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PUBLIC LIBRARY, FORT WAYME & ALLEN CO.

GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS COLLECTION

FORT WAYNE, INDIANA



Gem



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY




3 1833 01793 2051



GENEALOGY
977.202
F77P
1868-69



TV^ILLI^MS'



FT. WAYNE DIRECTORY



I^OIE^ 1868-9;



r



TO WHICH IS APPENDED



A UNITED STATES POST OFFICE DIRECTORY.



4



FIFTH ISSUE :

COMPUTED BY WIL,L,IA5IS & €0.



PUBLIC LIBRARY, FORT TONE & ALLEN CO

GOVERN?^£NT DeCU^ENTS COLLECTION
FORT V'MYNE, INDIANA

FORT WAYNE, IND.:

No. lOi Columbia Street.

1868.




CINCINNATI ADVERTISEMENTS.



Vanduzen & Tift,

Buckeye Bell Foiiiuliy,



IIS^ Church, Academy. Factory, Plantiition,
Steaiiiboat, Fno, and Signal Bells. IManufao-
tiiiers of and Deak'rs in Ilra^^s Coc-ks, Gl()>)e
Valve-, Ste;!m Whistle", Brass Castings, Spel-
ter Solder, Bahbitt Metal, Irci Pipe and
Fittings, Hose and Couplings, Steam and
Water Ganges.

102 and IC4 East Second St..

Ci:%'€S:^^:?b'ATl, - ©MS®.




PREFACE



\\'e believe th. • uv patrons will fiud our present Issue more reliable
than auy of our prc.eiiinf^ Volumes. The inlbrmatiou which it contains
is the result of a t'lnrouiih canvass of the City of Ft. Wayne, superin-
tended by H. THiiiiNTON Bennett, Esq., our Asv^^istant Compiler, whose
conifictency and faiclifulness have been fully tested by our patrons, iii the
vohiii;'- heretofore 'Oiupiled by him for the Citv of Ft. Wayne.

'I' idilcct and j-.opare the matter for a City Directory for publica-
tion. >- .! perplexing and difficult task. The nature of the work compels
us to >eek inform, tiou from each member of the community — from the
iuteili luit and the i,2,uorant ; from the civil and polite citizen and the
rouub aid unlettctd resident. kSome are unwillinu' to have their names
appc.u ill a City Directory, and purposely avoid the canvasser ; others
j;-ive the informati ii in an imperfect and scarcely intelligible manner.
Only ibrough pvr-evering labor and continued watchfulness can an
approximation to rrectness be attained in a Work of this character.
We tiiiiik, howe.'.. . that we have in most instances been enabled to
overc'vnie the dithLiiities and obstacles which surround the undettaking,
.iml enutidently believe that the Directory fur 18G8-9 will be found
by <uu patrons a reliable and trustworthy uuide to the Residences and
Businesti Houses '■! uie CiTY OF Ft. "Wayne.

Oar new DirkotuRV, for 18G8-0, contains about Six THOUSAND
NAMi.:?. which is a much larger number than is contained in any Di-
KECTOKV previously published for the city ; and, judging from experience
gathered from the canvass of other cities, we should say, shows that the
preseixi Dopulation of the Citv op Ft. Wayne is upwards of twenty-six
thousand souls. Vv ithiu the last five years the Citv has not only greatly
incre;i.-ed in popui;!t!on. but the numerous splendid business houses, large
manui'aetories and beautiful residences, erected during that period, are
palpabie evidences of a great increase in bu.sine.s.s and wealth, and indi-
cate for the city a frdil more rapid growth in the imme'liate future, and
demonstrate, beyond a doubt, the power of Ft. Wavne to maintain her
proud position in the foremost rank of the great Cities of the West. We
predict for the Citv of Ft. Wayne a rapid increase in population and a
progiessive and f/in-perous future.

We return ou; :li<iuks to the merchants and business men of the City
for the patronage extended to the Work, and to the Press, for the many
favoratjle notices published during the canvass, and renew our promise to
the public to faithfuiiy labor to make each succeeiing Issue of our
Directory more worthy of commendation ami patronage.

WILLIAMS & CO.



