Patrick O'Brien.

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He has admirers by the score and courts them all, they say,
And soon will marry one of them in famed old Bantry

Bay.

But if perchance he went to France to visit gay Paris,
When he'd come back to Patsy Stack he'd sport the

fleur de lis
And tell the maid from whom he strayed when he went

far away,
He'd roam no more, but stay on shore in dear old Bantry

Bay.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 73

Some other noted celebrities in Bantry town do dwell,
They're known throughout the valley and also in the dell.
There's Nano Ryan and Mickey Brien, who live across

the way,
Who swears his horse can beat the train from Cork to

Bantry Bay.



OLD DROMORE.



One summer's day from Bantry Bay, two ladies in the

party,
From Boston town, of high renown, O'Brien and

McCarthy.
Our jaunting car wended its way by meadow, brook and

lawn.
As we drove through Conocna feigh and into Collo-

mane,
By Poul Gourm and Aughaville we went with goodly

speed.
Bold Jack O'Shea drove us that day behind his faithful

steed.
The ladies were both strangers and from Columbia's

shore.
And went with me that Sunday to visit old Dromore.

When we reached that ancient place where first I saw the

light.
The little church and schoolhouse that were my heart's

delight.



74 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

We pitched our camp right on the road and raised our

flag of green.
Despite the minions of the Crown, defiant was our

mien.
There I beheld the faces known in days gone by,
Brave men were they to do and dare and wilUngly would

die.
If they could free their native land, and that from shore

to shore.
The Sunday that I spoke to them at the crossroads in

Dromore.

When I stood by that rustic ditch and gazed on all around,
1 thought of how my motherland by alien chains was

bound;
How my kith and kin were murdered or forced to cross

the sea.
Some of them now in luxury and some in poverty ;
And when I beheld the house where first I saw the day.
The schoolhouse and the ancient church with spires so

tall and gray.
My thoughts flew back to boyhood, I was a child once

more.
As I spoke to my countrymen that Sunday at Dromore.

McCarthy brave and Cotter and young Rahilly also,
The meeting called to order, when I asked them not to go
With rents to robber landlords, the despoilers of our

race.
And told them all to pay no rent, before the Peeler's face.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 75

This land is ours by God's own rights and that you all

know well,
That bastard spawn of Cromwell's band we'll try now to

expel.
Brave Father Burts was chairman, whom all of us adore.
That Sunday when, with my Boston friends, I spoke at

old Dromore.

We started then for Cahargh, with banners waving high
Until we reached that famed old spot, prepared to do or

die,
The homes of the McCarthys, where Chieftains once did

reign,
And Cromwell met his Waterloo in the Bishopland

campaign.
The Reverend Palmer took the chair, a Priest sincere and

true.
Who willingly would shed his blood for you, dear land,

for you ;
He'd abolish landlordism, and that from shore to shore.
Such were the words he spoke that day after we left

Dromore.

Iscariots of the Irish race, who are both low and mean.
Were doing the dirty work that day of England's King

and Queen;
The ladies from America could hardly understand
How men could stoop so low, being born in Ireland.
To see them wear the livery of a foreign King and Queen,
Who persecuted Irishmen for the wearing of the green;



76 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

These are the hirelings of the Crown, and in Ireland are

galore,
They watched me in the toilet room after I left Dromore.

Success to you, O'Donovan, and may your life be long.
We toasted you in wine that day and sang your health in

song.
Your house and festal board you gave with hospitality,
Presided over by your charming wife and interesting

family;
And when we left your domicile we left it with good will,
And directed our course for Skibbereen, down by the old

steam mill.
May God His choicest blessings on John O'Donovan pour
And always send grist to his mill from Cahargh to

Dromore.

From there we went to Schull, where the people did us

cheer,
In sight of old Fastnet Rock adjacent to Cape Clear;
I spoke to them that evening and told them what to do ;
How they'd been persecuted by a hireling English crew.
When Miss O'Brien then sang about the Emerald shore
The audience loudly cheered her and called for an

encore —
When she gave them ''Sailing Home" you should have

heard them roar,
vSuch cheering as was never heard from Sherkin to

Dromore.

Now fare 3^ou well, good people, remember one and all,
The British Lion is trembling and very soon will fall ;



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 77

The Russian Bear is after him, and when they come tx)

blows
The Fenian boys will fall in line as everybody knows.
So keep your powder dry and sharpen well your steel,
And soon you'll have a leader like brave Owen Roe

O'Neill;
So now keep up your courage and the solemn oath you

swore,
To chase the cowardly Peelers from Cork to old Dromore.

