R.L. Polk & Co. cn.

Fort Wayne, Indiana, city directory (Volume yr.1890-1891, pt.2) online

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likely to fall below than rise above the estimate.

FROM CLEVELAJfD. FROM DETROrT

Transportation § 9.00 § 7.C0

Meals 5-00 4.00

An upper berth for the trip 4.00 z.oo

Total with upper berth §18.00 $13.00

E.xtra for a lower berth. 2.00 1 ,00

Total with lower berth $20.00 $14.00

Two persons in one room 38.00 27.00

Third person, add transportation and meals 14.00 11.00

Total cost, three persons in one room §52.00 $38.00

Only the transportation is purchased in a through ticket Meals and berths are
arranged for exclusively by the company.

MACKINAC ISLAND.

THE rockgirt, fairy isle, sitting like an emerald gem in the clear, pellucid wave,
rises majestically from the crystal waters, which cover but cannot conceal the
glistening, white pebbly depths beneath. Ii is the central point of the three
great lakes. It knows no land breeze, hence the winds are always cool and refreshing;
they never cease flowing. Its area is over two thousand acres, of which the natiouaj
park and military reservation comprise about nine hundred. The natural scenery is
unsurpassed. Nature seems to have exhausted herself in the manifold objects of
interest which meet the eye in ever^' direction. The lover of Mother Earth will hardly
grow wear)' of wandering through its shaded glens, and climbing over its rugged
rocks, each day bringing to light some new object of beauty and interest. Long-
fellow, in his poem of " Hiawatha." has put into English verse some of its wild
InJian lc^^-::d:>, wIulIi pi.vjplu uvury rock and glen wiih spccirai iiabitants. It the
poetic muses are ever to have a new Parnassus in America, they should certainly fix
on Mackinac Island. Hygeia, too, should place her temple here, for it is one of the
purest, dr}-est, clearest and most healthful of atmospheres.

Nothing can exceed the beauty of this island. It is a mass of calcareous rock,
rising from the bed of Lake Huron, and reaching a height of more than three
hundred feet above the water. Some of its cliffs shoot up perpendicularly, and tower
in pinnacles like half ruined gothic steeples. The island shows unmistakable evidence
of the water having once been two hundred and fifty feet above its present line. It
is a mooted question whether the lake has fallen from its original level, or the island
has been lifted up. It is cavernous in pl:ic(.s, and in these the ancient Indians were
■.vont to place their dead. Portions of the beach are level and well adapted for
.an dings.




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t=^._L^.»5»' »»f-l




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The harbor at the south end is a little gem. In it, vessels can anchor and be sure
of a holding, and around it the little old-fashioned French town nestles in primitive
style, while above frowns the fort, its white walls gleaming in the sun. This village
is a perfect curiosity in itself. Situated at the foot of theblulT, its two streets extend
for a distance of a mile along the beach. The buildings are a ridiculous mixture of
the modem and antique. Some were brought from Old Mackinaw when the town








^m^





A STREET IN OLD MACKINAW.



and fort were removed from that point after the massacre of June 4. 1763. iMany of
the fences are of the original palisade style. The whole area of the island is one
labyrinth of curious glens and vallej's. Old fields appear in spots which were formerly
cultivated by Indians. In some of them are circles of gathered stones, as if the
Druids themselves had dwelt there. The island was formerly covered with a dense
growth of rock maple, oak, iron wood, etc., and there are still parts of this ancient
forest left, but all the southern limits exhibit a young growth. There are walks and
winding paths of the most romantic character among its hills and precipices. From
the eminences overlooking the lake can be seen magnificent views of almost illimitable
extent, and as the observer gazes from the rocky battlements of the fort upon the
surrounding waters, there steals upon him a sense of security which seems a complete
bulwark against the host of Summer annoyances.

