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R. van der Meulen.

Critical pronouncing dictionary of the English language: incorporating the ... online

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BOMB, Un', «. A hoUow iron biR, or dielf, fiUed with

gvBpomfer. and fnmiihed with a Tent for • ftuee, or

veodeB tabe, filed with combustible matter ; to be

ttuuwn out from a mortar*
BOIffl» b&ni', «t . TosomuL
BOUB^bW, n. To bombard.
BOMB-CHEST, b^m^tdi^ «. A chest filed with

boobs, placed onder ground, to blow on in the dr.
BOMBARD, b^.bl.'r{ ei To attaeic with bombs.
BOBIBARD, b6m£bArd, n. A great gun.
BO»!BARDED, b6Ba.bft^rd4d, pp. Attacked with

bombs. [shoots bombs.

BOMBARDIER, bdm-blr-dA^r, n. The engineer who
BOMBARDING, bAm.b&'rd-Ing,/ipr. Attacking with

bombs. f dirowing ^mibs.

BOMBARDMENT, b6m^ba'rd-m5nt, n. An attack by
BOMBARDO, b&m-b&'r-dA, ». A musical instniment^

mnehUkeabasaooa, andnseduabasstothehatitboT.
BOMBASm, bteafb&.sA'n, «. A slight silken stnff.
BOMBAST, b^m^bA'st, h. Fustian ; big words.
BOMBAST, b^mrble't, a. High soundmg.
BOMBAST, b&m^b&'st, rf. ToinlUte.
BOMBASTICK, bAmA>l^st.!k, a. Of great sound with

little meaning.
BOMBASTRT, btokOt&'st-r^ n. Swelling words.
BOMBUT, b6mib«-lt, n. A salt formed by the bott-

bic add, and any base saturated.
B0afBIC,b6ai^V, a. Pertaining to the silkworm ; as.



BOMBOATION, bdraibO-A^shfin, «. Noise.
BOMB KETCH, bAm^kMi, ii.\ A Tessel,
B0»1B VESSEL, Um^winL, n, f buflt, to bear

ibock of a mortar, when bombs are to be fired.
BOMBYCmOUSL b^.b!s£ln.fis, a. lilade of tSXk.
B0MBYX,b6m£btks,ii. The silk worm.
dONA FIDE, b^n&.fi'Hll, a. With good &ith ; widi-

out fraud or deeeption.
BONAIR, bd-ni'r, a. Complaisant
BONAROBA, b^^nA-r^^ n. A showy wanton.
BONASDS,b4.nA£eAs,orb2.nls£6s,ii. Akind of bnilklo.
BONCHIEF, bd^nff.4hlf , a. Good consequence.
BONCHRETIEN, bteg.kr^^in'g, n. A species of

pear, so called.
BOND, MadT, n. A writing of obligaiioB to pay a sitm,

or persona a contract.
BOXD.bdBd'.ii. OntiTe.
B0\DAQS.b6QdC». Omtivity.
BONDMAID, bindlmA'd, V A woman slare.
BONDMAN, er BONDSMAN, bdnd^man, or bo&di^

mBB,a, Aman-daTe.
BONDSERVANT, bAnd^sir.Yfint, fi. A slave.
BONDSERVICE, btod^sfo-vfs, ». Slarery.
BONDSLAVE, bted^slAS M* A man in sfayery.
BONDSMAN, b&nds^min,». AsUto. A person giving

lecori^for another.
BONDSWOMAN, bAnd^^m-ftn, or b6nd2^m.fln, n.

A woaaa slare.
BONDUC, bAn^dflk, «. A cUmbing plant, anadre of

tlie West Indies, bearing a pod, containing two hard

SMd^ of the sise of a child's marUe.
BONB,b^a,a. Thesolid|iartsofthebodyofananimaL

Boutf bobbins, fat wearing bonelace. Bones, dice.
BONB^bA'n, wL To take out the bones.
BONE.ACHK b^n.i% «. Pain in the bones.
90NED,b«y,a. Boney, large.
BONED, bA'nd, 00. Deprired of bones, as in cookery.
B0NINO,]mr.b$W!ng. Depriring of bones.
BONELACi,byn.llfs:». Azenlsce.
BONELESS, b^'m Us, a. Wanting bones.
BONBSBT,bA^n-rft, vL To restore a bone outof joint

toito phee. [broken or luxated bones.

