Patrick O'Brien.

Birth and adaption; online

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when I left Ireland to seek a livelihood under that
flag which is the emblem of freedom — the Star
Spangled Banner." [Loud and continuous cheering.] —
Skibbereen Eagle, August, 1901.



248 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

THE UNITED IRISH LEAGUE PUBLIC
MEETING AT DROMORE.

The Rev. Father Burts was called to the chair, and
among those present were Messrs. Patrick "Rocky
Mountain" O'Brien, F. McCarthy, J. T. O'Hea, P.
Nugent and others.

Mr. O'Brien, who was received with great cheering,
said he had great pleasure in coming there that day to
say a few words to the people of Dromore, because in
the little schoolhpuse yonder he was taught his A, B,
C's. That same schoolhouse turned out many dis-
tinguished men who were in America to-day, among
them he might mention Frank O'Neill, Chief of Police
in Chicago, who in that little schoolhouse learned his
A, B, C's side by side with himself. [Hear! Hear!]
He holds one of the loftiest positions that Irishmen in
America might claim. He need not tell them that he
is well able to fill that position, and that burglars and
desperados have a "holy horror" of Frank O'Neill, of
Tralybawn. [Cheers.] In this little schoolhouse was
also taught a gentleman, Mr. O'Driscoll, of Augha-
ville, who is now dead, and who was one of San Fran-
cisco's leading merchants. Speaking on the land
question, he said that his opinion was that God
Almighty made the world not for a few, but the whole
human race. He did not create it for robber landlords.
He never meant that lOO acres be given to one man,
500 to another, 100,000 to another and none to some.
[Hear! Hear!] His opinion was that until they aboh



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 249

ished landlordism they would have no prosperity in the
country. [Hear! Hear!] They could only do that
by uniting together, joining the national organization
and, standing on a united platform, try to wring
concessions from the landlords, and if this failed they
should take up arms, if necessary, and assert their
rights in the land that bore them. [Cheers.] For the
last seven hundred years England had been robbing
and persecuting their country; she had held Ireland in
an iron grip ; in the streets of Clonakilty the Saxon
mercenaries held up little children on their bayonets.
The landlords of to-day were the descendants of these
hirelings. They were the absentee landlords, who
were ruling Ireland [Shame!] and of the hard-earned
money that was sent by the industrious Irish boys and
girls in America £9 out of every £10 found its way to
the pockets of these robber landlords, who spent it in
the gambling hells of Europe.

Now his advice to the people was to live on the
product of the land themselves, and if there were any-
thing over to give it to the landlords. If he had his
say they would get nothing; but at all events let them
come last. [Hear! Hear!]

A Voice — What claim have they to it ?

Mr. O'Brien — None; absolutely none. I say that
the landlords are the biggest scoundrels and the big-
gest highwaymen in the world to-day. [Hear! Hear!]
He left that parish himself owing to the action of rob-
ber landlords. His heart was with them to-day in Dro-
more, and his advice from the platform was to give the
landlords only what was left. [Hear! Hear!] Give



250 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

them nothing, even. If they acted unitedly and
showed that they were doing the work they would
have the sympathy and assistarj.ce of the Irish race in
America. [Cheers.] There was no other nationality
as grand and noble as the Irish race in America. They
in Dromore and in every other portion of Ireland had
reason to be proud of their boys and girls in America
[Cheers] for they never forgot that they had a char-
acter and purity to sustain.

Yes, they had always before their minds the last
parting requests of their aged parents when taking
their final farewell of the land which in all probability
they were destined never more to see. They could see
the Irish girls up at 4 o'clock in the morning scrubbing
the floor of a hotel, afterward going to Mass and then
sitting down to send their earnings to their parents at
home. He (Mr. O'Brien) went to America not be-
cause he had a row with the family coachman — there
was no coachman in the family. [Laughter.] He did
not go there looking for poverty; it was staring him
in the face at home. Every spot and every plot in the
country was dearer to him than those of any other land
[Cheers], but he was forced to leave owing to the greed
and injustice of landlordism. There was a great deal
of emigration from Ireland in the last fifty years, and
he advised the young boys and girls to remain in Ire-
land in order to leave some at home who would yet
release Ireland from the grasp of her tyrants and ex-
terminate them. [Cheers Cheers.] If an opportu-
nity to right their country were granted it was their
duty to avail themselves of it. Obedience was a sol-



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 251

dier's first duty. They should obey in both the church
and the army; if not they would go to pieces. [Hear!
Hear!] They should work with courage and deter-
mination if they were refused their rights, and if an-
other artificial famine arose they must do what Tommy
Downshires did — took the provisions from the ships and
his brother Ulster Orangemen and warned them not to
pay more than tenpence on the pound. [Applause.]
If there had been more Tommy Downshires in the South
of Ireland in the famine period there would not have
been so many cofhnless graves in Skibbereen and
Bantry, for the food which went to feed the hirelings who
passed coercion laws against Ireland would have fed the
people of the South. He advised them to join an organi-
zation beneficial to their country and be ready at all times
to strike a blow for freedom. [Applause.] — Skibbereen
Eagle, August, 1901.




