R. D. (Richard Doddridge) Blackmore.

Educational screen & audio-visual guide (Volume 36-37) online

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REFERENCE
COLLECTION



PUBLIC LIBRARY



From the collection of the



San Francisco, California
2007




IM Jg - ,
. 36, No. 1



JANUARY, 1957 VOL.



A UNIFIED MATERIALS PROGRAM
CLOSED CIRCUIT STUDY HALL TEACHER
SLIDES IN THREE MINUTES

AV REMINISCING



From "The Greot Adventure" (Louis de Rochemont)







King/




This word, in film processing, is a very important
word indeed.

People tell you that one film processing job

is as good as another, and what the heck, what's the

measure of accuracy, anyway?

Well. To answer that one would take a very long time.

Suffice it to say here that it's summed up in

all the operations of a processing job, where even

the smallest details are of great importance.

It shows everywhere, and it positively shines when

the film appears on the screen.

What we're talking about, of course, are the people
and the operations at Precision Film Laboratories.
Here attention to detail, sound, proven techniques
are applied by skilled, expert technicians to
assure you the accurate, exact processing your films
deserve to justify your best production efforts.

Accuracy is a must for TV for industrials for
education for all movies.



you'll see




and hear



P ff C



ION




M LABORATORIES, INC.
st 46th Street, New York 36, New York

A DIVISION OF J. A. MAURER. INC.



In everything, there is one best



in film processing, it's Precision




36827




/Xfflfim

S~V -m - 7 - m-~m S




CALL YOUR AUTHORIZED SVE
AUDIO-VISUAL DEALER TO DISCUSS
THIS APPROVED, MONEY-SAVING



.4



FILMSTRIP- PROJECTOR
PLAN"



CHOOSE FROM OUTSTANDING
SVE FILMSTRIP SETS LIKE THESE
PRIMARY



Phonics: A Key to Better Reading
Adventures with Early American

Indians

Living Together
Science for Beginners

INTERMEDIATE

Words: Their Origin, Use

and Spelling

Steps in Building A Paragraph
Using Good English
Hero Legends of Many Lands
Your Home in the Americas
Lands and Peoples Overseas
Stories of Great Americans
Basic Weather

JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH

Exploring Punctuation
Our National Government



Using and Understanding

Numbers
Be Healthy, Go Safely the

Primary Way



Prehistoric Man Through the

River Cultures
Correlated Science Series
Using and Understanding

Numbers Decimals and

Measurements
Be Healthy, Go Safely the

Intermediate Way



Establishing the Republic



II ith each $200. order for SVE filmstrips or slide-
sets, you receive a $64.50 School Master "300" Projector
absolutely free! When your order for materials totals
$300. or more, you get an $84.50 School Master "500"
as your free gift! It's a wonderful way to start or
enlarge your audio-visual program. (Projector shown
is Model "500". Rewind Take-up is optional at $7.50
additional cost.)



HUNDREDS OF SUBJECTS AT EVERY GRADE LEVEL.
SEND FOR FREE 56-PAGE CATALOG.



r



SOCIETY FOR
USUAL EDUCATION,



SOCIETY FOR VISUAL EDUCATION, INC. (A Business Corporation)
1345 Diversey Parkway, Chicago 14, Illinois

Gentlemen: Please send SVE Educational Catalog of filmstrips, slidesets and audio-
visual equipment.

G Include name of my authorized SVE dealer.

Name . .



"1



A Subsidiary of




School

I Address.



City_



_Zone_



_State_



EdScreen & AVCuide January, 1957



TEACHERS




V



Art



Flo-master felt tip pen

Teachers who use this all-purpose felt-tipped
pen for visual aid and drawing projects often
wonder how they ever got along without it.
The Flo-master is a truly universal writing tool
...for paper, wood, glass, metal, cloth, rubber and
even plastics. Whether you want to make visual
aids, charts, graphs, maps, posters or flash
cards ... or art or lettering, your Flo-master is
always ready for instant action - and no clean-
up afterwards!
Slim, trim Flo-master
Pens have interchange- Graphs
able tips, use brilliant
instant drying Flo-mas-
charts ter inks in eight stand- Posters
ard colors, including
black. Individual Flo-
Flash cards master Pens are avail- visual aids
able from your school supply, art, or stationery
center at prices from $3. Flo-master colorcraft
sets, equal to 4 complete sets in 4 colors, are
designed especially for Art and Elementary
School Teachers. Ideal for supply room.
Get your free copy of the Flo-master School Bul-
letin showing time-and-money-saving ways to
ease your work load with this handy felt-tipped
pen. Write to Cushman & Denison Mfg. Co., 625
Eighth Ave., New York 18, N.Y.