ITTER, Wn-^k-it, n. One who restores



BOl



B0NETTA,bA.n&4,n. Aseaiish.
BONFIRE, bAn^fl'r, a. A fin made for some pnUie
cwfe of tvnmph.



BONQRACB, bA'ng.gr&'s, n. A for^ead-doth.
BONIFORM, bAn^ftrm, a. Of a good shape.
BONIFY, bto^fi', r#. To convert into good.
BON-MOT, bteg^md^, «. A joke.
BONNET, bAn^ ». A covering for the head. AUri

of little ravelin.
BONNET, binOt. ei. To make obeisance.
BONNETS, bAn^ n. In the sea language, are small

sails set on the eonnes on the misen, mainsail, and

foresaiL
BONNIBEL, bte^bH, n. A handsome girL
BONNILASSk bte^^Ubi, n. A beantifol maid.
BONNILY, bAn^-*, orf. Gayly.
BONNINES8, bdn^n^s, «i. Oayety ; plumpness.
BONNY, bAniA, a. Handsome. ' ' *^ '^ r„ak.
BONNY-CLABBER, bAn^kl&b-fir, n. Soar butter.
BONTEN, b6n^tfo, n. A narrow woollen stuff.
BONUM-MAGNUM, bA^nfim-mAg^nfim, n, A great
BONUS, bA^nus, «. A benefit ; an advantage, [tdum.
BONY, b6:n«, a. Full of bones. I(%ina.

BONZES, bte^s^s, n. Priests of Japan, Tonquin, and
BOOBY, h6iU, n. A stupid fellow. A bird so caUed.
BOOK, bAk', n. A volume in which we read or write.
BOOK, bAk', «f. To rmiter in a book.
BOOKED, hWd, pp. Entered in a book; registered

in a book. [tering.

BOOKING, bAk^tng, ppr. Entering in a book ; regis-
BOOK-KEEPER^ltdk^A'p^r, «. The keeper ofae.

accounts. [accounts.

BOOK-KEEPING, bAk4«p-lng, n. The art of keeping
BOOKBINDER, bik^bi'ad-^, n. A bmder of books.
BOOKCASE, bAk^l's, ». A case for holding books.
BOOKFUL, bAk^fftl, a. Full of book knowledge.
BOOKISH, bAk.lsh, a. Given to books.
BOOKISHLY, bAk^lsh-U, ad. Devoted to books.
BOOKISHNESS, bAk^bh-n^ ». Application to books.
BOOKLAND, bAkOlnd, n. The same as free-soccage

lands.
BOOKLEARNED, bAk^l^d, a. Versed in books.
BOOKLEARNING, bAk^lAr-nlng, n. Skill in literature.
BOOKLESS, bAk^l^, a. Not given to books.
BOOKBfAKING, bAk^mAfk^Ing, n. The art of making

books.
BOOKMAN. bAk£mln,». Given to the study of books.
BOOKMATE, bAk^m^t, 11. A school-feUow.
BOOKOATH, bAk^yth. n. The oath made on the book.
BOOKSELLER, bAk^sAl-Ar, n. He who seUs books.
BOOKWORM, bAk^flrm, n. A worm that eats holes

in books.
BOOM, bA'm, m. A long pole used to spread out the

clue of the studding m. A pole set up as a mark to

show the sailors how to steer. A bar of wood laid

across a harbour.
BOOM, b^m, ef. To rush with violence.
BOOMKIN, bAm^kln, ». See Bumhk.
BOON, bA'n, n. A gift ; a grant.
BOON, bA^n, a. Gay ; merry.
BOOR, hA'r, a. A lout ; a clown.
BOORISH, bA'r-lsh, a. Qownish.
BOORISHLY, bA^r.!sh.lA, a<f . In a boorish 1
BOORISHNESS, bA^r.bh-nAs, ». Rusticity.
BOOSE, bA's, or bA's, ». A staU for catUe.
BOOSY, b^c-A, a. Overcome with drink; intoxieated.
BOOT, bA't, rf. To profit.
BOOT, bA't, n. Profit ; gain.
BOOT, bA't, n. A covering for the leg.
BOOT of a GwcA, bA^t, ». The space between the

coachman and the coach.
BOOT,bA%0f. To put on boots.
BOOT-CATCHER, byt-klt^har, «. The person at an

inn who pulls off the boots of passengers.
BOOTED, bA^t-Ad, a. In boots.
BOOTEE, bA^tl, n. A word sometimes used for a half,

or short boot. [hemisphere.

