Patrick O'Brien.

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ocean wide,
Where we spent many happy hours upon the green

hillside.
I thought of Erin's daughters whom England did

enslave
As I knelt by the Pacific, above my sister's grave.

On the shore of the Pacific she rests peacefully.
She left her home and country for a land of liberty.
Born beneath the English flag she scorned to live a

slave.
And left that home in tender years and crossed the

ocean wave.
'Twas sad to And her buried so far away from home,
But we are destined far and wide in foreign lands to

roam.
Grim death has taken her away, with husband true and

brave,
May peace be theirs for evermore is all that now I

crave.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 191

ON BOARD THE "MAINE."

'Twas evening; all was still as we at anchor lay,

With thoughts of wives and little ones, down in
Havana Bay.

The pilots with their little craft were waiting for the
dawn,

The mocking-birds were singing and the dew was on
the lawn,

The sons of toil had gone to rest in that isle of
golden sheen,

"All's well on board !" the watchman cried, while gaz-
ing on the scene.

Three hundred souls we had on board, no danger did

we fear,
AVith a captain brave and jolly crew, our gallant ship

to steer;
But what is that? Great God above! The noise

comes from below;
Our ship's in twain, our gallant "Maine," by Weyler's

torpedo.
Hush! Hush! the noise is o'er; see them struggling

with the tide.
"Jump in! Be quick! Save all you can," the gallant

Sigsbee cried.

My God! What have they done?' Behold this awful

wreck !
Our comrades dead and dying and maimed upon the

deck.



193 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Just see that headless body drifting with the tide,
Oh, would it were in battle that gallant hero died !
Another with an arm gone is trying with might and

main
To save the comrade by his side who was by Weyler

slain.

Now Uncle Sam well knows the treachery of Spain,
And will avenge our comrades who perished in the

"Maine."
The mothers and the fathers, the wives and sisters,

too,
The brothers and the sweethearts of our noble tars so

true
Will see our starry banner o'er Cuba proudly wave,
Where the-heroes of our battleship their lives so freely

gave.

May our sailors brave now rest in peace, and remember,

one and all,
They died beneath that starry flag that never feared a

ball.
Our banner now doth proudly wave, assail it if you

dare.
You cowardly dogs, now bite the dust for war we will

declare.
United now throughout the land our battle cry shall be,
''Avenge the 'Maine' in war with Spain, then Cuba

shall be free."



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 193

DEWEY, THE HERO.

After ploughing the raging billows, through spume and

spray,
The Hero of Manila is now anchored in the bay.
He's the sailor of America, and Dewey is his name.
Bronzed and rugged from the sea, from Vermont hills

he came.
He entered old Manila with quick-firing gun and ball,
And many a Spanish sailor at his command did fall.

'Neath the starry flag of Washington he comes here

once again.
After freeing the Filipinos from the cruel yoke of

Spain.
No Kaiser, Bear or Bull would dare Old Glory now

assail.
With Yankee tars true to our stars, and sons, too, of

the Gael,
Our sailors fought for liberty and kept the Dons at

bay;
With Dewey, Schley and Hobson foremost in the fray.

Schley and Dewey are the men whose victories on the

sea.
In Asia and America have set the people free.
They showed the Spanish navy what Americans could

do.
They know we are not afraid of any foreign crew ;
They also know our gunners never miss the mark,
Whether firing at a man-o'-war, a brigantine or bark,

13



194 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Long life to Admiral Dewey, recorded let it be,
Columbia's noblest emblem, the banner of the free,
Without a stain he brought it back and proudly it doth

wave
O'er the deck of the ''Olympia" and gallant crew so

brave.
With a soldier in the White House no power on earth

now dare
Trifle with Old Glory or with that flag compare.



LADY MAJORIE HOWARD.

Have you heard of Lady Howard, so handsome,

straight and tall,
A credit to her native isle, admired by one and all?
She'^ not like some poor toady who pulled our colors

down
When he saw Erin's emblem, the Harp without the

Crown.
No slave is she to royalty or England's King or Queen,
Old Ireland should be proud of her, she dearly loves

the green.
Her heart is full of charity the people know right well ;
The poor and needy call on her and praises of her tell.

How stately she appears each day with raiment rich

and rare.
There is no lady in the land with Marjorie can compare.
Her hair is of the golden sheen, her eyes of azure blue.
Her carriage grand, her voice sublime, her lips of

purest hue.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 195

Her name is heard both far and wide, each time in

merited praise,
Whene'er she walks through mead or park the people

at her gaze ;
They know of her good qualities, the truth to you Til

tell,
The subject of m_v ditty owns the Kenwood House

Hotel.

