Robert Hooper.

A new medical dictionary: containing an explanation of the terms in anatomy ... and the various branches of natural philosophy connected with medicine online

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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

PRESENTED BY

PROF. CHARLES A. KOFOID AND
MRS. PRUDENCE W. KOFOID







;V/2*>v







QUINCY'S LEXICON-MEDICUM.




A NEW



CONTAINING AN



EXPLANATION OF THE TERMS



IX




ANATOMY, || CHYMISTRY,
PHYSIOLOGY, PHARMACY,

PRACTICE OF PHYSIC, SURGERY,

MATERIA MEDICA, 11 MIDWIFERY,



D THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY CONNECTED
WITH MEDICINE.



SELECTED, ARRANGED, AND COMPILED, FROM
THE BEST AUTHORS.



" Nee aranearum sane texus ideo melior, quia ex se fila
gignunt, nee noster vilior quia ex alienis libamus ut apes."

JUST. LIPS. Monit. Pottt. Lib. i. cap. i.



BY ROBERT HOOPER, M. D.

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD, AND THE RQYAL COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS OF LONDON ;
PHYSICIAN TO THE ST. MARY-I/E-BONE INFIRMARY, &C. &C.



PHILADELPHIA:

PUBLISHED BY M. CAREY & SON, BENJAMIN WARNER, AND EDWARD PARKER.

1817.
Griggs & Co. Printers:






TO

WILLIAM SAUNDERS, M.D. F.R.S

FELLOW OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS ;
OF THE ANTIQUARIAN AND OTHER SOCIETIES ;

THIS WORK IS DEDICATED,

AS A MARK OF RESPECT AND ESTEEM,
BY HIS SINCERE FRIEND,

THE AUTHOR.



M372993







I



'







PREFACE.



TT HEN Dr. Quincy published the first edition of his Lexicon Me-

i

dicum, mathematical principles were generally adopted to explain the
actions of the animal frame : hence we find in his work a continual
recurrence to them. Since his time the functions of the animal econ-
omy and the knowledge of anatomy have received successive im-
provements, and the fashionable follies of mathematical explications
have been reduced to their proper standard. To preserve the name
which Dr. Quincy so deservedly obtained, and to render his work as
useful as possible, such alterations and amendments were made in
every following edition, as were suited to the doctrine of the times.
It nevertheless has so happened, that his work, even in the thirteenth
edition, contains very many of the absurdities of his day : The ana-
tomical explanations are given in the language of the old schools,
too often tedious, and abounding with every hypothesis ; the physi-
ology of the human body has been almost wholly overlooked; and
I all useful nosological descriptions omitted. Similar deficiences and
useless exuberances occur in every other department of the work.



PREFACE.

When, therefore, the present editor was solicited to undertake its
revision, he thought he could not do a more acceptable office to the
public, than almost wholly new model it. With this view he has
been careful to collect such information as may render the work
generally useful. Particular attention has been paid to the deriva-
tion of the terms, the anatomical description of the various parts,
and the explanation of their functions ; the diseases are considered
according to the most approved nosological arrangement, and their
symptoms and distinctions clearly enumerated : the materia medica
and the preparations, especially those which enter the last edition of
the London Pharmacopoeia, have been amply considered ; the im-
provements of modern Chymistry every where introduced, and the
terms in Surgery, Midwifery, Medical Botany, and other Branches
of Natural Philosophy, as far as connected with Medical Science,
have been fully treated. In doing this, the editor has availed himself
of the labours of the most eminent writers on the different branches
of medicine, and has made such extracts, abridgments, translations,
and selections, as the extent of the work would admit. It was his
original intention to have given to each writer the merit of the par-
ticular description selected from his work ; but having occasion to
consult, frequently to abridge, and sometimes to alter various pas-
sages in works connected with his subject : and finding it difficult,
and in many instances impossible to discover the original writer of
several articles ; and at the same time attended with no particular
advantage, he prefers making a general acknowledgment of bis obli-
gations than to particularize the respective labours of each individual.



PREFACE.

