Rai Bahadur Hira Lal.

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KAWARDHA STATE. 167



would not allow a tombstone to be put up in a place of
worship, but neither the builder of Rama's temple nor the
citizens of Kawardha ever dreamt that these pillars con-
tained records of this nature.



(237) SATI INSCRIPTIONS.

There are a number of Sati records in Chhapri and
Boria. Two of these, belonging to Boria, have been utilized
as pillars in Rama's temple at Kawardha. They belong to
the 1 4th Century A. D. To the same period belong the
Sati pillars of Chhapri, one of which is dated in Samvat
1430, or A. D. 1373, and another in Samvat 1445, or A, D'
1388.

(Cunningham's Archaeological Reports, Volume XVII,
page 41.)



r68 INSCRIPTIONS IN C. P. AND BERAR.

SAKTI STATE.

(238) GUNJI STONE INSCRIPTION,
(In



Gunjlis 14 miles from Sakti. Near this village is a
spring known as Damau Dahra, and on a rock there this
inscription in Pali characters is incised. It consists of two
parts, the first of which begins with salutation to Bhagavat,
and is dated on the I5th day of the 4th fortnight of
Hemanta in the 5th regnal year of a king named Sri
Kumara Vasanta, and contains the words Bhagavato Usubha-
tithi, the name of a thera Godachha and the name Vaslthi*
puta. Can this last be the same Vasithiputa mentioned
in the Ajanta Cave inscription 1 ? This would take back our
record to the first half of the second Century B, C., but it
is ascribed to the first Century A. D. by Mr. D. R. Bhan-
darkar. The second part of the inscription is dated on the
second day of the 6th fortnight of Grishma in the 8th year
of Kumara Vasanta's reign. Damau Dahra is just a little
solitary place like Rupanath, which has an Agoka record,
and a likely place which a few Buddhist monks may have
selected for their residence.

(Cousens' Progress Report ; , 1904, page 54.)

i Burgess 1 Arch. Survey of Western India, Volume IV, page 146.



SARANGARH STATE. 169

SARANGARH STATE.

(239) SARANGADH PLATES OF MAHASUDEVA.
(In the possession of the Sarangadh Chief.}

This charter, as others 1 belonging to Mahasudeva, was
issued from Sarabhapura, and records the grant of a village
Chullandaraka, situated in the bhukti or sub-division of
Tundaraka, by the royal family, and assented to by the king.
The inscription is exactly worded like other inscriptions
of this king (see Nos. 122 and 123), and does not give any
new information about the dynasty to which the king
belonged, The capital Sarabhapura, from which the char-
ters were issued, remains still unidentified. It is probable
that it may be a new name imposed on Sirpur (old Sripura),
when this dynasty ousted the later Guptas from there. It,
however, failed to perpetuate the name, as its rule lasted for
a short time. 2 Tundaraka is Tundra in theBaloda Bazar
Tahsil of Raipur District, 35 miles west of Sarangadh, but
Chullandaraka is not traceable.

(Epigraphia Indica, Volume IX, page 281 ; and Jour*
nal Bengal Asiatic Society, Volume XXXV, page 195 ff.)



(240) PUJARIPALI STONE INSCRIPTION OF GOPALA-

DEVA.

(Deposited in the Raipur Museum.}

Pujarlpali is a village 22 miles from Sarangadh, the
head-quarters of a State of the same name.

The inscription is written in praise of the Varahi
goddess locally known as Barhadevi, and almost every
sloka mentions the name of her devotee Gopala, who appa-
rently built a temple to which the stone was affixed. In
the 34th sloka the goddess is stated to have given him a
boon that his prowess would be unparalleled. In slokas
38 to 40 a number of places are mentioned where the glory
of Gopala vira was spread like that of the autumnal moon.

1 See Fleet's Gupta Inscriptions, pages 197 and 192.

2 Epigraphia Indica, Volume XI, page 186.



iyo INSCRIPTIONS IN C. P. AND BERAR.