The late Dr. Dr.ike says ; *' The island is the most important summer resort to
which we can diroc': t^o 3.':y^''c-'^ of the infirm or ihc- u-shioiiable. As a health resort
it is unsurpassed. Its cool, dry air and the living streams of pure water which gush
from the lime rock precipices, are just what are needed to bring back the glow of
health to the faded cheek, and send the warm currents of life dancing through the
system, superseding all necessity for nauseating iron, sulphur and epsom salts,"

At watering places generally, all the features of the surrounding scenery are soon
familiarized to the eye, which then merely wanders over the commingled throngs of
coquettes, dandies, dancers and idlers, and soon returns to inspect the real or fancied
infirmities of its possessor. A visit to Mackinac reverses all this. Its natural beauties
and historic associations, together with the innumerable lesser attractions which
cluster round about, sen/e to furnish visitors with so much entertainment and variety
for either the robust or weakly ones, that ennjii which eventually is felt at most resorts
need not be experienced here. You eat with a new relish, and sleep like a child.




You row, or ramble, scarcely able to keep your buoyancy
within bounds. Dr. Mills, once post surgeon at Mackinac,
says : " Xo better place can be found for sickly girls and
puny boy'-^, for worn-out men and women. From the hour
of entering Lake Huron, your feelings will indicate that you
have passed beyond the reign of miasma, fever, dyspepsia,
blue devils and duns, and you look back upon the whole of them
with gay inditference, or a feeling of good-natured contempt, as
every turn of the steamer's wheel carries you farther into the
temperate and genial climate of the lakes, and away from your
perplexities. Under these influences real diseases may abaLte, and
the imaginary ones be forgotten, and this salutarj' mental excite-
ment will not soon die away, for the historic associations, not less
than the surrounding scenery, are well fitted to maintain it." Dr.
Mann says: "A few whiffs of the air would make your lungs give a
hygienic laugh. Children are crazy with animal spirits, and eat in
such a way as to demonstrate the paradox that the quantity con-
tained may be greater than the container." These extracts will no
doubt meet with a hearty response from thousands who have visited ^lackinac.

Dr. Hammond, the famous physician, says : "I have no hesitation is saying that
it is the best summer resort of which I have any knowledge, for persons whose nervous
systems are run down, or who desire to be built up and strengthened."

HOTEL ACCOMMODATION

IS a very satisfactory problem at Mackinac. There are innumerable hostelries of
every grade of price and corresponding service. If the tourist wishes to study
the ancient features of the island from their stronghold, he will put up at the
John Jacob Astor House. This was originally the headquarters of the American Fur
Company, and a glance at its low ceilings, scored by heavy timbers, its ancient fire-
places, its clumsy iron door locks, and its old storing vaults will satisfy any lover of
antiquities, even before he has been invited by the genial proprietor to inspect the
account books of four score years ago. The ^fission House, at the extreme easterly
point of the island, is another relic of ye olden time. Commanding one of the best
views on the island, it is very popular with those loving quiet repose.

, The place of all places for the fashionable resorters is Plank's Grand Hotel,
situated on a commanding eminence at the western end of the island, and facing the
straits. This hotel is the largest summer resort in the West, accommodatmg as it
does upwards of 1,000 guests, and representing a capital of $300,000. Its rates are
from S4.00 to S5.00 per day, and the season extends from July ist to September 20th-
This tremendous building is 650 feet in length and five stories in height. Its architec-
ture is ct the " Old Colo;.;^] " si\ '.c, ihu disLiuctive feature beiug a culonnaded portico,
30 feet wide, upon which the windows of every floor open. The interior is well
arranged and fully equal to every demand of the most fastidious taste. The lower
floor is occupied exclusively by the dining-hall, drawing-room and private parlors,
with the large rotunda office in the center. The dining-hall is a mammoth apart-
ment, capable of seating 600 people. It occupies the space of two stories, the
vaulted ceiling being 27 feet overhead. The guest rooms are large, light and
airy. Each front suite is provided with a private balcony The hotel is lighted
by gas and electricity, heated by steam, and provided with elevator and electric
call and fire alarm bells. It is also supplied with barber shop, bath-rooms, steam
laundrv' and a first-class livery. A metropoHtan orchestra is in constant attendance.
The grounds have been made very attractive and a casino constructed for indoor
■.,>ports. The hotel is under the management of Mr. J. O. Plank.