V



V



v



o- master

Felt tip pen *'



VISUAL AIDS CAN BE COSTLY BUT NOT
WITH A "DO-IT-YOURSELF" FLO-MASTER



EDUCATIONAL

BEEN

& AUDIO-VISUAL GUIDE

January, 1957 Volume 36, Number 1, Whole Number 348

t




Founded

in 1922

by

Nelson L. Greene



IN THIS ISSUE



C^altorial

16 COPYRIGHT VIOLATIONS



ea

12 CLOSED CIRCUIT STUDY HALL TEACHER Lee Weddig

14 HOW TO RUN A NON-STOP SHOW ON ONE PROJECTOR

T. Robert Bassett

18 READ ... SEE ... HEAR Edward T. Schofield
22 SLIDES IN 3 MINUTES Philip Lewis
24 AV REMINISCING M. I. Smith



6
8

26
34

37
39



ON THE SCREEN

HAVE YOU HEARD? News about People, Organizations, Events

EVALUATION OF NEW FILMS L. C. Larson, Carolyn Guss, John Fritz

SOUND ADVICE about Audio Materials and Equipment

Max U. Bildersee
CHURCH DEPARTMENT William S. Hockman

AUDIO-VISUAL TRADE REVIEW Robert E. Schreiber

Monthly Review of What's New from Manufacturers & Distributors





10 AV CALENDAR

37 AUDIO DIRECTORY

49 INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

Inside Bock Cover TRADE DIRECTORY FOR THE AUDIO-VISUAL FIELD



IDUCATIONAL
1RESS

ISSOCIATION
OF

^AMERICA



BUSINESS & EDITORIAL ADDRESS: EDUCATIONAL SCREEN & AUDIO-VTSUAL GUIDE,
2000 Lincoln Park West Bldg., Chicago 14, Illinois. Contents indexed in the Wilson Educa-
tional Index. For microfilm volumes, write University Microfilms, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE (U.S. currency or equivalent): Domestic $4 one year, $6.50 two
years, $8 three years. Canadian and Pan-American 50 cents extra per year. Other for-
eign Jl extra per year. Single copy 45 cents. Special December Blue Book issue $1.00.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS should be sent immediately to insure uninterrupted delivery of
your magazine. Allow five weeks for change to become effective.

EDUCATIONAL SCREEN & AUDIO-VISUAL GUIDE is published monthly except July and
August by The Educational Screen, Inc. Publication office, Barrington, Illinois; Business
and Editorial Office, 2000 Lincoln Pork West, Chicago 14, Illinois. Printed in the U.S.A.
Re-entered as second-class matter October, 1953 at the post office at Barrington, Illinois,
under the Act of March 3, 1879.

ENTIRE ISSUE COPYRIGHT 1957 BY THE EDUCATIONAL SCREEN, INC.



EdScreen & AVCuide January, 1957



NOW COMPLETED AND READY FOR IMMEDIATE USE

THE PAGEANT OF AMERICA FILMSTRIPS

THIRTY VITAL AND HISTORICALLY ACCURATE FILMSTRIP DOCU-
MENTS PICTURING THE LIFE STORY OF OUR NATION FROM PRIMITIVE
INDIAN TIMES TO THE PRESENT ATOMIC ERA

BOARD OF EDITORS

RALPH H. GABRIEL |Pm CLYDE M. HILL

Department of History FT* 51 Director, Yale University-Fairfield

Yale University IjfSEjf Study of Elemental 7 Teaching

WILLIAM H. HARTLEY Nflf MAY HALL JAMES

Chairman, Department of Education 'l^ l -^'^_- lS P Department of Social Sciences

Maryland State Teachers College, Towson 'iiStEryERiJ^ New Haven State Teachers College

ASSOCIATE EDITORS

Peter Brandwein, New York Times; Van Wyck Brooks, author; Mabel B. Casner,
educator and author; Alice Elizabeth Chase, Yale University; Robert ]. H.
Kiphuth, Yale University; Carroll L. V. Meeks, Yale University; and Stanley T.
Williams, Yale University.

