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write with his left hand.

" Eighteenth. — We set off again to visit
the out-gangs, but it came on so stormy and
wet, that before we had gone far we put back.
About noon I walked over several parts of (he
settlement, and conversed with many of the
prisoners. The man who lost his arm said,
that when he was awakened, and in imminent
danger from this accident, and the Lord found
him, when he sought Him not, so strongly did
he feel his own desperate wickedness, that he
could entertain no hope, until he was reminded
by William Schofield, [a Wesleyan mission-
ary stationed here,] of the mercy extended to
Manasseth, Solomon, IMary Magdalene, and
others of similar character. He said he had
been guilty of house-breaking, and many other



203

crimes, for which he had been three times
sentenced to the settlement; that the gallows
was no terror to him, and that he was so har-
dened that he did whatsoever he wished, in
defiance of the laws of God and man, till the
Lord visited him, and brought him low by
this accident. This man now ranks amongst
those, who, having been forgiven much, love
much. The alteration in his conduct is
noticed by all around him: the commandant
says his very voice is changed ; formerly it
was ferocious, now it is mild ; formerly he
was contentious, and addicted to fighting, now
he is gentle and peaceable ; formerly he was
so given to swearing, and the habit of it had
such i)o\vcr over him, he had to lay his hand
upon his month, that he might not swear;
now he is to be found warning others against
this sin. The men who have turned from
their evil ways, are allowed to sit in the room
Used for the adult school, in order that they
may not be disturbed in reading and medita-
tion, by those who still leniain in fully, and
would be disposed to deride them ; and this
man, on account of his infirmity, is also allow-
ed to retire alone to one of the caves which
are formed in the base of the island, to medi-
tate and pray. Though he has lost an arm
close to the body, he is not idle, but employs
bin self in carrying wood for fuel, after it is
landed from the boat. I invited him to show
me his cave : he readily consented, and led
me down a sleep and slippery path at the back
of the island, and near to the place where J.
Thomas was killed a few days ago. The cave
was damp on one tide, and had a honey-comb-
like incrustation upon it ; its sloping roof was
dry, a few old palings formed its loose floor,
and a cold wind blew through it from a small
opening at its farther extremity. I could not
stand upright in it, but entered by stooping ;
he followed, and we sat down upon its floor,
and conversed for a while on the mercy of
God to sinners, in sending his Son into the
world to save them, and in calling them by his
Spirit to come unto Him. After spending
a little time in this cold and forlorn place, so
much prized by its occupant, and in which he
compares his privilege, (to use his own words,)
in being allowed to meditate in quiet, and to
wait for the Spirit's influence, with the priva-
tions of those who in former ages wandered
in sheep-skins and goat-skins, in deserts and
mountains, and in dens, and caves of the earth,
being destitute, afflicted, tormented, we kneel-
ed down before the Lord, whilst I prayed for
this ' brand snatched from the burning,' as
well as for myself; and when I ceased, he
prolonged the voice of supplication, ascribing
glory, honour, and praise to Him that liveth
forever and ever, who in the riches of His
mercy had called him out of darkness into His
marvellous light, and translated him from the
kingdom of salan, into the kingdom of His
own beloved Son. In the course of conversa-
tion, this monument of Divine mercy desired
that I would tell audacious sinners of the
mercy that God had shown unto him ; and that
he found such comfort and pleasure in right-
eousness, as he never could have thought of
whilst he remained in sin. When he became
awakened, he found himself in ignorance as



204



THE FRIEND.



well as in sin : since that time he had learned



The follorcing linrs are eaid to have been composed by
the Princess Amelia, daughter of George Third,
ehoitly before her death.

Unthinking, idle, wild, and younj,
I laupli'd, and danc'd, and talli'd and sung ;
And proud of lieullh, of freedom vain,
Drcani'd not of sorrow, care, or pain ;
Concluding, in those hours of glee.
That all the world was made for me.

But when the hour of trial came.

When sickness shook this trembling frame,

When folly's gay pursuits were o'er.

And I could dance and sing no more.

It then oceurr'd, how sad 'twould be

Were this world only made lor nic.