CONTENTS.



Abhrevijitions 35

Al [il'.alietical Arrin^emunt of Xiimei 35

liauks and Bankers 25

Benevolent Assnciatiuiis 20

Unundario-i of Wards 3i'

Business Directory 181

Cliureh Directory 21

(Mty (r over n men t 17

Oountv Officers 27

Fire Department IS

InJex to Ailvertiaemunts G

Insurance Companies and Agencies 2'i j Townsliip Officers

Internal Revenue 22'



Justices of the Peace 25

IMisoellaueons 20

Newspapers 28

Xjtaries Public 24

PateiitLaws . . 8

Post nice Directory Back jiart of Bool:

Preface 5

Public Buildings 23

School Department 19

Sketch of Fort Wayne 9

Street Directory 31

23



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS.



ART GALLERY.

ShoatfJ. A 38

ATTORN KYS AT LAW.

Houch John 51

R;indan F P 34

BAKixa po\vdi':r.

Biddle & I'.rnndriir 50

BELL FOUXDRY.

Vnndnzen & Tift 4

BLACKS.MITII SHOP.

JMesing Ch.is ■^S

BOILERS.

Bass k Hanna 42

Murray (fe Baker 41

BOOKSELLER.

Stockbridse X. P 48

BRASS FOUXDER.

Hatterslev A 4ti

BREW KETTLES.

Xenroth Anton 34

BREWERY.

Beck K. .T <t Stotz 62

BUSINESS COLLEGE.

American Busi ness Institute 3U

CAUPEXTER

Potter .Joseph L 48

CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, &a.

McDougal ,t Co 66

ToH-nlev, D;WaM. Bond & (?o lii

CARRIAGE MANUFACTURERS.

Stanley. Bieber & Co 64

Stevrn< Thos 46

CAR WHEELS.

Bass .t Hanna 42

CASTIXGS.

Murray «t Baker 44

CLOAK AXD DRE.SS MAKIXCI.

rtf C. (t Co 38

T.wnlev. DeWald. Bond & Co 16

CLOTHIERS

Fledderman John G. & Co 40

CLOTHS, &<:.

Frencli. Hanna & Co 62

COAL OIL.

Biddle i- Brandritr 50

COLLECTING AGENT.

Bossier M. H 64

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS.

Coeliran, Hum phrey & Co 44

I'otter Joseph L 48

COPPER STILLS.

Ni-uroth Anton 34

DRUGGISTS.

Biddle & Brandriff .50

(jratigny tt Co 34

Meyer Bros. S: Co 2

DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES.

Gratisnv tt Co 34

DRY GOODS.

O rff C . .\: Co 38

Root ,V Co 2

Townl.-v. DeWald, Bond Al Co 16

DYE WORKS.

LewisB. A 46

ENGIXEERS.

Murray & Baker 44



FANCY GOODS.

Gr;itif;"v & Co

Root ,<• Co

FOUXDRY FACIXGS.

Crawford Geo. & Co

FRUIT JARS.

Hemintrrav R. & Co

FURXITURE.

Miller John M

GAS FIXTURES.

Hatterslev A

GEAR CUTtlXG.

R. IS tetter Louis

GLASS MANUFACTURERS.

Hemingray K. & Co

GRATES.

Bass ,t Hanna

Siitermeister & Becker

GROCERS.

1 1 II est is k Hamilton

HARDWARE.

Brand rill' & Roberts

HOTEL.

JIayer House

IXSURANCE.

jKtna Insurance Co Facing pntje Si and

American Life of Phil adeltihia

Bos.slerH. II

Condon .1. Frank

Ilomeof Xew York ...

lloujih John .56, 58 and

International of New York

Mutual Life of New York

rvaudall F. P

Uiii'.erwri ters* Agency

IRON FOUNDERS.

Murrav & Baker

IRON, NAII.S, .Vc.

Bran.lritr k Roberts

IRON RAILING.

Bass \' Hanna

LAND AGENTS.

Ho.iirhJolm

Ran.l-ill F P

LIME. PLASTER AND CE.MENT.

Crawf.ird Geo. & Co

LOOKING GLASS PLATES.

