Patrick O'Brien.

Birth and adaption; online

. (page 9 of 13)
Online LibraryPatrick O'BrienBirth and adaption; → online text (page 9 of 13)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


From Donegal in Ulster to Sherkin and Kinsale,



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 167

How England took the food away to feed her Saxon

crew,
And let our people starve to death. Oh ! millions then

they slew.
Think of the waifs and widows by barbarous England

made,
From Donegal to Skibbereen, brave Irish Boer

Brigade.



Think of the men of forty-eight and sixty-seven, too,
Bill Allen and Joe Brady, O'Brien and Duffy, too,
Pete Crowley and Will Larkin, martyrs all did die,
With gallant Michael Barrett, who did John Bull defy ;
Now show the gallant Kruger the Gaels are not afraid
Of fusilier or grenadier, brave Irish Boer Brigade.



Think of the seven centuries of murder, the gallows
and the jail.

Our confiscated God-given rights to our own Innisfail ;

Think of the men of ninety-eight who fought for free-
dom's cause,

On Irish soil for liberty 'gainst cursed Saxon laws.

Our clergy murdered at their shrines, when low to God
they prayed.

Avenge them now, with steady aim, brave Irish Boer
Brigade.



168 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

COMOHOLA.

One summer's day from Bantry Bay to Kealkill town

we went
To view the fields and meadows green upon out

pleasure bent.
At Comohola Hills we pitched our camp adjacent to

the road,
Where you could see up in the glen Tim Cadogan's

abode.
And brawny mountaineers with bronzed and rugged

mien,
Prepared to strike for Ireland and her glorious flag of

green.
Lynch and Cotter led the van, the Peelers in the rear,
With speech and song the valley rang by men to do

and dare.

The Reverend Father took the chair and told them one
and all.

That they should speak their native tongue from Cork
to Donegal.

The English is a foreign one : they forced us to comply

With the language of the Sassenach when our own
they did destroy.

Cotter was the next to speak, and he spoke right man-
fully—

He told how Sarsfield fought and bled for Irish liberty,

And spoke the Irish language in France with his
brigade.

At Fontenoy and Limerick and also at Belgrade.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 169

Lynch, the teacher, also spoke and told them fall in

line
And learn to speak the Gaelic tongue from Shannon

to the Boyne.
He told them how they were plundered by an alien

hireling crew.
Who stole their books and manuscripts, but ne'er could

them subdue.
And now they must resuscitate that language so long

dead:
Here are the books, put down your names, by your

good pastor led.
O'Brien then sang old "Keimaneigh," you'd swear he,

too, was there.
The cheering and the yelling drove the Peelers to

despair.

The sergeant is a bachelor and that you all know well,
No Irish girl would marry him, the truth to you I tell.
He's a hirehng of the Government that stole our tongue

away,
And doing Iscariot's dirty work from Gougane to the

Bay.
Soon he'll have to take the pick, the shovel and the hoe
And bundle up his livery and from old Ireland go.
We'll have no use for Bobbies, old Ireland must be free.
For the Gaelic is our battle cry in fight for liberty.

Long life to you brave Cotter, O'Brien and Lynch also.
That you may help to free your land and smite the
tyrant low.



170 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

May the language now in vogue by you take root in

Irish soil
And help lo chase the foe away who did our homes

despoil.
May the boys and girls of Kealkill, Comohola and

Gougane
Speak Irish when they courting go from Cork to

Collomane ;
May Mrs. Dowling live to hear the sweet tongue of the

Gael
On the lips of every colleen in dear old Innisfail.



WHEN PAPISTS COULD APPLY.

When freedom's cause throughout the land was in its

infancy,
And the banner of the patriots waved triumphantly,
The men who rallied 'neath its folds knew neither creed

nor fear.
But to fight for home and liberty did proudly volunteer.
When Lafayette came here from France, prepared to

do or die.
You would not hear those nasty words: "No Papists

need apply !"

When Kosciusko crossed the seas to fight for freedom's

cause,
He left his home and country, oppressed by Russian

laws,



BIRTH AND ADOPTION., 171

And sought the camp of Washington with ready sword

in hand.
To help to strangle tyranny in Columbia's fair land ;
The foreigner was welcome then, for freedom was his

cry.
And no such words were ever heard : "No Papists need

apply."

At Trenton and at Monmouth, the foreigners were

game;
Moll Pitcher and Ted Murphy, John Bull did promptly

tame.
Molly manned the cannon, killing tyrants by the score,
While Murphy's sure and stead aim left Fraser in his

gore.
Fitzgerald was with Washington, and proudly would

he die.
Fighting in the ranks with him when Papists could

apply.

