge Hall,

8:30 a. m.
16th— Electrical Workers No. 677, Gatun
Masonic Temple, 7:30 p. m.
Truckdrivers, Balboa Lodge Hall, 7:30
p. m.
17th — Operating Engineers No. 595,
K. of C. Hall, Margarita, 7 p. m.
Machinists No. 811, Balboa Lodge Hall,
7:30 p. m.
18th— Teachers No. 227, General Library,
Balboa High School, 7 p. m.
AFGE No. 14, Balboa Clubhouse, 7:30

p. m.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 3,
Gatun Legion Home, 7:30 p. m.
19th — American Legion Auxiliary Unit

6, Gamboa Legion Hall, 7:30 p. m.
22d— Machinists No. 699, K. of C. Hall,

Margarita, 7:30 p. m.
23d— VFW Auxiliary, Post 3822 Home,

7:30 p. m.
24th — Operating Engineers No. 595,
Balboa Lodge Hall, 7 p. m.
American Legion Post 7, Fort Clay-
ton, 7:30 p. m.
25th — Governor - Employee Conference,
Board Room, Administration Building,
2 p. m.
VFW Post 100, Old Boy Scout Building,

Cristobal, 7:30 p. m.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 2,
Legion Home, Old Cristobal, 7:30
p. m.

MARCH

1st— VFW Post 3857, Cristobal Veterans
Club, 9 a. m.



2d Postal Employees No. 23160, Bal-
boa Lodge Hall, 7:30 p. m.

Pedro Miguel Civic Council, Union
Church, 7 p. m.

Cristobal-Margarita Civic Council,
Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m.

VFW Post 727, Fort Clavton, 7:30 p. m.

VFW Post 3822, Curundu Road, 7 :30 p.m.

American Legion Post 3, Gatun Legion
Hall, 7:30 p. m.
3d — Meatcutters and Butchers No.
121, Officers' Home, 7:30 p. m.

Teachers, No. 228, Auditorium, Cristo-
bal High School, 3:30 p. m.

Gamboa Civic Council, Community
Center, 7:30 p. m.

Gatun Civic Council, Gatun Club-
house, 7:30 p. m.

Machinists No. 811, Balboa Lodge Hall,
7:30 p. m.
4th— VFW Post 40, Wirz Memorial,
7:30 p. m.

Isthmian Nurses Association, Build-
ing 283, Gorgas Hospital, 8 p. m.
5th — Carpenters and Joiners No. 667,
Margarita Clubhouse, 7:30 p. m.

Marine Engineers, Jewish Welfare
Board, 7 p. m.
6th — American Legion Post 6, Gamboa
Legion Home, 7:30 p. m.




December 15 through January 15

The following list contains the names of
those V. S.-rate employees who were trans-
ferred from one division to another (unless
the change is Administrative) or from one
type of work to another. It does not con-
tain within-grade promotions or regradings.

CIVIL AFFAIRS BUREAU

Alan C. Gillespie from Guard, Pacific
Locks, to Postal Clerk, Postal Service.

Mrs. Evelyn M. Taylor from Substitute
Teacher to Kindergarten Assistant, Schools
Division.

Mrs. Beatrice M. Rhyne from Clerk-
Typist, License Section, to Clerk-Stenog-
rapher, Office of the Civil Affairs Director.

Lyon J. Hoard from File Clerk, Record
Section, Administrative Branch, to Postal
Clerk, Postal Service.

Robert L. Jordan * 2 from Heavy Truck
Driver, Motor Transportation Division, to
Fireman, Fire Division.

COMMUNITY SERVICES BUREAU

Mrs. Ellen E. Bailey from Property and
Supply Clerk, Record Section, Administra-



February Sailings



From Cristobal


STEAMER


Leave Cristobal
10 a. m. Friday


Arrive Port-au-
Prince 7 a. m.
Sunday, leave noon
Sunday


Arrive New York
8 a. m. Thursday


A neon _ _ .

Panama -. _

Cristobal


February 13

February 20

February 27

March 7


February 15

February 22

March 1

March 9

(Monday)


February 19

February 26

March 5

March 13

(Friday)




(Saturday 1


From New York


STEAMER


Leave Neic York
4 p. m. Tuesday


Arrive Port-au-
Prince 7 a. m.
Saturday, leave
4 p. m. Saturday


Arrive Cristobal
2 p. m. Monday


Panama _


February 10
February 17
February 26
(Thursday)
March ' 3


February 14
February 21

March 2
(Monday)

March 7


February 16
February 23

March 4
(Wednesday)

March ~ l )


CnstobaF- . .
Ancon * . _

Panama _ - - . . . .


* Schedule changed because of Washington's Birthday holiday.



tive Branch, to Clerk-Typist, Housing
Division.