A



MACKINAC REGION.

L L of Northern Michigan's
many attractions are within
easy reach of ^lackinac Island
Indeed, so central is this spot, tha'.
the "Mackinac Region," as com-
monly spoken of, is supposed to in-
clude every attraction of the Grea*:
Lake Region of Upper Michigan
All methods of travel may be caller
into use, and all seem to start fron.
a common center or hub, radiating
as they do from this small island.
Perhaps the most important of these
secondary points is the Little Tra-
verse Bay. Here, clustering withir:
a mile or two of each other, and
with fast extending suburbs almost touching, arf
Petoskey, Bay View, Wequetonsing, Harbor Spring;,
and Harbor Point. The most expeditious route is via the G.



R. & I. Railway, whose excellent train service renders com-
munication possible at almost any hour of the day. The distance by this route is
only thirty-five miles from Mackinac City, the nearest point to Mackinac, on the
mainland. They may also be reached by either the day or night lines of steamers by
way of Lake Michigan. By these lines the mileage is nearly doubled, and the better
part of a day or night occupied in the journey. By far the prettiest route, however.
is via the picturesque Inland Line of steamers through Mullet Lake and Indian
River. The Michigan Central Railroad leading directly south, touches Topinabeo
and Indian River in an hour's ride from Mackinac. These points are also local to the
Inland Route.

Charlevoix and Traverse City, on Grand Traverse Bay, are best reached by the
steamers on Lake Michigan. They are about a days' ride from Mackinac.

A line of splendid steaniers makes daily trips to Sault Ste. Marie, leaving
Mackinac about nine in the morning, and passing all of the superb scenery of the St.
Mary's River by daylight. At the Soo, connections are made with the through steam-
ships running to the north and south shores of Lake Superior and to the Canadiar
ports situated on Georgian Bay.

In a water trip to Chicago or Milwaukee, there is considerable diversity of choice
The Lake Michicr-in and Lake Superior Transportation Co.'s steamers rurir.incf withnr.t
stops straight tiirough the center oi the lake, attord a quick trip and the novelty of
being in mid-sea for twenty-four hours. The Xorthern Michigan steamers, coasting
to all important points on the Lake Michigan east shore, and consequently taking up
more time, afford the tourist a better opportunity to view the industries of the region.
Coming back to the service more directly connected with the island, we may mention
that nothing gives a more general idea of its wonders than a trip around its shores in
one of the numerous steam yachts. These trips are on at all hours of the day. So,
also, are the fishing excursions to Les Cheneaux, than which no more delightful way
of spending one day may be contrived. The ferry steamers, and the constant move-
ment of steamers of regular routes, afford excellent opportunities to visit the mainland
either north or ^oiuh at any hour of the day or night.

PETOSKEV is a charming resort situated on the side of a high bluff near the
head of Little Traverse Bay. The town numbers 3,500 souls, and has a water front














BAY VIEW COLLEGE.



of 1^4 miles, to which a long pier gives considerable character and
life. A lofty limestone cliff Hanks it on the '.vest. Among its ,
trees may be seen the tents of many "campers," and further •-
on the pretentious villas of wealthy residents. From the verge ^."
of this cliiT the" view is superb. Five miles distant is the ^, -" ^^
ridge of hills that lines the opposite shore of Little Tra-
verse Bay. These sweep in a symmetrical
curve around this vast amphitheatre, and
follow up the hither shore until they rise
and terminate in hi^h cliils. The white line
of pebbly beach which stands out so promin-
entlv against the green of the hills now takes
an abrupt turn to the left, and forming a
crescent two miles long, ends in a wooded
point.

