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BIOGRAPHY



OF THE



CLASS OK 1838



OF



Princeton College.






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BIOGRAPHY



OF THE



CLASS OF 1838



OF the;



COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY,



AT PRINCETON, N. J. »



" So HEi<p MF God, during thf time of my administration,

Princeton' SHAI<I< keep faith with the dead." — From P>-esidetit Patton' s
Inaugural Address.



PREPARKD BY

tVIIvI^IAM EDWARD SCHENCK, D.D.
At tlie request of his Surviving Classmates.



PHILADELPHIA, PA:

JAS. B. RODGKRS PRINTING CO., 54 N. SIXTH STREJET.
1889.



a^toO'^



X






ROLL OF THE CLASS OF 1838.



GRADUATK MEMBERS.

NAME AND ADDRESS. PAGE

ABERT, JAMBS WILLIAM . • Newport, Ky. 26

ALEXANDER, SAMUEL DA VIES . 153 East 78th St., N. Y. City 29

* ALLEN, JAMES MADISON. . 32

ALLEN, WILLIAM TEMPLE . . Gaylord P. O., Clarke Co., Va. 34

BEACH, BLOOMFIELD JERVIS Rome, N. Y. 36

* BEACH, ZENAS LINDSLEY 38

BEARDSLEY, CHARLES SHEPARD, 292 North St., Auburn, N. Y. 39

* BELLOWS, CHARLES THEODORE • - • 4i

* BERRIEN, JAMES LEWORTHY . 41

*BLANEY, JAMES VAN ZANDT 42

*BLACKWELL, CLAYTON 45

* BRANCH, LAWRENCE O'BRIAN 47

* BURTON, JOHN WILLIS 5°

CAMPBELL, ALEXANDER SPOTSWOOD

Loch Raven, Baltimore Co., Md. 51



* Deceased.

3



4 Roiviv OF the; CI.ASS OP 1838.

NAME AND ADDRESS. PAGE

*CARPKR, JAMES SAMUElv 53

*CAZENOVE, WIIvLIAM GARDNER ............. 54

CLARKE, EDWARD SAMUEIv . 712 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pa. 56

*CIvAWSON, WIIvIvIAM SHINN. ............... 58

* COBB, HENRY LAWRENCE 59

*CONKI.ING, EIvISHA WHITAKER • 60

*COOK, LEWIS CONDICT • 61

* CORY, JONATHAN 63

CUMMINS, JAMES STARKE LANE

. Churchtown, Lancaster Co., Pa. 64

* CUNNINGHAM, JAMES HAWTHORN . 66

*DANDRIDGE, ALEXANDER SPOTSWOOD ......... 67

*DAVIS, JOSEPH HOLMES 71

*DOD, WILLIAM ARMSTRONG 72

* EAGER, JOHN McAULEY 73

*EYRE, MAHLON DICKERSON 76

* PRICK, ARTHUR WILLIAM 78

* FUNSTEN, DAVID 79

*GIBBS, JOSIAH WILLARD 81

* GULICK, JOHN STORY . 82

*HALSTED, OLIVER SPENCER (2d) ............ . 84

* HOLLYDAY, WILLIAM MURRAY 86

*HORNBLOWER, WILLIAM HENRY 87

* Deceased.



ROLIv OF the; CI.ASS OF 1 838. 5

NAME AND ABDRESS. PAGE

*JACKSON, JOHN SIMS 89

*JAMISGN, ANDREW SIMPSON 91

JEMISON, WILLIAM HENRY, East Lake P. O., Jefferson Co., Ala. 92

*JOHNSON, DANIEL 95

*JONES, GEORGE CROW 97

*LEONARD, ABRAHAM FAW 98

LITTLE, THEODORE Morristown, N. J. 99

Mcknight, lewis . . . 486 Milwaukee St., Milwaukee, wis. 102

*McREE, GRIFFITH JOHN .*. . . 103

MONTGOMERY, THOMAS COLEMAN

213 Powers Building, Rochester, N. Y. 104

NEWBOLD, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS ..... Bordentown, N. J. 106

* PATTERSON, MALCOM ALFRED 107

PENDLETON, ELISHA BOYD

Berkeley Springs, Morgan Co., W. Va. 109

PERRINE, LEWIS Trenton, N. J. iii

*PORTER, ABNER ADDISON. 113

*PURNELL, THOMAS RICHARD 117

*REDIN, RICHARD WILLIAM 119

*RICE, JOHN HOLT 120

*RICHEY, ROBERT THEODORE 122

* RIDGWAY, CHARLES DANIEL 123

* ROGERS, WILLIAM HENRY LUTTRELL 124

* Deceased.