BOOTES, bA^te's, n, A constellation in the northern
BOOTH, bA^th, n. A temporary house built of boards.
BOOT.HOSE,bA't-hA's,n. Stockings to serve for boots.
BOOT.JACK, bA't-jkk, ». An utensQ for pulling off a

boot.
BOOTLESS, bA^t-Us, a. Useless.
BO0TLESSLY,bVt.lAs.lA,acl. Uselessly.

Digitized by V^OOQLC



BOR



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BOOT-TOPPING, b6't-tApi!ng, n. The op«fttf<to of
deanung a ship's bottom, near the surnoe of the
water, hy scrapinff off the grass, slime, shells, &c,
tod dtnbing it wiUi a mixture of tsllow, sulphur, and
renn.

BOOT-TREE, b^t-tr*, n. Two peces of wood, shaped
like a W, to be driven into boots, for stretching them.

BOOTY, MitA, n. Things gotten by robbery,

BOPEEP, bd-pA'p, fi. A cfild's play.
BORABLE.bd'r.&bl, a. That may be bored.
BORACHIO, b^ritsh^^d, n. A botUe, or cask.
BORACIG, b6-r&»^lk, a. Pertaining or produced firom
borax.

BORACITE, bAr^&.si't, n. Borate of magnesia; mag-
nesian earth, combined with Ixnacic acid.

BORACITED, biri^si't-U, a. Combined with bo-
racic acid.

BORACOUS ACm, b^^kils U^ld, ». The base of
boradc acid, partially saturated with oxygen.

BORAGE, bAr^lj, n. A plant.

BORAMEZ, b^r-l-md'z, n. The Scythian lamb.

BORATE, b^rKt, n. A salt formed by a combination
of boracic acid with any base saturated.

BORAX, bd^r&ks, n, A salt, prepared from sal ammo-
niac, nitre, calcined tartar, sea salt, and alum, dis-
solred in wine.

BORBORYGM, b^^bd-rfm, n. A term in medicine,
lor a rumbling noise in the guts.

BORDAGE, b^rd.^j, n. See Boan-LAKOS.

BORDEL, bAr^^f, n. \. ^^.,,

BORDELLO, b6rd^l-A, «. /^ *"'^**-

BORDELLER, b6rd^-^r, n. The keeper of a brothel.

BORDER, b6r^Ar, n. The outer part, or edge of a
country, garment, &c.

BORDER, M'r.dAr, m. To approach nearly to.

BORDER, b^r-dAr, 9<. To adorn with a border.

BORDERED, b4'r-dArd, pp. Adorned with a border;
touched upon. [borders.

BORDERER, b4'r-dAr.ftr, n. He that dwells on the

BORDERING, b4'r.dflr.lng, ppr. Lying near; oma-
menting with a border.

BORD HALFPENNY, b^rd-hi^p^n-«, n. Money paid
for setting boards or a stall in a ftir or market.

BORD LAm)S, b^rd-l&nds, ». Demesnes formerly
appropriated by the owners of lands, for the mainte-
nance of their bord or table.

BORDRAGING, b6rd^r&'j-lng, n. An incursion on
the borders of a country.

BORDURE, bdr^u'r, li. A border, in heraldry.

BORE,b^r, 9^ To piece.

BORE, bd'r, vi. To make a hole. [the ground.

BORE, bd'r, vL Is when a horse carries his nose near

BORE, b^r, «. The hole made by boring. The in-
strument with which a hole is bored. The sixe of
any hole.

BORE, bd'r, h. A tide swelling above another.

BORE.bA'r. The preterite of tear.

BOREAL, bd^r6.&I, a. Northern.