The late gales on the coast of Great Britain
and France, during a period of si.K weeks,
produced a loss of property, in ships and
cargoes, belonging to England, of about
I,000,OOOZ., and about 500 human lives.



THE FRIEND.



THIRD MONTH, 25, 1843.



The Comet whose appearance was briefly
noticed last week, continues to display its
radiations, with more or less intensity, accord-
ing to the state of the atmosphere, every star-
light evening. The following additional
account will interest our readers, the more so
as coming from the quarter it does :
To the Editors of the North American.

Havekford School, 3d Mo., 9(h, 1843.

There can be no doubt that a comet, second
only in splendor to the memorable one of 1680,
is now witiiin the limits, or in the vicinity of
our system. As this unusual visiter appears
not to have been very generally seen in this
part of the country, perhaps the following
brief statement of observations made at this
place on the evenings of the 6th and 7th inst.
may not be wholly uninteresting.

The comet, or rather its tail, was first
observed hereon the evening of the 6th by one
of the students. Its appearance then was that
of a luminous train, making an acute angle
witii the horizon, and intersecting it about 15
degrees south of west. It continued visible
for about an hour, and then rapidly vanished
from sight. This somewhat sudden disap-
pearance, which occurred about 8 o'clock, is
easily accounted for from the oblique position
of the train, bringing the fainter portions
towards the extremity, within tlie mists of the
horizon, soon after the brighter parts nearer
the nucleus had descended below it. Very
little doubt was entertained as to the real char-
acter of this phenomenon, yet as a partial
display of auroral light occurred later in the
evening, it was suggested that possibly some
connection might exist between the two
appearances, and therefore the return of the
strange visiter on the following evening was
awaited with much anxiety. On the evening
of the 7th, the sun descended in a cloudless



sky, and about twenty minutes after, the train
began to be visible, gradually increasing in
brilliancy until 7 o'clock, when it presented a
most beautiful appearance.

The elevation of the extremity of the tail
was now ascertained to be 20 degrees, the
length to the horizon 37 degrees, the inclina-
tion with the horizon about 33 degrees, and
the general breadth by estimation, 1 degree.
The point of intersection with the horizon was
observed to move rapidly towards the south,
as would of course be expected. It may be
well to mention for comparison on a future
occasion, that the conspicuous starSirius was
exactly in the direction of the train produced.'
Samuel J. Gommere. [

WEST TOWN SCHOOL.

The Committee to superintend the Board-
ing School at West Town, will meet there, on
Sixth-day, the seventh of next month, at ten
o'clock, A. M. I

The Committee on Instruction meet the]
preceding evening, at half past seven o'clock.

The Senii-Annual Exan)ination is to com-
mence on Third-day morning of the same
week, and to continue till Fifth-day evening.
The scholars to disperse as usual on Sixth and
Seventh-days.

Thomas Kimbee, Clerk, j

Philada., 3d Mo., 25th, 1843. i



street, and No. 56 Chestnut street; Benjamin
Albertson, No. 45 North Sixth street, and
No. 19 High street.

Visiting Managers for the Month George

R. Smith, No. 487 Arch street; George G.
Williams, No. 61 Marshall street ; Benjamin
H. Warder, No. 179 Vine street.

Superintendents. — John C. and Lxtitia
Redmond.

Attending Physician. — Dr. Charles Evans,
No. 201 Arch street.

Resident Physician. — Dr. Joshua H.
Worthiiii'ton.



A staled annual meeting of the " Bible
Association of Friends in America," will
be held in the Committee-room, Mulberry
Street Meeting-house, on the evening of Se-
cond-day, the I7th of Fourth month, at eight
o'clock.



Samuel Bettle, Jr., Sec'ry.



Mahried, at Friends' Mccetinjr, Goose Creek, Lou-
don county, Va., on Fifth day, the 9lh of Second mo.
lai^t, JosKPH N. JoLLiFFE, of Hopcwcll, Frederick coun-
ty, Va., to Sarah E. Janney, of the former place.

, at Friends' Meeting-house, Twelfth street,

Pl)iladelphia, on the 1st inst., EnwARD Bell, of White-
marsh, to Elizabeth Smith, daughter of Daniel B.
Smith, of the former place.