JlillerJohn M

LUMBER DEALERS.

Clark \' Rhiiiesmith

Coeliran , Humphrey & Co

MACHINE WORKS.

Bhss ,t llanna

MANTELS

Siitermeister & Becker

MARISLE WORKS.

Siitermeister <t Becker

MEDICINES. CFAMILY).

Biddle & Brandrift

Mever B os. A: C"

MILL FURNI.^.HING GOODS.

Bass \- Hmna

MILLINERY

Oift C. Si Oo

MILLWRKiHTS.

JMurray & B.iker . ..



40
46
16

7

'2
36

62

52

40

56
66
64
66
58
60
60
60
34
58

44



54
34

1

40

48
44

42

36

36

50
2

42
38

44



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS.



MCSIC AN'D .MUSICAL IXSTRUMEXTS

Stiiekliiid.f N. P .

W.ilther F, \V. & Co

XEWSTAPHIRS.

F'lrt Wayne Democrat

Fort Way lie CJ a eite Co

ludiana Stiais Z.iitiing

NOTARY PLBLIC.

Bo<?ler H. H

NOTION'S.

Ro.t & Co 2

PAINTERS.

.Aml(;vsoii& Kover 36

PAINTS. OILS. .V.C



liulJle ^ Braudriff ."Oi STEAM ENlJINES.



I SASH. DOORS. BLINDS. &c.

■18. Bramlriff .\; Rol.crts f2

Gtj j C'lchran. liuniphrt-v ,!l Co -14

Hur.l 0. D ; SO

SAW MILLS.

MuriMv \- Biker 44

SEAL PRESSES.

Evi;nsP.,Jr 1

SLEIGHS.

Stanley. Beilier & Co 64

SMIT MACHINES.

liiiss A: Hauua 42

SODA ASH.

Crawl.. r. 1 O.o. & Co 1



68



701
61 1



Brandrilf ,t Roberts .5'.

Grati;;ny A: Co 34

Meier Bros A- Co 2

PAPER HANfilNUS.

AuJersiin it Kover 3>'

Stock l.r idle N. P 48

PATENT LAWS.



Kni-ht Br.< SisTOVES. etc



A: Hiiiina.. 42

Murray A: Biker 44

Rtistctt^v Loni«..,. 10

STENCIL CUTTER. STEEL STAMPS. &c.

EvcusP...Ii- 1

STORli FRONTS.

Hard O.D 50



PATENT SOLICITORS

KiUL'ht Bros 4

PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY.

Shoaff J A 38

PIANO MAKliRS.

Walt her F. W. k Co 66

PLOW MANUFACTURERS.

Jlesiuft Chas 48

Rei.l A. D. A: Co 64

PLUMBERS' MATERIAL.

ILittcrslev A 43

printers:

Fort Wayne Gazette Co 72

Sarnighaiisen J.... 70

Zimn^erman »t" Co 68

PRINTING PRESSES.



Brandnft k Roberts... 52

STRAW (iOODS.

OrffC.A- Co 3S

TAILORS. (MERCHANT).

Fledderm:in Jolin (t. A- Co 40

TIN. COPPER AND SHEET IRON WARE.

Brandritt A: Roberts 52

Xenrotli Anton 3o

TIN PLATE.

Braniritt .t Roberts 52

TOWER CLOCKS.

Rastetter Louis 1^

TRUSSES. SHOULDER BRACES. &c.

Riddle A; BraudriU

TlRNERS.

Cochran. Hnmrlirey <t Co ■»<



»



R.istetter Louis 16 WAGON MANUFACTURER



PUMP MANUFACTURERS

Kvle A. P. A: Co
RAILROADS

C H \."

P". Ft'w .tC. Railway 74

REAL ESTATE AGENTS.

Bossier a. H 64

Hongh John 54

SAL SODA. CAUSTIC SODA, &«.

Crawford Geo. & Co 1



Stevens Thomas
WINDOW SHADES.

t McD.niL'al A Co

D. :?ailroad IM WOOL DEALERS AND WOOLEN JIILL.

French. Hanna A: Co

VTROUGHT IRON PIPE.