These are Kedara (on the Himalayas), Prayaga (Allahabad),
Pushkara (in Rajputana), Purushottama (Jagannath Purij,
Bhlmesvara (in the Upper Godavari District), Narmada,
Gopalapura (apparently the village of that name on the
bank of the Narmada, near Tewar, close to Jubbulpore),
Varanas! (Benares), Prabhasa (Pabhosa, near ^Allahabad),
the junction near Garigasagara (in Bengal), Srivairagya-
matha, Pedaragrama (the head-quarters of the Pendra
Zamindari in the Bilaspur District), and 2 or 3 other places
which are illegible. All these are holy places of (>reat
celebrity, except Gopalapur and Pendra which appear to
have been mentioned, because Gopala had probably some
connection with them, Apparently, he was the founder of
Gopalapura, which was named after him, and Pendra was
perhaps his birth-place. The inscription is undated, but
is attributable to the nth Century A. D. on palaeographic
grounds. A Gopaladeva is mentioned in the Boramdeo
inscription noticed in Cunningham's A rchao logical
Reports, Volume X, page 35 ff. Both Pendra and Pujarlpali
are so close to Kawardha State in which Boramdeo is
included that it is very possible that the two Gopalas are
identical. Mr. D. R. Bhandarkar holds the same view on
other grounds. (Vide Cousens' Progress Report for 1904,
page 51.)



SARGUJA STATE. 171



SARGUJA STATE.

(241) THE RAMGADH HILL CAVE INSCRIPTIONS.

(In situ.)

The Ramgadh hill is about 32 miles from Ambikapur,
the capital of Sarguja State. There is a natural tunnel
here known as Hathphor, near which there are two caves
known as Sita Bengara and Jogi Madha on the side of
what is locally known as Kanda Ghudarl hill. In each of
these caves there is an inscription in Pall characters
belonging to about the 2nd Century B. C.

A contribution on these inscriptions by Dr. Bloch to
a German Journal has excited much interest among the
orientalists, though, according to Dr. Burgess, the inference
drawn is somewhat far fetched. He has discussed the
matter fully in the Indian Antiquary * from which the
following quotation will show the nature of the controversy
and enable the reader to form his own opinions :

1 Dr. Bloch of the Archaeological Survey had recently
' visited these caves, and in a letter of 3oth April 1904,
' published in the Zeitschrift der Deut. Morgenland, Bd.
' LVIII, S. 455, ne reads the first line of the inscription in
'the larger cave as Adipayamti _ hadayam sabhdva-
' garu&avayo, and explains it &sAdipayanti hridayam
1 svabhdvagurukavayah : li The poets, by nature, worthy
' of honour, fire the heart." From the inscription begin-
' ning thus, he infers that " we may surely expect a
' panegyric on the poetic art, and when such a hymn is
' met with on the wall of an artificial rock excavation, it
' can there be applicable only because the place served
f for presenting poetical compositions before a larger
' public. And the arrangement of the cave, " he adds, " is
' admirably adapted to this purpose. In a semi-circle,

* rising above on one another in terrace form, a row of

* seats are hewn out, which are again divided by radiating
' lines, quite in the style of the Greek theatre. From these
' seats a comfortable view was presented over a natural

* platform la^id out below, which afforded room enough to

1 Volume XXXIV, page 197 ff,



172 INSCRIPTIONS IN C. P. AND BERAR.



erect a small stage. Naturally the amphitheatre is only
in miniature : it might afford space for thirty spectators ;
but its arrangement on a classical model cannot be
mistaken. Above the seats is a rectangular chamber with
broad benches along the walls, where people evidently
retired when the cold of winter nights made it unplea-
sant to remain in the open air. At the entrance there
are still deep holes in the floor into which the posts
were fitted that supported the curtain by which the cold
was shut out, and inside there was room enough for
festive nach party."