FRIENDS' ASYLUM. I Pied, at Ne

Committee on Admissions. — John G. Hos-



d, Ma



Bed ft

of Second month, Basheb.i

Bli.'^s, aged 28 years; a ni

kins. No. 60 Franklin street, and No. 50 tjcular Meeting. During



North Fourth street, up stairs; Isaiah Hack- sumption, she
er. No. 112 south Third street, and No. 32 "f God, through

and Wii^ a striki



?s., onThird-daT,lhe2Ist
. Bi.i-s, wife ofSamuel S.
bcr of New Bedford Par-
protracted illness of eon-



fested a confiding (rust in the mercy
s dear Son, Christ Jesus, our Lord,

/-.t , , . . o I i> ..I • TvT .^o ano was a siriuniK example of patience and resignation

Chestnut street; Samuel Belt e, ir., No. 73 , ,, ^i- . .,,^, . ■; ■\. „, „ „, „f f „, ,•

' J f,,^ c. 1 T- to the Divme will, rejoicing m the prospect ot her dis-

INorth lenth street, and 26 bouth front s„|u(i„n_ pvineing that death was divested of its terrors,

street ; Charles Ellis, No. 95 South Eighth and the grave its victory.

PRICES OF BIBLES AND TESTAMENTS REDUCED.

isnciation of Friends in America, have concluded to reduce the prices of nearly
which are now sold at the rates following : —

of Friends in Atnerica, — Depository No. 50 North Fourth street, up stairs, Philadelphia.

Prices of Bibles and Testaments.





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WATER BAPTISM.

(Continued from page 300.)

1st. To suppose that the infant church
should (according to promise,) be ushered
into the full enjoyment of the spirituality of
the gospel kingdom, and then be immediately
led back into the dispensation of figures, to
feed upon the shadow mstead of the substance,
is a supposition at war with tlie nature of the
Christian religion. The genius of the Jewish
religion was to worship God through a system
of figures that veiled the glories of the inner
temple, into which none were admitted save
the high priest, and he but once a year. At
the moment Jesus gave up the ghost, that veil
was rent asunder ; and now, says the apostle,
Heb. X. 19, " We have liberty to enter into
the holiest by the blood of Jesus, and there
worship God in spirit and in truth, in a new
and living way."

2d. 'I'he apostle Peter's e.fposition of Joel's
prophecy, puts this matter to rest. The Jews,
together with the strangers, who assembled in
multitudes on the day of Pentecost to see what
was the matter, began to e.tpress their amaze-
ment as to the cause of those extraordinary
movements that accompanied the outpouring
of the Spirit on that occasion, and some even
conjectured that these men were filled with
new wine. The apostle commenced at once
undeceiving them, by observing that " these
men were not drunken, as they supposed, but
that this was that which was spoken by the
prophet Joel ; and it shall come to pa.ss in the
last days, (the last dispensation,) saith God, 1
will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh ;" not
upon the disciples who were present on that
occasion, and the few who assembled at the
house of Cornelius only, but " upon all flesh ;"
and so far was this outpouring of the Spirit
from being limited to the few that were pre-
sent on those occasions, that the apostle says,
" the promise is to you and your children;"
(their offspring after them,) and not only those
who were present, but to all those who were
afar off. So much for the idea that the Holy
Ghost fulfilled its mission of baptism on those
two occasions, and then ceased its baptising
office in the church.

But we are not done with this view of the
subject yet. We purpose showing under our
ne.xt head, that the baptising influence of the
Holy Ghost is just as necessary in the Chris-
tian church at this day, as it was on the day of
Pentecost or on any other day. In the mean-
time we will bring forward one more te.xt to
prove that the baptism of the Holy Ghost is
the one gospel baptism. Paul says, 1st Cor.
xii. 12, " For by one spirit," (not by one
water,) are we all baptised into one body."
There the apostle makes use of the term body,
meaning the church of Christ ; " A spiritual
house made up of living stones," or as the apos-
tle Peter has it, 1st Pet. ii. .5," Ye also as lively
stones are built up a spiritual house." VVe
now ask, is this the case in reference to water
baptism ? Are the members of the Christian
church all baptized into one body by water?
Alas ! brethren, instead of this being the case,
water baptism has been the fruitful source of