6 ROI,!, OF THE CLASS OF 1 838.

NAME AND ADDRESS. PAGE

ROWAN, EDWARD STEPHEN . 272 Ainslie St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 125

* SAWYER, ROBERT WOOD 127

SCHENCK, WIIvLIAM EDWARD

4006 Baltimore Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 128

*SCUDDER, AMOS ...................... i35

* SEAMAN, I^EONARD WILLIAM. 136

*SHERRERD, SAMUEL i37

* SMITH, JOHN IRWIN 138

SMITH, WILLIAM ASA 201 Prospect St., Trenton, N. J. 140

*VAN ARSDALE, HENRY . 142

*VAN WYCK, CORNELIUS C 144

*VAUGHAN, BENJAMIN BOISSEAU 145

*WALL, JAMES WALTER 147

*WATKINS, JOEL THOMAS 149

*WEEKS, SAMUEL G 150

*WHITELEY, WILLIAM GUSTAVUS . ............ 151

* WILLIAMS, LEWIS JEFEERY 153

* WILLIAMS, SAMUEL GER ALDUS 155

WOODHULL, HENRY WILLIAM BECK

124 Berkeley Place, Brooklyn, N, Y. 157

* Deceased.



ROIvI. OF THE CI.ASS OF 1 838.



NON-GRADUATB MEMBERS.

NAME AND ADDRESS. PAGE

*ANCRUM, THOMAS JAMBS 163

BARRETT, RUFUS KING, Bedford Station, Westchester Co., N. Y. 164

*BONHAM, JOHN ELLIS 165

*BOYD, WILLIAM ARMSTRONG •. . . . 167

BOYKIN, EDWARD MORTIMER Camden, S. C. 167

* BRANCH, JOHN RICHARD 169

* BROWN, LUTHER 170

*BRUEN, JAMES McWHORTER 171

COMFORT, FRANCIS MARION, Woodville, Wilkinson Co., Miss. 173

* COOKE, PATRICK HENRY i74

*EASON, WILLIAM C I75

* EYRE, MANUEL 176

* HAMILTON, WILLIAM I77

*JOHNSON, JAMES STEVEN 178

*LEWIS, ELISHA JARRETT I79

*LONDON, JOHN LORD • • • 180

McKAY, NEILL • ^^^

• Deceased.



o ROI.I. OF THE CI.ASS OF 1 838.

NAME AND ADDRESS. PAGE

*McKNIGHT, ROBERT 182

REED, SAMUEL 105 South Front St., Philadelphia, Pa. 184

*ROUGET, PETER 184

*SATTERFIELD, GEORGE WILLIAM BOZMAN 187

*SNEEDEN, HUDSON S. ................... 188

* STEWART, SAMUEL GRIFFIN CAMPBELL 189

* TAYLOR, HENRY PORTERFIELD 190

VAN GIESEN, MORRELL . . 75 Washington St., Geneva, N. Y. 191
WADDELL, JAMES ADDISON, Roxbury, Charles City County, Va. 193

*WELLING, ISAAC WATTS 194

WINTHROP, WILLIAM HENRY New London, Conn. 195

WIRT, DABNEY CARR . . . Oak Grove, Westmoreland Co., Va. 196

* Deceased.



HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1838.



It is not intended in this Httle book to claim for the Class
of 1838 any special superiority over other classes which have
preceded and have followed it. It only asks that this be re-
membered and honored as one of many excellent classes
which have gone forth from our Alma Mater. Its chief at-
traction, in the eyes of its surviving members, is tftit it is our
class.