The release of the final six units and Teacher's Guides in this magnificent series climaxes nearly five years
of scholarly, painstaking work on the part of distinguished historians, educators, visual aid specialists and qual-
ified technicians. Authorities agree that they have successfully created the most comprehensive and effective
supplementary tool ever devised for the teaching of United States history and related subjects.

Rare source material used throughout the 30 units adds authenticity and vivid reality to the full sweep of
America's growth and development in all of its important aspects, including the lesser-known areas of our
sociological, industrial and cultural progress.

An illustrated, professionally written Teacher's Guide accompanies each of the 30 units and greatly augments

the value and appeal of the filmstrips for classroom instruction.



Enthusiastically endorsed as "top-flight material" and "of the highest calibre," the series has been approved
and adopted by leading Boards of Education and has been successfully integrated into the course of study at all
levels.

1. The Story of the American Indian 10. The Young Nation and Foreign Affairs 21. The Growth of American Education

2. European Explorers Discover a New 11. Westward to the Mississippi 22. The Story of American Sport
World 12. Winning the Far West 93. The American Spirit in Literature

;. Spain Establishes a Great Empire 13 . Early Americans on the High Seas 24 The St of American Paintillg

The Ri^ and Fall of New France 14 . California, Texas and the Mexican War .,. The AmCTican s irit in Archit ec t u,e

3. The English Colonies in North America 15 . slavery and the War Between the States ^ Th StQ ^ of , r()I , and S[eel

6. Life in Colonial America 16. Union and Reconstruction

_ , 27. The Story of Coal, Oil and L'raiuum

/. Patriots and Minutemen 17. The Age of Reform

8. The Thirteen Colonies Win 18. Farmer, Rancher and Cowboy

Independence 19. Communication in the United States 29. The Growth of American Democracy

9. Free Americans Establish a New Nation 20. Transportation in the United States 30. The Rise of America as a World Power

ORDER THE PAGEANT OF AMERICA FILMSTRIPS NOW WITH FULL CONFIDENCE
THAT THEY WILL PRODUCE EXTRAORDINARILY EFFECTIVE CLASSROOM RESULTS

YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS FILM SERVICE

386 Fourth Avenue New York 16, N. Y.



P.S. We urge you also to order Yale's famous publications, THE PAGEANT OF AMERICA, 15 vols., and
THE CHRONICLES OF AMERICA, 56 vols. Both series are widely recognized as standard for reference
in the field of American history.



EdScreen & AVCuide January, 1957




PORTABLE, LIGHTWEIGHT
New AV Model

MOVIE-MITE

For Your Every Need

PROVIDES EVERY FEATURE OF
PROJECTORS COSTING </> MORC



FOR PREVIEW AND ALL
EDUCATIONAL USES





IN AUDITORIUM



The NEW MODEL C-55 MOVIE-MITE port-
able 16mm sound projector fits compactly in
one small case. Nothing else to carry. Tops
for sales, industrial, educational and enter-
tainment use. Rugged, lightest In weight,
(only 26 pounds), fool-proof operation. NEW
safety trips PROTECT FILM. Wonderful for
large screen showings. Thousands In use.
Price only $2tl.so.

Lightest in weight
lowest in cost Smallest in size
Eaiy on film Easy to use

Top quality picture and sound

Write or Phone Collect



THE HARWALD COMPANY ,NC
UIO CHICAGO AVENUE. EVANSTON. IUINOIS



On the SCREEN



Cover: The Great Adventure

On this month's cover you meet six-
year-old Kjell Surksdorff, a Swedish
boy for whom each day is a great
adventure. Kjell is the son of Arne
Edward Sucksdorff, who made the mo-
tion picture The Great Adventure, one
of the great films of recent years. For
a lyrical review of this "lyric film poem
about the moods of the seasons, the
moods of forest animals, and the
moods of -little boys," see page 26 in
this issue.