BOREAS, bA^r^is, n. The north wind.

BORECOLE, bd'r.kAa, n. A species of cabbage.

BORED, bd'rd, pp. Perforated by an anger, or other
turning instrument.

BOREE, b^rd', ». A kind of dance.

BORER, bd'r-^r, n. A piercer.

BORING, b^r-fng, ppr. Perforating a soUd body.

BORN,bArm,/p. Come into life.

BORNE, b^m. The participle passive of bear,

BORNOUSE, bdr^ni^s, n. A wooUen cloak.

BOROUGH, b&r^, n. A corporate town; or town
that sends a member, or two members, to Parliament

BOROUGH English, bAr^A, n, A customary descent
of lands or tenements to the owner's youngest son ;
or, if the owner have no issue, to his voungest brother.

BOROUGH-HOLDER, b4riA-h6a(f-&, «. A head-
borough. [rubber, or elaaCio gum.

BORRACHIO, b6r-r&tsh^;;^ ». The caoutchouc India

BORREL, bAriil, a. Rustic; rude.

BORREUSTS, bdr^l-Ists, n, pL A sect of Christians
in Holland, called so from Borrel, their founder, who
eject the use of the sacrament, public prayer, and all
external worship, and lead a very aujtere life.



BORROW, bAr^, of. To take from another upon credit*
BORROW, bir^A, n. A pledge ; a surety.
BORROWED, bAr^d, pp. Taken by requeit, mnJ

CMiaent from another.
BORROWER, bAr^A-^. ». He that borrows.
BORROWING, b6r^.lnff, ppr. Taking by coosenl

from a nerson, to use and return ; imitating.
BORSUOLDER, b6rs^dld-Ar, R. The tithingman.
BOS, hbaf, n. A ^enus of animals ; the horns hollow,
and turned out m the form of crescents ; eight fore
teeth in the under jaw, none in the upper ; there are
no dog teeth. The species, or different kinds au«.
the Taurus, or common ox ; the Urns, Aurocos, or
Bison, of Europe ; the Bison, or Buffido, of North
America; the Bubalus, or proper buiUo, of the
Eastern continent ; the Caffer, or Cane buffiilo ; the
Grannicus, or Yak of Thibet ; and tne Moechatoj,
or Musk Ox of North America.

BOSCAGE, bfts^k^, ». Wood.

BOSCHAS, hMiis, n. The common wild dock, or
mallard, belonging to the genus Anas.

BOSH, bAsh', %. Outiine ; figure.

BOSKY, bAski*, a. Woody.

BOSOM, bd^zAm, or b6ziAm, ». The breast. The
breast, as the seat of the passions; of tendemesi ; of
secrets.

BOSOM, bdz^fim, a. As 5o«om friend.

BOSOM, b6z-Am, vt. To conceal in privacy

BOSOMED, bAz^Amd, pp. Inclosed in the bosom ;
concealed in the bosom, or heart, as the receptacle of
all the tender affisctions, more particularly in woman.

BOSOMING, b6z-Am-!ng, jtpr. Inclosing and conceal^
ing in the bosom ; embracing, and drawing, and hog-
ging to the bosom, as a good and fond mother does
her child.

BOSPORL\N, b^pA'r.^ln, a. Pertaining to a Bos-
porus, a strait, or narrow passage, between two aeaa,
or a sea and lake.

BOSPORUS, bfts^pA-rds, n. A narrow strait, between
two seas, or between a sea and a lake, so called, it is
supposed, as being an ox-passage, a strait over vihtch
an ox may swim. So our northern ancestors called a
strait, a sound, that is, a swim.

BOSQUET, b6s^k£t, K. See Busket.

BOSS, h6$f,n. A stud.

BOSSAGE, b6sU^, ». Any stone that projects. Rostjc
work, in the comers of edifices, callea rustic quoins.

BOSSED, bded". a. Studded.

BOSSIVE. bMv, a. Crooked.

BOSSY, b^s^, a. Prominent.

BOSTRYCHITE, bds^tr^-ki't, n. A gem, in the form
of a lock of hair.

BOSUN, bA^An. a. Corrupted from boatswain,

60SVEL, b6sivk a. A species of croic/oof.