One object in the preparation of this little work is to recall
to ourselves the old memories and associations of college
times, and thus, in a measure, to enjoy again the delights of
that halcyon period of human life — a period whose recollec-
tions are now mellowed by the lapse of half a century, and
made more sacred by the havoc death has wrought among
the associates of those days. Here let me quote a few sen-
tences from the pen of Judge William Patterson, the distin-
guished author of "The Biography of the Class of 1835," in
which he expresses, in tender and poetic language, the very
feeling which prompted (in part) the preparation of this simi-
lar work :

" It is difficult to convey to the uninitiated an idea of the feelings and
associations aroused by college memories. Strong at all times to the
individual who can cherish aspirations other than those of a nature
purely selfish, they culminate, when, after the lapse of many years, the
few who remain nearing the ultima thule of the' downward slope meet,
perhaps to come together nevermore on this side of The River, to talk of
what always will be clothed in the freshness of green— of dream-hfe and
a border land without a limit or a shore, and tell the same old story
told in the heretofore and to be told in the hereafter, yet varied in infin-
ity as the leaves upon the grass or sands by the murmuring ocean tides.
There is a sentiment of Free Masonry connected with such associations,

9



10 BIOGRAPHY OF THE CI,ASS OF 1 83 8.

incomprehensible to those never initiated in those inner mysteries, and
it is but the manifestation of a higher tone and more mellowed growth,
that this fellowship is ceasing to be regarded with the harsh sneers of
derision cast over it in the primitive days of a stern utilitarianism. * * * *
Life, or what remains of it on earth, will be no worse to those who can
find pleasure in the dreamy recollection of past memories and associa-
tions : it is more likely that the future, however short, could be contem-
plated with a fuller faith and better aspirations. And as memory wan-
ders back and recalls the many thoughtless gayeties that strewed its
pathway with summer flowers, it finds a resting-place, soft and green,
where life was a happy scene of innocent amusement, and the fleeting
visions that have passed from before us seem almost to stay in our
presence forever."

. Another object in this work, and many may think it a more
practical one, is to make a small contribution to the coming
." Biography of Princeton College." The true wealth and
glory of such an institution must be sought in its Alumni.
Let her treasure their memories and carefully preserve their
personal histories, and thus enable herself more and more
proudly to say to the world " These are my jewels," We do
earnestly hope that the time is not far distant, but very near
at hand, when our Alma Mater may be able to secure the ser-
vices of a competent man, with a genius for such work and
an enthusiastic devotion to it, whose whole time shall be
given to gathering from every accessible source, to arranging
and to preserving, all that can be learned of her Alumni from
the very beginning. Doubtless much valuable material has
already perished, and more is perishing every year. Let
what yet remains be gathered and preserved in a biographical
form. From this, largely, a fitting History of the College
may be produced hereafter. If any one would learn how
much can be done in a limited period, and that by a city pas-
tor weighted with multitudinous cares and duties, let him
examine the volume entitled " Princeton College in the Eight-
eenth Century',' prepared by the Rev. Samuel Davies Alex-
ander, D.D , of this Class of 1838. It contains an invaluable
treasure of facts about the Alumni of the last century. Before
laying aside his pen. Dr. Alexander most truthfully says in
his eloquent Preface : — " The history of a College is best read
in the lives of her sons. The history of the changes which



PRINCETON COLLEGE. H

occur in her government and instruction is too contracted in
its nature. To take in the grand sweep of her influence we
must follow her sons as they go forth into the world to mould
and direct the elements that surround them." And again:
" Read these sketches and the conviction will be irresistible
that the country, the Presbyterian Church, and the Cause of high
Christian Culture, owe their present exalted position in the
land to the noble men who went forth from Princeton during
the last century." Yet the mine which Dr. Alexander
worked so successfully is not exhausted, even in regard to the
Alumni whose names adorn his pages. Great treasures of
information about Princeton Alumni yet remain to be gath-
ered. Our hope is that the authorities of the College will
soon take efficient action to collect these from every accessi-
ble source and utilize them. Why may not the*College in
the near future have a biography of every man who has ever
received a diploma from her hands ? And as one of the steps
toward this, let each class that leaves her walls, be encouraged
to take all appropriate measures for doing substantially what
the Class of 1838 is now doing — prepare, when the journey
of life lies mainly behind them, a Class Biography, copies of
which shall be placed in possession of the College. We are
fully persuaded that the college authorities, through these and
other means, not only may secure materials for a new future
history of the Institution, but would also attach to it and firmly
hold large numbers of individuals and families now becoming
forgetful of the strong and ancient ties which bind them to
the College of New Jersey. To this use we contribute this
little offering.