You'll find folk there from Germany, from France ana

sunny Spain,
From the golden West, Chicago, too, and from the

coast of Maine ;
The hostess greets them one and all, she knows no

sect or clan.
But treats them all with courtesy, that motto is her

plan.
O'Connor from Chicago with smiles you will meet

there,
A hater of oppression, for he can do and dare.
His charming wife and daughter, like Maurice, love the

green.
They have no use for dukes or knights, nor any king

or queen.

Long life to Lady Howard and her lovely family.
May they live to comb gray locks and see old Ireland

free;
May her troubles all be very small, morning, noon and

night,
And may her children comfort her, her joy and heart's

delight.



196 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Her name should be recorded among the brave and

true,
For she has shown America what womankind can do.
May her days be spent in happiness wherever she may

dwell,
In marble halls or palace walls or Kenwood House

Hotel.



BABY GENEVIEVE.



Away down in old V^irginia, where the darkey loves to

dwell,
My thoughts are all of Genevieve, the child I love so

well.
When I go home at night she meets me at the door,
And runs to kiss me with the love her mother gave

before.
Her mother's looks and smiling face in her I can

perceive,
Whene'er I gaze upon the face of Baby Genevieve.

With a heart that's almost broken, I'll bear it for her

sake,
For she is with the angels since her God from me did

take —
My love and pride and heart's delight of happy days

gone by.
For Death's dark mantle wrapped her round and took

away my joy.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 197

But when I see my baby's face, this heart it doth re-
lieve,

For mother's looks were just the same as those of
Genevieve.

Oh, baby, dear, how hard it was when mamma passed

away.
And with the last fond look she gave this to me did say :
"Take care of Baby Genevieve, she is our youngest

child,
And God will help you through life's ways" — she spoke

so sweet and mild.
Your mother's words I think of now, and joyfully I

perceive
Her handsome face and hazel eyes in Baby Genevieve.



ON BOARD THE "ALAMEDA."

(Sung by the Royal Quintette Club, of Honolulu.

Tune : "The Good Old Summer Time.")
Once more beneath our starry flag, the emblem of the

free,
We're leaving Honolulu to cross the deep blue sea ;
Here's to our gallant captain, who takes us through

the main ;
On board the "Alameda" we're homeward bound again.
We're homeward bound ! We're homeward bound !

We're homeward bound again,
On board the "Alameda" we're homeward bound
again.



198 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

And when we reach the Golden Gate in San Francisco

Bay,
We'll welcomed be in that city by lads and lassies gay;
They're waiting for our little craft, also her gallant

crew,
Who take delight both day and night to see us safely

through.

We're homeward bound ! We're homeward bound !

We're homeward bound again.
On board the "A^lameda" we're homeward bound

again.



And now upon the boundless deep no danger do we

fear,
In God so just we place our trust for all to us so dear.
Blow on, ye gentle breezes, blow, and drive our bark

toward home ;
Despite the wars in foreign lands, in safety we may

roam.
With a captain brave and a jolly crew who takes us

through the main.
On board the ''Alameda" we're homeward bound again.

We're homew^ard bound ! We're homeward bound !

We're homeward bound again.
On board the "Alameda" we're homeward bound

again.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 199

ON BOARD THE "MAJESTIC."

Farewell, farewell, asthore machree, we ne'er may see

you more,
For we are leaving you behind for fair Columbia's

shore.
The hirelings of an alien race have forced us from our

home,
And we must leave our kith and kin in foreign lands

to roam.
The baihffs and the landlords, a curse to Erin's Isle,
Have caused the children of the Gael to leave their

native soil ;
But though I leave you far behind, you're ever dear

to me,
And from the bounding billows I bid farewell to thee.

Another glimpse I take of you and it may be the last,
The happy days I spent with you remind me of the

past.
And though I leave your fertile shore in other lands

to dwell.
While life is left I'll ne'er forget the hours spent in the

dell;
Your shady groves and valleys, old Ireland's joy and

pride,
Shall ne'er forgotten be by me, though salt seas may

divide.
I know your sons are good and true, your daughters

pure and brave.
But foul oppression forces them to cross the ocean

wave.