' Now this seems a somewhat extensive deduction
' to draw from the first line of an inscription and the
' ascent to this cave. Mr. Beglar's plan (Arch. Sur.
1 Ind. Rep., Vol. XIII, pi. x) and Mr. Bali's sketch
'of the approach show the vaulted entry, about 14 feet
' deep, opening to ten or twelve yards wide at the
( front, with stairs up at the sides and semi-circular steps
1 or benches between ; but the rock appears naturally to
( shelve away rather rapidly for placing a stage below ;
1 and inside the raum genug fur eine solenne ' nautch
' party ' is scarcely 5 feet between the wall and a
' bench 2 feet high, and would be cramped for any dance
1 movement. We surely require more satisfactory evidence
f before we conclude that this approach was constructed
' as a Greek theatre for dramatic representations even on
( a small scale. Had this been so, we should naturally
' expect that such would be found not only in this solitary
'instance in remote Sarguja, but the other and better
' examples would certainly occur among the hundreds of
' rock excavations still fairly complete in Western India.
' Yet no trace of such has been found elsewhere.

'But much of the force of the deduction must depend
1 on the accuracy of the reading of the inscription, which
'in May 1904 was read differently by A. M. Boyer l
' as :

adipayamti hadayam sa[dha} va garaka \m\

vayo

eti tayaw . . * . dule vasamttya hi sdvd^ubhute
kudos tatam evam alamga [td~\.



1 Jour. Asiatique, Xteme Ser. Tom. Ill, page 478 ff,



SARGUJA STATE. 173



'This would give a different sense, but the true
' reading will depend on the impression or photographs
< of the epigraphs. M. Boyer's transcription of the
' Joglmara inscription runs :

Sutanukd nama { deva lasikyi \
tarn kamayitha ha In na Seye
| Devadine nama \ lupadakhe

' and mak'es Davadi[n]na an ft artist of statues " and
' " excellent among young people " and a lover of " Sutanuka
'the devadasi".

1 That some of the early caves may have been used
'for amusements is quite probable. In one of the
' Aurangabad Bauddha caves we have a ndch represented
'in the very shrine (Arch. Sur. West. India,
'Vol. Ill, pi. liv, fig. 5), and it may readily have occurred
'to modern visitors that such caves as Nos. 3 and 15 at
' Nasik, the Uparkot Caveat Junagadh, and others at Kuda
' Mahad, 1 &c., with seats round three sides of them, might
' have been so arranged with a view to theatrical,
1 representations. 2 But these were not in the open air, like
' Greek theatres.

' And here I may incidentally remark that it seems as
( if we sometimes forget that all the numerous Viharas
1 (literally, ' pleasure-houses ') may not have been occupied
' by monks. There must have been convents for the nuns,
' possibly some of them rich in wall frescoes, such as we
'seethe remains .of at Ajanta in which nachnis and
' lenasobhikds are not excluded. Something might
' perhaps be learnt on this matter from the management



1 Conf. Cave Temple, plates iv, vi, xix, xxvi, &c. ; Arch.
Sur. West. Ihdia, Vol. IV, plates vii to x. May there not be
some significance in the figures attending the dagaba in the Gautami-
putra Cave (No. Ill) at Nasik being females, as also on the Jaina
sculpture of a dagaba from Mathura discovered by the late Pandit
Bhagwanlal Indraji ?

z Since the above was written, Dr. Luders has directed attention
to a review of Mr. V. A. Smith's Early History of India, by Professor
Pischel in the Deutsche Liter at urzeitung (4 Marz, 1905, 540 f.), where,
after expressing serious doubt as to the alleged Greek influence on the
Indian drama, he brings to notice a passage in the Bhdratlyandtyasdatra
(ii. 20 f. and ii 69, Bombay ed., or ii 17 f. and ii. 84, ed Grasset), which both
Bloch and Luders have overlooked

Kdryah sailaguhd aro dvibhumir ndtyamandapah
with which also the Dasakumaracharita agrees,



174 INSCRIPTIONS IN C. P, AND BERAR,



( and inmates of the monasteries aad convents in Nepal
' and Tibet : Bauddha moral conduct is not necessarily
'of a high order.'