The following have principally contributed toelucida tethe several sub-
jects. Jlccum, Mken, Minus, Bell, Bergius, Blanchard, Burns, Burseri-
us, Callisen, Castelli, Ctiaptal, Cooper, Cruickshank, Cullen, Denman,
Duncan, Edinburgh Dispensatory, Endinburgh Encyclopaedia, Editors
ofMotherby's Dictionary, Four croy, Green, Haller, Hunter, Innes,Latta,
Lavoisier, Lewis, Linnceus, Meyer, Murray, Nicholson, Pott, Richerand,
Richter, Saunders, Sauvage, Scarpa, Smith, Soemmering, Swediaur,
Symonds, Thomas, Thomson, Turton, Vaughan, Vossius, Willan, Wil-
lich's Encyclopaedia, Wilson, WoodvilU.









Jw









A NEW




J\_ A A. ANA. (From ava, which signi-
fies of each.) A term in pharmacy.

It is never used but after the mention of
two of mure ingredients, when it implies,
that the quantity mentioned of each ingre-
dient should he taken ; e. g. g*. Potassx
iiitratis : Sacchari albi aa ^j . i. e. Take the
nitrate of potash and white sugar, of each
one drachm.

ABAM. A term used by some ancient
chy mists for lead.

ABACTUS. Abigeatus. Among the an-
cient physicians, this term was used for a
miscarriage, procured by art, or force of
medicines, in contradistinction to abortus,
which meant a natural miscarriage. The
moderns know no such distinctions.

ABACUS. (From a Hebrew word, signi-
fying dust.) A table for preparations, so
called from the usage of mathematicians
of drawing their figures upon tables sprin-
kled with dust.

Z\BAISIR. Jlbasis. Spodinm Jlrabum.
Ivory black ; and also calcareous powder.

ABALIENATIO. A decay of the body, or
mind.

ABALIKNATUS. Corrupted. A part so
destroyed as to require immediate extirpa-
tion ; also the fault or total destruction of
the senses, whether external or internal,
by disease.

ABANET. (Hebrew, the girdle worn by
the Jewish priests.) A girdle-like bandage.

ABANOA. Adi/. The palm of the Tsknd
of St. Thomas, from which Thernal's re-
storative is prepared.

ABAPTISTA. (From ., priv. et @*.7f]u,
to plunge.) Abaptiston. The shoulders of
the old trepan. This term is employed by
Galen, Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Sculte-
tus, and others, to denote the conical saw
with a circular edge, (otherwise called mo-
diolus, or terebra,) which w:is formerly
used by surgeons to perforate the cranium.

ABAPTISTOX. See Jlbaptista.

ABARNAHAS. Ovum rujfum. A chemi-
cal term formerly used in the transmuta-
tion of metals, signifying luna plena, mag-
lies, or magnesia.



ABARTAMEX. Plumbum, or lead.

ABARTICULATION. (From ab, and arti-
culus, a joint.) That species of articulation
which has evident motion. See Diarthrosis.

ABAS. N (An Arabian word.) The scald"
head ; also epilepsy.

ABASIS. See Jlbaisir.

ABBREVIATION. The principal uses of
medicinal abbreviations are in prescrip-
tions ; in which they are certain marks, OP
half words, used by physicians for despatch
and conveniency when they prescribe, thus :
readily supplies the place Q? recipe
h. s. that of ' hora somni n. m. that of nvx
moschata elect, that of electarium, Sec. ;
and in general all the names of compound
medicines, with the several ingredients, are
frequently wrote only up to their first or
second syllable, or sometimes to their third
or fourth, to make them clear and expres-
sive. Thus Croc, Jlnglic. stands for Crocus
*%ngkcanus' Conf. Jlromat. for Confectio
Jlromatica, &c. A point bi ing always pla-
ced at the end of such syllable shews the
word to be incomplete.

ABDOMEN. (From abdo, to hide, be-
cause it hides the viscera. It is also deri-
ved from abdere, to hide, and amentum^ the
caul ; and by others it is said to be only a
termination, as from lego, legumen, so from
abdo. abdomen ) The belly.

The abdomen is the largest cavity in the
body, bounded superiorly by the diaphragm
by which it is separated from the chest ;
inferiorly by the bones of the pubis and
ischiurn ; on each side by various muscles,
the short r.bs and oss'i ilii , anteriorly by
the abdominal muscles, and posteriorly by
the vertebrae of the loins, the os sacrum and
os coccygis. Internally it is invested by a
smooth membrane called peritoneum, and
externally by muscles and common integu-
ments.

