Patrick O'Brien.

Birth and adaption; online

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died
Fighting for the gallant Boers, who was his mother's

pride,
Against the Kerry Butcher, a traitor to our land.
God grant that I may meet him soon away down on the

Rand."



THE BELLE OF INGLESIDE.

I met her in her native State,

Not many months ago.
The bloom of youth was on her face

And milk white skin of snow.
Her golden hair hung o'er her back.

And eyes were sparkling bright,
When first I met this charming girl,

My joy and heart's delight.
And though I leave her far behind

And seas may us divide.
While life is left I'll ne'er forget

The Belle of Ingleside.

How sad it is to part with one
That is so dear to me.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 143

Through glen and vale, o'er hill

And dale and o'er life's stormy sea,
I wish her all the joys of life,

Health and wealth galore,
And long to see the face once more

Of her whom I adore.
She's fairer than the early dawn

Or sun at eventide.
The sweetest girl I ever met.

The Belle of Ingleside.

Now fare thee well my precious one,

To you 1 will be true.
While life remains in this poor heart

'Twill beat alone for you.
And should we never meet again,

No matter where I be,
I'll ne'er forget the happy hours

Spent in your company.
When we went through the Golden Gate

To take a carriage ride.
She looked far sweeter than the flowers —

The Belle of Ingleside.

The lilies and the daisies, and violets

In the dell
Could not compare with one so fair

The truth to you to tell.
And though she's in her tender years,

The subject of my theme,



144 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

She holds my heart both night and
Day and haunts me hke a dream.

I whispered words of love to her
As wx sat side by side

'Neath the sun-kissed hills of Emmery —
The Belle of Ingleside.

I know she'll not forget the past

Although far, far away.
She'll take me to her heart again

When we meet in the Bay.
And when these longing eyes see hers

Of azure blue,
She^ll seem as fresh again to me,

Just as the morning dew ;
And if perchance we meet again,

My treasure and my pride,
I'll press her closer to my heart,

The Belle of Ingleside.



LOS ANGELES, CAL.

These fertile plains and valleys grow the orange and

the vine,
The fig tree and the olive, too, the blue gums and the

pine;
This climate it surpasses all, even France and sunny

Spain,
But give to me old Erin's Isle, I ne'er may see again.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 145

I often dream of you, asthore, your fields so fresh and

green,
Your smiling vales, your crags and peaks, the grandest

ever seen ;
The hours I spent I felt content beside your flowing

tide,
And the colleen dass I loved so well doth oft run in

my mind.

I know right well she thinks of me, though on a for-
eign shore,
Gra gal machree, ma colleen dass, I ne'er may see you

more;
I know full well she looked for me many times in vain,
And I would give this world if we could only meet

again.

And though salt seas doth us divide, to me you're ever

dear.
Your rosy cheeks and bright blue eyes, far off as well

as near;
My life I freely would give up if it would ever be,
That God decreed my native land like this one should

be free.

Though this soil is rich and beautiful and fragrance

fills the air.
The snow-clad hills and mountain peaks with Erin's

can't compare;
The daisies and primroses that blossom in the dell,
Killarney Lakes and Bantry Bay, Pacific plains excel.

10



146 BI^TH AND ADOPTION.

ROOSEVELT'S CHARGE.

''Onward !" shouted Roosevelt with his bronzed and
rugged face,

As his steed dashed up the mountain with a sure and
steady pace.

O'Neill was close behind him, a descendant of Owen
Roe,

When a bullet in the forehead, fired from ambush, laid
him low.

''Onward ! March for Santiago," Teddy Roosevelt
boldly cried,

While shot and shell flew quick around, laying com-
rades by his side.

Shafter led his gallant forces to El Caney through

the hills.
Assisted by Rough Riders dashing over dykes and rills.
When Raf¥erty charged through the crags our victory

seemed plain.
For we could hear the slogan, "Remember, boys, the

'Maine' !"
"See the swarthy Toral coming," Colonel Wood was

heard to say,
"With his ragged dagoes crawling from the trenches

where they lay."