And when that hour at last arrives, in spite of King or

Queen,
We'll pull the Union Jack beneath our Irish flag of green ;
We'll have no use for Peelers nor toadies of the Crown,
We'll chase them from old Ireland and tear their colors

down ;
Our own green flag will proudly wave and that

triumphantly,
So be prepared without delay to strike for liberty ;
"Faugh-a-Ballagh" is our cry, and that from shore to

shore,
We'll show them soon what we can do from Belfast to

Dromore.



A VISIT TO MY NATIVE LAND.

After years of toil and trouble in that land beyond the

sea,
I revisited my native land I left in poverty.
And when I trod my native shore, her valleys and her

hills,
I thought of the marauders — the cause of all her ills —



78 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

The Peelers and the soldiers, that cursed hireling crew,
Who murdered meri and women and babes and mothers

slew.
Who leveled down the cabins with blood-stained sword

and torch.
With crowbars on their shoulders they always led the

march.

What a pity that these traitors were born on the soil

Where Irishmen in slavery for bread each day do toil ;

Where the purest maids throughout the earth, and that I
proudly know,

Are a credit to old Erin no matter where they go ;

To think that men of Irish birth, with mothers good and
pure,

Would persecute their kith and kin and always them
allure.

Oh, mothers, when you bore them you made a great mis-
take.

For they helped to plunder you and treasure from you
take.

To see those cowardly rufifians on Sunday go to pray
With weapons shining brightly, all ready for the fray.
To shoot down babes and women, as they often did before,
When the husbands and the fathers were banished from

our shore.
O blessed God! may Thy right hand those hirelings of

the Crown
Exterminate from out our land and tear their colors

down;



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 79

They're a curse to poor old Ireland, that fair land of the

fair,
There is no other land so pure or with her can compare.

I landed on your shores just at the break of day,

I need not say I happy felt with spirits light and gay

To see the smiling faces and red and rosy glow

Of Erin's sons and daughters who in old Ireland grow.

I thought it was a pity that they should e'er be slaves

And forced to leave their native land and cross the ocean

waves.
I'd use the torch, I'd use the sword, I'd use the flames of

hell.
If I could set old Ireland free and Cromwell's breed expel.

I'm glad to find you better than when I left your shore
To cross the broad Atlantic where billows loudly roar.
When I was forced to leave you, a wanderer to roam,
Down in Rio de Janeiro, far from my native home,
I thought of you both night and day, Acushla Asthore

Machree,
And often prayed that I might live to help to make you

free.
I'm glad to see your face once more, although in slavery.
But God is good and yet will steer your future destiny.

The landlords and the bailiffs, the spawn of Cromwell's

breed,
Must leave our fertile island, from there we must them

weed.



80 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

They're worthy of no quarter, those vampires spawned in

hell,
For freedom's dawn is looming up, as they all know full

well.
The Peelers and the soldiers, the sailors and shoneens,
The land grabbers and agents, the coastguards and

gombeens
Must seek some other quarters, for here they cannot stay.
For they must leave old Ireland, and that without delay.



A VISIT TO CLONAKILTY.

On the twenty-sixth of August we went to commemorate,
To Clonakilty City, the heroes of ninet)^-eight.
Their memory is a balm to hearts both true and brave,
Some in their homes on Irish soil, some o'er the ocean

wave.
O'Leary and brave Saunders at the station did we meet.
With a Cead Mil-le Failtha that day they did us greet.
They showed us through that ancient town and there

were sadly seen
The graves of patriots who dearly loved the green.

Their memory still is cherished, you'll see that on the

square.
The gift of gallant Irishmen with whom none can

compare.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 81

'Tis a credit to old Carbery and Clonakilty, too,

And showed the traitors of the green what Irishmen

can do.
In the center of the city a monument you'll see
In memory of the men who shed their blood for Irish

liberty.
It was started by Bob Saunders to outlast monarchy,
For Irishmen will ne'er be slaves, their country must be

free.

In the town hall that evening Bob Saunders took the

chair,
And told the people one and all that now they must

prepare
To deal John Bull a deadly blow just like the valiant Boer,
And drive the Peelers far away from poor old Erin's

shore.
I spoke to them that evening, and told them what to do :
To place no trust in Parliament or any hireling crew.
I told them they should win their rights and that with

shining steel,
Like the immortal Washington and brave Owen Roe

O'Neill.