No summer resort or watering-place on
the continent can boast of purer air, fresher
breezes or better hotels. Facilities for re-
creation are also good. Boating on the
bay and short excursions by steamer or rail-
road may be indulged in at all times.
Owing to the salubrious climate and central location, the Western Hay Fever Associ-
tion makes its headquarters here

BAY VIEW, of Summer University fame, lies one mile further up the beach.
Though but a few yeais have passed since the location of the grounds, this Assembly
has become immensely popular in the East and South, ranking next to Chautauqua in
size and completeness. The location is beautiful and no expense has been spared in
improving its natural advantages. The land rises in natural terraces from the bay
and affords cozy and picturesque sites for the four hundred cottages, of which glimpses
may be caught through the trees. Clear cool water has been brought to these cot-
tages through pipes from a never-failing spring further up the hill side.

HARBOR SPRINGS lies six miles further round the shore of Little Traverse
Bay. It is located on a beautiful harbor (Wequetonsing) formed by the crescent of
Harbor Point. Along the water's edge are large springs from which gush streams of
water as clear as air and of a temperature only 12 to 15 degrees above freezing
point. The history of the place is full of interest. Pieces of pottery show that it was
once a stopping pl.-xce for the ancient mound builders. It was for many years a cen-
tral point for the payment of annuities, and for ages a favorite camp ground for the
Indians. Many curiou.s legends are extant.. Strangers always visit the antiquated
C:ithvjlic church, ioj;:o_a niuic ihau 200 years ago by Marquette.

THE HARBOR POINT RESORT, directly opposite, is singulariy favored.
The strip of rolling land on which it is situated is hardly more than a stone's throw
in width, and while on the outer shore the heavy surf of Lake Michigan rolls grandly
over a fine bathing beach, the children may with perfect safety paddle about the
harbor within. Besides the large amusement hall and hotel which stands high above
the beach on the breezy Lake Michigan side, the resort includes numerous cottages,
which are provided for such of the guests as prefer the seclusion of their own roof.

CHARLEVOIX, t3 miles below Petoskey, on the Lake Michigan shore, is a most
picturesque snot. Tl'.e hcaurifu! little town is situated at the mouth of a .'^hor: strait,
the outlet of Kinind arid i^ine L..ikt'S. Further up, autl ju.st between the lukcs, are the
handsome grounds and residences of tlie Kalamazoo and Chicago Resorts, which
occupy the north and south shores respectively.



THE INLAND ROUTE is undoubtedly the most interesting one between
Mackinac and Petoskey. Nothing short of a water trip through the heart of Florida
can compare to this wonderfully novel route by crooked rivers and lovely lakes, across
the northern end of Michigan. Even with the former the comparison ends here, as
the salubrious climate and the high forest grown shore are lacking. A little steamer
leaves Mackinac at 7 o'clock, Cheboygan at g o'clock every morning, and after picking
her way among logs and booms, past saw-mills and through the lock,, steams up the
crooked Cheboygan to Mullet Lake. The lake is 12 miles long by 5 wide, with a
charming ruggedness of outline, caused by the thickly wooded hills which completely
encircle it and form its shores. Topinabee, a favorite spot for campers, is situated at
the further end, and here the passengers debark for. dinner. After a short rest the
little vessel resumes her journey, and worries through Indian River into Burt Lake.
the lower end of which is crossed in reaching Crooked River. The latter stream u
the shallowest and most crooked of the three, and although the steamer draws but
thirty inches of water, it is only by a constant succession of twists and turns, .scrapes
and pushes and stops and backs that she gets through to Crooked Lake, where after a
run of three miles, she ties up to the wharf at Oden, after an e.Kciting and highly
interesting day. A dummy starts immediately on the eight-mile run to Petoskev,
■where it arrives in season for supper. The little steamers Romeo and Juliet, which
compose this line, are marine marvels. A vessel capable of carrying 150 passengers,
which may safely and constantly make the trip through mid-lake from Mackinac to
Cheboygan, yet at the same time is compact enough to wriggle through stretches of
river that would seem impossible to crafts larger tnan a skiff, must be the handiwork
of a genius. The twin screw system now in use on the most famous ocean flyers, has
been employed in miniature to funiish the motive power. This enables the boat to
turn in her own length, but even then, poles and ropes are in frequent demand, and
the ingenuity and e.yperience of the captain is taxed to the utmost

MARQUETTE, the metropolis of Lake Superior countr\', is a very handsome
city. Its business portion displays great activity and metropolitan tastes. Its resi-
dences, which are exceedingly beautiful, are placed high up on a bluff to the north,
and command a view of the lake for 30 miles. While its central location makes it a
capital base of operations for all the lovers of the rod and gun who \-isit these natural
game preserves, it possesses no small attractions within itself. Speckled trout may be
caught in the streams near by, while in the bay lake trout of twenty to thirty pounds
in weight furnish exciting sport. The hotels are of the best, and everything necessary
for hunting and fishing may easily be obtained.

