Richard Lepsius.

Letters from Egypt, Ethiopia, and the peninsula of Sinai online

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cessary to import provisions from Kgypt. From the words of Amru
also, quoted above, there appears to have been a longer perioil between
the conquest and the cleaning out the canal. I, therefore, think that we
ought rather to follow the defined statement of Kl-Kendi, who is cited
by^Maqrizi himself (p. .'U3), and who wrute about 880. He places the
restoration of the canal five years later— namely, in the year 23 ; j. c. G44,
the last year of Amru. For the history of the canal, compare, besides
the treatises of Letronne which we have cited, what the same scholar
said at a former time in his edition of the Dicuil. 1814, 8vo, p. 10, &c.,
and in his translation of the 17th book of Strabo, p. 382; also ^lan-
nert, Geopr. von Africa, Abth. i. p, rjOS, &c., and Weil, Gcsch. der
ChaUfen, Bd. i. p. 119, ic; the last of whom likewise places the re-
storation of the canal after G41.

The result we have lurrived at with regard to the whole history of this
remarkable connecting canal is, therefore, briefly, the following:

c. 1350 B.C. liamscs II. {Se^ostris) digs the canal from Bubastis to
Heroonpolis (Mukfar, near Seba-Biar), and with the assistance ot
the Israelites builds near it the towns Pithom and Ramses.

c. 600 B.C. ISeko appears to have conducted the canal as far as the
Bitter lakes.

_ c. 500 B.C. Darius, for the first time, makes the whole connection,
since he cuts through the elevation between the Bitter lakes and the
sea.

c. 350 B.C. In the time of Aristotle the canal appears to have fallen
into disuse.

c. 250 B.C. PtolcmcEus Philadelphus digs a wide canal, amnis PtolemcBus,
from the sea to the Bitter lakes, constructs an artificial sluice, and
builds Arsinoe on the sea.

c. 100 A.D. Trajan opens a new canal, amnis Traianus, from Babylon
to Heroonpolis.

643 (644) A.D. 'Omar re-opens the interrupted connection.

762 (767) A.D. Mohammet ben 'Abdallah fills up the canaL



81TUATI0K OF riTUOM. 417

a« in a different tiirection, from that taken by the unclean iu
the Manethonic narration.

On the othiT haiul, wc have loiinJ tliat the to\ni of
Kamses derivtd in nauu- from ilie Kini,' liamses-Miamun
(Sesostria), by whom it was built, and that the ancient Nile
canal, on which it waa situated, was constructed, accordini*
to tho Greek accounts, by Sesostris, i. e. Eamses-Miamun.
It isj evident that these two work^, that of the canal and that
of the town, nrr- «N»nii