A friend of mine from Boston was with me on that day.
And sweetly sang "Mavourneen" and "Sailing Down the

Bay."
The boys and girls encored her and loudly did her call ;
When she sang old "Jerusalem" you'd think the house

would fall.



82 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Though born in America she hates all Saxon laws ;
Her father is an Irishman and loves the Irish cause.
She's a credit to America, a warm friend of mine,
And lately came to Paddy's land ; her name it is O'Brien.



Miss Murphy sang in Irish and Father John also ;

The real McCoy was also there, whom many of you

know.
He sang the "Minstrel Boy" and also ''Shandon Bells,"

You'd hear the echo on that night resounding in the dells.
The meeting then being over, we all retired to rest
In dear old Clonakilty, close by the ocean's crest.
Miss Lynch and Miss O'Brien are Irish to the core,
And lately left America to see old Erin's shore.



Now fare you well, Bob Saunders, and O'Leary true and

tried,
I 'm forced to cross the ocean and travel far and wide ;
But rest assured, where'er I roam, I'll ne'er forget the

cause,
I'm ready now just as of yore to break the Saxon laws.
So be prepared both one and all, remember what I say.
The Fenian boys are not dead yet, but waiting for the

fray.
And when that longed-for hour arrives, in spite of king

or queen.
The sons and daughters of the Gael will rally round the

green.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 83

Next day we went to Baiidon behind an old staggeen,
Where the banner of King Billy once waved above the

green ;
Where a Jew, a Turk or athiest through a certain gate

could go,
But where no Papist could apply in days long, long ago.
The "poor scholar" carved beneath it, I'm sure you all

know well,
"The same inscription written here is on the gates of hell."
From there we went to Rebel Cork, Miss Lynch and Miss

O'Brien,
And sailing down the River Lee they said it was the

Rhine.

They went aboard the tender that took me out to sea
To cross the broad Atlantic for the land of liberty.
Old Ireland should be proud of them, her daughters true

and brave,
Though living in America where the starry flag doth

wave;
They're worthy of being recorded among the brave and

true.
They showed their Irish brothers what Irish maids could

do.
They're both now in America, that land of liberty.
And to his will I do resign my future destiny.



84 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

SHAUN BHEE'S EVICTION.

When a stripling in Ireland one morning I saw

An eviction that was not according to law ;

I saw the last cow taken out of the barn,

And rescued by brave hearts that very same morn.

The bailiff he seized her one morning in June

While the owner was sleeping and dreaming of ruin.

I saw the cow taken at dawn of the day,

And Blakney he hastened to steal her away,

Knowing full well if Mike were around

She never would go to the Drimoleague Pound ;

So I planned the rescue and knocked on the door

Of poor Shaun Bhee's cabin, v^^ho slept on the floor.

Mike and his wife I quickly awoke,
And both followed Blakney and thus to him spoke :
"That cow is our father's !" they loudly did shout,
"If you don't let her go we will dash your brains out;
Her milk is his medicine now in his old age,"
Then seizing the cow they flew into a rage.

One blow dealt by A/Iickey the bailifif laid low.
Then he gave him another and two more I trow ;
The blood of the bailiff was thick on the field
When Mike took the cow and forced him to yield.
I witnessed all this, which was a great feat,
And proud was I that the bailiff was forced to retreat.

I first gave the signal to Mickey to start,
And told him be lively or else he'd be caught.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 85

1 ran over woodlands, o'er hills and o'er brakes,
When I think of that morning, oh, how my heart aches ;
The old man lay dying on the cold cabin floor,
When I gave the alarm by blows on the door.

At last I succeeded, how sad was his moan !

But he was defiant as a king on his throne.

"Go bring back my cow ! Like your father be true,

I am too feeble or I would go too ;

I am ninety odd years," the old man did say,

"And have worked for the landlord by night and by day.

"Go rescue the cow, no time's to be lost,

Bring her back to me whate'er the cost."

I was then but a stripling, but remember quite well

The wails of the children resounding the dell.

The old man with vengeance then gazed on the crowd

x\t the door of his cabin, defiant and proud.



ON BOARD THE "CAMPANIA."

Farewell, dear native land, you're fading from my view.
Your shores I'm leaving far behind to cross the ocean

blue.
My heart is with you day and night, acushla asthore

machree,
Though I may never see again those scenes so dear to me.
Your mountains and your valleys I've strolled in days

gone by,
The blackbird and the thrush I've heard beneath your

azure sky;



86 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

The linnet and the nightingale I've heard them o'er and

o'er,
Oh, gra machree I'm leaving thee, and ne'er may see

thee more.