THE TRIP TO THE SOO is worthy or note. The steamer after rounding
Mackinac Island follows the northern shore of Lake Huron as far as Detour, at the
entrance of the St. Mary's River, where the real interest begins. The river is 62
miles long, and is composed of a succession of beautiful straits and broad iakc^. It is
almost euLirely shuL m uy high iiilis. winch rise irom the water's edge. In the manv
beauties and eccentricities of the stream and its outline, it is freely compared to the
Hudson and other famous rivers. The channel is narrow, crooked and shallow, how-
ever, and must be passed by daylight. This is usually accomplished at dawn, this line
being the only one which makes it at mid-day. The river is full of islands, and there
are many popular hunting and fishing resorts along its course.

SAULT STE. MARIE, a city of S.ooo inhabitants, may be reached by rail or
-water. There is much of interest about the old place. It lies on the left bank of the
river, just below the famous government ship canal, built for the purpose of passing
tlie St. Mar\-'s Rapid.s. The government works are exceedingly interesting. The
immense and ju-rreei siructure of masonn-. the water power which rims all the
machinery necessary to operate the monster gates of the lock, and the dynamos which
furnish the electric lighting, are perfect in all their details, and well display man's
ingenuity.



-IE?




I.AKK CRIE: DIVISIOBi.

Steamers CITY OF CLEVELAND
and CITY OF DETROIT (New)

DAILY I.IXE BETWEEN'

CtrEVEI^AND and DETROIT.



LEAVE CLEVELAND 10.00 P. M,— After the arrival of ALL trains. Passengers due in Cleveland via Bee

Line at 9.45 p. m., or via Erie at 9.00 p. m., should notify Conductor of tneir

wish to catch the steamer.
ARRIVE DETROIT 5.00 A. M. — :/ia..<r,g connections with EARLIEST trains in every dlrect.^n. By thi»

route passengers nnay reach the Sag.naw Valley at 10.55 a. m., Grand Rapids

at noon, and other points at correspondingly early hours.
LEAVE DETROIT 11.00 P. Nl.— After the arrival of ALL trams. Passengers due in Detroit via Michigarr

Central Fast Train at 10.45 p. m., or via Detroit, Lansir.g 8i Northern at 10.20
(Standard Time.) p. m.. should notify Conductor of thei' wisn to catch the steamer. By this route

passengers may leave Bay City, Saginaw, Grand Rapids, Niles, Kalamazoo, etc., after

S'jpoer and reach Cleveland following morning.
ARRIVE CLEVELAND 5.30 A. M.— Connecting with EARLIEST trains East, South and Southwest, and

reaching Pittsburg or Columbus at noon.
CLEVELAND V/HARVES, 23 River Street. DETROIT WHARVES, Foot of V/ayne Street.

The Sunday iM'gnt Trips are operated only during June, July, August and September.



LAKE H1.TRO?« OIVISIOZV.

Steamers CITY OF ALPENA and CITY OF MACKINAC

FOUR TRIPS PER WEEK BETWEEN

DETROIT and MACKINAC.



MON P M

10. oo

TUES A M
2.00

3.00
6.30
8.30



4-3°
9.00

WED A H
5.30
7.00

7-3'='
CO:



GOING NORTH.

W£D AH fRl A M SAT P «

9.00 9.00



P M

1. 00

3.00

4.00

7.00
10 00



a-45
7.30

P M

4.00

5 30
6.00



10.00 Mis. Lv Detroiti



P M

t.oo



4 00

6.30



2-45
7.30

P M

4 00

5 30

6 00



2.00



3.00
6.'3o



4 30
9.00

'ON A U

5-3°

7.00



62

S2
94
124

180

228

3'9

345
353



.Ar.