OFFICE OF COMPTROLLER

Mrs. Chiquita C. Cassibry, Clerk-
Typist, from Terminals Division to Typist,
Office of the Comptroller.

John N. Walker, III from Postal Clerk,
Postal Service, to Cash Accounting Clerk
Accounting Division.

Mrs. Frances A. Hunter from Clerk-
Typist, Contract and Inspection Division,
to Clerk-Stenographer, Plant Inventory and
Appraisal Branch.

Charles L. Nix from Contract Assistant,
Contract and Inspection Division, to Valu-
ation Engineer Plant Inventory and Ap-
praisal Branch.

Mrs. Margaret M. Janssen from
Clerk-Typist, Accounting Division, to Clerk
Stenographer, Management Division.

ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION
BUREAU

Samuel B. Mauldin from Powerhouse
Operator-Dispatcher to Power Dispatcher,
Electrical Division.

Augustus R. Kam from Civil Engineer-
ing Aid, Engineering Division, to Contract
Assistant, Contract and Inspection Division.

Chester R. Boltz from Wireman to
Distribution Foreman, Electrical Division.

William A. Muller from Apprentice
Wireman to Wireman, Electrical Division.

Miss Maria I. Uribe from Typist,
Engineering Division, to Clerk-Typist,
Contract and Inspection Division.

HEALTH BUREAU

Miss Annie L. Allnutt, Dental Hygien-
ist, from Gorgas Hospital, to Pacific Dental
Clinic^.

MARINE BUREAU

Victor L. Sanger from Junior Fere nan,
Ferry Service, to Tractor-Bulldozer Oper-
ator, Dredging Division.

John F. Martin, Guard, from Atlantic
to Pacific Locks.

Maurice F. Dunn from Towboat Master
to Senior Towboat Master, Navigation
Division.

Frank D. Harris from Master {Taboga)
to Maintenance Superintendent (Chief,
Aids to Navigation Section).

Charles F. Brown and Heyward A.
Shingler, Lock Operator (Wireman), from
Atlantic to Pacific Locks.

Abe L. Lincoln from Rigger to Lock
Overhaul Foreman, Locks Division.

Carl R. Meissner from Life Guard,
Physical Education and Recreation Branch,
Schools Division, to Checker, Locks Divi-
sion.

RAILROAD AND TERMINALS BUREAU

Mrs. Zulu Lee Smith, Clerk-Typist,

from Electrical Division to Terminals Divi-
sion.

Mrs. Louise K. Allen, from Accounting
Clerk, Printing Plant, to Clerk- Typist,
Terminals Division.

Charles E. Chase from Heavy Truck
Driver, Motor Transportation Division, to
Ganger and Foreman, Cribtender, Term-
inals Division.

SUPPLY AND SERVICE BUREAU

Mrs. Helen T. Bradley from Card
Punch Operator, Accounting Division, to
Clerk, Division of Storehouses.

Kenneth N. Woodcock from Cash
Accounting Clerk, to Commissars Assist-
ant, Commissary Division.

Samuel Dubin from Cash Accounting
Clerk to Storekeeper Division of Storehouses

Edward T. Rathgeber from Storekeeper.
to Cash Accounting Clerk I tivision of Store-
houses,

James B. Gilder from Commissary
Assistant to Property .uu\ Supply Clerk,
Commissary Division.

Leo J. Krziza, Accounting Clerk, from
Maintenance I >i\ ision to Motor Transporta-
tion Division.

Earl E. Trout, Safety Inspector, from
Commissary Division to Office of Supply
and Service Director.

Max R. Hart, Safety Inspector, from
Motor Transportation Division, in Office of
Supply and Service Director.

Reed R. Mcllvaine, from Stevedore
Foreman, Terminals Division, to Super-
visory Steward, Hotel Tivoli.



February 6, 1953



THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW



15



ANNIVERSARIES



CANAL TRANSITS— COMMERCIAL AND U. S. GOVERNMENT



Employees who observed importanl anni-
versaries during the month of January •'"•
li-tcd alphabetical^ below. The numbei
of years includes .ill Governmenl service
with the (-'anal or other agencies. Those
with continuous service with the Canal are
indicated with (*).

41 YEARS

Gregor Gramlich, Dipper Dredge Mas-
ter, I dredging I >ivision.

<5 YEARS
Gapt. Lucien A. Skeels, Panama Canal

Pilot, Navigation Division.

25 YEARS
Ruth E. Creasy, Elementary School
Principal, Diablo Heights, Schools Division,
l.ela M. Holden, Elementary Teacher,
Balboa, Schools Division.

John A. Knox, Lock Operator-Machin-
ist, Locks Division.