Hattersley A



46



46



R. HEMir^ORAY 1^ CO.,

No. 68 Walnut St., Cincinnati, O.,



.VAXrFACTLRER.S OF







COXSISTIX« OF

Frnit Jars, Lamps, lanterns, Chimneys, Branfli^'s, Hoik ^Tincs, Bemi

Johns, Strew Cap Flasks, Tumblers, and a general variety

of Table Ware. Also, Philosophical Apparatus, and

Round ii Oval Shades for Artiliclal Flowers and

Statuettes. Solar, Sun and Comet Burners

on hand in large quantities.



X. B.— Our PATENT FRUIT .JARS, manufactured exclusively by us, stand unrivalled for
preserving qualities, and have the best reputation of any Jar in the West.

^-•LIBERAL DISCOUNT TO THE COUNTRY TRADE.-^



DIGEST OF UNITED STATES PftTENT UWS,

COMPILED BY

IvlVIGHT I5HOS.,

No 24 WEST rOUBTH ST., CINCINNATI, O., and
■ No. 406 F STREET. WASHINGTON, D. C.



1 & P4TFNT for seventeen years is granted to
thVfi^st^i^vSTf a new and usefa. AH . acU.ne,

Manufacture, or l^°™P«f'''°" b^if^f.^'^j o/'patented in any
known in tlu3 country, nor PUbHsliea or pa
' foreign country. Application fee, SlJ. issue, *

Actlfl' |«^ 1";™ ig useful .as a precautionary step,
in^-ci^sa^r^^hTi^ve-nt!. re^iurL .urth.

means to m.ature his '.nvention »»^ «'\'^' h-

'^\°- *"t>PT TPATION for Letters Patent, should
hv a Model, (wliere the case admits of one) oi

''^?*'«wsTrX -A patent for 3)i. 7, or H years, is
ali^.^!?*J^ «^^i;..°;r"slu,^^r^ ^li^^sitlt
-^ - ^a;::r=nr^^£^%artic.^- —
ufacture, or * "««V„""^'";„ked into, or printed,

-^-::te^:o^::ror^^-^9^ - « ^^f^
"-"T^t^rSS^^^S-t^sio

rXdrfn ?h'e P:tent"^(^mi:!l:Uolt, commissioner of

Patents, 1857. . , j„.;__ issued as an object

An engraved or P"»'fi,^^7^„d intended for sale

copyright law, '""'.y",, >.'" oie .as a work of art,
ecuted, it is not r-oduced for sale .as a ^,^^^j

but is designed to_ be affixed V;ir,,;!!,T, f^Hs under



but is designed to oe amxeu "' '^ "^ ; , j „, ^^j^
to a manufactured ftj-t-'^'^^tls^ and consequently
rntt'^l^;^t\Td^"yrr.^^trl'Bishop,Commis•r

°^^'1-OPYiuGHT raav be obtained for. 1st.
P^inth^'r^a^i'^'^a^". forming no par any 01-
rp^"^t[;;nrand^^ntro? eTg'r^a^inti' I'ntended for sale

SrU thTlHgir/ atentee or by any ^ his as-
JmK^|t;^ree inonths p.ior -U. expiration

r-?BsSSnc!^«:5'i?oiii?^e=io^

l"f effortrmJe and difflcnlties incurred in matnnug
fnd^^ntr^du'cfng the invention AppUca ion fee, SoO.
T „ c^n \rt 1S4>^ Sec. I; Actlabl, oec. lu.
'T FOREIGNERS ma, obtain a patent on same

'"irjOINT "inventors are entitled to a
appUotti'ota?d''luMb? recorded in United States



sime instrument; and having the same interests, with
tlTriKht to u.e them separately, tlu-y can not for any
egal use of then,, incur any obligatw,,, to each otl^e .-
Chapm.an, J., Supreme Ct. Mass. IbGl, p. 22o. Allen

^^'?.f -rJ^iS-E CiPECI FICATION must set forth the
• .-it. «,f.l7f,ill clHii- a-id exact terms, as to

Tnlwe one ki "d in tL^aVt 'to which it appert.ains, to
coitound ...ul use it without n.aking any experiments

"^T ri^vli'DONn'KNT.-If ■an inventor (before
anplic^.'m for a rl tVnti kn-wingly suffers his lu-

v^Ei ;" in.^ public a";' .f "-\',r mibl"- i
objection, it is a dedication of it to the public.