Welcome 1957!

Whatever else 1957 may bring, it is
certain to bring new and old audio-
visual challenges. Many of you readers
must meet the basic AV challenge
head-on: how to provide teachers with
all the teaching materials they need
exactly when they need them and with
a minimum of effort on their part.
Can this be done best through a uni-
fied instructional materials program?
Edward T. Schofield will tell you why
he thinks so and how such a program
works on page 18.

If you want the challenge of an
exciting, brand-new audio-visual teach-
ing tool, turn to Phil Lewis' picture
story on page 22. In one minute you'll
find out how to make slides in three
minutes.

If you're already tired of 1957 chal-
lenges, take a look backward with
M. I. Smith to the AV challenges of
the early 1900's. Listen to his descrip-
tion of an old lantern slide projector:
"The projector was a heavy, cumber-
some machine. The illumination was
from four acetylene burners, a load
in itself. We also had to carrv two



copper tanks of gas as well as a tripod
stand, screen, and a heavy wooden box
of 3 x 4 glass slides."

Just compare that load with our
modern, lightweight, portable AV
equipment well, so the lady on page
34 does have a decided AV sag or list!
It takes a strong back in every decade
to get things done. We still wouldn't
trade our modern AV problems for the
AV problems of yesteryear. And we
still think AV equipment makers have
come a long way toward making AV
equipment lightweight. (Is our list
showing?)

If you want an intriguing way of
running a nonstop film show, take
page 14 into the projection room and
follow the instructions. When Head-
master Bassett wrote us about the idea
he picked up from a projectionist in
Beirut, Lebanon "a practical method
for running two or more reels of film
continuously on a single projector"
we had it tried out in our Rochester
laboratory. Editor Reed assures us it
works. We don't know how you'll put
this trick to use. Maybe its perform-
ance could become a test item for
student projectionists.

How to Read Educational
Writing

"Extensive research has shown . . ."
One or two abstracts of doctoral
theses which the writer happened to
come across.

"The most recent statistics available
. . ."They go back to 19-)<i.

"Outstanding leaders in education
believe ..." -The writer believes it,
at any rate. _ l\s



EDUCATIONAL SCREEN & AVGUIDE

EDITORIAL STAFF

PAUL C. REED, Editor. JUNE N. SARK, Man-
aging Editor. WILLIAM S. HOCKMAN, Editor
for the Church Field. L. C. LARSON, CAROLYN
GUSS, and JOHN FRITZ, Editors for Film
Evaluations. MAX U. BILDERSEE, Editor for the
Audio Field. ROBERT E. SCHREIBER, Editor for
the Audio -Visual Trade Review. PHILIP
LEWIS, Technical Editor.

BUSINESS STAFF

H. S. GILLETTE, Publisher. MARIE C. GREENE
Associate Publisher. JOSEPHINE H. KNIGHT'
Business Manager. PATRICK A. PHILIPPI Cir-
culation Manager, WILMA WIDDICOMBE, Ad-
vertising Production Assistart. General Con-
sultants: Educational & Recieotional Guides
Inc. (WILLIAM LEWIN, President, and RUTH
M. LEWIN, Vice-President).

Advertising Representatives

WILLIAM LEWIN and HENRY ARONSON 1630
Springfield Ave., Maplewood, N. J. (South
Orange 3-3217)

WILLIAM F. KRUSE, 2000 Lincoln Park West
Bldg., Chicago 14, III. (Bittersweet 8-53131

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

IAME5 W. BROWN, School of Education San
Jose State College, California

EDGAR DALE, Heod, Curriculum Division, Bu-
reau of Educational Research, Ohio State
University, Columbus



AMO DE BERNARDIS, Assistant Superintendent
Portland, Oregon, Public Schools

MARGARET W. DIVIZIA, Supervisor in Charge,
Audio-Visual Education Section, Los An-
geies City Schools, Los Angeles, Californio

W. H. DURR, Supervisor, Bureau of Teaching
Materials, State Board of Education, Rich-
mond, Virginia

CHARLES F. HOBAN, Project Big Ben, Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