In the cavity of the abdomen are con-
tained,

1. Jlnterioriy and laterally.

1. The epiploon. 2. The stomach.
3. The large and small intestines. 4. The
mesentery, 5. The lacteal vessels, 6. The



ADD



ABO



pancreas. 7. The spleen. 8. The liver
and gall-bladder

Posteriorly, without the, peritoneum, are,

1. The kidneys. 2. The supra-renal
glands. 3. The ureters. 4. The recepta-
culum chyli. 5. The descending aorta.
6. The ascending vena cava.
3. Inferiorly in the pelvis, and without the

peritoneum,

In men, 1. The urinary bladder. 2. The
spermatic vessels. 3. The intestinum rec-
tum.

In women, beside the urinary bladder
and intestinum rectum, there are,

1. The uterus. 2. The four ligaments of
the uterus. 3. The two ovaria. 4. The
two Fallopian tubes. 5. The vagina.

The fore part of this cavity, as has been
mentioned, is covered with muscles and
common integuments, in the middle of
which is the navel. It is this part of the
body which is properly called abdomen ; it
is distinguished, by anatomists, into regions.

The posterior part of the abdomen is
called the loins, and the sides the Epicolic
regions.

Abdominal Hernia. See Hernia Abikmi-
nalis.

Abdominal muscles. See Muscles.

Abdominal ring. See Annulns Abdominis.

Abdominal regions. See Regions.

ABDUCENS LABIORUM. A name given by
Spigelius to the levator anguli oris. See
Levator anguli oris.

Abducent nerves. See JVervi abdncentes.
f Abducent Muscles. See Abductor.

ABDUCTIO. (From abduco, to draw away.)
A species of fracture, when a bone is divi-
ded transversely near a joint, so that each
part recedes from the other. In Ccelius
Aurelianus it signifies a strain ; and is men-
tioned as one of the causes of ischiadic and
psoadic pains.

ABDccTon. (From abduco, to draw
away.) Abducent A name given to those
muscles whose office is to pull Ix^ck or
draw the member- to which it is affixed from
some other, as the abductor pollicis draws
the thumb from the fingers. The antago-
nists are called adductores, or adductors.

Abductor auricularis. See Posterior auris.

Adductor auris. See Posterior auris.

Abductor brevis alter. See Abductor pol-
licis mantis.

ABDUCTOR INDICIS MAN US. Ab-
ductor of Douglas. Semi-interosseus indi-
cts of Winslow. Adductor indicis of Cow-
per.

An internal interosseous muscle of the
fore-finger, situated on the hand. It arises
from the superior part of the metacarpal
bone, and the os trapezium, on its inside,
by a fleshy beginning, runs towards the
metacarpal bone of the fore-finger, adheres
to it, and is connected by a broad tendon
to the superior part of the first phalanx of
the fore-finger. Sometimes it arises by a



double tendon. Its use is to draw tl;
fore -finger from the rest, to\v"ai-cls th e
thumb, and to bend it somewhat towards
the palm.

ABDUCTOR INDICIS PEDIS, An in-
ternal interosseous muscle of the fore-toe,
which arises tendinous and fleshy, by two
origins, from the foot of the inside of the
metatarsal bone of the fore-toe, from the
outside of the root of the metatarsal bone
of the great-toe, and from the os cuneiforme
internum, and is inserted tendinous into the
inside of the root of the first joint of the
fore-toe. Its use is to pull the fore-toe in-
wards, from the rest of the small toes.

Abductor long us pollicis mantis. See Ex-
tensor ossis metacarpi pollicis mantis.

ABDUCTOR MEDII DIGITI PEDIS.
An interosseous muscle of the foot, which
arises tendinous and fleshy, from the inside
of the root of the metatarsal bone of the
middle toe internally, and is inserted tendi-
nous, into the inside of the root oi'the first
joint of the middle toe. Its use is to pull
the middle toe inwards.

ABDUCTOR MINIMI DIGITI MA-
NUS. Carpo-phalangien du petit doigt of
Dumas. Extensor tertii internodii minimi
digiti of Douglas. Hypothenar minor of
Winslow.

A muscle of the little finger, situated on
the hand. It arises fleshy from the pisiform
bone, and from that part of the ligamentum
carpi annnlare next it, and is inserted, ten-
dinous, into the inner side of the upper end
of the first bone of the little finger. Its use
is to draw the little finger from the rest.