''Nr'pi?ent is held to be invalid by "ason of the
nurchise s.ale, or use prior to the application for a
rate t except on proof of the abandonment of the
fniention to the public; or that sneh purchase, s.ale or
pdor nse,has beiu for more '"a»t»o years prior to
, h appy^on "i;^ P-l-p^'^cif'.^a^uliUc work^
if'reliedup" to void a I-tent, must be such as would
be sufficient in a patent.-Parker v. Stiles, M l.ean,

^°Z' 'ax' TIIPROVER upon an original patent
has n^Hght to use tie original, nor has the origin,
patentee i right to use the improvement without

" u"k"E R E ' COLO R A B L E DI FFER-

En6es* or slight improv.n.en.s, can not shake the
rightof the original in v.n.or -2^^^ ^^^ ._^_

"'cl'^f^GITTilATE fO:>iniNATION, is

whe^e'two or\Jore ,,a,-ts act f.gether, in a new way,

"■•>r^YECHANlCAL E(iUIVAI.ENT me.ans
f ^Jl^'^HE PROm'lvr^'f a^ralented machine is

'''l'''\'nr^riiTii IlTs!-Pat: nted articles pur-
chit-edViu'd'e^^to*''!* ht can u..t be sold or used out-

"2rVAT¥N'fEiU''^vrre.V"ired to mark each
artfcle made or vended under their patent, (or where

S?^M=^^!''a^";^ - -1e^r;;ri!

!ls^g Ihro^r^si-'Vs-h^n^^r^r^i^

P^'rpWrLTVof'nraless than 5100 and costs is
i„curr\d''J^r^?adi fraudulent i-arking unpa ented
articles with the word "patent or UUe purase, 01
for unauthorized use of a patentee's mark. Act Ibl.,

®*9;,^T'HF INVENTION, if new. and useful to
/.). Ifli. *^-7 '/;",„.,,], piflier of nng experiment

=^"-?Mre';fu\if do;; th^r'he"^^ discovered some
new^eUmeJ or Property of matter may secure to
himself the ownership of us '^^'^^^^J^,,,,, .,„d to

^' '''.'fr.tf \ts value lis patent, in such a case,
demonstrate its ^ame. mi 1 . ,^^^^3

7'^\u' '.TrM "and may e as 'b"oad' as the mental
'" '*''fir itself But^the mental conception must

^^^Sii^a -'^^^m^ci^t^r^i^

-V^s^me'rfocesfof^rl^The absuact must be^^

existence, ready '"""P^"' inventor shall summon him
?o"^t"is?nl"-uXcrmisrue"r of Patents, Nov..

1858. ' 1



i;;



'^' Cash fcssel5^";^«. J^^jgg ,,4,1^



C<^.



QC



CJ





o



00



VsJ




Insurance Company



OF HARTFORD, CONN.



♦ -♦-



$



IN 49 YEARS IT HAS PAID FOR

PJr^ THOUSAND (5,000) DWELLING HOUSES AND CONTENTS.
TWENTY-TWO HUNDRED (2,200) CHUliCHES, SCHOOLS, tCc,
EIGHT THOUSAND (S,000) STOHES AND 31ERCHANDISE,
FORTY-FOUR HUNDRED (4,400) MILLS AND MANUFACTORIES,
TWENTY-TWO HUNDRED (2,200) SHIPMENTS BY LAKE, <£c.

Makin^r n Total of l^«»»«KeN paid of over

Q3,000,«jOO.OO!

The daily destmction by Fire of Property in the United States reaches the enorm-
ms sum of $250,000.

ARE YOU INSURED? IF JSfOT, WHY NOT?

The cost is triflhu/; the duty is manifest ; the result may be your escape
^'roin ruin; while delay and neylect may involve you in irretrievable disaster,
bankruptcy, poverty, and cruel disappointment.

