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0mtuatta,



OR



HORYE OTIOSIORES.



Wi Pople, Pri7iteri
67, Chancery Lane,






(Pmmana,



OR



HOR.E OTIOSIORES



VOL. T.



LONDON:

PRINTED FOR LONGMAX, HURST, REES, ORME, AN»
BaOWJV, PATERNOSTER ROW,

1812.



3

>7



o



ip






• ?•••• • ••



CONTENTS



OF



THE FIRST VOLUME.



1 Mirrors

2 Etymology of Dunce

3 Plum Pudding

4 Medical Poets

5 Taudry Lace

6 The Camel add the Needle

7 Citoyenne •

8 Cauda Diaboli

9 Methodist Camp Meetings

10 Law of the Mozcas *

11 Inferiority of Women

12 Steam Engines ,

13 Aristotle . •

14 Arrow-headed letters

15 Three methodsof lesseningthe number of rate



Page

1

6

6

8

ib,

9

13

ib.

13

21

29

23

ib.

2&



IT


CONTENTS.


16


Translations . . *


17


Hell , . ..-■-..,


18


Transplanting Trees. . ,


19


St. Andrew's Cross , .


20


Clock-Mill


21


Locke . •


22


Hans Engelbrecht .


23


Effect of Music upon animals .


24


Dogs ,


25


St. Romuald . . .


26


Touching for the Evil ,


27


The Oak of Mamre . .


28


Invention for the blind


29


Words and Symbols .


30


Stilling the Sea with Oil


SI


An heptastic Vocable


32


Service for Prisoners . .


33


Mode of ventilating a Town •


34


Melancholy


35


Mosquitoes t


36


Coup de soleil . .


37


Anthony Purver . •


38


The Composition of Body in receiving .


39


Fr. Domenico Ottomano


40


Menageries , . ,


41


Juan de Esquivel Navarro


42


The Virgin Mary's Milk


43


Omar 11. .


44


Tomb-flies


45


Thomas O'Brien Mac Mahon ,





CONTENTS.


r

Pag*


46


Solan Geese • . •


79


4T


Hole's Arthur . • «


83


48


Poetical Moods and Tenses


85


49


Garden at Banstead • •


80


50


Foot-Racing 1 . •


88


61


Queen Mary's Funeral


89


52


Bunjan's Holy War • •


90


53


A Dual Giant . • i


ib.


54


Henrietta Maria


91


55


The worst of all Pum . •


93


56


Poem attributed to Sir Walter Ralegh .


94


67


Steel Mirrors for assisting the Sight «


99


58


Classification of Novels


101


59


Crocodile . •


ib.


CO


Small Wit .


103


61


Grapes in Madagascar


104


62


Kit hard Flrcknoe • . <


105


63


Defence of Popery . • «


110


64


The Wafer


113


65


Motteux -


119


66


Public Accommodations


ib.


67


Catholic Devotion to the "Virgin


123


68


Cupid and Psyche


128


69


Writing Tables


132


70


Lions of Romance . $


134


71


Cortes .


138


72


C coa Cordage


141


73


Odour of Sanctity .


ib.


74


Mexican Tennis


144


75


Amau'u and Esplandiaa


145



Yl


CONTENTS*


70


The Gossamer


77


Ships' Names . . «


78


Stationers in Spain . •


79


Sindbad ,


80


Nebuchadnezzar .


81


Omens . . • ,


82


Munchausen


83


Cold Bathing in Feveri


84


Payment of a Copyer of Books


85


Animals in Paradise


86


Glover's Leonidas .


87


*The French Decade


88


Labrador.


89


• RideandTie . . .


90


* Jeremy Taylor « , .


91


* Criticism « . .


92


♦Public Instruction «


93


Tractors .


94


Blackguard . • ,


95


Frith the Martyr . $


98


Tostatus ,


97


♦Picturesque words ,


98


•Meteorolithes


99


Meditation and Contemplation «


100


Parchment Book-coven . ,


101


The Carpenter Bird


102


* Toleration


103


*War .


104


Bishop Kenn . , >



* The articles marked thus are by a different writer,





fONTBNT^




Page


105


•Parodies . 4





208


106


•M. Dnpuis • .


,


209


10T


Hereticks of the early agei .


.


211


108


The Needle . *


,


213


109


•Origin of the Worship of Hymen


1


215


110


•Egotism


.


