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3 CHILDREN'S BOOK
COLLECTION



LIBRARY OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES



Ex Libris
ELVAH KAHSHI



LITTLE SISTERS;

OR

EMMA AND CAROLINE?




NEW HAVEV.
Published by S. Babcock.

164



2 THE LITTLE "SISTERS.




EMMA AND CAROLINE.



HVP????V?VTV9??,

^LITTLE SISTERS.:

Emma was five years old,
and Caroline only two ; so
you see Emma was a great
girl, while Caroline was only
a baby.

Emma, being eldest sister,
had many things the baby
could not have ; but Emma,
being a good girl, gave her
little sister leave to look at
all her toys, and you can not
think how pretty it was to
see Emma lead her little
sister by the hand and show
her all her things. She used
to say, See here, dear little
sister, look at this pretty



4 THE LITTLE SISTERS.

thing; do not break it, my
love ; if you do, I shall not
have another like it, and then
I know you will be very sorry.

The little sister could not
speak plain, but she could
nod her head, and say Yes,
and Emma would always let
her take any of the play
things that the baby had a
fancy for.

Sometimes the little girl
would keep Emma's toys too
long, and Emma would want
them : but she did not snatch
them out of the little baby's
hands ; she would say, No,
never mind, never mind, lit-
tle dear, when you are older
you will know better ; I am
a great girl you know, nurse,
and I must teach her to be



THE LITTLE SISTERS.




good and kind, by being good
and kind myself, and mam-
ma will love us more and
more, every day.

When they walked out in
fine weather, every one stop-
ped to look and see how nice-
ly the eldest little girl led
her sister, and did not run.
too fast, for fear she should
tire the baby ; or when the>
baby would not walk, buj
cried for the nurse to carry



6' THE LITTLE SISTERS.




her, then Emma would throw
a ball, or draw her go-cart,
to tempt her little sister to
walk ; for she would say, I
know, nurse, you must be
tired, as Caroline is so heavy
for you to carry. The nurse
loved Emma, and so did ev-
ery one, as she was such a
good child ; but her mamma
loved her the most of any
body, and you can not think
tow proud she was of her '



THE LITTLE SISTERS.




One day the two little girls
were in the drawing-room,
and Emma gave her little
sister leave to look at her
best wax dolf, and to hold it
in her hands. This was very
good in Emma, for it was the
first wax doll she had ever
had. She was very fond of
it indeed.

There was a lady in the
room who called Emma to
kiss her ; Emma went to he*



8 THE LITTLE SISTERS.

as soon as she was called, for
she was a good child, and
did not pout and look cross,
as I have very often seen
little girls do. But Emma
laid down the wax doll, and
told the baby not to touch it
until she came back.

The lady said, You look,
my dear, as if you were a
rery good child, you are
also very pretty, but that I
do not much mind, as it is
with the conduct of a good
child that I am most pleased,
when I meet one.

When Emma went back
to her little sister, she found
she had snapped off one of
the doll's arms and had pul-
led off more than half the
hair. Emma grew very red,



THE LITTLE SISTERS. 9




and was ready to cry when
she saw what the baby had
done to the poor doll, but she
did not say one cross word
to her ; she only said, Well,
my little dear, I see I must
not lend you the next wax
doll I may get, for you are
not old enough yet to play
with them ; but do not cry 4
for I am not angry with you
at all ; and pray, mamma, do
not scold the baby, for, poor



THE LITTLE SISTER*.

little thing, you know she is-
but a baby, and does not
know any better yet ; when
she is a little older I am sure
she will be good.

The lady who was in the
room got up and kissed Em-
ma, and said, You are one of
the best little girls I ever saw,
and I feel as if you would
soon have a new wax doll.

I have little girls at home,
and I shall tell them how
well you behave to your little
sister, that they may learn to
be as good.

She then went away, and
the day went on as before.

Just as Emma and Caro-
line were going down stairs
into the parlor, after their
supper, to stay a little while



THE LITTLE SISTERS. II




with their dear mamma be-
fore they went to bed, a
knock was heard at the street
door, and a porter brought
in a blue box. Her mamma
put out her hand to take it^
but the man said, No, mad*
am, it is for Miss Emma.

Dear me, said her mamma*
what can it be ?

The box was placed on the
table, and Emma got into a
chair at the table, and tha



12 THE LITTLE SISTERS.




string that tied the box was
cut with mamma's scissors,
and, when they had taken off
a great many paper wrappers,
they found what do you
think? A very large wax
doll, dressed in a nice white
frock, with a pink sash, and
brown shoes trimmed with
pink, trowsers down to the
feet, and a white beaver hat
and feathers ; gloves on the



THE LITTLE SISTERS. 13

hands and arms ; it had black
eyes, dark brown hair, red
lips, and rosy cheeks, and
looked as if it smiled ; there
was a pelisse and tippet in
the box, for her to wear when
she went out walking, and a
night-cap and night-shift for
Emma to put on her when
she undressed her to put her
to bed ; on the top of the
box lay a letter directed to
Miss Emma Barton.

Emma was sorry she could
not read it herself, but
thought she would make
haste and learn as soon as
she could ; but now she had
to ask her mamma if sha
would please to read it to
her. So her mamma opened
the letter, and sitting down



14 THE LITTLE SISTERS.




by the table, read it aloud
to Emma. She found in it
these words :



Ofy dear good little girl,

As I saw how kind you were to
vour little sister to-day. I went to
a shop and bought as pretty a wax
doll as I could get, and I hope your
good mamma will give you leave
to accept it from me ; and I beg
you will always be as good as you
are now.

GRACE LOVECHILD.



THE LITTLE SISTERS. 15

So you see it was the lady
who saw how good Emma
had been to her little sister
in the morning, when she was
there, that had been so kind
as to buy her this pretty doll.

Her mamma took her the
next day to thank and kiss
the lady ; and Emma grew
up a great girl, and taught
her little sister to be as good
as herself!

And thus, all little chil-
dren will find that it is much
better for them to be obedient
to their parents, and affection-
ate to one another ; for they
will not only be far happier,
by so doing, but find them-
selves rewarded when they
least expect it.



16 MAMMA AXD EMMA.
EVERY DAY NOT PLAY-DAT.

On Monday, Emma, did you play ?

Yes, and on Tuesday too:
Wednesday I had a holiday,

Of course had naught to do.

Thursday all my tasks I said,
Then played an hour or more ;

A whole suit for my doll I made,
And worked my finger sore.

Friday I worked, I played, I read,
This day passed quickly by ;

Saturday, fell and hurt my head,
Did little else but cry.

Cut Emma, now these days ara
gone,

Let Sunday claim your care,
And pass the holy seventh one,

A* suits it best in prayer.







FOR CHILDREN. !

S. BABCOCK, :



NEW HAVEN,

[8 CONSTANTLY PUBLISHING .



: TOY BOOKS,

of every description.






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