EMILY S. JONES, Executive Secretary, Educa-
tional Film Library Association, New York
City

F. EDGAR LANE, Supervisor, Instructional
Materials Department, Board of Public In-
struction, Dade County, Florida

F. DEAN McCLUSKY, Professor of Education,
Head of Audio-Visual Education, Univer-
sity Extension, University of California at
Los Angeles

SEERLEY REID, Chief, Visual Education Service
U. S. Office of Education, Washington

CHARLES F. SCHULLER, Director, Audio-Visual
Center, Michigan State College, East Lan-
sing, Michigan

ERNEST TIEMANN, Director, Visual Instruction
Bureau, Associate Professor, Division of
Extension, The University of Texas, Austin

DON WHITE, Executive Vice President, No-
tional Audio-Visual Association, Evanston,
Illinois



EdScreen & AVCiuiHp



nnnnn/



For American



Literature Courses




NEW CORONET FILMS



AMERICAN LITERATURE:

The Westward Movement

MARK TWAIN:

Background for His Works

WALT WHITMAN:

Background for His Works

American Literature: The Westward Movement pre-
sents authors whose works were largely inspired by
the spread into new and unsettled lands: Conrad Rich-
ter, Bret Harte. Hamlin Garland, and Francis Park-
man. Liberal quotations from their works against a
background of movement, building, and settlement
give high school students a splendid opportunity to
visualize the human context of great writing.

Walt Whitman: Background for His Works and Mark
Twain: Background for His Works provide a visual
basis for understanding the works of these authors in
relation to the periods in which they lived. Abundant
quotations from Whitman's poetry and Twain's prose
form an integral part of the films. Both are for high
school literature courses.



Other new CORONET films released this month (each one reel)
include:

Amphibians The characteristics of frogs, toads, and sala-
manders; how and where they live; what they eat; and
their developmental changes. (Grades 4-10).
Kindness to Others-A class learns what kindness is and
how to be kind to others. (Grades 1-3).
Beginning Responsibility: Other People's Things A classroom
illustrates in its activities how public and private prop-
erty and borrowed or found articles should be cared for.
(Grades 1-3).

All films are available in color or black-and-white.



Write for preview . * .

If you are considering purchase, fill in coupon for pre-
view prints of the fifms featured above; or for a list of
Coroner film libraries tf you are interested in rental.

Coronet Films



CORONET BUILDING CHICAGO 1, ILLINOIS




CORONET FILMS

Dept. ES-157, Coronet Building, Chicago 1, Illinois

Q Please send me your catalog describing all Coronet films, including those

mentioned above.

Q Please send me without charge preview prints of the films I have checked for
purchase consideration:

Q American Literature: The
Westward Movement
n Wait Whitman: Background
for His Works

Q Mark Twain: Background

for His Works
Q] Amphibians
QI Kindness to Others
[j Beginning Responsibility:

^ Other People's Things

i_ I am interested in renting these
films. Please send me a list of
Coronet film rental libraries.



Name

School or Organization

Address .

City



Zone State-



EdScreen & AVCuide January, 1957



News about people, organizations, events



Have you heard?



California AV Conference

"Teamwork, Key to the Audio-Visual
Program" will be the theme of the an-
nual conference of the Audio-Visual
Education Association of California to
be held in Bakersfield (Calif.) Jan. 31,
Feb. 1 and 2, 1957. Cooperating asso-
ciations are the California School Su-
pervisors Association, San Joaquin
Valley Section; School Librarians As-
sociation of California; Northern Sec-
tion; California Elementary School
Administrators Association, Central
Section; and National Audio-Visual
Association, Western Division.

Beginning Thursday afternoon
dealers' exhibits will be open at all
times that conference sessions are not
scheduled. This will give conference
goers an opportunity to see the newest
in audio-visual materials and equip-
ment.

Among the speakers will be Dr.
Adrian L. Ter Louw of Eastman Kodak



Company, whose topic, "Good Seeing
in the Classroom," will be presented at
Friday afternoon's general session, and
Dr. Elmo N. Stevenson. President of
Southern Oregon College of Education,
who will be banquet speaker Friday
evening.