THE FRIEND.



much division in the church, both as respects
its mode and subject, more particularly the
former. While some contend for sprinkling,
others contend for pouring, and others again
for immersion ; and while some put the sub-
ject into the water on their back, others put
them in face foremost: and while some are
content with giving the subject one dip, others
give them a dip for each member of the tii-
nity ; and yet another sect, we are informed,
taking the passage in reference to Philip and
the eunuch literally, both the administrator
and the subject go under the water together.
Again, while some consider infants as proper
subjects of baptism', others contend that none
but adult believers ought to be admitted as
subjects of this ordinance ; and so tenacious
are some of those divisions in behalf of their
own views, that they proscribe the members
of all other branches of the church from a
participation with them at the Lord's table ;
nor will they admit any to church membership
with ihem, but such as enter through this
rite. Is this a baptism that unites the mem-
bers of Christ into one body 1

9d. We come now to the third head, viz. :

That the Baptism of the Holy Ghost is the
only iiaving Baptism.

Much has been said and written on this
subject by those who believe water baptism
to be an ordinance of the gospel, commanded
by Jesus Christ. Some have advocated it as
a saving ordinance, among whom are the Ro-
manists, and if I am not mistaken, the Camp-
bellite baptists; at all events, to be born of
water is with them indispensable. They,
together with some of the clergy of the high
church of England, call it regeneration, and
of course consider it an ordinance, without
which salvation is almost, if not altogether
impossible. VVe will not undertake to say
that any sect or denomination of Christians
entirely exclude the influences of the Spirit
from accompanying the administration of
water baptism ; but it is evident that they do
not admit that any can enter Christ's spiritual
kingdom unless baptized with water, and thus
cut of!" the Quaker church at a stroke — and if
immersion be the only right mode, the pedo-
baptist churches also.

We have made these introductory remarks
for the purpose of showing, that the advocates
of water baptism have not agreed among
themselves whether to consider it a saving
ordinance or not. In reference to ourself, we
have no faith in it, save as an initiating rile :
the performance or non-performance of which
has nothing to do with our final salvation, any
more than circumcision among the Jews had
to do with their final salvation, since the
apostle has told us that he is not a Jew that
is one outwardly, neither is that circumcision
which is outward in the flesh ; but he is a
Jew that is one inwardly, and circumcision is
that of the heart, in the spirit, and not in the
letter.

So we say he is not a Christian that is one
outwardly, neither is that baptism which is
outward on the body; but he is a Christian
who is one inwardly, and baptism is that of
the heart, in the spirit, and not in the letter.



^ 205

We will now attend to those Scriptures that
prove the baptism of the Holy Ghost to be the
only baptism that is saving.

The first passage we shall notice is 1st Pet.
iii. 21, where, speaking of Noah and his
family being saved by water, he calls it " a
figure of the baptism that now saves us." If
the apostle meant water, both in the figure and
the thing prefigured, then water baptism is a
saving ordinance, for the apostle calls it " the
baptism that now saves us." But if the anti-
type be the baptism of the Holy Ghost, then
our conclusion stands uncontradicted, viz.,



[that the baptism of the Holy Ghost is the
lone saving baptism. The text we have chosen
for our motto, involves the very same view;
llio apostle there say.s, " he saved us by the
washing of regeneration." If the apostle
meant water baptism, then it is a saving or-
dinance, for the apostle says, " By it he saved
us ;" but if the term regeneration means what
we have said it does in our explanatory re-
marks, then the washing of regeneration in
our text means the cleansing of the soul from
moral pollution by the baptism of the Holy
Ghost, and its being again begotten and born
of God. Those two passages are conclusive,
and would need no comment, were it not that
the prejudice of education leads so many to
think that wherever baptism is spoken of it
means water baptism, unless accompanied
with the term Holy Ghost, or Holy Spirit.
That the Apostle Peter in this passage uses
water baptism as a figure of the baptism of
the Holy Ghost, is evident from several con-
siderations :