216


HI


•Cap of Liberty


;


217


112


Ablactation,— as our old Dictionaries call it 218


113


•Bulls .


.


219


114


•Wise Ignorance .


.


221


115


Change of Climate •


.


222


116


Gift of Tongues . .


«


226


117


• Rouge . . .


i


227


US


•E-ari* Trrtfwrcc, i. e Hasty Words


.


228


119


•Motives and Impulses


.


ib.


120


♦Inward Blindness


.


231


121


•The Vices of Slaves no excuse for Slavery 232


122


•Circulation of the Blo<>d


.


234


123


•Periturae parcere chartae •


.


236


124


•To have and to be . .


.


237


125


♦Party i'assiou .




238


126


•Goodness of Heart indispensable


to a






man of genius .


»


239


127


•Milton and Ben Jonson





IN


128


♦Statistics , •


.


240


129


♦Magnanimity


.


ib.


130


Cliristianus 1'ranciscus Paullinus





245


131


Sindbad




248


132


Mostansir Billah . •


»


249


133


Bishop Berkely • g


.


2il



"V11J


CONTENTS*


fag$


134


Government of Norcia •


251


135


Early English Metre


253


136


Trpilusand Creseide


255


137


Miraculous Combustion of wood withoi


it




ashes, and oil without smoke


25ft


138


Two Modes of Atheism


263


139


Sea-fires . . ,


263


140


Ground- fires


266


141


Dey


269


142


The Night M*re .


270


143


Sects in Egypt . .


271


144


The Squid-hound .- .


273


145


The Stigmata


274


146


Tree of L fe


276


147


Teut2<lius . .


283


148


Mayor. Merino . .


28T


149


He shall set the Sheep on his right haru


k




but the Goats on his left. Matt. xxv.


S3. 289


150


Do^s at Court . .


293


151


Feasts . , . .


294


152


Goldsmith • «


29ft


15J


Aq-ia Vitae


ib.


154


Torrid Zone .


298


155


* Negroes and Narcissuses . ,


304


156


* An anecdote , «


ib.


157


*The Pharos at Alexandria .


ib.


158


B "an! foinni'in S nse .


305


159


♦Tob-ration


303


160


•Hini o: a new Species of iiistory


313


161


itabbinical ^egend , . ,


322





CONTENTS.


IX

Page


165


St. Vitus


325


163


Burial Grounds • . < .


328


164


Image Worship . • •


330


165


Effect of Domestication upon the Skin






and Tendons of Animals


331


166


Filtering Apparatus « •


332


167


Palestine . , .


333


168


Earth Bathing » *


23*



OMNIANA.



1. Mirrors.
Pope Innocent X. appointed a religion-
er of great virtue, discretion, and experi-
ence, secretly to visit the nunneries, and
inspect not merely their general disci-
pline, but look at the separate cells, and
persuade the nuns to discard every tiling
that was not perfectly consistent with
the state which they had embraced. After
some months had been employed in this
commission, the visitor made his report
to his holiness. He returned, he said,
greatly edified with what he had seen,
but not altogether satisfied j edified, be-

YOL.l. B



2 OMNI ANA.

cause he bad found such penances, such
lasting, such discipling, such cilices, such
praying and devotions, that it had been
necessary for him to moderate the excess
of the sisters in these things, and to check
their ardour. Edified also, because, hav-
ing found in the cells some articles of
furniture more costly, or of better kind
than suited with religious poverty and
simplicity, he had succeeded, notwith-
standing some repugnance on the part of
the nuns, in persuading them to part
with all these things, . . except one. And
because he had not been able to make
them part with that one from their walls,
and still more from their affections (except
in a very few rare instances) he was not
altogether satisfied with the success of
his commission. And what was the piece
of furniture, said his holiness. It was
the Looking Glass. Vieyra* heard this
story from Pope Innocent himself, and
Kiade a resolution at the time that he

* Serm. «. 11. p. 284.



OMNIANA. 4

<

would repeat it when next he preached
in a Portugueze nunnery.