Saturday's sessions will include a
series of brief demonstration-like pres-
entations of classroom techniques.

General chairman for the conference
is Miss Ruth Noel, president of the
Audio-Visual Association of California.

"Our Mr. Sun" on TV

"Our Mr. Sun," the first program in
the new" Bell System Science Series,
was seen over the CBS television net-
work on Monday, November 19. It is
expected that three or four science
programs will be produced and tele-
vised each year.

The program marks the television
debut of the Academy-Award-winning




Cooperating organization representatives are shown making final plans for the annual
conference of the Audio-Visual Education Association of California, to be held in
Bakersfield, Jan. 31, Feb. 1 and 2. Seated: Mrs. Elsie Holland, School Library Associa-
tion, Northern Division; Miss Ruth Noel, president AVEAC, Dr. George Ormsby, Bureau
of Audio- Visual Education, State Department of Education. Standing: Ron Cook, presi-
dent School Supervisors Association, San Joaquin Volley Section; Dick Utr, NAVA
Western Division; Paul Richert, California Elementary School Administrators Asso-
ciation, Valley Section.



director, Frank Capra. The cast of
"Our Mr. Sun" is headed by Eddie Al-
bert and Dr. Frank Baxter, both well
known to television audiences.

"Our Mr. Sun" tells the story of the
sun, from its worship by ancient man
to its use by modern man for a variety
of purposes.

The programs will be on color film
so that they may be used by schools,
clubs, civic organizations, etc., for years
beyond their brief hours on the air.

Around the ETV Circuit

OREGON. Three commercial TV stations
in Oregon are participating in an ex-
periment in educational television for
the state. The three stations are tele-
casting over a 13-week period two
series of programs from the national
Educational Television and Radio
Center. The broadcasts are a part of
the extended services of the Center.
The television committee of the state
board of higher education is present-
ing these examples of educational
broadcasting as a part of its study of
the opportunities and possibilities in
educational television for Oregon.
The commercial stations: KOIN-TV,
Portland; KVAL-TV, Eugene, and
KBES-TV, Medford. Educational pro-
grams being aired are: "The Finder,"
a series from St. Louis ETV station
KETC for children 9 to 12; "Spot-
light on Opera," designed to acquaint
the layman with opera, and "The
Painting," a series showing the actual
creation of a work of art by Siegfried
Reinhardt. Reactions to the programs
from Oregon viewers will help to de-
termine whether educational TV ef-
forts should be expanded ~in the state.

CHICAGO. There's "Today" and "To-
night" on TV and now educational
television station WTTW in Chicago
has come up with "Tomorrow." With
the help of the Adult Education Coun-
cil of Greater Chicago, the station
gives a rundown of the following day's
educational and cultural events in the
Chicago area at 10:00 each night. A
weather forecast is included.

(Continued on page 10)



8



EdSereen h AVf.mrlp Innnnru



FOOTCANDLES



GENERAL "ELECTRIC




How Dark Should an Audio-Visual Room Be?



ANSWER: The lighting condition of
an audio-visual room should be governed
entirely by its effect on the progress of
the student. The brilliance of the screen
image should be considered only as a sec-
ondary factor.

Experienced audio-visual educators real-
ize that the importance of the projection
has been over-emphasized, often to the
detriment of the student. It is also recog-
nized that various conditions and various
subjects require elasticity in the control
of light. This control should be simple
and immediate.




There is only one window covering that
can meet these specifications a Venetian
blind especially designed for this purpose.

With the LEVOLOR A.V., the instructor can
change the room from maximum dark-
ness to a soft diffused light-all by an
adjustment of the slats in a matter of
seconds.

*************

Full details and specifications will be sent
on request. Write to-LEVOLOR LORENTZEN,
INC., Audio-Visual Dept., 720 Monroe
Street, Hoboken, New Jersey.



Be sure to specify I

The Scientifically Developed Audio-Visual Blind

COPYRIGHT; LEVOLOR LORENTZEN. INC.

EdScreen & AVCuide January, 1957




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Online LibraryR. D. (Richard Doddridge) BlackmoreEducational screen & audio-visual guide (Volume 36-37) → online text (page 1 of 250)