200 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Farewell, farewell, once more, asthore, oh, may you

yet be free,
Though Columbia must be our home, that land of

liberty ;
We'll ne'er forget our motherland, her valleys and her

hills.
Or the robbers and marauders, the cause of all her ills ;
We seek the land of Washington, the best across the

main.
And will comply with all her laws where freedom we'll

obtain.
The rich and poor are equal there, a man's a man

alway,
"Farewell, farewell, my native land," to you once more

I say.



SISTERS TWO.



I met two sisters, young in years,

Not many months ago,
One had been across the sea

The other soon to go.
They were born in old Ireland,

A place you all know well.
And lately left their native home

In foreign lands to dwell.
Their eyes are of the azure blue.

None with them can compare.
Bereft of mother in their teens

When they were free from care.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 201

The one left home when scarce fourteen

The other then a child,
Now they're tall and handsome

With spirits undefiled.

That they're a credit to their native land

I gladly ween.
How stately they appeared to me

When on the village green.
I saw them at the pattern,

I saw them at the fair,
I saw them on the mainland

Prepared to do and dare.
'Tis sad to think that those bright eyes

W^ere forced to cross the sea
And leave their childhood's happy home

Through Saxon tyranny.
To see these pretty Irish girls

'Twas indeed a prize,
With their silken hair, rosy cheeks and

Expressive, bright blue eyes.

When I think of these sisters

It makes my heart feel sore,
They ne'er appeared so sweet to me

As they did at old Dromore.
That was their dear native soil,

In happy youth they played
Till they were forced to cross the deep

By laws the vSaxon made.



202 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Their father is an Irishman,

Respected far and near,
And should a call to arms come

Would gladly volunteer
To strike for home and motherland

Which Nellie and Mary
Were forced to leave with heav}^ hearts

And cross the deep blue sea.



A VISIT TO A DEAR FRIEND'S GRAVE IN SAN

FRANCISCO.

Note — Written for a lad3r whom the writer beheld kneeling over the
grave of her mother. San Francisco, July 1904.

She's resting on the hillside, the dearest one to me,
And sleeps her sweetest sleep in yonder cemetery.
Fond memories of childhood days I now recall to mind ;
Love like hers I know full well I ne'er again shall find.
She's gone to join the angels, her life to God she gave ;
My only consolation is to strew with flowers her grave.

Oh ! mother, how I miss you no tongue but mine can

tell,
For you were all on earth to me and in my heart still

dwell.
You nursed me with your tender care, with kisses soft

and sweet,
No more will you caress me, we ne'er again shall meet,
Except at that Celestial Throne where angels for us

crave,
My only consolation is my darling mother's grave.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 203

TOM'S WEDDING.

Welcome to the golden West from your childhood's

happy home,
A mother's pride and heart's delight — no matter where

you roam.
A father's love he gave to you when in your tender

years,
And now you miss their loving kiss which would allay

yours fears.
Although you are a happy bride your thoughts will

wander there,
Those hours you spent in infancy when free from every

care.
Your heart and hand you gave to one to cherish you

through life;
He'll stick to you through weal or woe since you've

become his wife.



All hands around this festive board stand up and drink

with me.
Long life to bride and bridegroom, too, is the toast we

drink to thee.
May every joy and happiness this world can unfold
Be always found within this home and heaps of love

untold.
And though far from your native place where you first

saw the light,
And words of love were spoken which vou to him did

plight,



204 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

The memory of the courting days must not be cast

aside
Since you've become the wife of Tom, his comfort and

his pride.

And when the cradle comes around, as come I hope it

will,
If one won't do, there may be two to help that cradle

fill.
It's nice to be a father, and Tom will often say,
"Rock-a-bye, my baby," singing sweetest lay,
"Since you have come to gladden us our home is now

complete.
With kisses and caresses we always will you greet.
Cead mille failtha once again I bid you welcome here,
I know full well that vou will be both faithful and

sincere."

Now boys and girls a warning take and listen unto me.

Be sure to marry one you love or live in misery.

Just think of what you saw to-night, a groom and

happy bride,
A model for all youthful souls, his darling and his

pride;
Modesty is pictured in her sweet, angelic face,
I hope no other human being will ever take her place.
And what of him? He's youthful, too, with manliness

galore,
He will be true to eyes of blue and keep wolf from the

door.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 205

The next will be the wooden one, I mean the wooden

wedding,
May peace and happiness be every hour yours until the

time that's pending.
Then comes the tin. May babies bright bring smiles

to you galore ;
And when the crystal comes around may there be half

a score.
The silver, I sincerely hope, will find you just the

same —
Two loving hearts that beat as true as when the

wooden came.
And when the golden comes around, and come I hope

it may,
May every guest that's here to-night be here on that

same day.