ABDUCTOR MINIMI DIGITI PEi)IS.
Calcaneo-phalangien du petit doigt of Du-
mas. Adductor of Douglas. Parathenar
major of Winslow, by whom this muscle ia
divided into two, Paratltenar major and
metutarseus. Adductor minimi digiti of
Cowper.

A muscle of the little toe, which arises
tendinous and fleshy, from the semicircular
edge of a cavity on the inferior part of the
protuberance of the os calcis, and from the
rest of the metatarsal bone of the little toe,
and is inserted into the root of the first
joint of the little toe externally. Its use is
to bend the little toe, and its metatarsal
bone, downwards, and to draw the little
toe from the rest.

ABDUCTOR OCULI. Adductor of Doug-
las and Winslow. Orbito-ihtus-scleroticien,
orbito-extus-sderoticien of Dumas. Rectua
Adducens oculi of Albinus. Indignatorius,
or the scornful muscle. Adducens Iracun-
dus. See Rectus externus oculi.

ABDUCTOR POLLICIS MA NUS. Sea-
phosus'phnlanginien du ponce of Dumas. Ad-
ductor pollicis mantis, and Adductor brevis
alter of Albinus. Adductor thenar Riolani
of Douglas, (the adductor brevis alter of Al-
binus is the inner portion of this muscle.)
Adductor pollicis of Co wpe r.



ABl



ABO



A muscle of the thumb situated on the
hand. It arises by a broad tendinous and
fleshy beginning, from the ligamcntum carpi
anmdare, and from the os trapezium, and
is inserted tendinous into the outer side
of the root of the first bone of the thumb.
Its use is to draw the thumb from the fin-
gers.

ABDUCTOR POLLICIS PEDIS. Calca-
neo-phalangien du pouce of Dumas. Abductor
of Douglas. Thenar of Winslow. Abductor
polKcis of Cowper.

A muscle of the great toe, situated on the
foot. It arises fleshy, from the inside of the
root of the protuberance of the os calcis,
where it forms the heel, and tendinous from
the same bone, where it joins the os navicu-
lure ; and is inserted tendinous into the in-
ternal sesamoid bone and root of the 'first
joint of the great toe Its use is to pull the
great toe from the rest.

ABDUCTOR TERTIF DIGITI PEDIS.
An interosseous muscle of 'the foot, that
arises tendinous and fleshy from the inside
and the inferior part of the root of the me-
tatarsal bone of the third toe ; and is insert-
cd tendinous in to the inside of the root of the
first joint of the third toe. Its use is to pull
the third toe inwards.

ABEB^OS. (From at, neg. and &&XJK
firm.) Jlbebeus. Weak, infirm, unsteady A
term made use of by Hippocrates de Signis.
ABEB>EUS. See Abebaeos.
ABELMOSCHUS. (Arabian.) Granum mos-
chi. Mbschns Arabum. JEgyplia moschatu,
Bamidmoschata. Alcea. Alcealndica. Alcea
JEgytiaca "uillosa. _ Abretle, Abelmoscfi. Abel-
musk. The seeds of a plant called the musk
mallow, which have the flavour of musk.
The plant Hibiscus abelmoschus of Linnaeus,
is indigenous in Egypt, and in many parts
of both the Indies. The best comes from
Martinico. By the Arabians the seeds are
esteemed cordial, and are mixed with their
coffee, to which they impart their fragrance.
In this country they are used by the perfu-
mers.

Abelm&sch. See Abelmoschus.
Abelmusk, See Abelmoschus.
ABEIIUATIO. (From ab and erro, to wan-
der from.) Lusus nature. Dislocation.

ABESSI. (Arabian.) Filth. The alvine ex-
crements.

ABESUM. Quicklime.
ABEVACUATIO, (From ab, dim. and era-
cuo t to pour out.) A partial or incomplete
evacuation of the peccant humours, either
naturally or by art.

ABIES. (From abeo, to proceed, because
it rises to a great height ; or from tar^ t
a wild pear, the fruit of which its cones
something resemble.) Elate T/teteia. The
fir. An evergreen tree. Linnaeus includes
the abies in the genus Pinus. Botanists have
enumerated several species : the four which
follow, are the principal that afford mate-
rials for medicinal use.



1. Pinus Picea, the silver fir-tree, which
affords the common turpentine.

2. Pinua abies alba, the Norway spruce
fir-tree, which yields the Burgundy pitch.

3. Pinus larix, the common white larch-
tree, from which is obtained tlie Venice tur-
pentine.

4. Pinus sylvestris, the Scotch fir, which
yields the pix liquida.

ABIES CANADENSIS. See JBalsamum Ca-
nadense.