20 YEARS

George T. Darnall, Jr., Hydrographic
Engineer, Dredging Division.

VVilmer I.. Downing, Payroll Clerk,
Finance Bureau.

Richard W. Fuller, Voucher Examiner,
Finance Bure m.

Capt. William C. Hearon, Panama
Canal Pilot, Navigation Division.

Carl W. Hoffmeyer, Postal Clerk,
Postal, Customs, and Immigration Divi-
sion.

Noble A. Phillips, Sheetmetal Worker,
Industrial Bureau.

Christian S. Skeie, Sanitation Inspec-
tor, Health Bureau.

Frank D. Spencer, Hydrographic En-
gineer, Dredging Division.
15 YEARS

Edward M. Altman, Magistrate, Bal-
boa Magistrate's Court.

Clarence L. Dimmick, Service Mechan-
ic and Refrigeration and Air Conditioning
Mechanic, Commissary Division.

Russell E. Hileman, Housing Manager,
Pedro Miguel, Housing Division.

Douglas Jordan, Bricklayer and Boiler-
maker, Industrial Bureau.

Ernest P. Muzzio, Construction In-
spector (Plumbing), Contracts and Inspec-
tion Division.



RETIREMENTS IN
JANUARY



Employees who retired at the end of
January, their birthplaces, titles, length of
service at retirement, and their future
addresses are:

Melville L. Booz, Pennsylvania; Cash
Accounting Clerk, Office of the Comptroller;
26 years, 5 months, 12 days; address
uncertain.

John T. O'Donnell, Pennsylvania;
Civil Engineering Aid, Maintenance Divi-
sion; 26 years, 9 months, 20 days; Philadel-
phia, Pa.

Acting Governor Conducts Conference

{Continued from page 3) comparison was

being studied.

Sam Roe, of the Pacific Civic Council,
asked if the daily air raid siren tests could
not be made at some time other than at
noon and if the daily tests are necessary.

Attending the conference were: Col-
onel Paxson, Mr. Doolan, F. G. Duns-
moor, Administrative Assistant to the
Governor, for the Administration; Henry
C. Simpson, Marine Engineers; F. H.
Hodges, Locomotive Engineers; S. J.
Garriel, Plumbers; Mr. Lovelady; Robert
C. Daniel, Conductors; M. J. Goodin,
Mr. Rice, Mr. Hammond, and Mr. Roe,
Civic Councils; Carl F. Maedl, Walter
Wagner, Mr. Luhr, John R. Townsend,
E. J. Husted, and Henry Chenevert,
Central Labor Union; Otto Hemerichs, a
visitor from the Washington office, and
C. R. Vosburgh, Schools.





Second Quarter — Fisral Year






1953


1952


loss




Atlantic

to
Pai mm


to
X 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 i .


Total


Total


Total


( Commercial \ essels:
( Icean-going


956


964


1,920


1,596


1,335


♦Small


134


136


270


258


536








1 (I'M)


1,100


2, ion


1,854


1 S71






**U. S. Government vessels:

Ocean-going


174


84


258


152




'Small . . .


43


52


95.


84








Total commercial and U. S. Government


1,307


1,236


2,543


2.090





*Yessels under 300 net tons or 500 displacement tons.
"Vessels on which tolls are credited. Prior to July 1,
ships transited free.



1951 . < iovernment-operated



Canal commercial traffic by nationality of vessels





Second Quarter — Fiscal Year


Nationality


1953


1952


1938


Num-
ber of

transits


Tons of
cargo


Num-
ber of
transits


Tons of
cargo


Num-
ber of
transits


Tons of
cargo


Argentine


2


4,270












3

297

11

5
25

3
47
31

1
36

1

19

115


1,523

1,871,704

50,899

40,252

29,926

16,676

235.345

26,451

2,200

153,920

9,400

163.541

139,349






British..


342
13

8
33

4
46
38


1.985,014
80.322
57,113
34,871
20,162
192,353
26,174


297

1


1 447 7?0










Colombian






Costa Rican. .






Danish.
Ecuadorean. _


56


220,973










38
50
26
99


153,249

55,900

238.848

141,777


28
83
19

1
3












Honduran


869

13 235








2
6

17

29

11

I


434

3,070

89,716

154,169

67,049




Irish :


12

37

81

33

5

2

30

5

229

112

7

5


8,230

178.416

496.489

198,441

15,643

10,837

144,044

2,338

825.438

583,123

14,663

24.268






Italian _.


13

72


46.192
418 525


Liberian




Mexican






Moroccan








Netherlands.
Nicaraguan.


23


135,513


74


205,439


Norwegian
Panamanian
Peruvian
Philippine


210

91
6

7

4


861,976

491,110

1.986

40,216

11,656


151
39

1


795,486
94,155

1,148














2


4 990


Spanish..