Vieyra's rhetoric seems to have beeit
eflicacious. One of the sisters of S.
Clara at Coimbra, seeing herself by ac-
cident in some water, observed that she
had just seen the face of a nun iu that
convent, which she had not seen there
for more than thirty years*. When I
was last at * * a nun made her escape
from the Irish nunnery. The first thing
for which she enquired, when she reach-
ed the house in which she was to be se-
creted till she could be conveyed en
board ship, was a looking glass. She had
entered the convent when only five years
old, and from that time had never seen
her own face. This was not vanity. A
man in the same situation might have
been allowed to interpret yvuh gsuvtqv in
the same manner.

The Hindoo women wear a small mir*

* Manoel da Esperanca, Hist. Serafica. I. 6. c. 24*

b2



4 0MN1ANA.

ror in a ring, — the Chury, Sir William
Jones calls it. We have them in pocket
books; and the ladies at Antwerp had
them set in prayer books, for the purpose
of what old Latimer calls prinking and
pranking at mass. Etiam # in libellis,
quos ad Ecclesiam deprecaturcs adferunt,
specula componant, quibus mnndum mulie-
brem, et phahras mas, ac capellitium inter
fervidas scilicet suas preces adornent.

There was however a degree of mo-
desty in concealing the mirror ; a few
generations earlier it was the fashion to
wear them pendant from the waistf, a
fashion far more probably alluded to by
Tasso, than as his biographer supposes
introduced by him, in his picture of Ri-
naldo.

Dal jianzo de V amante ■, estrav.io amese,
Vn chriitallo pendeaf lucido e netto*

Gier. Lib. Cant. xvi.

* Iheatrum humanae Vitae, quoted by Vieyra, t. 11.
p. 299.

f Des Coures. Cur. of Literature; quoted in Black's
lafe of Tasso. Vol I. p. 3S2.



OMNI AN A. 5

Lope de Vega curses the inventor of
looking glasses —

quanto mat. han hecho espejos vanos !
Muldigu el cielo el inventor primero.

from whence it may be inferred that he
did not, like Zebedee, shave himself.
But he goes on to say, thht if Venetian
mirrors had not been invented, water
would have been applied to the same
purpose.

Mas que inportaran vidros tenecianos
Si el agua supo hazer caso tanjiero.

Hermosura de Angelica, Cant 3.

No poet or romancer with whom I am
acquainted has made so beautiful a use
of the looking glass, as Francisco Botello
in his Alphonso. (Salamanca edition L.
7,lf.£(X) Cydipe is contemplating herself
in one, and by the agency of Venus, the
living portraiture is rendered permanent
in the mirror.

2, Etymology of Dunce,
Dunce is said by Johnson to be a word



6 OMNI ANA.

of unknown etymology. Stanihurst ex-
plains it. The term Duns, from Scotus,
" so famous for his subtili quiddities, he
says, is so trivial and common in all
schools, that whoso surpasseth others
either in cavilling sophistrie, or subtili
philosophic, is forthwith nicknamed a
Duns." This, he tells us in the margin
is the reason, " why schoolmen are called
Dunses." (Description of Ireland, p. 2.)
The word easily past into a term of scorn,
just as a blockhead is called Solomon ;
a bully, a Hector ; and as Moses is the
vulgar name of contempt for a Jew,

3. Plum Pudding.
The English pride themselves upon
their roast beef, their plum pudding,
and their constitution. The roast beef,
where oil cakes have not been introduced,
and there are no Gentlemen-feeders,
is what it always was. But the plum
pudding as well as the constitution, does
not appear to be the same thing which



OMNI AN A. 7

was the boast of our forefathers. The
Chevalier D' Arvieux* made a voyage
in the year 1058 in an English forty gun
ship, and he gives the receipt for making
one. Leur Pudding, says the Chevalier,
etuit deteUuble. C'est un compost de biscuit
pile, ou de farine, de laid, de raisins de
Covin I he, de sel et de poivre, dont on fait
une pate, qn'on enveluppe dans une serviette,
et <fue Von fait cuire dans ie pot avec du
bouillon de la viande ; on la tire de la ser-
viette, et on la met dans unplat, et on rappe
dessus du vieux fromage, qui lui donne une
odeur insupportable. Sans ce fromage la
chose en elle meme nest pas absolument
mauvaise. T. \. p. 154.