^XKoo

The JETNA presents unequaled facilities to the public, by means of its
extended and efflcient organization, its heavy capital and assets, for first'
dass Insurance.

Y\m $c mum ■N/^viariTioiv mwmB,

tssiied at as favoi'able rates ami rules als aro ooiislstsiit Mfith reliable indemnity.

Branch, 171 Vine Street, Cincinnati, O. J. B. BENNE TT, Manager.

50 CALHOUN STREET. FORT WAYNE, IND.




ir^'%11 >IOVa 33S)t^J^^' '




i?



F



>



ire.
I—






^




SKETCH OF FOET WAYNE.



Fort Wayne, situated on an elevated plain, at the junction of the
St. Marys and St. Joseph rivers, has from an early period been a point of
great interest. As early as 1700, the French visited it for the purpose
of trade with the Indians, and prior to 1719 they established here a
regular trading post, and it became one of their most important commer-
cial centers. In the Miami dialect the place was called Ke-ki-ong-gay,
and Ke-ki-ouge in the Pottawattamie. Vandreuil, the Governor of
Louisiana, writing in 1751, located " Fort Miami" at this point. It was
a small stockade fort, built by the French, situated near the St. Marys,
probably in the vicinity of the canal aqueduct. The dim outlines of this
fort were traced by General Wayne in 1794r, and by Colonel John John-
ston in 1800.

At different periods four nations have held dominion here. The untutored
Indian for centuries ; and for half a century prior to the conquest of
Canada, the tri-colored flag waved at the meeting of the St. Joseph and
the St. Marys. After that, in December, 1760, the British flag was run
up in its stead, and a fort erected upon the east bank of the St. Joseph,
near its mouth. May 27, 1763, during Pontiac's war, a small garrison
stationed there was massacred, througli the treacherous influence of the
French traders over the Indians. This was about the last exertion of
French power on this continent, east of the Mississippi.

The Declaration of Independence, in 1776, was the commencement of
an era that established the rule of the United States as the fourth power
that reigned over this region, and still reigns, greater than all that pre-
ceded it. The sagacious mind of Washington, at an early period, fixed
upon the junction of the rivers as of commanding importance for a strong
military post, and the main purpose of the campaign of 1791, was for its
occupation as a center of military operations for the North -West. His
plans contemplated a garrison of one thousand or twelve hundred men,
but the defeat of General St. Clair, within a day's march, defeated his
well-matured plans, and at that time the American army tailed to occupy
this favorite rendezvous of the savage Indians — this '• Federal City" of
the tribes that formed the 3Iiami Confederation.

In 1794: the United States were more successful. After defeating the
Indians at the Eapids of the Maumee, General Wayne marched to this



10 SKETCH OF FORT WAYNE.



point, and selected lieve a commanding site for a fort; and in October of
that year " Fort Wayne" was completed. From that period, and bearing
that name, for now seventy-three years, this has been a center of Ameri-
can civilization and power. It continued to grow in importance until
1825, when the first plat of the town was made, and it was laid out and
incorporated as the "Town of Fort Wayne." Since that time there has
been a steady, uniform and healthy progress.

From time to time numerous additions have been made to the original
plat— November, 1833, the Coanty Addition; October, 1836, Ewiug's
Addition; and May, 1837, Hanna's Addition, with many others since,
that have extended the limits of the town something over two noiles east
and west, and nearly the same distance north and south, and the popula-
tion has kept equal pace with its enlarged dimensions.

In 1828 the population of the town and its immediate vicinity was
estimated at about 500, and in 1830 it was computed at about 800. In
the winter of 1839 a Charter was granted by the Legislature for a City
Corporation, and on the 2d day of March, 1840, a vote of the citizens was
taken upon the adoption or rejection of the Charter, which was adopted.
The population was then about 1,200 ; in 1850 it reached 4,200, and in
1860 it was 10,300. At the present time, from the rapid growth of the
past five years, the population must equal 25,000.

The causes that produced this rapid growth are apparent. The com-
manding situation of the town, in the center of a large and fertile scope
of country that sought this point for trade, with no competing town, and
the facilities lor export and import, were important elements in its growth.
The facilities for this commerce resulted from the important internal
improvements constructed so as to make this a leading point in their
routes.