Though sad and lonely now I feel I've never hoped in

vain.
That I may live to see the day we'll burst your chains

in twain;
The hirelings of an alien race can never us subdue,
So come what will, through good or ill, to you I will be

true;
And though I leave your shores once more you're ever

dear to me.
And from the bounding billows I bid farewell to thee.
Your shady groves and valleys in dreams I'll wander

there.
And wish that I could stay with you, the fairest of the

fair.

Though cursed traitors tread your soil, the minions of

the Crown,
We'll sweep them yet from off our land and pull their

colors down;
The redcoats and the Peelers w^e'll banish as of yore,
Good-by, Cape Clear, I'm leaving you, likewise old Erin's

shore.
The Stars and Stripes are looming up, my home awaits

me there.
But you will still be dear to me, none with you can

compare.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 87

Your sons and daughters scattered will yet revisit you,
Another look before I say "Dear native land, adieu."

Schull, Glandore and Aughadown my thoughts are now
with you,

Fond memories of the hours spent in Nine Acres and Sea-
view ;

The creamery in the valley, the cottage in the glade,

The picnic by the seaside, from me will never fade ;

The haystack and famed Baltimore, O'Driscoll's castle,
too,

Dunbeacon Bay and Durrus most enchanting to the view.

Some friends that I love dearly in Ireland do remain.

As I roll on the billows across the raging main.

Good-by, old Galleyhead, while rolling on the deep.
From the deck of the "Campania" as the sun is going to

sleep.
I ne'er again may see your shores that are so dear to me.
While ploughing through the ocean for the land of liberty.
My native home Fm leaving for my adopted land,
For I have been since childhood on New York's distant

strand.
Fm standing on the deck as the moon shines o'er the dell
In the land of Robert Emmet and Charles Stewart

Parnell.

The last glimpse of old Erin is fading from my view.
But I'll ne'er forget your hills and dales across the ocean
blue;



88 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Your sons are still as true as Emmet or Wolfe Tone,
And waiting for that longed-for hour to strike and claim

their own.
Oh ! cruel fate, why must it be that I can not remain
In my own native land and not cross o'er the main ?
Away from scenes of childhood, 'mong strangers now to

dwell,
With aching heart again I say, "My native land, fare-
well."



A TRIBUTE TO MY BELOVED WIFE, WHO
DIED JANUARY, 8, 1899.

I ne'er will see that face again with beaming smiles so

sweet,
Which welcomed me from far-ofif trips, and fondly did

me greet;
No more by brook or streamlet in happy days I ween.
And walk with her I loved so well, will I again be seen.
She was all on earth to me, my treasure, and my pride.
And would that I could see again my fondest love, my

bride.

How well do I remember when she became my wife,

A purer soul could not exist, through twent}^ years of life.

As years rolled on my fondness grew for her I loved so

well,
And when she died how sad I felt no tongue but mine

can tell;
But Providence decreed that parted we should be,
And to His will I do resign my future destiny.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 89

The fondest hopes I cherish within this aching breast,
Are that her sweet spirit has flown to its celestial rest.
With all my trials and hardships, full of grief and care.
When I leave this sinful world I hope to meet her there.
In dreams I'm often with her in our once happy home,
The little ones, God bless them, for caresses to me come.

When I stood by her bedside to take a last farewell.
She looked far sweeter than of yore, the one I loved so

well;
She knew her hour had come, that hour I'll ne'er forget.
As she calmly waited to be called, I'm thinking of it yet;
Once more I kissed the precious lips of twenty years my

wife.
And then she calmly passed away and gave to God her

life.

vShe told me not to weep for her, but guard our children

dear.
And bring them up with tender care, to which I will

adhere.
'Tis sad to have to part with one that was so dear to me,
Who often cheered me on my way to bright prosperity ;
But now all hopes are blighted, I'll see her face no more.
Until we meet above the clouds on that bright heavenly

shore.

In a sacred spot in Calvary she sleeps, no more to wake.
Where green grass grows and lilies fair I planted for her

sake.
I am longing now to see that lonely new-made grave,
To moisten it with tears of mine this aching heart doth

crave ;



90 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

She is resting on the hillside calmly and serene,

And her request to me was, that it always be kept green.

Now fare thee well, my only love, I hope you're free from

care,
In heaven above where all is love there is no sorrow there.
And often in the solemn, the lone and silent night,
Methinks I hear once again the voice of my delight ;
And every hour throughout this my sad and clouded life.
It bids me be calm amid the peace of starry strife.