O'Brien and his seven sons, who, history will show,
Chased the English tyrants and dealt them blow for

blow.
When war was raging in the land, they fought upon

the sea.
And captured England's man-o'-war, and swore they

would be free.
In those proud days no A. P. A.'s would join in battle

cry,
And no such words could e'er be heard : "No Papists

need apply."



173 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

When Washington was short of funds, after a long

campaign,
Philadelphia sent him succor, his soldiers to maintain ;
To fight for freedom's holy cause and drive the Saxon

back,
The hirelings of King George's blood-stained, greedy

pack.
They give three cheers for liberty and Washington was

their cry,
For all of these were Papists — then Papists did apply !

Jack Barry was a sailor, well known from shore to

shore.
And made the English quake with fear when he was

commodore.
When British gold was offered him, he spurned the

same with pride ;
And flung the insult back at George, for he was true

and tried.
But Barry was an Irishman, and raised aloud the cry,
How dare you say, you A. P. A., ''No Papists need

apply"?

At the battle of Antietam and Gettysburg also.

That foreigners took an active part the bigots well do

know,
When the vilest reptiles of this earth to Canada did

repair,
And sought a refuge from John Bull, who kept them

in his lair.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 173

And those who bought a substitute, with the enemy to

cope,
Now cry aloud : "Protection and save me from the

Pope r

The scum of all the universe, the A. P. A. Brigade ;
They bastardize the laws of God through valley, hill

and glade,
And desecrate the name of him, the bravest of the

brave,
Who fought to give them freedom and fills a freeman's

grave.
His memory we all cherish, and his name will never

die.
And if he were alive to-day a Papist could apply.

When our President to John Bull sent word the other

day,
"Hands off Venezuela, I command you right away !"
'Twas then the Papists' blood arose and pulses beat

with joy,
As did their famed forefathers in France at Fontenoy.
Those A. P. x\.'s to cellars crawled and then did cry,
"We will not fight 'gainst England — let the Papists

now apply."

The vermin of the Orange race now trying to sow the

seed
Of discord and proscription will never here succeed.



174 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

This is the land of Washington, we glory in the same,
And every heart "beats high with pride" to hear that

hero's name.
While the beacon star of liberty shines brightly from

on high,
We'll show the Tory A. P. A. that Papists can apply.



Phil. Sheridan, the war horse, well known both far and

wide,
And every schoolboy in this land has read his famous

ride;
He fought to free the colored man and give him liberty,
He placed his trust in God above and knew no bigotry.
No slave was he to race or creed, "Susannah, don't you

cry,"
We set you free in sixty-three, for Papists did apply.



And when in old Virginia the Southerners showed their

might,
Meagher brave and Corcoran were foremost in the

fight.
They fought them in the Wildnerness with ready blade

and ball.
And many a gallant Southerner before their charge did

fall.
Though born in old Ireland, "Faugh-a-Ballah" they did

cry.
We'll show you fight both day and night, for Papists

can apply.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 175

And should Columbia need again the men who fought

with Lee,
And those who followed Sherman ''from Atlanta to the

Sea,"
The exiled sons of Erin, ah ! in battle proud array.
Will march again at beat of drum, all ready for the

fray ;
And when they see the Stars and Stripes — "Old Glory"

— they will cry :
"Charge, boys, and drive them back to hell ! We're

Papists — we apply."



A TRIBUTE TO TIMOTHY CADOGAN.

(Murdered by a Perjured Judge and Jury on January
II, 1901, in the City of Cork.)

Tim Cadogan was a farmer's son, his lawful debts he
paid,

Of landlord or of bailiff he never was afraid.

No Bird, nor crow, nor magpie, his spirit proud could
tam.e,

A rough and rugged son of toil from Kerry hills he
came.

One day he went to Bantry town, 'twas in the after-
noon.

As he had often done before in winter time and June.

A Bird was winged that morning, a minion of the
Crown,

No loss was he to Bantry nor any other town.



176 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Chorus.
The jury found him guilty one bleak December day,
And the judge made up his mind to take his life away.
He was murdered in old Ireland, far across the sea,
One thousand men like Cadogan would set old Ireland
free.

The bloodhounds and informers bafifled and at sea,
Hounded gallant Cadogan, which proved his destiny.
The Peelers in pursuit of him, no evidence could find,
.Through treachery they did conspire to gain that hero's

mind.
When they took him to prison, no danger did he fear,
He knew that he was innocent, this gallant moun-
taineer.
The jury thought the same of him and some decreed

it so,
Despite the perjured evidence of Dennis and Duclo.

[Chorus.