BOTANICAL, bi-t4ni!k.ll, a. ln.i.fj««r ^ K-.4-

BOTANICK/bA-tlniDca. |Rd*t«g to »»rbe.

BOTANICK, bd-t&n^Ik, a. He who is skilled in plants.

BOTANICALLY, bd-tAnitk-il-W, ad. After Uie man-
ner of botanists.

BOTANIST, b6t^&.n!st, a. One skilled in plants.

BOTANIZE, b6t^nt'z,rf . To gather and arrange plants.

BOTANOLOGY, bi-tin-AliA-j*, a. A discourse upon
plants.

BOTANOMANCY, bA-tlniAm^-s*, a. An ancient
species of divination by means of plants, especially
sage and fig leaves. Persons wrote their names and
questions on the leaves, which they exposed to the
wind, and as many of the letters as remained in thetf
places were taken up, and bcmg joined together, con •
tained an answer to tiie question.

BOTANY, b^&.nd, a. The science of plante.

BOTARGO, bA-t&'r-g6, a. A food, made of the roes
of the muUet fish.

BOTCH, bdtah', a. A swelUng or eruptive diacolooration
of the skin ; work ill finished.

BOTCH, bdtsh', vt. To mend, or patch clothes elomsil j.

BOTCHED, bMshd', ;)p. Patched clumsily.

BOTCHER, b^toh^r, n. A mender of old clothe*

BOTCHERLY, bAtsh^fe-W, ad. QumsUy.

BOTCHING, b6tsb^lng, ppr. Mending dumsily.

BOTCHY, hUai'4, a. Marked with botches.



Digitized by V^OOQl€



BO(J



BOW



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WTE,h^ t a. A compeimtion for aVnan sUin.
BOTETTO, bd-t^tA, n. A small, thick fish of Mex-

'tm» eight inches long; flat belly; convex back;

tiken oot of the water, it swells, and bursts if kicked.

lb Irrer is deadlypoison.
B0TH,b4^a, The two.
BOTH, bd^ COM. AswelL
BOTHER, b&th^. «<. Toper^ex.
BOTHNIC, bMUnlk, a, 1 Pertaining to Bothnia,
BOTHNIAN, bMh-n^-in, a. J a prorince of Sweden.
BOTOTOE, b&.tA^tA, H. A bird of the parrot kind, of

a iae bhie eoloar, of the Philippine Isles.
BOTRYOm, b&t^r^4^d, a. HaTing the form of a

boncfa of grapea.
BOTRYOUTE, b6i^^li't, n. Literally, a grape stone.
BOTS, bdt's, n. A species of small worms, fonnd in the

ialeitines of horses ; the larrsB of a fly, CEstms, or

Gad-iT, that deposits its eggs on ihe tips of Uie hairs

of dw legs, &C., whence the horse licks them off, and

iwiDows them ; foai¥i also in the hides of oxen, nos-

trib of iheep, &e.
BOTTLE, bMl, «. A Teasel with a narrow mouth, to

yat K qaor in.
BOTTLE, bdtl, rf. To incloae in botties.
BOTTLE- ALE, bAta-lO, n. Bottled ale.
BOTTLED, bMId, pp. Put into bottles; inclosed in

b^de s.
BOTTLEFLOWER, bdta.fli&^, n. A plant.
BOTTLESCREW, b^tl-skrA, n, A screw to pull out

tke eork. [quors into bottles.

BOTTLING, bdt^Hng, n. The operation of putting li-
BOTTUNG, booing, jppr. Putting into bottles.
BOTTOM, b6t^flm, «. The lowest part of any thing.
BOTTOM, b6t^flm, vt. To build upon.
BOTTOM, bit^Am, vi. To rest upon.
BOTTOMED, bit^flmd, a. Haring a bottom.
BOTTOMED, b6t^Amd,m». Built upon; rested upon.
BOTTOMING, bAUfim-tng, ppr. Building upon ; fur-

ualuDg with a bottom^
BOTTOMLESS, bAt:ftm-l&, «. Without a bottom.
BOTTOMRY, bAtiflm-r*, ji. The act of borrowing

■aney on a ship's bottom.
COTTONY, hUlin-^ ». In heraldry, a cross bottony
tenuutts at each end in three buds, biota, or but-
tnn, resembling in some measure the three-leaved

B0UCH£,b6<sh,ii. SeeBouax. Tgnis.