ABIGEATUS. See Abaclus.
ABIOTOS. (From at, neg. and iS/oa>, to live.)
A name given to hemlock, from its dead
qualities. See Conium.

ABLACTATIO. (From ab, from, and lac,
milk.) Ablactation. The weaning of a child
from the breast.

ABLATIO. (From affero, to take away.)
The taking away from the body whatever is
useless or hurtful ; it comprehends all kinds
of evacuations. Sometimes it signifies the
subtraction of a part of the diet, with a
medical view ; and sometimes it expresses
the interval betwixt two fits of a fever, or
the time of remission.

Chymical ablation is the removal of any
thing that is either finished or else no longer
necessary in a process.

ABLUENTIA (Abluentia, sc. medicamenta t
from abluo, to wash away.) Abtttrgent*.
Abluents. Medicines which were formerly
supposed to purify or cleanse the blood.

ABLUTION. (From abluo, to wash off.)
A washing or cleansing either of the body or
the intestines.

In chemistry it signifies the purifying of
a body, by repeated effusions of a proper
liquor.

ABOIT. An obsolete term of Arabic ex-
traction for white lead.

ABOLITIO. (From abaleo t to destroy.) The
separation or destruction of diseased parts.
ABORTION. ("Mortio, from aborior, to
be steril.) Mourns. Jlmblosis. Diaphthora.
Ectrosis. Eyambloma. Examblosis. JlpQ*
pallesis. Jlpopalsis. JlpophtJiora.

Miscarriage, or the expulsion of the fcctus
from the uterus, before the seventh month,
after which it is called premature labour.
It most commonly occurs between the
eighth and eleventh weeks of pregnancy,
but may happen at a later period. In early
gestation, the ovum sometimes comes ofF
entire ; sometimes the foetus is first expell-
ed, and the placenta afterwards. It is pre-
ceded by flooding, pains in the back, loins,
and lower part of the abdomen, evacuation
of the water, si iiverings, palpitation of the
heart, nausea, anxiety, syncope, subsiding of
the breasts and belly, pain in the inside of
the thighs, opening and moisture of the os
tincje.

ABORTIVES. ("Jlbbrtiva, sc. medicamenta ;
from abonor t to be steril.) Amblotica. Echo-
lica.
Medicines capable of occasioning 1 an



ABS



ABS



abortion, or miscarriage, in pregnant wo-
men. It is now generally believed, that
the medicines which produce a miscarriage,
effect it by their violent action on the sys-
tem, and not by any specific action on the
womb.

ABRASA. (From abrado, to shave off'.)
Ulcers attended with abrasion of part of
their substance.

ABRASION, fAbrasio, from abrado, to
tear off.) This word is generally employed
to signify the destruction of the natural
mucus of any part, as the stomach, intes-
tines, urinary bladder, &c. It is also applied
to^any part slightly torn away by attrition,
as the skin, &c.

ABRATHAN. Corrupted from abrotanum,
southernwood. See Jlbroiannm.

ABRETTE. See Abelmoschus.

ABHIC. An absoiete Arabic term for sul-
phur.

ABROMA. (From at, neg. et /?/<*, food ;
i. e. not fit to be eaten.) A tree of New
South Wales, which yields a gum

ABROTANUM. (A%CT*VOV, from *, neg.
and /Sgorof, mortal; because it never de-
cays : or from etCgo?, soft, and vovoc, exten-
sion ; from the delicacy of its texture.)
Common southernwood. Abrotanum mas.

Artemisia fry,ticosa t of Linnaeus '.Joins
setaceis rainosissimis. Class, Syngenesia.
Order, Polygamia snperflua. A plant pos-
sessed of a strong and, to most people, an
agreeable smell ; a pungent, bitter, nnd
somewhat nauseous taste. It is supposed to
stimulate the whole system, but more par-
ticularly the uterus. It is very rarely
used unless by way of fomentation, with
which intention the leaves are directed.

ABROTANUM MAS. See abrotanum.

ABROTONITES. (From abrotannm.} A wine
mentioned by Diosc.>r;des, impregnated
with abrotanum^ or southernwood, in the
proportion of about one hundred ounces of
the dried leaves, to about seven gallons of
must.