* Arveo was the name of his family, v hence (he
JJarve\s of Kngland. The branch from which lie
sprung settled in Provence, and when he appeared at
CMtrt it uas under the name of Arviou. Celte terminal*
son, says P. Labat, parut dure, et on s'accoutuma a ('«/,-
pellrr Arvieu. But when he was sent envoy extraordi-
nary to Constantinople, M. rlc I.ionne, the Secretary of
State, bei tag still dissatisfied with the name, h corrigta
dans ses instructions, en ajoutunt un x a la fin, et MI d
apostrophe au commencement,

I



e OMNI AX A.

4. Medical Poets,
i( Such physicians, says Huarte*, as I
have marked to be good practitioners,
do all piddle somewhat in the art of ver-
sifying, and raise not up their contem-
plation very high, and their verses are
not of any rare excelleneie." If this ob-
servation be true, Dr. Ferriar of Man-
chester has given proof in his pgetry of
his talents for physic.

5. Taudry Lace*
It was formerly the custom in England
for women to wear a necklace of fine silk,
called Taudry Lace, from St. Audrey. She
in her youth had been used to wear car-
kanets of jewels, and being afterward tor-
mented with violent pains in her neck,was
wont to say, that God in his mercy had
thus punished her, and the fiery heat and

jedness of the swelling which she endur-
es

ed was to atone for her former pride and

* Examen de Ingtnios. Engl, trans, p. S2.



OMNtANA. > Q

vanity*. Probably she wore this lace to
conceal the scrofulous appearance, and
from this, when it was afterward worn as
an ornament which was common and not
costly, the word taudry may have been
taken todesignate any kind of coarse and
vulgar finery.

It would not be readily supposed that
Audrey is the same name as Ethelreda.

6. The Camel and the Needle.
Matt. 19. 24.
* It is easier for a camel to pass through
the eye of a needle, than for a rich man
to enter the kingdom of Heaven." Vieyra,
quoting the text in one of his sermons
{t. 10. p, 249.) uses cable instead of camel,
following a plausible but erroneous inter-
pretation. It suited his purpose better
in this place. " What remedy then, says
he, is there for the rich man, that he
may enter Heaven ? I will tell you. Un-

* Cresses Church History, 16. 5. $ 7,
B 5



30 OMNI ANA.

twist the cable, and then thread by thread
it may go through the needle. Christ
Himself has taught how this is to be done,
by saying, sell that thou hast, and give
it unto the poor."

There is a print of the Camel and the
Needle in one of the little books, of
Drexelius, . . if I remember rightly : a man
is beating the beast forward towards a
needle which some unseen hand is hold-
ing down, and though it is big enough
to have been Gargamelle'sstockingneedle,
the camel appears perfectly sensible of
the impossibility of effecting his pas-
sage. That 'Ax^yKoq is to be rendered
camel is proved by three Hebrew adages
which Drusius has collected. Facilius
Eiephas per foramen acus. Non est Ele-
phas qui intret per foramen acus. Forte ex<
Fombodita tu es, ubi traducunt Elephan*
tern per foramen acus. The latter applied
to a liar, the two former, what he calk
Proverbia tv advvars. Hoc adagium, he
*dds, usurpat o qqjv^. Matt. IQ. 24. Mfe



OMNFANA. » 11

hyperbola, Non enim ulwarov divitem in-
troire in regtium ccelorum, sed admodum
difficile. Ibidem pro Elephante Camelus
legifur. Nam K«/xv)Xcq eat Camelus vel
Syro interprete, qui 7M vertit, voce mini-
me ambigua: qua animans, cum notior
sit vulgo in Judcca quam Elephas, libct
suspicari ideo in Elephant i loco positam
esse a Christo. Adagia Ebraica,p. 40.

Many mischievous alterations of Shake-
spere have been proposed, in that spirit
of criticism which would make all the
parts of a metaphor fit in as if they were
dove-tailed. It is of the very essence of
passion to speak in hints and fragments,
and they who censure a figurative ex-
pression as contrary to the principles of
taste, because it may appear abrupt to
iheir conception^ . . may as well maintain
that every rainbow must be a perfect
arch, and that all broken ones violate the
principle of optics,



12 OMNIA N A.

7. Citoijenne.
The vile word Citizeness was coined by
some of our translators in the days of the
French revolution. Gower might have
suggested a more allowable term.

The thirde dale she goth to plaine
With many a worthie citezaine,
And he with many a cirtezeine

/. iff,

Citizen and Ciiizene might perhaps
have been used upon this authority, and
the analogy of hero and heroine. The
word would not be worth a hint were
it not for Madame Roland's writings.