In a flash as quick as lightning Roosevelt's horse was

seen to fall.
And a cry rang through the mountain, "He is dead !" —

so thought we all.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 147

But grasping his revolver he dashed on without his
steed,

Crying out, ''Come on ! Come on, my boys ! our coun-
try now has need

Of all who have a spark of life ! Behold our comrades
slain ;

Avenge them and the gallant men who perished in the
'Maine.' "



"Remember Sigbee's battleship," Brodie brave did say,
"Likewise our gallant comrades, now in Manila Bay."
A cheer for gallant Hamilton was given with a will,
And also for the Seventy-first while marching up the

hill;
And Hamilton Fish, the brave young man who fell be-
fore San Juan,
Soldiers, sailors, all of them, adored him to a man.



Old Glory now most proudly floats o'er many foreign
lands,

And planted high on Morro walls by valiant hearts
and hands.

Should Bull or Bear or Kaiser dare to trifle with our
flag

We will show quick what we can do to any blood-
stained rag.

Our sailors and our soldiers can fight on land and sea,

As they have done in Cuba to set the people free.



148 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Roose"velt, brave Dewey, Schley and Hobson, too,
Are not afraid of monarch's power or any foreign

crew.
When Theodore is President, as he is sure to be.
With Dewey in the navy, then we'll chase them from

the sea.
Long life to Teddy Roosevelt and his gallant cavalry,
Whose blows at Santiago were struck for liberty.



CALIFORNIA'S WELCOME TO PRESIDENT
ROOSEVELT.

Thrice welcome to the nation's Chief from the Golden

West I write,
From North and South, from East and West, to greet

you we unite.
We know no party, we know no clan, all hail our

Chieftain brave.
Who burst in twain the yoke and chain, and freedom

gave the slave.
He was foremost in the battle van that set the Cubans

free.
And left his home and tender babes to strike for liberty.
He's our country's choice we all know well throughout

Columbia's shore.
And we'll elect him once again as we have done before.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 149

O'er the Sierras to our city he comes with goodly

speed,
God's angels watching in his wake, our country doth

him need ;
He fears no foe, he fears no power except that One on

high,
His watchword is America and for that land would die.
His heart is full of charity for those who are oppressed;
No friend is he of tyranny, that oft he has expressed;
He knows no clan, he knows no sect, is to his country

true,
And only knows one nation's flag, our own red, white

and blue.



Cead mi-le failtha once again from Frisco's Golden

Gate,
One million voices join with mine to welcome you in

state.
Long may your life be spared to us and those you love

so dear;
While you are in the White House no danger do we

fear;
Through you we'll have a navy and gunboats soon to

spare,
And then no nation on this earth with this one can

compare.
Hip! hip ! hurrah ! he comes to-day, the greatest chi^f

of all ;
Sing loud his praise and life-long days in house and
banquet hall.



150 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

CALIFORNIA.

In the land of wreaths and sunshine, out in the golden

West,
Are the homes of many exiles whom foreign laws

opprest.
You'll meet them here from Italy, from France and

sunny Spain,
From Germany and Switzerland, from far across the

main,
The Russian and the Hollander, the Swede and Norman,

too.
The sons and daughters of the Gael, to Erin always

true.
Oppressions and plutocracy, despotic laws and

monarchy.
They could not bear quite patiently, so they left home

for liberty.

The Finlander and Icelander have followed in their

train,
The Hebrew, Greek and Polander, the rough and

rugged Dane;
The Austro-Hungarian, the Slav and Portugee,
The Belgian and the Norseman whose homes are on the

sea.
The Scotchman with his brawny hands you will find

here also.
Sometimes digging for the gold, you know he is not

slow.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 151

The Arab from Arabia you will in the Far West find.
They could not live in their own homes so left them
far behind.