Another trial, the jury packed, the spawn of Cromwell's

breed,
To hang the gallant farmer's son at last they did

succeed.
The jury found him guilty, the judge's charge was vile.
With gown and wig, a la Norbury, a native of the soil.
And now his spirit hovers from Cork to Bantry Bay,
For Duclo and Dennis both swore his life away.
When he received his sentence disappointment did

abound
Among his friends and countrymen, who gathered all

around. [Chorus.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 177

He faced the bars and prison walls like Emmet and

Wolfe Tone.
Defied the judge and jury packed, from him there was

no moan.
He knew that he'd be murdered as thousands were

before
By Norbury and Lord O'Brien throughout old Erin's

shore.
Though young in years his spirit proud, O'Brien could

not break.
He tried to cheat "Norbury" and his own life take.
He knew what Wolfe Tone did when in his youth

and prime,
And tried to do the same, he thought it was no crime.

[Chorus.

Long life to Paddy Meade, his name will never die,
The judge and jury in the court he bodly did defy.
He knew the trial v/ould be a farce presided by

O'Brien,
That Judas of the Irish race from Cork to Ballyline.
Gilhooly, Flynn and Barry tried with might and main
To save the life of Cadogan, their efforts were in vain.
The judge decreed that he should die a traitor to the

Crown,
No more to see his native hills, nor visit Bantry town.

[Chorus,

The names of Dennis and his gang are loathsome now

to hear.
They dare not visit Bantry, their hearts are full of fear.

13



178 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

The grass they tread will wither and ne'er again will

grow,
When trampled by Iscariots like Dennis and Duclo.
Now like the owl that shuns the da}^ when darkness

is around
They crawl out of their hiding place, where reptiles

doth abound.

May Cadogan's spirit rest in peace on that bright

heavenly shore,
Before that court above the clouds where sorrow is no

more.



FITZHARRIS.

From out an English bastile, now haggard, old and

gray—
The bravest soul 'mong Irishmen has wended forth his

way.
No ball or chain or prison food his spirit proud could

tame,
An humble man, but true as steel, from Wicklow hills

he came.
When brutal British hirelings with gold to him were

sent —
To bribe him in his prison cage, they thought he would

repent.

"Go back," said he, "to Gladstone, and let it be to-day,
And tell him I would starve to death before I would
betray.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 179

I care not what the rest have done, to Ireland I'll be

true — •
And would not tell the name of one, if all of them I

knew;
Inside these dismal prison walls for life I will remain
Before you will find out from me by whom these men

were slain."



Through bolts and bars and prison walls defiantly he

cried —
"No gold for me through treachery, your worst is now

defied.
You say the rest have proven false — go back and to

them tell
Fitzharris' heart could not be changed, though in a prison

cell
It may be years, it may be death, to comrades I'll be

true,
Dan Curly and Joe Brady, and the gallant Fagan, too.

"Though sad it is to part with wife, with friends and

children dear,
Within these dark and gloomy walls no one to give me

cheer —
I'd rather die a martyr's death," defiantly his mien,
"Than for all the gold in England be a traitor to the

green."
Thus spoke an humble cabman from out his prison cage,
To the castle-hacks of Dublin, which put them in a rage.



180 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Awaiting trial, this hero lay, within the filthy jail,
Inducements great were offered him, but all of no avail —
*T'll give you twenty thousand pounds," the Gladstone

spy did say;
''And our great Queen's protection from Dublin to

Bombay."
"I spurn your golden offer — go find some English bloat,
I'd rather die a pauper first," said gallant "Skin the

Goat."

The jury packed within the court, agreed that he should

go,
From Liffy's Strand and Wicklow Glens; the judge

decreed it so.
His sentence he received as cool as Emmet or Wolfe

Tone —
And stood before the English judge, like monument of

stone ;
That day in Dublin Court House they sentenced him

for life;
A gallant man he still remains through every storm and

strife.



And after seventeen weary years, from out a living hell,
He comes among us once again, his ''prison life" to tell.
And though old age is setting in, in his declining years
He'd face the music once again, with trusty volunteers.
A man may often wear a tattered hat and ragged coat
And still be true to Fatherland, like gallant "Skin the
Goat."



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 181

KRUGER'S ENEMY.

The demon of all nations, the hypocrite of creeds,
With the Bible on her lips, with the devil in her deeds,
With Lyddite fire, with poisoned lead, with bullets of

dum-dum ;
Now plays her pranks in Africa to make the Boer suc-
cumb.
Not long ago the Sepoys, from the cannon's mouth she

blew,
And smoked to death were Zulus, in the caves to which
they flew.