(Indian Antiquary, Volume XXXIV, page 197 ff. ;
lbid. } Volume II, page 24^ ff. ; Journal Bengal
Asiatic Society, Volume XVII, Part I, page 66 ff. ;
Ibid., Volume XXXIV, Part II, page 23 ff. ; Hunter's
Statistical Account of Bengal, Volume XVII,
page 236 ff. ; Cunningham's Arch&ological Reports,
Volume XIII, page 31 ff.; and Corpus Inscriptionum
Indicarum^ Volume I, page 33.)



CHANG BHAKA& STATE. 175

CHANG BHAKAR STATE.

(242) HARCHAUKA INSCRIPTIONS.
(In situ.)

Harchauka is 1 1 miles to the north of Bharatpur, the
capital of the Chang Bhakar State. Here on the bank of
the Mawai river there are cave temples cut out of the
rock with a number of gods and goddesses. Some pillars
of the temple contain pilgrim records, 2 of which were
carved -by Karachulis or Kalachuris, and another by
a Chauhan. The characters seem to belong to about the
1 2th Century A. D., but they may be older. They are
nail-headed. The river Mawai forms the boundary
between Chang Bhakar and Rewah. The latter has
a colony of Kalachuria Rajputs, the remnants of the
Kalachuris who once ruled at Ratanpur and Tripuri in the
Jubbulpore District.



176 INSCRIPTIONS IN C. P. AND BERAR.

KOREA STATE.

(243) CHIRMIDHI INSCRIPTION.

Chirmidhi is a village about 6 or 7 miles from Khar-
gawan, the head-quarters of a Zamindarl in the Korea
State. Dr. L. L. Fermor, of the Geological Survey, recently
found an inscription which is much abraded. It records
the construction of a temple of Sayambhu (Svayambhu =
Brahma) and is dated Magha Samvat 1407, Saka 1272,
corresponding to January 1351 A. D. It eulogises one
Govinda Chuda Deva.



OTHBR STATES. 177

NANDGAON, CHHUIKHADAN, RAIGADH, UDAI-
PUR AND JASHPUR STATES.

None of the above-named States is known to possess
any inscriptions. In mauads Visvanathapali and Batal-
dah of the Kaigadh State there are primitive paintings on
the rocks rudely representing men and animals in red ochre.
These are locally known as inscriptions. They are believed
to be of great antiquity.



APPENDIX I.



INSCRIPTIONS ARRANGED ACCORDING TO

DYNASTIES IN CHRONOLOGICAL

ORDER.



APPENDIX I.



Inscriptions arranged according to Dynasties in
chronological order.



Name of Inscription.


No.


Page.


PART I. HINDUS, &c.






The Mauryas.

Rupnath Asoka's Edict
Deotek Stone Inscription

The Early Guptas.

Eran Stone Inscription of Samudragupta
Eran Stone Pillar Inscription of Budhagupta
Eran Small Boar Inscription
Eran Posthumous Stone Pillar Inscription of Goparaja...


12
52

53
56


14

42
42
43

44


The Hunas.






Eran Stone Pillar Inscription of Toramana


54


43


The Parivrajakas.






Betul Plates of Samkshobha


107


75


The Rajarshitulyakulas.






irang Plate of Bhimasena


116


83


The Uchchakalpa Maharajas.






Karitalai Plates of the Maharaja Jayanatha


27


21


The Somavamsis of Mahakosala, or the Late
Guptas.






Kharod Damaged Stone Inscription ...
Bhandak Buddhist Inscription
Rajim Plates of Tivaradeva ...
Baloda Plates of Tivaradeva
Sirpur ' Gandhesvara Temple ' Inscriptions of Siva
gupta.
Sirpur ' Lakshmana Temple ' Stone Inscription
irang Stone Inscription
Sirpur Surang Mound Stone Inscription
Sirpur River Gateway Inscription ...