. Marine City

Oakland Hotel

...St. Clair

.Port HuronS .Ar.

.. .Le.xingtoQ "

. . . Sani'ac "

.Sand PeachS "



, 0.scoda 4 .
Alpena5 .



. . . Cheboyjran 6 . . .
.Mackinac Is'.andT.
- .. St. Ignace » . . ,



Lv.



GOING SOUTH.

HUB PHI SAT AM MON AM TUE* P W

1.30 2.00 2.00 1.30



9.30
7.30



12.00

8 00



10.30
10.00



\lNECT!0NS-(I-2') With Railways
C:t/ St'Binners. i C ") in'^id Rou'c
..t ., S:>. S. S: Ai'i.-.; - r... .-. .-, :.r _



'e-g'"5- (3) P. H. & No. W. Ra Iway. (4) D.,

<~) Steamers for uake Mc'. jan. Lake Supe



FRl PM
8.30

6.00
3-30
FRl A M
11.00

7-3°

THUR P M

11.00

930

g.oo
B



SUN PM
8.30
6.30



6U



3 30

P M

IT .00

7.30

SAT PM

11. 00

9.30 IC.30

9.00 to. 00

C. Si A. Railv\«y.
and Soo R v»r.



6.45
4.15

P M

13. 00
8.00

MON A M
12. 00



THIS LAKE LINE of swift steamers furnshes the only reliable, enjoyable and comfortable means of reaching
the Summer Resorts of Nortnern M.chtgan, MacUirac, Petoskey, Harbor Springs, Bay View, Cha.-levoix.
Traverse City, Les Cheneaux Islands, Sauit Ste. Marie. Marquette.

THE LAKE AND RAIL Route formed by the 0. & C, and the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic R'y, is th»
shortest, quickest and cheaoest way of reaching Lake Superior and Northwest points. Fast Express
Trains, having elegant parlor or sleeping ca's attached, leave St. Ignaca immediately after the arrival of the
steamer, and reach Sault Ste. Marie in 4 hours, Marquette in 6 hours, the Copper Region in 5 hours and
Duluth in 15 hours.

FOR NORTHWEST POINTS located on the lines of the Northern Pacific R. R., Canadian Pacific R'y. or
St. Paul, Mmneapol s ii Manitoba R. R., this new and interesting route through Lake Huron and across the
Upper Peninsula to Dj'uth wi I be found the cheapest.



F. E. Randall.

East. Pass. Ag't, Pittsburg, Pa.

D. CARTER, GcN. W»N»Gtq.



GuS. SCMANTZ.

Cenfl Pass. Ag't, Detro t. Mich



T. F. Newman,

Gen'l Ag't, Cleveland, O.
E. B. WHITCOMO, Gen'l P*s». Agent. Detroit. Mich-



STEflMERS RUN UNTIL DECEM.3ER I.



FORT WAYNE DIRECTORY.



R. L. POLK, President.



A. C. DANSER, Vice-President. ALBERT DUFFILL, Sec'y and Treasurer.
INCORPORATED 1 8S5.



^. ^- ^°L^ * Co




:E=>-cr:Bi^zs:E3::E::iBS,
§uiUsl}ers of 0azethers mid ^tmswBss ^ireciari^B



ILLINOIS,
. MICHIGAN,

PENNSYLVANIA,
NEW JERSEY,
MINNi:SOTA,
MONTANA and
DAKOTA,
KANSAS,
MISSOURI,



CALIFORNIA,
WASHINGTON,
COLORADO.
WYO^ilNG,
NEW MEXICO,
UTAH,
NEVADA,
ARIZONA,
ARKANSAS.



FOR THE STATES OF

WEST VIRGINIA. '
KENTUCKY,



Online LibraryR.L. Polk & Co. cnFort Wayne, Indiana, city directory (Volume yr.1890-1891, pt.2) → online text (page 33 of 34)