From Servia, Herzegovina, Turkey and Siam,
Macedonia and South Africa, China and Japan ;
Singapore, Hawaii, South Seas and Java, too ;
Corea, Persia, Russia, Burmah and Timbuctoo ;
Morocco, Madagascar, Madeira, the Azores,
And the dusky sons of Mexico, our friends, but once

our foes;
Our banner now floats o'er them all, no matter who

they be,
'Twas planted by George Washington, who made this

country free.

There is no place for tyrants here, so let them dare to
come,

We have no use for absentees in this our future home;

We have no use for kings or queens, so let them under-
stand

This is the freeman's only 'home from every foreign
land.

The rich and poor are equal here, thank God for
liberty ;

The West is now inhabited by those who would be
free.

All now comply with native laws, established by the
sword.

And freedom smiles on every face trusting in one God.



nr BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

And should a call to arms ring, 'tis then we would

unite,
And march beneath Old Glory to fight with all our

might ;
The Dutchman and the Irishman, the Scotchman and

the Dane,
The Frenchman and the Polander and the swarthy son

of Spain,
Would march beneath that banner that no power dare

■ assail.
With Roosevelt foremost in the van with soldiers of

; the Gael,
The Hessian and the Saxon, and the Dago in the rear,
We'd sweep from off the universe, for we can do and

dare.



Let -Germany with all her ships and Hoch the Kaiser,

too,
England and the Dagoes, that blood-stained hireling's

crew.
Let them come out by day or night, we'll chase them

■from the sea>
With Roosevelt and brave Dewey, who fought for

liberty.
We showed John Bull what we could do 'way back in

seventy-six.
Since then we have grown older and up to all his

• tricks;
Let Italy and Germany, England and Japan
Call oiit their forces any day, we'll lick them to a man.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 153

And if that hour should ever come, just at the bugle's

call
The people from the nations would rally one and all.
Then all would be Americans and by that banner stand,
" 'Twas planted by George Washington throughout

this glorious land ;
'Tis the emblem of our country and never will come

down,''
We place our trust in Providence, in valley, hill and

town.
Let the Britons nov\^ blockade and their piracy pursue.
We'll make them keep their hands off our own red,

white and blue.



A TRIP TO HONOLULU.

Roll on, my gallant bark, thro' foam-capped waves and

wind.
Though you bear me from fondest friends that I must

leave behind;
And now upon the boundless deep as billows 'round

me swell,
I. whisper back to those I love a parting fond farewell.
It may be weeks, it may be months, ere we shall meet

again.
But I'll be true to eyes of blue on land or on the main.
So Kathleen, dear, cheer up your heart undaunted do

thou be,
I'll count the days, I'll count the hours, till I return to

thee.



154 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Chorus.
Sailing, sailing, on the "Siberia,"
Sailing, sailing, from San Francisco Bay;
Sailing, sailing, on the ocean crest.
Sailing, sailing, from the Golden West.

And though in distant lands I be, far, far away from

home,
My thoughts will be of you, dear heart, no matter

where I roam.
['11 keep you in my memory morning, noon and night.
Till I'll return to you again my joy and heart's delight.
It may be in Hawaii, it may be in Hong Kong,
It may be in Manila, mingling in the throng.
Blow on you winds and carry back to those I love so

well
My future hopes of brighter days in happiness to dwell.

The flying-fish and porpoise I see swimming with the

tide,
The sea-gulls and the albatross are on the ocean wide.
Though the waves are high as mountains, no danger

do we fear.
With a captain brave and joll}^ crew our stately ship to

steer.
The storm now is o'er, the sun is shining bright.
All hands are on the promenade, with faces smiling

bright.
We're bound for Honolulu, the land of sugar cane,
But I'll return before it's long and home with you

remain.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 155



KING NED'S SPECIAL DISPENSATION.

Oh, Paddy did you hear the news throughout old Erin's
Isle?