OUR FRESHMAN YEAR.

What a halo still lingers around our Freshman year!
Were we to live for centuries could we ever forget the feel-
ings with which we assembled on November 5, 1834, at our
first college recitation in a front basement room of the old North
College to meet our Greek tutor, Hugh N. Wilson, who,
from that day onward, was known as " Hugo?" There were
just twelve of us— the " original twelve "—the nucleus of the



12 HISTORY OF THE CI.ASS OF 1 838.

class of 1838. The twelve were Samuel D. Alexander,
Thomas J. Ancrum, Zenas L. Beach, Clayton Blackwell,
Joseph H. Davis, William H. L. Rogers, George W. B.
Satterfield, William E. Schenck, Morrell Van Giesen,
Samuel G, Weeks, William H, Winthrop and Henry W. B.
Woodhull. Of these twelve, five are yet living, and of these
five, three — Alexander, Schenck and Woodhull, were present
at our semi-centennial class meeting on June 20, 1888. The
other living ones are Van Giesen and Winthrop, who did not
graduate in 1838. By accessions from time to time, at the
end of the year the class numbered twenty-four. It steadily
moved onward in the pathway of learning, reading Livy and
the Odes of Horace under Tutor Burrowes ; Xenophon and
Aeschines under Tutor Wilson ; and working at Algebra un-
der Adjunct Professor Stephen Alexander,

A memorable incident of this year was the burning of the
First Presbyterian Church. It stood on the same spot
where the present edifice stands, but with its side to the
street. We were all in the College Chapel (now the Muse-
um) at 5 P.M. on July 6, 1835, and President Carnahan was
conducting Evening Prayers, when suddenly the bell began
to ring furiously, and the cry of " Fire" came up from the
street. The first impression was that the College building
was itself on fire. The students rushed from the Chapel,
and the President was left alone and standing in the pulpit.
When we reached the church, fliames had just burst through
the roof, and in spite of all efforts soon only the bare
brick walls were left standing. The conflagration was sup-
posed to have been caused by the stick of a sky-rocket fired
on the evening of the 4th of July, two days before, which had
entered an attic window, and there smouldered until the fire
burst out. The burning of the church affected the Commence-
ments and some other exercises of our whole College course.

A noteworthy occurrence in the Freshman year was the
presentation of a gift by the class to Tutor Burrowes, who
was greatly respected and beloved by all its members. As
he was about to leave and become a Professor in Lafayette
College, the class purchased a large and handsome Bible, ap-



PRINCETON COLLEGE. 13

pointed the writer to make the presentation with a few re-
marks, and marched in procession to his room. The inter-
view was brief, but very touching and memorable. Nearly
fifty years afterwards the writer was in San Francisco, and
called to see his former tutor, who was then, as he is yet, the
Rev. George Burrowes, D.D., Professor of Greek and He-
brew Exegesis in the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of
San Francisco. Dr. Burrowes spoke of our Freshman gift
almost with tears, and showed him the Bible, carefully pre-
served. Having subsequently sent the Professor a printed
account of our Semi-Centennial Class Meeting on June 20,
1888, in which he was mentioned as now our only surviving
college instructor, the writer received a letter from Dr. Bur-
rowes in which he wrote : "Among the pleasures crowning
my old age [Dr. Burrowes is now in his seventy-ninth year]
not the least delightful were my meetings with you on your
recent visit to this Coast, and the refreshing influence of such
a renewal of the friendship of early manhood. Your kind
remembrance of me at the fiftieth anniversary of your class
graduation touched me deeply. I thank and bless you for
all your friendship, kindliness and affection. The Bible was
beautiful in typography, and is one of the delightful remem-
brances of my life. It is inscribed — ' Presented to George
Burrowes, Tutor, by the Freshman Class of Princeton Col-
lege, as a Testimonial of their high regard for him, Septem-
ber, 1835.' It hangs as a beautiful fixed star over those early
days, never sinking below the horizon of memory during all
the revolutions of the following years. I remember very pleas-
santly Dr. Woodhull, Mr. Jemison and Dr. S. D. Alexander,
of your class." As has been intimated above, Dr. Burrowes
is now the only living instructor of any of our college days.
Long may he linger in life to bless us and to be blest by us !
The commencement at the end of our Freshman year was
one of unusual interest. In consequence of the recent de-
struction by fire of the First Presbyterian Church in which
the Commencement exercises had been held since its firs*
erection, a large canvas tent had been set up against the rear
end or southeastern wall of the chapel, now the Museum.