Since the days of all the Henrys, and all the Georges,

too.
She has ravaged, plundered, murdered, in order to

subdue ;
Murdered Irish mothers — murdered their babes unborn;
From kings entombed in foreign lands, their buried

jewels were torn.
Where e'er she got a foothold, she got it by the sword,
Regardless of all blood she shed, she cared but for the

gold.

She tried her hand at grabbing in Boston years ago,
When by stout hands her merchandise into the sea

did go;
But the stalwart sons of Vermont whose war-whoop

pealed aloud.
Supported by New Hampshire, defiantly and proud,



182 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Rushed to the camp of Washington with ready blade

and ball,
And many a British buccaneer at Bunker Hill did fall.

Then England got some lessons what Americans could do
From O'Briens and O'SuUivans, with Yankee ships and

crew ;
She depended on her army to pillage, rob and loot.
And thought she could control the coast from Boston to

Duluth;
How the "Margarette" was captured is .needless now

to tell;
By O'Brien and his seven sons the flag of England fell.

Her rapine and her butchery no more we tolerate.
The doers of such cursed deeds we will exterminate,
Throughout the land of Washington no refuge can they

seek ;
They came to Christianize us, with whispers low and

meek,
And then destroyed our commerce, for which they

dearly paid —
Some fifteen million dollars was the bargain that they

made.

Of late, they've gone to Africa to crush the gallant Boer,
With gattling gun and cannon their battery loud did

roar.
But Joubert met them face to face and fought them man

to ma,n.
Till blood and brains flew o'er the plains, with Kruger

in the van.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 183

Each Fusilier and Glostershire will nevermore forget
The blows dealt out by Kruger's men — they're thinking
of them yet.

O, -Blessed God ! may your right hand the gallant Boer

defend,
And strengthen him with heavenly aid the Saxon's head

to bend,
With shrapnell, shot and bullets, till none are left to tell
How Coldstream Guards and Queen's Blackguards be-
fore the Burghers fell ;
May every red-coat ranger and foolish Fusilier
Get little rest by day or night from Kruger Musketeer.

Oh, what a gallant onward charge the Boers made that

day.
Laying low both officers and men — before they ran away.
One thousand in the trenches, dying and maimed did

groan,
All wishing they had never left their far off English

home ;
Thus, England got a lesson she never got before,
Since the days of Balaklava ; God bless the valiant Boer !

Defenseless babes and mothers, in Wyoming Valley lay.

Slain by English savages at early dawn of day.

While the fathers and the husbands were responding to

the call
To fight for country's liberty, their sacred homes and all ;
Thus did British "civilizers" the babes and mothers slay :
With no one to defend them, their life's blood ebbed

awav.



184 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

And this happened in America some hundred- years ago,
'Tis in our school-books, history, to let our children know
How foully England murdered the matron, child and

maid;
And paid the Indians for the scalps ; and missionaries

paid
For founding smallpox hospitals, to propagate disease —
AMiat wonder that, for England's fall we'd pray on

bended knees?

A foul disease to scatter — when war's resources failed —
To cause an epidemic in George Washington's Brigade;
It's writ in Stewart's History of Revolution times,
In chapter four, page sixty-two, you'll find the very lines ;
And later still, in Washington the Capitol she burned,
And burned Staten Island — humanity she spurned.

She thought she was in India, or out in the Soudan,
Or fighting against savages with Kitchener in the van ;
This time she met her \\'aterloo by bullets of the Boer,
AATio scattered all her "Tommy" boys, and left some in

their gore;
The Fusiliers and Grenadiers now wish they were at

home
In Spitalfields and Fordham's Flat, no mote inclined

to roam.

Xow the Bully of all Nations her colors must pull down,
Oom Paul will rule in Africa despite the English Crown.
The Red Cross and the Shamrock entwined henceforth

will be,
With gallant Blake and Joubert in fight for liberty ;



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 185

And Lady Gonne, that lady who kept Irish youths away
From enlisting in a robber's cause, from Cork to Dublin
Bay.

Now England seeks America, with bribery in hand,
To form an alliance with so-called ''^Mother Land."
She has no friends in Europe, where her deeds are too

well known ;
Russia, France and Germany, her friendship all disown.

Long life to ]\Irs. Belmont, and noble Helen Gould,
As thorough-bred Americans their names must be en-
rolled.
They showed they were no toadies, but women true and

brave.
Who willingly would give their lives, our starry flag to

save ;
Their names will live in history for many years to come,
Their first thought was xAmerica, and charity at home.



LEAVING HOME, AUGUST, 1868.