Ned took the Anti-Papist Oath, the vilest of the vile.

He denounced the Pope and Cardinals, the Priests and
Bishops, too.

And swore they were idolators, a superstitious crew.

And now the Pope rewards him with a special dis-
pensation,

To eat meat on a Friday, the day of his coronation.

Sure Paddy, dear, I would not let my dog eat it at
home,

Although I got permission from the Holy Church at
Rome.



When I was in old Ireland, some thirty years ago.
To eat it on a Friday would send me down below.
But times have changed since then, avic, the Pope

prayed for the Queen,
Who murdered men and women from Tyrone to Skib-

bereen.
If I got it three times a week, I'd ask for it no more,
And never would I emigrate from poor old Erin's

shore.
Vaughan and Rampollo, Norfolk and his clan,
Care no more for old Ireland than I do for Japan.



158 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Faith, Mike, I think it was a shame to grant the King

permission
To feed his subjects on flesh meat the day of its

omission.
Although it was no law of God, sure you and^ I know

well,
To eat it on that day we thought would send us

straight to hell.
And now just after mocking us, and our clergy true

and tried,
Vaughan and Rampollo the whole thing would decide.
And now throughout old Ireland the gluttons of the

Crown
Can say the King is next to God in city and in town.

God knows then, Pat, avic, machree, I would not be sur-
prised

If they made Vaughan Pope of Rome by means they
have devised.

You know by grant of Adrian against the Irish cause.

He killed and plundered all our kin, sustained by Eng-
lish laws.

If Ned could now control the Pope, to Rome he would
be true,

Och, the blood is boiling in my veins, what would poor
Ireland do?

Sure if we kept back Peter's pence and sent no more to
Rome,

You'd hear a howl from Vaughan & Co, throughout
our native home.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 157

Sure Pat, Ned said the Pope was wrong, Lord's supper

was a lie,
The Mass was superstitious and Leo did defy.
The Pope knew all about this oath taken by King Ned,
But the feasting was postponed a bit, the King was

sick in bed.
Still from the Propaganda the dispensation came.
To eat meat on a Friday, the Pope affixed his name.
So all his Irish subjects who were loyal to the Crown,
Could feed on meat upon that day, from Cork to

County Down.

Now, Pat, what do you think of that, pray tell me if

you can.
Don't you think they insulted us right from the

Vatican?
Sure, if the Pope took such an oath against the English

Church,
They'd raise a cry throughout the land and leave us in

a lurch.
Begorra, Pat, I thought to-day this world was all a

stage.
And Priest and Pope could play their part from child-
hood to old age.
God knows, agra, we have been true to the Holy Church

of Rome,
Though England killed our kith and kin and drove us

from our home.



158 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

ON SEEING A BEAUTIFUL IRISH GIRL TAK-
ING A LAST FAREWELL OF HER AGED
MOTHER.

(Scene: Bantry, August, 1901.)

One day in dear old Ireland, I never shall forget,

My heart was filled with sadness, my eyes with tears

were wet,
As I saw the gray-haired mother taking a last farewell,
And press the child close to her heart, a sad tale 'tis to

tell.
She knew that she would ne'er again her loving child

embrace.
For she was going across the sea with thousands of

her race,
And forced to leave her home by cursed alien laws,
But true to faith and motherland and Ireland's holy

cause.



I saw the mother in a swoon as the daughter went

away.
She gave a long and anxious look at dear old Bantry

Bay,
"Slaun lat,'' said she, "Acushla asthore machree.
My blessing go along Avith you to your new country.
Think of your father in his grave, beside him I'll soon

be.
How sad it is that you must go across the deep blue

sea.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 159

Farewell, farewell, once more my child, I'll ne'er see

you again.
For you are leaving kith and kin to dwell across the

main.