14' HISTORY OF THE CI.ASS OF 1 838.

Under this the usual exercises were this year held on Sep-
tember 30th. Here the Hon. William Gaston, of North Car-
olina, delivered his famous Annual Address before the two
Literary Societies. It occupied two hours in the delivery,
and was a masterpiece of intellectual power and oratorical
grace. Here also Nicholas Biddle, the great President of the
old United States Bank which General Andrew Jackson
vetoed, delivered his equally famous oration before the Alumni
Association — an oration everywhere and long spoken of as
polished, powerful, elegant and eloquent to an extraordinary
degree.

OUR SOPHOMORE YEAR.

On the opening of the Sophomore year, on the 8th day of
December, 1835, our twenty-four Freshmen found themselves
overwhelmed and almost lost in a large accession of nearly
fifty new classmates, making before the end of the year sev-
enty-four in all. They were led forward in Euclid and Trig-
onometry by the diffident but able Professor Stephen Alex-
ander; through portions of Horace and Cicero by one of the
Tutors ; and Demosthenes and Homer's Iliad under the very
intelligent and attractive guidance of Professor John S. Hart.

The most memorable event in our Sophomore year was the
burial at Princeton of the famous Colonel Aaron Burr, at one
time Vice-President of the United States. He died Septem-
ber 13th, 1836, at the Richmond House, on Staten Island,
N. Y., in his eighty-first year. We insert an account of the
funeral service found in The Newark Daily Advertiser, of Fri-
day, September 19, 1836, believed to have been written by
the Rev. James W. Alexander, D.D. :

"Princeton, Sept. 17, 1836. The body of Col. Aaron Burr was re-
ceived from New York at Amboy and taken to Hightstown on the rail-
road, whence it was brought to Princeton in a hearse, accompanied in a
carriage by the pall -bearers : — Gen. Robert Swartwout, Col. S. Swart-
wout. Col. J. W. Scott, Col. Romeyn, Gen. Bogardus, Major Popham,
H. M. Western and Samuel Copp, Esqs. The remains reached town
about noon and were deposited in the College Chapel, where the de-
ceased had often listened to the voice of prayer from his venerable
maternal grandfather, the pious President Edwards. At the appointed



PRINCETON COLLEGE. 15

hour the Faculty and students with some of the citizens of the borough,
assembled at the chapel and soon after 3 p. m. the services were appro-
priately commenced with the reading of the 90th Psalm and a prayer
by the Rev. Dr. Van Pelt, who had attended the sickness of the deceased
on Staten Island. President Carnahan then followed with an impres-
sive, judicious and appropriate discourse from I Cor. vii. 31 : "For the
fashion of this world passeth away.'' He briefly sketched the history of
the deceased, and remarked on his honorable parentage and his con-
nection with the College. His public career was delicately touched,
with only such allusions to his duel with Hamilton as might be of ser-
vice to the assembly without wounding the feelings of any. The ser-
vices in the Chapel were closed with a prayer by the Rev. Benj. H,
Rice, D.D. A large funeral procession was formed on the College
Green, composed of the Mercer Guards, the clergy, the corpse and
chief mourners, the Cliosophic Society, the Faculty and students of the
College and Seminary, citizens, &c. The body was deposited at the
foot of his father's grave with the honors of war — the Mercer Guards
firing a volley over the grave,'' %