252 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

INDEX

PAGE

Preface 5

The Massacre of Wyoming, 1778 30

Tammany 42

Farewell to Ireland 50

Bantry Bay 53

Thoughts of the Fenian Days 56

On Leaving Ireland 59

Leaving Home 61

A Dream of Home 63

KiLLARNEY 66

Maggie 69

Skibbereen 70

My Friends in Bantry 72

Old Dromore 73

A Visit to My Native Land 77

A Visit to Clonakilty 80

Shaun Bhee's Eviction 84

On Board the "Campania" 85

A Tribute to My Beloved Wife 88

To Ireland 90

A Visit to Gougane Barra 92

To My Esteemed Friends of Bantry Bay 96

The Maid of Droumourtneen 98

Judas Iscariot Sheridan — The Peeler 101

On Board the "Teutonic" 103

Dear Old Collomane 105

An Irish Girl 107

A Tribute to Major John McBride 109

Thinking of Home 112



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 253

PAGE

Thoughts of Boyhood Days 114

GOLEEN 115

A Year Since Then 120

Unity 121

The Sister of Mercy 122

On Board the ''Majestic" 125

Capture of Lord Methuen in South Africa. . . . 126

A Shamrock from Ireland 129

A Visit to the Old Folks' Grave 131

Why Fm Sad 132

My First Visit to Gougane Barra 134

An Appeal to Ireland 136

The Irish Volunteer's Farewell to His Mother 139

The Belle of Ingleside 142

Los Angles^ Gal 144

Roosevelt's Charge 146

California's Welcome to President Roosevelt. . 148

California 150

A Trip to Honolulu 153

King Ned's Special Dispensation 155

On Seeing a Beautiful Irish Girl Taking a

Last Farewell of Her Aged Mother 158

Glengariff's Lovely Bay 161

My Second Visit to Gougane Barra 163

The Irish Boer Brigade , . 165

Comohola 168

When Papists Could Apply 170

A Tribute to Timothy Cadogan 175

FiTZHARRIS 178

Kruger's Enemy 181



254 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

PAGE

Leaving Home, August, 1868 185

A Visit to Glengariff 187

Easter Greetings to My Dear Children 189

A Visit to My Sister's Grave in San Francisco,

Gal., March, 1902 190

On Board the ''Maine" 191

Dewey, the Hero 193

Lady Marjorie Howard 194

Baby Genevieve 196

On Board the "Alameda" 197

On Board the "Majestic" 199

Sisters Two 200

A Visit to a Dear Friend's Grave in San Fran-
cisco, Gal 202

Tom's Wedding 203

In Answer to an Invitation to Father Lynch's

Silver Jubilee 207

A "Siberia" Poem , . 208

Hawaii 210

Rooky's Bereavement 212

"Rocky Mountain" O'Brien's Bereavement.... 216

Hundreds at the Obsequies 220

A Distinguished Irish-American 221

"Rocky Mountain" O'Brien Vigorously Resents

Mr. Dooley's Caricature of the Irish Race. 229
"Rocky Mountain" O'Brien — A Fenian, He Was
with the Raiders Into Canada and Single-
Handed Captured Pigeon Hill — He Has
Performed Many Daring Feats and Has

Been a Soldier in Many Climes 233

Ireland and Its Possibilities 237

The United Irish League Public Meeting at

Dromore 248



LUKE G. LYNCH,

Buyer and Manager for the

WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S CLOAK,
SUIT AND FUR DEPARTMENTS

IN

THE BERLIN"

BROADWAY'S POPULAR
DRY GOODS STORE,



BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

is a sterling and tincompromising Irishman, a lover
of liberty, a hater of despotism, a believer in the
Democracy founded by Thomas Jefferson and a
disciple of Martyr Robert Emmet, Lord Edward
Fitzgerald, Theobald Wolfe Tone and John
Mitchell.

Pay this worthy Son of Erin a visit before
purchasing elsewhere.



St. Vincent's
Academy

42 Wallace Place, Newark, N. J.

UNDERj THE SUPERVISION OF THE

Sisters sT the Order
if St Joseph



ONE OF THE MOST DESIRABLE

INSTITUTIONS FORo BOYS

AND GIRLS IN THE

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High-Class Education

BOARD AND TUITION
VERY MODERATE



OCT 1 1904





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Online LibraryPatrick O'BrienBirth and adaption; → online text (page 13 of 13)