"Oh, would that I could keep you now, in my declining

years.
How peacefully I'd close my eyes and wipe away my

tears,
But foul oppression forces you to leave your mother

dear.
That's robbed us of God-given rights and homes once

happy here.
'Tis sad to part with you, asthore, or one so good and

pure.
But for old Erin and her cause my troubles I'll endure.
My daily prayers shall be for you while on the raging

deep,
Think of your mother dear who oft for you will weep."

This scene I witnessed lately in famed old Bantry Bay,
One morning as I took a stroll along the pier and quay.
To see the gray-haired mother her tears flowed fast

and free,
For the daughter who was leaving for the land of liberty.
The blood was boiling in my veins while gazing on the

scene,
To see my sister of the Gael leaving our isle of green.
I saw out in the harbor, the English craft and crew.
That forced the children of the Gael to cross the ocean

blue.



160 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

-For they protect the robbers who stole our land away,
Which caused us all to leave our homes far, far from

Bantry Bay.
Oh, cruel alien hirelings, traitors to your soil.
For you were bred on Irish earth and in slavery doth

toil,
You're the cause of Erin's loved ones being forced to

emigrate.
But soon, thank God, we'll take our stand and you

exterminate,
The sons and daughters of the Gael will then at home

remain,
For we will strike for libertv and freedom will obtain.



May the mothers' cry for vengeance 'gainst cursed

English laws
Be heard throughout old Ireland for freedom's holy

cause;
May the grabber and the agents and soldiers of the

crown,
Get little rest by day or night and meet with scowl and

frown;
May emigration soon be stopped throughout old Erin's

shore.
And boys and girls remain at home from Goleen to

Dromore ;
May the mother's tears avenged soon be for her who

sailed away
And bid farewell to home and friends in dear old

Bantry Bay.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 161

GLENGARIFF'S LOVELY BAY.

There is one spot in Ireland that's ever dear to me,

Beside that ancient castle that overlooks the sea,

Its antique walls and buttresses were built in days

gone by.
By the robbers and marauders who did our homes

destroy.
They robbed us of our priceless art we cherished night

and day.
With torch in hand a ruthless band destroyed Glen-

gariff's lovely Bay.

The tall oak and arbutus, the willow and the pine,
The hemlock and the hazel you'll see them all entwine ;
The primrose and the daisy bedeck the village green,
The blackbird and the thrush and goldfinch too I ween.
Their notes you'd hear re-echo anear or far away.
There is no place throughout the earth Hke Glengariff's
lovely Bay.

The boys and girls are beautiful and none can them

excel.
At Hotel Roach you'll find fair maids, the fairest in the

dell:
Miss Lottie is the pride and Hly of the vale,
A credit to her native land, my darling Innisfail.
The Misses Roach are charming girls, that I can

proudly S3.y,
They'll ahvays greet you with a smile in Glengariff's

lovely Bay.

11



162 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

At Vickery's and Roach's, in the Glen or in the Bay,
You'll find no place to equal them, anear or far away;
Miss Lannan and Miss Collins are as fair as I have

seen
In Bantry or Glengariff or Paris, too, I ween.
The hours I spent in Glen and Vale, I think of night

and day,
And long to gaze once more upon Glengariff's lovely

Bay.

Now often in the stilly night my thoughts fly back to
you,

Where the sun-kissed hills and meadows green are
moistened with your dew.

The tourists who have seen your vales, claim none can
you excel,

Your mountain peaks and purling streams that mur-
mur in the dell ;

I've heard the echo in the Glen one pleasant summer
day,

Farewell, farewell, asthore machree, Glengariff's lovely
Bay.

Your shady groves and valleys are ever dear to me.
Your scenery surpasses the Shannon or the Lee.
The lilies and the violets and ivy green also.
Lend enchantment to the view no matter where you go.
You're the dearest spot on Irish soil ; in foreign lands

away
Wearily I long to see Glengariff's lovely Bay.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 163

Now fare you well, Glengariff, acushla asthore

machree,
I'll ne'er forget your beauties in this land of liberty.
Although I'm in a foreign land, you'll find no change

in me,
'Though I may never see you I'll keep you in memory.
You're dearer far to me than Killarney or Lough Rea,
.So let us weed out Cromwell's breed from Glengariff's

lovely Bay.