ABSCEDENTIA. (From abscedo, to sepa-
rate.) Decayed parts of the body, which,
in a morbid state, are separated from the
sound.

ABSCESS. (From abscedo, to depart;
because parts, which were before contigu-
ous, become separated, or depart from each
other.) Jlbscessio Jlbscessus. Imposthuma.

A collection of pus in the cellular mem-
brane, or in the viscera, or in bones, prece-
ded by inflammation.

ABSCISSION. (~Abscissio ; from ab, and
tcindo, to cut.) Apocope. The taking away
some morbid, or other part, by an edged
instrument. The abscission of the prepuce
makes what we call circumcision. Abscis-
sion is sometimes used by medical writers
to denote the sudden termination of a dis-
ease in death, before it arrives at its decline.
Celsus frequently uses the term abscissa
^ox to express a loss of voice.



ABSINTHIUM. (A>9/ov," from *, neg.
and 4*v6c?, pleasant : so called from the dis-
agreeabieness of the taste.) A genus of
plants in the Lmnxan system. Class, Syn~
genesia. Order, Polygamia sttperflua. Worm-
wood.

ABSINTHIUM COMMUNE. See Absinthium
vulgare

ABSINTHIUM MARITIMUM. Sea wormwood,
falsely culled in our markets, Roman worm-
wood. Artemisia maritime,.

Absinthium Ponticum of Linnaeus :foJiis
multipart iti a, tomentosis racemis cernuis Jlos-
culis faemineis ternis. This plant grows
plentifully about the sea-shore, and in salt
marshes. The specific differences between
it and the common wormwood, absinthium
vulgare, are. very evident. Its taste and
smell are considerably less unpleasant than
those of the common wormwood, and even
the essential oil, which contains the whole
of its flavour concentrated, is somewhat
less ungrateful, and the watery extract
somewhat less bitter than those of the com-
mon wormwood. Hence it is preferred, in
those cases where the Artemisia absinthium
is supposed to be too unpleasant for the
stomach. A conserve of the tops of this
plant is directed by the London Pharma-
copoeia.

ABSINTHIUM PONTICUM. See Absinthium
Maritimum

ABSINTHIUM VULGARE. Common worm-
wood. Falsely called in our markets Absin-
thium Komanum, or Roman wormwood. Ah-
sinth'inn Ponticum of Discorides and Pliny,
Murray.

Artemisia Absinthium of Linnaeus : -foliis
compositis multijidis^floribiis subglobosis pen-
dutis : receptaculo mUoso. Clas;?, Syngenum.
Order, Polygamia super flua. This plant is
a native of Britain, and grows about rub-
bish, rocks, and sides of roads. The leaves
of wormwood have a strong disagreeable
smell : their taste is nauseous, and so in-
tensely bitter as to be proverbial. The
flowers are more aromatic and less bitter
than the leaves, and the roots discover an
aromatic warmth, without bitterness. This
species of wormwood may be considered
the principal of the herbaceous bitters. Its
virtus, in the words of Bergins, is antipu-
tredinosa, antacida, anthelminthica, resol-
vens, tonica, spasmodioa. And although it
is now chiefly employed with a view to the
two last-mentioned qualities, yet we are
told of its good effects in a great variety of
diseases, as intermittent fevers, hypochon-
driasis, obstructions of the liver and spleen,
gout, calculi, scurvy, dropsy, worms, &c.
See Woodville's Medical Botany. Cullen
thinks it is possessed of a narcotic power,
and that there is in every bitter, when
largely employed, a power of destroying the
sensibility and irritability of the nervous
power.

Externally, wormwood is used in discti-



ABS



ACA



tient and antiseptic fomentations. This
plant may be taken in powder, but it is
more commonly preferred in infusion. The
Edinburgh Pharmacopoeia directs a tincture
of the flowers, which is, in the opinion of
Dr. Cull en, a light and agreeable bitter,
and, at the same time, a strong impregna-
tion of the wormwood.

Jlbsorbing vessels. See Absorbents.

ABSORBENTS. Absorbentia.

1. Small, delicate, transparent vessels,
which take up any fluid from the surface
of the body, or of any cavity in it, and
carry it to the thoracic duct, to be mixed
with the blood. They are denominated



Online LibraryRobert HooperA new medical dictionary: containing an explanation of the terms in anatomy ... and the various branches of natural philosophy connected with medicine → online text (page 1 of 182)