And now before we leave this house, all you that are

yet free,
I hope when next we meet again that married you

will be,
And settle down for love alone whene'er you hitch for

life.
'Twill carry you this world through, the struggle and

the strife ;
So wed for love, and not for gold, if you take my

advice.
A happy home and loving heart — for gold they will suffice.
Now comes the hour when we must part, but in our

hearts will dwell
The pleasant hours we spent with you, God bless you

both, farewell.



206 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Now one word more about the bride before I end my

theme :
She comes from good old Irish stock, no wonder she's

a dream.
Her father I have i<nown for years, to home and home-
land true,
Her mother is a faithful wife and loving mother, too ;
Though born 'neath the starry flag on fair Columbia's

shore,
Next to the Stripes the Shamrock comes, now and for

evermore.
She saw old Erin in her tears by English hirelings

made,
The roof tree often in a blaze by England's vile

brigade.

And now a last word before we part from round this

festive board :
We care not for a king or queen or •. ny monarch horde.
We love the emblem of the free, none with it can

compare,
And, if assailed by any power, then we will do and

dare.
" Hip ! Hip Hoorah ! by night and day, beneath it we will

stand.
So drink with me right heartily and toast your native

land.
She is the greatest on this earth and we will her

uphold,
We're not ashamed, won't be defamed her history to

unfold.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 207

IN ANSWER TO AN INVITATION TO FATHER
LYNCH'S SILVER JUBILEE.

(San Francisco, June, 190-i.)

To go see you I do incline,

E'en though buttermilk took place of wine.

If Pluto's angels were the guests

I would go there to hear their jests.

A soggarth you are of the few

To faith and homeland always true,

And should the Apes your church assail

They'll know you came from Innisfail ;

A patriot, priest and soldier, too.

To Stars and Stripes you would be true.

And should a call come o'er the sea

To strike for Irish liberty

You would be foremost in the fray,

Like Ennnet was in Dublin Bay.

I'm glad you live to celebrate

Your Jubilee in Golden Gate.

Beneath that emblem of the free —

That glorious flag of liberty.

And when to-morrow you will pray,

Think well of those who are far away ;

And pray for them to crush the foe

And break the chains that bind them low.

To commemorate your Jubilee, this line

From ''Rocky Mountain" Pat O'Brien.



208 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.



A "SIBERIA" POEM.



(A trip to Honolulu on the S.S. "Siberia," J. T. Smith
in command, January ii, 1904.)

On board the ship "Siberia" we ploughed the raging
main.

The ladies did their very best all hands to entertain.

Mrs. Macintosh looked stately, with her winsome, win-
ning ways

She sang and played last evening with electric lights
ablaze.

And Mrs. Holmes and Miss Grozelier, commanding was
their mien.

You'll meet them in the dining-room with smiles for all
I ween.

Next we see bold Brewster upon the promenade.

With a lady on his arm, he renders her his aid.



Next upon my threshold Parker Lyon doth appear,
With O'Shaughnessy and Lewis and genial Judge Gear;
Jermyn of the Chicago fire, who barely saved his life,
Smith was his companion in the struggle and the strife.
Cunningham came from Salt Lake, a handsome-looking

man.
He is going to Flonolulu or maybe to Japan ;
And now there is a youthful face distinguished far and

wide.
His name resounds throughout the land from dawn to

eventide.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 209

Some call him Mr. London, but he likes the name of

Jack,
He's going to see Mikado at the Russian have a whack ;
He represents this nation at home or anywhere,
There are no papers on this earth with his can compare.
And when he goes to Washington as secretary to Hearst,
To break the combination of the railroad and the trust.
He'll treat the Jew and Gentile and the heathen just

the same,
He's a credit to America, that man of noble fame.



There was a lady came aboard, and came quite unaware,
She came on board our gallant ship no clothes had she

to wear.
But she has gladdened mother's heart and faithful

father's, too.
She first saw light beneath that flag, our own red, white

and blue.
Oh ! welcome, baby darling, and may your Hfe be long,
We'll toast you in the banquet hall and sing of you in

song,
And now you're added to our list, though born upon

the sea.
That you may live to comb gray hairs are my cherished
hopes for thee.

Success attend our captain, and Francis Leonard, too,
The purser, freight clerk, engineer and all his gallant
crew.