BOUCHET, b&^shl', n. A sort of pear.

BOCD.bWd',.. AweeriL

BODGE, bysh, w. TosweHout.

BOUGE. byih, >. ProTisions.

BOUGIE, b&-sh^, «. In surgery, a slender instrument,
latrodoeed through the urethra, into the bladder, to
natn% obstructions ; made generally of slips of
med linen, coiled into a slighUy conical form.

BOUGH, bAA^, ». An arm of a trei.

BOUGHT, Wl Preterite and parUciple of buy.

BOUGHT, b4^t,ii. A twist. That part of a sling which
"*rtaia$ the stone.

BOUGHTY, biAit*, a. Crooked; bending.

BOUnXON, bAU^Ang, n. Broth ; soup.

bles, laid in a strong mortar.
BiruMT.

mouldinff, the conrexity of
tf a circk, being a member
le Tuscan and E^ric capital,
fly against any thing, so as

rong sudden blow. A boast.
k boaster.

pr. Bounding with violence,
5-

(-1^ ad, Boastingly.
I , g^^. - ...ened ; tied to some thing or

5ffi.M&»a'.i«. A limit; aleap.
SSS'?^'*^- ToUmit. To restrain.
B0U^.b4fa»d',n. To jump.
KS25» WW, fl. Destined
^^ARY,b46ndiir.*,». Limit.



BOUNDED, bAAnd^, tm. Limited; terminated.
BOUNDEN, bAAndan, pp. of bind.
BOUNDENLY, \AAndUn-U, ad. DutifuUy.
BOUNDER, biAndOr, n. A boundary.
BOUNDING, b&And^lng,t»r. Confimng; terminating.
BOUNDING-STONE, bAAndilng.stA'n,». \ A stone to
BOUND-STONE, bAAndistA'n. n. /pUy with.

BOUNDLESS, bAAndilis, a. UnHmited-
BOUNDL£SSNESS,bAAnd4^n^ n. Unlimitedness.

BC jerally.

BC Munifleenoa.

BC

BC iberally.

BC Generosity.

BC dness ; Tirtne.

BC

BC

BC

BC

BC

BC

BC >ort.

BC n. A citizen ;

BOUrSeON, bA^r'-ihin, vi fo^rout.

BOURN, bA^m, n. A bound ; a limit. A brook.

BOURSE, bA^rs, }i. See Buasx.

BOUSE, bA^x, et. To drink hard.

BOUSE, bA^s, e<. To swallow.

BOUSY, bA's-A, ad. Drunken.

BOUT, b4At<, n. A turn.

BOUTADE, bA-t&'d, n. A whim.

BOUTEFEU, bA't-flA', n. An incendiary.

BOUTISALE, bA^tA-an, ». A cheap sale.

BOY ATE, bA^T&'t, n. M much land as one yoke of
oxen can cultivate in a year.

BOVEY-COAL, bA^vA-kAa, n. Brown lipfnite; an
inflammable fossil, resembling in many of its proper-
ties, bituminous wood.

BOVINE, bA^vln, a. Pertainins to oxen and cows.

BOW, bAA', vt. To bend the body. To depress.

BOW, b4A', rt. To make a reverence.

BOW, b&A', n. An act of reverence.

BOW, bA', n. An instrument which shoots arrows. A
rainbow. The instrument with which stringed in-
struments are struck. The bowt of a aaddltf two
pieces of wood laid archwise, to receive the upper
part of a horse*s back. Bow of a ship : that part
which begins at the loof, and compassing the stem,
ends at the forecastle.

BOWABLE, bA^ibl, a. Flexible of disposition.

BOWBEARER, bA^bir-^r, n. An under officer of the

BOWBENT, bA-bint, a. Orooked. [forest.

BO WD YE, bA^, n, A scarlet colour, superior to mad-
der, but inferior to the true Marlet grain for flxedness ;
first used at Bow, near London.

BOWEL, \AM\, vt. To take forth the bowels.