149
ii
118
117
119

120

129
132

'33


13

86
85
86

88

101
102
102


The Sarabhapara Kings.






Arahg Plates of Raja Maha Jayaraja ...
Khariar Plates of Maha Sudeva
Raipur Plates of Maha Sudevaraja ... *
Sarangadh Plates of Maha Sudeva


121
123
122
239


96

97

2 6

169



Name of Inscription.



No.



The Vakatakas of Pravarapura.

Siwani (Seoni) Plates of the Maharaja Pravarasena II
Dudia Plates of Pravarasena II
Chammaka Plates of Maharaja Pravarasena II
Balaghat Plates of Prithvishena II ...



The Kalachuris of Tripuri.

Karitalai Stone Inscription of the reign of Chedi Kirtg

Lakshmanaraja.

Bilahri Stone Inscription of the rulers of Chedi
Bargaon Kalachuri Inscriptions
Benares Copper-plate Inscription of Karnadeva
Simra Pavilion Inscription
Jabalpur Copper-plate of Yasahkarnadeva
Tewar Stone Inscription of Gayakarnadeva of the

(Chedi) year 002.

Bahuriband Jain Statue Inscription
Bheraghat Stone Inscription of the Quefen Alhanader?
Jabalpur Stone Prasasti of Jayasimhadeva of the

Chedi year 926.

Tewar Stone Inscription of the reign of Jayaslmhadera
Karanbel Stone Inscription of Jayasimhadeva
Gopalpur Stone Inscription of Vijayasimhadeva *.

Kumbhi Copper-plates of Vijayasimhadeva
Bheraghat Chaunsath JoginI Temple Inscriptions ..

The Haihayas of MahakosaU.

Ratanpur Branch.

Akaltara Stone Inscription

Ratanpur Stone Inscription of Jajalladeva

Pali Temple Inscriptions

Kugda Fragmentary Inscription

Rajim Stone Inscription of Jagapaladeva

Seorinarayan Statue Inscription

Ratanpur Fragmentary Inscription of Prithvideva II ..

Mahamadpur Stone Inscription

Seorinaraysn Stone Inscription of the time of Jajalla

deva II.

Malhar Stone Inscription of Jajalladeva II
Kharod Stone Inscription of Batnadeva III
Ratanpur Stone Inscription of Prithvideva III
Kothari Fragmentary Inscription
Ratanpur ' Mahamaya Temple' Inscription of Vahi

rendra.

Kosgain Stone Inscription of Vaharendra
AkalUra Fragmentary Stone Inscription



78
114
174

22



34

28
45
35

47

29

32

40
30
44

37



38



143

!$
157

156
163

146
144



142

159



Name of Inscription.


No.


Page.


Raipur Branch.






Ramtek ' Lakshmana Temple ' Inscription


3


3


Rayapura Stone Inscription of Brahmadeva.


126


ft


Khalari Stone Jnscription of the reign of Haribrahma-


125


99


deva.






Irang Plate of the Haihaya King Amarasimhadeva ...


127


100


The Rashtrakutas of Manpur,






Undikavatika Grant of Abhimanyu


81


58


The Rashtrakutas of Malkhed.






Tiwarkhed Plates of Nannaraja


1 08


76


Multai Plates of Nannaraja


109


77


Deoll Plates of Krishna III


8


10


NilkanthI Stone Inscription


5


ii


The Western Chalukyas of Kalyan,






Sitabaldi Stone Inscription of the time of Vikrama-


2


2


ditya VI.






The Sailavamsis.






Raghol! Plates of Jayavardhan*


3


18


The Nagvamsis of Chakrakotya.






Errakot Telugu Inscription


214


iS3


Barsur Telugu Inscription of the time of Jagdeka-


198


144


bhushana.






Potinar Telugu Inscription of the time of Jagdeka-


199


145


bhuthana.