H



210 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

They're a credit to the company, a kind word have for

all,
And should you need them day or night they're always

at your call.
Now we're bound for Honolulu on fair Columbia's

shore.
The Stars and Stripes are floating there and will for

evermore.
Judge Gear is at the helm with Roosevelt in the van.
We place our trust in God above, that motto is our

plan.



HAWAII.

In an island in the South Seas far, far away from home,
In solitude I wander there, my thoughts across the

the foam ;
"Tis now I think of days gone by and scattered far and

wide
The little ones so dear to me, a mother's joy and pride.
But soon my bark for home I'll steer across the ocean

blue,
And say to famed Hawaii, ''To you I bid adieu."
So here's to home and homeland across the deep blue

sea,
I wonder are there any there who still remember me.

How often in these distant isles, no tongue but mine

can tell.
The scenes I witnessed day by day all others do excel :



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 211

The warning of the craters and ebbing of the tide,
The snow upon the mountain peaks and lava flow beside.
The cave down in the valley spontaneously doth grow,
With eruptions of volcanoes their craters all aglow.
So here's to home and homeland far, far across the

main,
I wonder will they know me there when I return again.

Though I have been in foreign climes and distant lands

galore.
There's no place I love half so well as poor old Erin's

shore ;
Her daughters are the purest that e'er the sun shone on,
Her sons are brave through every war, deny it if you

can.
And though they're scattered far and wide, just at the

bugle's call
They'll rally round our flag of green with ready blade

and ball.
Once more our gallant craft is ploughing through the

main,
I wonder will they know me when I return again.

To strike for home and homeland our sacred rights to gain.
United now to face the foe on land or on the main.
Too long we're slaves to English rule, her tyranny and

reign.
The hour has come to strike at last, our rights we must

obtain.



212 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

I wonder would they know me now dressed in Irish green,
Side by side with Wycherley in dear old Skibbereen,
We'll raise aloft that green old flag, our colors we'll

display,
And chase the Saxon from Dundalk to ''Famed Old

Bantry Bay."



ROCKY'S BEREAVEMENT.

(Lines written on the death of Margaret A., wife of
Patrick ''Rocky Mountain" O'Brien.)

BY MARY J. o'dONOVAN ROSSA.

Twenty golden years of love,

And then a night of woe !
When truest heart from fondest heart,

Reluctantly must go.
And round her couch a weeping band,
Eight children and their father, stand

To kiss her lips of snow.

"Now mourn me not as lost," she said,

"I only go before,
To wait where friendship never parts —
To wait and watch for you, dear hearts,

On heaven's happy shore !



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 213

"And build no monumental stone,

Nor darkly drape my bed,
But lay me down in robes of white,
With bloom of flowers and sunshine bright.

And waving grass o'erhead !

"Thy Kingdom come ! Thy will be done \"

She sighed with failing breath.
A lovely woman fair of face,
A Christian woman strong in grace,

And not afraid of death.



The pivot of a household's love,

Her children's joy and guide ;
Core of her husband-lover's heart,

His comfort and his pride ;
The flower and bloom of womanhood.

As mother, maid or wife.
Sighed out her fragrant spirit there.

And closed her eyes on life.



Her aged father weeps with cause

Above her silent face ;
The apple of his eye she was.

And none may take her place.
Her sobbing sisters droop around

With anguish in their mien.
While far and near, and thronging come

The grieving friends and kin.



214 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Three days and three nights,
Amid flowers and Hghts,

And prayers and rainfall of tears,
In a sumptuous casket of silver and mauve,
Attired as a bride, in a miniature grove
Of palms, she was waked by her love.

And the friends and acquaintance of years.

Three days and three nights ! and then
The last leave-takings of death begin.
'Mid the frantic grief of friends and kin
Her placid features are prisoned in.
And the casket raised on the arms of men
Who would die to lift her to life again.



Oh ! the heart-breaking moment for sorrowful friends

As the cortege was formed in the porch,
And the quick and the dead in solemnity wed

Re-entered the doors of the church.
A pause ! and a doubt ! Did his courage give out?

Where is Rocky ? Not missing — no, never !
Noble, reverent, grave.
Handsome, open-browed, brave.

He will honor his "Maggie" forever.

No weakling in sorrow, but stalwart and proud

He followed his love on her way.
Till nearing the altar, where lowly he bowed.

And gave back to heaven the blest clay.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 215


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Online LibraryPatrick O'BrienBirth and adaption; → online text (page 10 of 13)