BOWELLESS, b4A^l-l^ a. Without tenderness.

BOWELS, biA^ls, ». Intestines. The seat of pity.

BOWER, bAA^r, n. A shady recess.

BOWER, biA^, M. One of the muscles which bend the
j oints .

BOWER, \AJMr, n. Anchors so called.

BOWER, b4A^r, vt. To embower.

BOWER, b4A^r, vt. To lodge.

BOWERY, b4A^r-A, a. Embowering.

BOWGE, b&Ai^ or bAJ. See To Boucx.

BOWGRACE, bA^'s, or b4A^gr&'s, n. In sea-Un-
guage, a frame, or composition of junk, laid out at the
sides, stem, or bows of ships, to secure them from in*
jury by ice.
BO WH AND, bA^hind, a. The hand that draws the bow.
BO SINGLY, b&A^lng-IA, ad. In a bending manner.
BOWL, bA^, n. The hollow part of any thing.
BOWL, bAa, n. To play with.
BOWL, bAa, pf. ToroUasabowL
BOWL,bAa, rt. To play at bowls.
BOWLDERSTONES, bAad-dir-stAnx, n. Lumps of
stones rounded by the water.



97



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BOWLEG, bO^Ug, ». A crooked IsK.

BOWLEGGED, bA^lM, a. Crooked lees.

BOWLER, b^Ur, n. He that pUyi at bowls.

BOWLINE, bd^lin, ». > Arope frstiaedtothemiddk

BOWLING, bfi^lhig, n. j part of tke ooiside of a mO.

BOWLING, bda-Ug, m. Throwing bowb.

BOWLINGGREEN, b6a<lxig-gr7ii, a. A gfrecs ftv
bowlers. f greo n.

BOWLlNGGROnND,b^bg-Kr4&Bd,« AbawKaou

BOWMAN, b^mK n. An archer. [eatch M.

BOWNET, b6^n^f , n. A set nadeeftwigs^fteiMdte
catch fish. [p^ toffotbev.

BOWSE, bafts', 91. A tea term, sigMfyutf tohale or

BOWSHOT, b^shat, n. The qiace wUdi an anrew
may pass in its flight.

BOWSPRIT, b^sprlt, n. SeeBowsmr.

BOWSSEN, U£m^»in, vt. Ta drench ; to soaK.

BOWSTRING, bd^strSng, ». The string of a bow.

BOWWINDOW, b6i&In.d&, n. See Bay-wixdov.

BOWYER, bA^^^r, *. An archer.

BOX, bdks',!!. A case. Theeaseof thenarberVcoav-
pass. A seat in the pUyhoose. A Tree. A bfew
jnven with the hand. To strike with the fist.

BOX, bdks', vt To indoee in a box. To boot the eom-
pass, is to rehearse the several points ef it in their
proper order.

BOXED, bAksd',j)p. Inclosed in a box.

BOXEN, b^ks'n, ad. Made of bex.

BOXER, bdks^r, n. A man who fighU with his fist.

BOXING, b&ks^Ing, /9^. Fighting with the fists. Cut-
ting a hole in a tree, as the mapk, to extract the sap.

BOXH AUL, b&ks^h&l, r^ To veer the dbin by a par£.
colar method, when tacking is impracticable.

BOXTHORN, b6ks^thium, ta. A plant ; the lycinB^ or
a species of it. [wsceace.

BOY, b4^, a. A male child ; one in the state of ado-

BOY,b^,vt To treat as a boy.

BOYAN, b&S^^d, n. A 6kbckj covered with a parapet,
serving as a communication between two trenches.

BO YAK, hk^fit, M. A Russian or Greek aoUemaa.

BOYBLIND, W^blind, a. Undiscemiag.

BOYHOOD, b4^h&d, a. The state of a boy.

BOYISH, U^lsh, a. Belonging to a boy.

BOYISHLY, b^^lsh^lft, ad. Childishly ; trifiiagly.

BOYISHNESS, bA^^ah.a^, a. ChiUnhness.

BOYISM, b^bm, a. The state of a boy.

BOYSPLA Y, b&^s-pU, n. The amoaement of a boy.