1st. He " calls it a figure of the baptism
which now saves us." If he means water
baptism both in the figure and the thing
figured, then he makes use of one figure to
represent another, which would be a manifest
abuse of all figurative language, because all
figures are intended to represent realities, and
not one shadow to typify another ; for it must
be admitted on all hands, that water baptism,
at best, is nothing more than an outward and
visible sign of inward and spiritual washing.
An inquiry may arise in the minds of some
as to how the salvation of Noah and his family,
in the ark, could be a figure of spiritual bap- •
tism? — We will answer this query after ask-
ing how it could possibly be a figure of im-
mersion, or any other modes? Noah and his
family were not immersed in the waters of
the flood ; it was the wicked inhabitants of the
old world that were immersed, while Noah
and his family floated above the water. What
kind of an immersion would you call it, gentle
reader, suppose you saw an adn)inistrator of
water baptism, take his subjects aboard of a
boat, and float them on the water for a given
lime, and then land them on dry land? would
you call that immersion ? Or suppose you .saw
them taken aboard a covered boat that re-
mained where it was built, until a heavy show-
er of rain should float it? would you call this
immersion ? or would you not rather call it
sprinkling, or pouring? To us it would ap-
pear a strange representation of any of the
present modes of baptism, when not a drop of
water in either case touched the subjects of
this baptism.



206

But let us now see how this baptism of Noah
and his family, represents the baptism of the
Holy Ghost.

1st. The wicked inhabitants of the old
world represent the carnal mind that is en-
mity against God, not being subject to his
law.

2d. The water of the flood that swept away
the ungodly race, represents the washing of
regeneration; the destruction of the carnal
mind by the baptizing eflicacy of the Holy
Ghost.

tid. The ark, represents Jesus Christ the
author of the baptism of the Holy Ghost, who
is called the ark of safety.

4th. Noah and his family, from whom a
new generation was to spring, who should no
more be destroyed by a flood, represent the
new man, who by the baptism of the Holy
Ghost, is renewed in knowledge after the
image of him who created him.

This explication of I lie figure has a parallel
in 1 Cor. x. 1 and 2 ; " Moreover, brethren,
1 would not that ye should be ignorant how
that all our fathers were under the cloud, and
all passed through the sea, and were all bap-
tized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea."
It is not a little amusing to see how the advo-
cates of both sprinkling and immersion, strain
this passage to make it a figure of their re-
spective modes of baptism ! We have already
shown that it is an abuse of all figures to sup-
pose that one is presented to typify another.
We cease to wonder that Israel should remain
with the vail on their hearts in the reading of
Moses, when the Christian ministry of the
nineteenth century is put to their shifts to
understand a passage of Scripture that is writ-
ten as with a sunbeam. Campbell in

his debate with McCalla, supposes that

whereas the Israelites had a wall of water on
each side, and a cloud over their heads, they
were of course immersed. On the other hand,

McCalla is equally confident that there

was no immersion in the case, except with the
Egyptians, who were overwhelmed in the
depth of the sea ; yet supposes they were
somehow baptized either by atfusion or sprink-
ling; had the cloud afforded rain,

McCalla would have had the best of the argu-
ment; but as it is, their suppositions are
equally groundless. How could the Israelites'
baptism in the cloud and in the sea be a figure
of any of the modes of baptism now in use
since not one drop of water touched the bodies
of the Israelites? but let us suppose, for a mo-
ment, that the baptism of the Israelites unto
Moses in the cloud and in the sea was a fis
of the saving baptism of the Holy Ghost,
whereby the spiritual seed of Abraham are
baptized unto Jesus Christ as his natural
descendants were unto Moses, how would the
analogy then stand :

We say it would stand as follows : —
1st. The children of Israel, while in Egyp-
tian bondage, represented the condition of
Adam's falfen family under the bondage of
sin.

2d. Moses, unto whom they were baptized,
and who led them out of Egyptian bondage,
represents Jesus Christ who leads his people
out of spiritual bondage.



THE FKIEND.



3d. The Egyptians, to whom Israel were in
bondage, are a representation of the carnal
mind into which all are in bondage, until re-
deemed by Jesus Christ.

4th. The cloud, and the sea, while they
were the instruments of the destruction of
Israel's enemies, were the instruments of Is-
rael's salvation. This baptism in the cloud, and



Online LibraryRobert SmithThe Friend : a religious and literary journal (Volume 16) → online text (page 76 of 154)