The first of these was the Wabash and Erie Canal, completed from the
west in 1838, and from the east in the fall of 1842, thus connecting Fort
Wayne with Lake Erie at Toledo. By affording the means of shipping
direct to the Lake, the canal drew the trade of a large region of country,
north and south, immediately to this point. The water power resulting
from this improvement furnished facilities for the erection of mills and
manufiictories, that were of great importance in its progress ; and from
this period it took a new start, and this impetus continued till the era of
Plank Roads, in 184S. These roads were constructed with much energy
and rapidity to a great distance in every direction, attracting an increased
trade from a large and fertile section of country. Lastly came the Rail-
roads. The Ohio and Indiana Railroad was first located in 1852, and
completed in 1854. The Fort Wayne and Chicago Railroad was com-
menced in 1854, and completed in 1857. These two roads being consol-
idated with the Ohio and Pennsylvania Railroad, constitute the Pittsburgh,
Fort Wayne and Chicago Railway Company, making a line 467 miles in



SKETCH OF FORT WAYNE. Jl



length, and inferior iu importance to no road in the United States, and
equal to any in its management and success.

IS'ext followed the Toledo and Western Eailway, located in 1854, and
completed in 185G, connecting Lake Erie with the Mississippi.

Aside from the travel and freight brought to Fort Wayne, thus adding
largely to its commerce, it has the fortunate position of being a central
point on these great lines, and hence was the best location for their exten-
sive shops for repair and the building of rolling stock, for both the roads.
They therefore erected shops so extensive that they should be visited and
examined to properly realize their magnitude and importance.

The Toledo, Wabash and "Western Railway Buildings consist of a
round-house, 140 feet in diameter, with capacity for 24 engines ; brick
machine shop, 100 feet wide by 160 feet long; blacksmith shop, 40 feet
wide and IGO feet long ; wood shop, 30 feet wide and 200 feet long. A
brick freight depot, 25 feet wide and 60 feet long ; an elegant and conve-
nient passenger depot, 40 feet wide and 100 feet long. These shops and
the working of the road give employment to over five hundred men, with
a monthly pay-roll of over $30,000, and an expenditure for material of
$250,000 per month.

The shops of the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago Railway exceed
in size and importance in direct ratio with the increased length of the
road, and embrace a brick depot 290 feet long by IGO wide, and two
stories high ; freight house 200 feet by 60 feet ; brick office for Vice
President, Superintendent and Engineers, 50 feet square, two stories
high ; transfer house 25 feet by 100. In addition to these buildings for
the crencra) business of the road, all the machine work, buildin"- of cars
and repair work for the entire Western Division, from Crestline to
Chicago, 280 miles, is done here, requiring extensive buildings and an
immense expenditure.

A car shop, main building two stories high, 225 feet by 75 feet, with
two wings 185 feet by 75 feet, which turns out 30 passenger ears annually,
and 50 freight cars per month or 600 a year, and uses 18,000,000 feet of
lumber per year, and iron and other materials in proportion. Machine
shop for the building and repair of engines, 335 feet long by 110 feet
wide, one story, and offices al the south end, two stories, and 30 feet
square. Boiler shop, 140 feet by 50 feet, and in the second story, copper
and tin shop. A blacksmith shop, 320 feet by 80 feet. Round house
310 feet in diameter, with stalls for 48 engines. Water house 50 feet
square, two stories high. Fire proof oil house 30 feet square, two stories
high. Paint shop 150 feet by 75 feet, with capacity for eight cars. All
these buildings are of brick, and of the most substantial character, and
covcrino- over six acres of ground. The men employed and the expendi-
tuies are equal to the extent and importance of the buildings. Men iu
the motive power department, under the control of Isaac Dripps, Esq., are



12 SKETCH OF FOBT WAYNE.

983; in the transportation department, 538; in road or maintainance way
department, 1,330; station agents and telegraph operators, 160; total of
men, 3,020. At an expense for labor and material for a single month:



Online LibraryR.L. Polk & Co. cnFort Wayne, Indiana, city directory (Volume yr.1868-1869) → online text (page 1 of 44)