Bhairamgadh Incomplete Telugu Inscription


218


136


Dantewara Telugu Inscription of the Saka year 984 ...


212


152


Dantewara Masakdevi's Notification


213




Gadia Jungle Slab
Rajapura Plates of Madhurantakadeva


222
207


S7

150


Kuruspal Tank Slab of Dharana MahadevI


204


149


Kuruspal Fragmentary Stone Inscription
Kuruspal Inscription of Somesvaradeva of Saka


205

2*3


149
148


year 1019,






Gadia Telugu Inscription of Somesraradeva
Barsur Stone Inscription of GangamahadevI, wife o


206

200


146


Somesvaradeva.






Narayanpal Inscription of Gunda MahadevI


201


146


Kuruspal Stone Inscription of Somesvaradeva
Jatanpal Stone Inscription of Saka year 1140
Dantewara Pillar Inscription


202
20g
2O8


147
150


Barsur Nagari Inscription


221


157


Temara Sati Stone Inscription of Saka year 1246
Sunarpal Stone Inscription of Jayasimhadeva


211

210


'S
tSi



Name of Inscription.


No.


Page.


The Nagavamsrs of Kawardha,






Sahaspur Statue Inscription
Pajaripali Stone Inscription of Gopaladeva


168
240


123
169


Boramdeo Temple Inscriptions


233


162


Mandava Mahal Inscription at Chaura




162


Kawardha Inscriptions


^36


1 66


The Pramaras of Malava.






Mandhata Copper-plates of Jayasimha of Dhara
Nagpur Stone Inscription of the rulers of Malava
Harsauda Stone Inscription of Devapaladeva


88

i


62
65


of Dhara.






Mandhata Plates of Derapala


89


63


Rahatgadh Stone Inscription of Jayasimhadeva


57




Mandhata Plates of Jayavarman II


90


64


The Chiefs of Kakaira (Kanker).






Gurur Stone Inscription


169


123


Deokut Stone Inscription


137


104


SihawS Stone Inscription of Karnaraja


128


101


Kanker Plates of Pamparaja of (Kalachuri) Samvat 965 ..


229


159


Kanker Plates of Pamparaja of (Kalachuri) Samvat 966...
Kanker Stone Inscription of Bhanudera


230
228


160
159


Kanker Rock Inscription


231


160


The Kakatiyas of Bastar,






Dantewara Kakatlya Inscription
Dongar Inscription of Daryaodeva
Dongar Inscription of Bhairamadeva


::i

217


I 53 '


The Yadavas of Deogiri.






BarsI Takli Sanskrit Inscription


182


J33


Amarapur Stone Inscription of Simghana


190


*39


The Gonds.






Amoda Sati Inscription


SI,


41


Ramnagar Stone Inscription


77


54


The Bhonslas of Nagpnr.






Inscriptions of RaghujI and Mudhojlin Dulah Rahman


177


127


Shah's Shrine at Ellichpur.






KarnarjunI Temple Inscription at Ratanpur


153


116



Name of Inscription.



PART II. MUSALMANS.
Muhammadan Kings of the Slave Dynasty.

Batiagadh Stone Inscription of the Vikrama year 1385.
Batiagadh Undated Stone Inscription
Bangaon Sati Inscription

The Faruqis.

Khandwa Gun Inscriptions

Asirgadh Jami Masjid Inscriptions of Adil Shah II
Burhanpur Jami Masjid Inscriptionjn Arabic
Burhanpur Sanskrit Inscription of Adil Shah
Burhanpur Adil Shah Tomb Inscriptions
Asirgadh Idgah Inscriptions

The Khaljis of Malava.

Damoh Persian Inscription

Batiagadh Persian Stone Inscription ...

The Imad Shahis of Berar.

Glwilgadh Persian Inscriptions

Gawilgadh Kangura Inscription ... ,

The Bahmanis of Gulburga.

Narnala Fort Inscriptions

The Mughals.