The Cliosophic Society adopted a resolution " that the
efforts of this individual on behalf of our Society during her
infant struggle and the affectionate interest he has at all times
manifested for her success, claim from us an expression of
condolence for his loss and of gratitude for his service." It
was also resolved that "the members of the Society will wear
crape on the left arm for thirty days :" which was done.
Never can we forget that melancholy march from the College
to the grave, the long procession, of which our Sophomore
Class (including the writer) formed a part, headed by a brass
band playing as a dead march " The Portuguese Hymn," and
filling the streets of Princeton with its wailing strains. A
tombstone, paid for mainly by the Edwards family of New
York, was afterwards erected over his grave. It is astonish-
ing how many stories, absolutely and wholly, false, have been
invented and published about Colonel Burr's burial. As our
class were not only eye-witnesses, but also participants in the
whole affair, the writer has on that account been more care-
ful to give a plain and full statement of the occurrence.

The erection of the West College was finished this year,
and a number of its rooms were occupied by members of our
class during the Junior year.



16 HISTORY OF THE CI.ASS OF 1 838.



OUR JUNIOR YEAR.

In its Junior year the class was further enlarged from 74
to ^y members, an unusual addition for that advanced stage
of the course. The total number of students in the college
was 240. Now we entered upon the mazes of Analytical
Geometry and Differential and Integral Calculus under the
guidance of that admirable preceptor, Professor Albert B.
Dod. In this field he was beyond compare, " and as he illus-
trated the propositions as only he could do," one of his pupils
has written, " we marvelled much that what he made appear
so easy and so plain, to us should seem so wondrous hard."
Now, too, we really enjoyed the teachings of President Carna-
han and of Doctors Maclean and J. W. Alexander. As having
attained the dignity of Juniors, we were also freed (except on
Monday mornings) from the irksomeness of the early recita-
tions before breakfast, which we had been obliged to attend
throughout our Freshman and Sophomore years.

The memorable event of this year was the undertaking of
the American Whig and Cliosophic Societies, to erect two
new Literary Halls. Their views and wishes having been made
known to the Faculty and Trustees of the College, were sanc-
tioned by both. Each Society then appointed a Committee
to solicit subscriptions from the Alumni; Commodore Robert
F. Stockton heading the Whig subscription list with one
thousand dollars. We do not remember the names of other
large subscribers. The erection of Clio Hall was begun first,
but they were finished at very nearly the same time. It was
the Class of 1838, in its Junior year, that fully initiated these
enterprises, but the new Halls were not occupied by the So-
cieties until after our graduation. Ah ! how both Whigs and
Clios suffered for years from over-crowding and lack of ventila-
tion and fresh air in those old third-story Halls with their low
arched ceilings. Our successors for the last fifty years have
never known what a deliverance they have had through the
efforts of the Class of 1838, and what a debt of gratitude they
have been owing us.

The Fourth of July was this year (1837) observed at Prince-



PRINCETON COLLEGE. 17

ton with unusual spirit. The national flag was hoisted at
sunrise with the ringing of bells and firing of cannon; a na-
tional salute was fired also at noon and at sunset, and in the
evening the College buildings were illuminated, and there was
a grand display of fireworks. There was speaking in the
Seminary Chapel both forenoon and afternoon, the rebuilt
Presbyterian Church not being yet ready for use. A proces-
sion was formed in the College Campus and marched to the
Chapel under the lead of Major John A. Perrine, Marshal of
the day. The exercises were as follows : Forenoon — Reading
of The Declaration of Independence by Joshua Hall Mcllvaine,
of Delaware; an oration by Joseph Branch, of North Carolina;
an oration by A, Gardiner Mercer, of Pennsylvania. After-
noon — Speeches by members of the Class of 1838, viz.:
Samuel G. Williams, of North Carolina ; Edward C Rowan,
of New York; William A. Dod, of New Jersey; J. Willard
Gibbs, of Pennsylvania ; John M. Eager, of New York ; and
James S. Carper, of Virginia.

The Commencement of 1837 was held in the newly rebuilt
Presbyterian Church. Its most striking feature was the de-
livery of a magnificent oration on " The Bible and its Literary
Claims," by the Hon. Samuel L. Southard, LL.D.

OUR SENIOR YEAR.

In the Senior year the class was decreased in numbers from
eighty-seven to seventy-five. The latter was the number
which passed the final examination, and received diplomas.
The whole number of students in the college was two hundred


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