Alas, alas, in foreign lands six thousand miles from home.
Thinking of my native hills in distant climes to roam,
I left your fertile plains, asthore, when I was young in

years ;
And when I kissed a mother dear, she wiped away her

tears —
I left her with a broken heart, was forced to go away ;
Heart and brain with care oppressed, I sailed from

Bantrv Bav.



186 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

I left one Sunday morning, before the signal gun;
'Twas there my trials, troubles and sorrows had begun.
As I sailed out of the harbor, I whispered a farewell
To the sun-kissed hills and meadows green and daisies

in the dell ;
The little birds ne'er sang so sweet as they did on that

day,
When I left home and homeland and sailed from Bantry

Bay.

As I sailed in the little craft that took me out to sea,
'Twas then I prayed to God above my country to set

free;
There is no reason she should be in bondage all these

years.
Bleeding from her many wounds and shedding bitter

tears ;
She is as fair as other lands, and trying night and day
To raise the Green above the Red in dear old Bantry Bay.

Although out in the Great Far West, with plenty all

around,
I'd rather live in Ireland, my own dear native ground.
'Tis true there's wealth galore and plenty always there,
But give to me old Erin's Isle, none with her can com-
pare.
I know her fields are fresh and green, though she in

bondage lay.
And that's the reason I left home and sailed from Bantry

Bav.



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 187

As I roam these wild prairies and mountains of the West,
My thoughts fly o'er the billows to the land that I love

best.
Though oceans roll between us, you're ever dear to me,
I'll ne'er forget my native hills for any far country.
Your sons and daughters they are brave at home or

far away,
And always will be dear to me, far, far from Bantry Bay.

Why should the wandering Celt forget his home beyond

the sea.
The Lififey and Blackwater, the Shannon and the Lee,
Killarney and Glengariff, Avoca and Dunlow,
The Pass of Keimaneigh where yeomen were laid low?
These places are all dear to me, though very far away.
Yet still my heart flies back once more to dear old Bantry

Bay.



A VISIT TO GLENGARIFF.

(August 17, 1902.)

In August last one summer's da}^ to the Glen my bark

did steer,
To view the fields and meads so green, no danger did I

fear.
With lightning speed O'Brien's steed that day flew like

the wind;
Each bike and horse and gallowglass he left them far

behind.



188 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

Comohola's hills and Newton, too, looked beautiful

that day ;
The lads and lassies gaily decked as we left Bantry

Bay.
Miss Murphy was the village queen and stately did

appear.
As we drove through the village the people did her

cheer.

When we reached the village green the first thing met
my view

Were the boys and girls from Bantry — they were a
jolly crew.

They cycled from that ancient place that Sunday after-
noon,

And when the rain began to fall they waited for the
moon ;

It came just like an avalanche and flooded glen and
vale.

That summer's day I'll ne'er forget in dear old Innisfail.

Now as we start for Bantry, with its madly flowing
" tide,

The subject of my ditty was sitting by my side.

She sweetly sang "Mavourneen" and "Suwanee River,"

too,
"Must We Then Meet as Strangers ?"— "My Love, Will

You Be True?"—
Mavourneen delish Eileen oge, her voice rang through

the glen ;

She also sang the "Wexford Boys," "United Irishmen."



BIRTH AND ADOPTION. 189

She is a charming Irish girl, graceful and serene,
A credit to old Erin's Isle, my native land so green.
Her sister and Miss Heffernan also sang that day.
And as they sang the valleys rang as we drove to the
Bay.



EASTER GREETINGS TO MY DEAR
CHILDREN.

Easter greetings to you all I waft across the breeze
To where mother's love and tender care their utmost

did to please.
How sad to think that she is gone, who watched you

carefully,
And spent two years ago to-day in this hotel with me.
Think of her in the morning, think of her night and

day,
The sweetest soul that ever lived from us has passed

away.
Her memory cherish dearly, of you she did take care ;
As pure as ever lived was she, an angel bright and fair.
My troubles I have borne through sunshine and

through strife.
Since God has taken her from me, a mother and a wife.
So children, dear, 1 beg of you, and this is all I crave,
To visit on next Easter Day your mother's lonely

grave.



190 BIRTH AND ADOPTION.

A VISIT TO MY SISTER'S GRAVE IN SAN

FRANCISCO, CAL., MARCH, 1902.

Silently I went along to where all seemed most serene,
A.nd the sun-kissed peaks and meadows with verdure

ever green.
All, all, was still within these walls where thousands

were at rest
Afar from home and motherland, out in the Golden

West.
My thoughts flew back to childhood days across the


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 11 12 13

Online LibraryPatrick O'BrienBirth and adaption; → online text (page 9 of 13)