Burhanpur Jami Masjid Inscription of Akbar ,

Asirgadh Fort Inscription of Akbar

Burhanpur Adil Shah Tomb Inscription

Asirgadh Fort Inscription of Danyal

Panchgawhan Inscriptions

Mangrul Inscriptions

Burhanpur Akbari Sarai Inscription

Asirgadh Fort Inscription of Shah Jahan near Phuta
Darwaza.

Asirgadh Fort Inscription of Shah Jahan near the
tank.

Asirgadh Fort Inscription by the Raja of Mandhata...

Sati Pillars of the reign of Shah Jahan

Asirgadh Fort Inscription of Aurangzeb near Kamar-
gadh Gate.

Asirgadh Gun Inscriptions

Akot Inscriptions

Charwa Mahalpura Inscription of the time of Aurang-
zeb.



No.



102



Page.



105



170



181



93

93
59
93



50

52



83



74



125

126



132



7i
66

66
136

73
66

66
66



68

138

59



i86



Name of Inscription.


No.


Page.


The Mughals. (Concld.)






Dhamoni Persian Inscription


62


47


Amner Tomb Inscription


178


130


Imambada Inscriptions at Ellichpur ...


177


127


Fathburja Inscriptions at Akola


180 m


Akola Inscriptions about Asadgadh


180


131


Sati Pillars of the reign of Aurangzeb


59


45


Pachaburja Inscriptions


180




Mangrul Dargah Inscriptions
Dulah Rahman Darwaza Inscriptions at Ellichpur


1 88

177


137
127


Citadel Inscriptions at Akola


1 80




PART III. MISCELLANEOUS.






Miscellaneous Dynasties.






Asirgadh Seal of Sarvararman


92


65


Drug Stone Inscription of Sivadeva


166


122


Karitalai Inscription of the reign of Viraramadeva


4i


38


Gumji Stone Inscription of Kumara Vasanta
Ramgadh Hill Cave Inscriptions


238
241


168
171


Murwara Slab


49


40


Somaripet Inscription


in




Kherla Fort Inscription


110


78


Ratanpur ' Badal Mahal ' Inscription of the rulers of


IS2


115


Talahari Mandala.






Lanji Stone Inscription


24


19


Singorgadh Stone Inscription ...


69


49


Damoh Stone Inscription of Vijayasimha ...


68


49


The Bundelaf ofPanna


74


5 2


Churmohi Inscription of Govinda Chudadeo


243


176



APPENDIX II.



DYNASTIC LISTS OF KINGS REFERRED TO

IN THE CENTRAL PROVINCES AND

BERAR INSCRIPTIONS AS HAVING

HELD SWAY IN THESE

PROVINCES.



APPENDIX II.

DYNASTIC LISTS.

N. B. Dates in italics are taken from sources other than inscriptions.

PART I. THE HINDUS, &c,

The Maurvas.
B.C.

322 (i) Chandra Gupta.

298 (2) Bindusara, son of i.

272 (3) ASoka, son of 2.

232 (4) Dasaratha, grandson of 3.

224 (5) Sangata.

216 (6) Salisuka.

206 (7) Somasarman.

/pp (8) Satadhanvan.

/p/ (9) Brihadratha.

The Early Guptas.
A.D.

290 (i) Gupta or Srigupta.
305 (2) Ghatotkacha, son of i.
320 (3) Chandra Gupta I, son of 2.
350 (4) Samudra Gupta, son of 3.

401 (5) Chandra Gupta II, son of 4.
415 (6) Kumara Gupta I, son of 5.
455 (?) Skanda Gupta, son of 6.
480 (8) Puragupta, son of 6.
485 (9) Narasirhhaguptaj Baladitya, son of 8.

530 (10) Kumaragupta II, son of 9.

484 Budhagupta reigning in Eastern Malava.

510 Bhanugupta, his son and successor possibly

allied to the above dynasty.

The Hunas.

49 (0 Toramana.


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