11

49

3

584

16


53,471
170,340
25,687
3,422,199
20,074


5

36

2

535

6


25,395

168,738

12,566

3,400,570

10,259




Swedish . .
Swiss .


27


180,032


United States
Venezuelan .


464


2,583,090




4


21 052














Total


1,920


9,183,754


1,596


8,215,609


1,335


6,670,241



Reactivation Of Civil

Defense Moves Ahead



(Continued from page 1) will have a

woman alternate.

The Civic Councils are also selecting a
head warden for U. S.-rate townsites who
will be known as a Zone Commander.
The Zone Commander in turn will select
Section Commanders, most of whom will
be women and each of whom will be
responsible for an average of 25 families.
They will organize first aid, child care,
light rescue and fire guard teams in their
respective neighborhoods.

The same procedure will be followed
in the local rate townsites with the excep-
tion that the local rate school principals
of each community are selecting the Zone
Commander in lieu of a Canal-wide local
rate civic organization.

Each warden will be trained in a course
to be conducted by Lieutenant Dolan



when he returns from Washington and
each will be responsible for passing down
civil defense information to his neighbor-
hood group.

Through this community effort, Lieu-
tenant Dolan said, Civil Defense expects
to teach each Canal Zone resident the
elements of "self protection." that is,
what to do when the siren sounds, what
measures to take to protect themselves,
how to take care of their families, their
neighborhoods and, ultimately, the
community.

All teams will be mobile, to be called
upon in case of need in another area, but
the efforts of all will be coordinated to
avoid duplication and confusion.

First aid and Nurses' Aide training
programs will be coordinated with the
local chapter of the American Red Cross.

In November 1904 the Isthmian Canal
Commission's employees on the Isthmus
totaled 3,500.



16



THE PANAMA CANAL REVIEW



February 6, 1953



Donor Worries As His Boxer

Goes To "Seeing Eye" School




THESE POTENTIAL SEEING EYE DOGS are
the pups, Duke, about to make contact with the
bones offered by his master, Charles E. Reilly, and
Crony, shown with her back to the camera. On the



right is the Reillys' pet Boxer, Pippin, who sired these
pups and the Boxer, Gee, donated to The Seeing Eye
and recently graduated from guide dog training with
a new, blind owner.



No final grade from a crucial examina-
tion ever was awaited with more hope
and apprehension than the reports Charles
E. Reilly received while the Boxer he
donated to the blind was going through
"Seeing Eye School."

By the time that dog, "Gee," had
made the grade and was graduated with
a new blind owner, Mr. Reilly, Chief
Accountant for the Commissary Division,
was training and worrying about the
potentialities of two more tentative
candidates.

The present potential Seeing Eye dogs
are 20-week-old "Crony" ("Gigolo's
Crona"), sister of "Gee" ("Gigolo's
Rubicon" ARC W-256367), and 18-
week-old "Duke" ("Lustig Duke"), half
brother of the successful candidate.

Mr. Reilly has already told The Seeing
Eye that either puppy is theirs for the
asking and because of his wish to give the
dog to that organization has turned
down an offer of $200 for the fine young
specimen, Duke.

It isn't enough that a dog owner is
willing to part with his pet for the sake
of the blind— even if the pet is some $300
worth of purebred like the handsome,
fawn-colored Gee.

Physique, health, temperament, and
intelligence must be letter-perfect for the
purpose if the puppies are to serve as
Seeing Eye dogs.

Mr. Reilly tentatively offered Gee to
several training centers before he de-
cided to send him to The Seeing Eye,
Inc., in Morristown, N. J., the first such
institution in the United States and
still a leader in the field.

Hard To Part With Dogs

"It would not be easy to part with one
of my dogs," he explained in making the
offers, "unless it be to a trained benefi-
ciary whose life would be bettered



through our separation."

Only German Shepherds are taken at
some of the training centers and are
in the majority at The Seeing Eye, where
some Boxers and Labrador Retrievers
are also used.

The requirements of the training cen-
ters only heighten the little anxieties
inherent in the ownership of fine dogs —
which resemble more than anything else
the pangs of parenthood.

In the case of his personal pet Boxer
"Gigolo" ("Pippin"), who sired the
other pups, Mr. Reilly worried and wrote
to kennel clubs about the dog's "ignoble
timidity." Boxers are supposed to be
fearless, but Gigolo just went away when
threatened by other dogs— even those
that were only about a fourth as big as he.

Gigolo disposed of that worry when he
outgrew the discouraging faint heart
that belied his fine long British Boxer
blood line. Mr. Reilly made arrange-
ments to acquire that dog, the first
Boxer that he had, while he was on vaca-
tion in England, in the summer of 1948.


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