MY SECOND VISIT TO GOUGAN BARRA.

By crags and peaks and idyllic scenes we journeyed on

our way,
From Kealkill to Gougan along with Jack O'Shea;
The rain came like an avalanche and oh, how it did

pour.
As we drove through the pass that day in sight of

Coumonore.
We went through famed Keimaneigh, that old historic

place.
Where the yeomen met their Waterloo and King

George did disgrace.
Where the brawny sons of Kealkill, Snave and Braur-

lin, too,
Fought the minions of the Crov/n when shot like hail-
stones fiew.



164 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

We journeyed on through pouring rain, no danger did

we fear,
And when we reached the monastery we got a hearty

cheer.
Deep-valleyed Desmond looked so grand and lovely to

behold.
Where Munster's king once reigned supreme, defiantly

and bold.
The sources of the River Lee were murmuring in the

vale.
That sacred spot that's ne'er forgot in dear old Innis-

fail.
To see the little island church in Fin Bar's Monastery,
And the purling streams rush down the rocks that fed

the River Lee.



After visiting that ancient place we steered our bark

for home.
The sights we saw we'll ne'er forget for many years to

come.
O'SuUivan and McCarthy, Lynch, O'Brien and Shea
Sang that evening coming home from Gougan to the

Bay:
''AVhen the Harvest Days Are Over," then came ''Dolly

Gray,"
"Mavourneen" and the "Irish Rose" and "Sailing

Down the Bay" ;
"Every Nation Has a Flag," that was well rendered,

too;
Also the "Starrv Banner," our own red, white and blue.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 165

The tourists of that Sunday are scattered far and wide,
Some in their homes on Irish soil, some o'er the ocean

wide;
Some now reside in Boston, down in the old Bay State,
Where the tea was pitched into the sea, the taxes being

too great.
They were a jolly company, that day I'll ne'er forget,
I've thought of it through gloomy hours, I'm thinking

of it 3^et.
Their songs re-echoed in the Pass as we drove from

Gougan
To Bantry Bay that August day and then to

Collomane.



THE IRISH BOER BRIGADE.

M'Bride and Blake commanded the Irish Boer Brigade,
Three thousand strong they marched along through

valley, hill and glade.
While being reviewed by Kruger, defiantly their mien.
Their watchword Faugh-a-Ballagh, the boys who wore

the green.
How anxiously they waited their ancient foe to meet.
With shrapnel, grape and cannister, equipments all

complete.

The bloody siege of Limerick, New Ross and Oulart

Hill,
Wolfe Tone and Robert Emmet, that made their

heart's blood thrill,



166 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

All anxious now to meet the foe and deal him blow for

blow,
And to avenge the bloody deeds of centuries ago.
All Limerick's treaties broken that were promised,

written, made,
Now charge them, boys, and drive them back, brave Irish

Boer Brigade.

Although it is on African instead of Irish soil.

Your hatred must be none the less for those who did

despoil
Our homes and lands and sacred rites in modern ages,

too,
And butcher men for worshipping their God above, so

true.
This is the land of missioners, of Bibles and of tracts,
The hypocrite of nations, who annuls God's sacred acts.

Oh, freemen of the world, behold this bloody strife,
How England tries to crush the Boer and take away

his life.
High heaven gave him titles which no one dare assail.
And miay God guide the bullets of the sons of Innisfail ;
His home out of the wilderness with brawny arms he

made,
Defend him now and God will bless the Irish Boer

Brigade.

Remember forty-seven when famine did prevail.


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Online LibraryPatrick O'BrienBirth and adaption; → online text (page 8 of 13)