TO IRELAND.

(On board the "Lucania," July 5, 1900.)

Ah! there you are asthore machree, most charming to

behold.
Where first I saw the light of day, beneath your green

and gold;
Your mountain peaks are now in view, your hills and

valleys fair.
Oh, there's no land throughout this world that can with

you compare !
I've thought of you in distant lands and climes far, far

away.
And often with an aching heart to God for you I'd pray.

The exile's thoughts are first of home, no matter where

he be,
And now, thank God, my native land, your shores once

more I see.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 91

Oh ! mother dear, why must it be that you are still in

chains ?
Your sons have fought for other lands and given their

blood and brains.
You look to me just as of yore, your fields are fresh and

green,
Oh! gra machree, but there you are, my first love, oh,

my queen !

When first Ileft you, Ireland, to cross the deep blue sea,

Fond hearts were there, but now, alas ! they will not wel-
come me.

The graveyard now contains their bones, no more I'll see
their face,

And I will miss their loving kiss, also their fond embrace.

Though years have passed since last I saw your valleys
and your hills,

Your glories I have ne'er forgot, your sorrows nor your
ills.

Historic dear old Kerry Head, you look just as before;

The Fastnet Rock, Bull, Cow and Calf, near dear old Bal-
timore.

With pleasant sail we'll see Kinsale before it is high
noon.

Oh! how I long to tread your shores, dear motherland,
aroon ;

Once more I greet you with a cheer from out the ocean's
roar,

This pays me for the years I've been away from you,
asthore !



92 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

A VISIT TO GOUGANE BARRA.

(Sunday, August 19, 1900.)

When first I gazed upon those scenes of fame,

My native town I reached, when from New York I came.

I heard so much of Keimaneigh, the Leap, the Whip and

Stone,
The Peep-o'-Day and White Boys and kings they did

dethrone ;
The battle fought in Keimaneigh in eighteen twenty-two ;
And how the gallant Michael Walsh the Yeomen did

subdue ;
And how the patriots held the pass from Kealkill to

Gougane,
How mountaineer chased cavalier o'er valley, hill and

lawn.

When I beheld these ancient scenes I thought of bygone

days,
Of Doheny and Smith O'Brien when foremost in the

frays ;
And how when in pursuit of them, the traitors on their

trail,
Bold Doheny gave them the slip and for New York set

sail.
Deep-valleyed Desmond I beheld most charming to the

view.
Where Munster's king once reigned supreme, defiantly

and true.
When I gazed on that valley, described as Nature's vale,
I thought of all the glories of poor old Innisfail.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 93

And how she was in bondage despite her piety,

By cursed alien tyrants of high and low degree.

I heard my native tongue in song and prose that day

By Coakley and O' Sullivan in Gougane far away.

I'd like to know why other lands that are not half so fair,

No rents nor taxes have to pay and breathe their native

air.
But we're oppressed by foreign laws and native hirelings,

too —
The vampires of Cromwell's spawn, and to his teachings

true.

But the day yet will come when those tyrants must go,
Far away from my birthplace to England I trow ;
Such vipers and bloodhounds no more will we need,
For with musket and cannon we'll force them to yield.
Gilhooly, our chieftain, Den Downey and Co.
Will join in the combat, they're true men I know ;
Stack and O' Sullivan will be in the fray
To drive all the Peelers from Bantry Bay.

Whiddy Island, where chieftains once did reign,

Not far from Dunboy Castle, where Philip's hot campaign

Was waged against the Saxon, when he went torch in

hand
To reach the powder magazine and strike for motherland.
That harbor looked so picturesque, beneath the azure sky.
I thought if Wolfe Tone landed there how proudly he

could die,
Fighting for our sacred rights, our castles, lands and all,
For he would strike for liberty with ready blade and ball.



94 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

The square is now called after him in letters large I ween,
Where lately I heard minstrels sing "The Wearing of the

Green."
The peelers then dispersed the crowd and forced the

bards away,
But reinforced they came and sang the same next day.
The boys and girls surrounded them and loudly they did

yell
When they sang in the highest key, ''Brave Charles

Stewart Parnell."
Costigan and Stack then formed a hollow square,
They knew it was their Spion Kop, Taboo was in the

rear.



I've traveled all over old Ireland, through meadow,

through mountain and lawn,
But I'll never forget the last Sunday I spent with my


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