BOYUNA, bA^tt'.nfi, n. A krge serpent of America,
black and slender, haviasr an intolerable smell.

BP. An abbreviation of bi»op.

BRABANTINE, bri-bintiln, a. Pertaining to Bra-
bant, a province ot the NeUierkads, of which Brus-
sels is the capitaL

BRABBLE, br&bO, a. A clamoroas contest

BRABBLE, br&bl, vL To clamour.

BRABBLER, br&h^l^, a. A clamorous ieflow.

BRABBLING,br&b^llag,m)r. OamouriBg; wrangling.

BRACE, br&'s, ©f. Tabind.

BRACE, bri's, a. Cincture ; bandage. A piece ef tim-
ber, framed in with bevel joints, used to keep the
building from swerving either way. Ropes belonging
to all the yards, except the mizen. Tniek strains of
leather on whiolk a €oach hangv. Atfaess. In print-
ing, a crooked line, inclosing a passage, which oiwfat to
be taken together, and not separate^ ; as in a triplet.
A pair ; a couple.

BRACED, br&'sd, jyf. Furnished with braces ; drawn
dose and tight.

BRACELET, brfts-Mt, a. An ornament fir the arms.

BRACER, br&'s^, a. A cincture.

BRACH, brftk', a. A bitch-hound.

BRACHIAL, brik^^V. a. Belonging to the arm.

BRACHIATE,br&k^^j%a. In botany, having branches
in pairs.

BRACHMAN, or BRAMIN, brftk^mln, brl^mln, or
br]Lro-!n« n. An ancient philosopher of India. A
branch of the ancient gymnosophists. A priest of In-
dia, of the first cast of Gentoos.

BRACHYGRAPHER, bri-klg^rl-f^r, a. A short-
hand writer.

I*«ACHYGRAPHY, brl-Hglrl-ft, a. Short^hsnd.



BRACHYLOOT^hri-kB^a^a. In rhatoria, tka ex-

pressing of any thing in the most ceaciie manner.
BRACINO, hr&'s^, apr. Fumishiii« with braeet j

making tigdftt with cerda «r '
BRAClC hrW, a. A breach.
BRACKEN, br&k^, a. Fenu
BRACKET, br&k^t, a. A fixture of wooiL
BRACKISH, brftk^Sdkt <u Sahish.
BRACKISHMESS, hrlk^bh nis, a. Saknasa.
BRACKY,brftk^a. Brackish.
BRACTBA,orB&ACTE,hr&k^t^&,orbrU^a. A

floral leaf; oaaoliha seven lulcruma er proas of plmiia.
KtAIXhcldf,a. Sigaifies ireadL
BRAD, br&d', a. A sort of nail to floor rooms witii
BRADYPUS^ brld^pAs, a. The sloth, which sa».
BRAG, brig', M. To boast.

BRAQ, brig', a. Abosat. A kiad of game at cards.
BBAG, hrftg", a. Proad ; boasting.
BRAGGADOCIO, brig-i-dd^

a. A boastinff fenoar.
B
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B
B
B
B
B
B
H
R
B



orbrtg-h-^ysh-td.

To brag.
Beostfohiess.



riak.
ing.

Boastingly.
abosel.

Pertaining to the

BRAID, hvft'd, ««. To weave tegetfier. To reproach.
BRAID, br&'d, a. A texture. A start.
BRAID, br&'d, a. Grally; deeeitfoL
BRAIDED, bri^d-H fp' Woven to^er to forsa one
~^~* [strmgs, to form one.



BRAIDING, brii'd'ing, apr. Weaving three or more

BRAILS, br&Oz, a. Small ropes reeved through Mocks.

BRAIN, bri^, a. That eolleetion ef vessels and <>rBan8
ia tiM head, from which sease and motion arise. The
understanding.

BRAIN, bdt'n, vt. To dash out the brains.

BRAINED, brftrnd,ap. Killed by dadiing out Hwbraina.

BRAINING, bri's-big, ppr. Killing by dashing ont
the brains.

BRAINISH, brftVtsh. a. Hotheaded; ferioos.

BRAINLESS, brd'n-lis, a. SHIy.

BRAINPAN, br&'n-p&n, a. The skuH.



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