8. Cauda Diaboti.
All painters represent the devil with a
tail and in one of the prints to the Dutch
translation of Bunyan's Holy War, it may
be seen in what manner his breeches
maker accommodates it. Pereant qui
ante nos fiostra dixissent, . . might be said
on this occasion by the author of that
stanza in the Devil's Thoughts, which
describes this convenient tail-hole. But



OMNI AN A. 13

>

though poets and painters agree that he
wears a tail, and that it is in that place
where tails are more appropriate than in
the situation where the barber places
them ; and though many sinners, and still
more saints who have seen him, have no-
ticed this appendage, it is not so generally
known how he came by it. It grew at
his fall, as an outward and visible token
that he had lost the rank of an angel,
and was fallen to the level of a brute.

Vieyra. Serm. t. 11. p. 291

9- Methodist Camp Meetings.
The Rev. Samuel Coats (in the Method-
ist Magazine for May, 1804) gives an ac
count of a Camp-Meeting held about fif
teen miles from Baltimore. It was held in
a forest, in a very retired situation, with
only one blind road leading to it. A
stand was erected in the midst of a piece
of ground containing three or four acres:
and round this, the tents, waggons, carts,
coaches, chairs, horses, &c. were ar-



14 OMNIANA.

ranged in a circle. Fires were kindled
at the front of each tent. The number
of those who encamped on the ground,
was not above two or three hundred,
owing partly to a fear of catching cold ;
partly to f a prejudice which had been
taken up against camp-meetings." On
this account also there were fewer preach-
ers than there would otherwise have
been, there being only about twenty.
But the number of people who attended
on the week days, was from 1000 to 1500,
and more than 5000 on the Sunday.

A horn was blown in the morning to
collect the people to a general prayer
meeting at eight o'clock. This lasted till
ten, and then preaching began. The
same order was observed in the after-
noon ; one sermon was preached at each
time, and two or three exhortations deli-
\ered. " During this time, (says Mr*
Coats) the minds of the people were affect-
ed in a most extraordinary manner. Many
fell down slain (so to speak) with the sword



OMNIANA. 15

>

of the spipit ; the word of God, and groan-
ed like men dying in the field of battle,
while rivers of tears ran down their
cheeks. A number of souls were quick-
ened and comforted on Saturday and
through the Sabbath : but the most glo-
rious times were on the evening of the
Sabbath, and the Monday following. It
appeared as if nothing could stand before
the word of God. If we only spoke to
any of the bye-standers, they were melt-
ed down like wax before the fire. It seem-
ed as though all oppositions were fled,
and their minds were stript of every plea
except . . . God be merciful to us sinners..
Oh my dear sir, if you had been there,,
you would have been astonished. In one
place you would have seen a poor sinner
leaning with his head against a tree, with
tears running from his eyes like drops of
rain upon the ground, while some went
to him, and pointed to him the Lamb of
God, who taketh away the sins of the
world. In another place you would have



16 0MN1ANA.

observed a whole groupe of people, and
from the midst of them would have heard
the piercing cries of broken hearted pe-
nitents. If you had turned your eyes in
another direction, you would have disco-
vered a grey-headed father and his two
daughters, all down upon their knees to-
gether among the leaves and dirt, crying
upon God to have mercy upon their poor
souls. I could have led you from thence
a little way along a gradual ascent to a
spot highly favoured of Heaven, where
was a tent filled with happy souls to the
number of fourteen or fifteen, who had
either been assured of God's pardoning
mercy, had been more fully renewed
in love, or had received some peculiar
comfort that day. In the meantime,
prayer, which was fervent and unceas-
ing, was so remarkably answered, that if
a mourner only prayed a few minutes for
his own soul, he was generally assured of
his acceptance immediately, and rejoiced
in God his Saviou*. I understand that



OMNIA N A. 17

>

(wo whole waggon loads of people, who
came thither from a distance, returned
home, rejoicing in the love of God.

" This scene continued three days and
nights, with scarcely an hour's intermis-
sion. Not less than 100 persons are sup-
posed to have been convinced ; and I
have no doubt, (saya \ ' I its) but if the
generality of those who were together on
the Sabbath day, had encamped on the
ground, and continued there day and
night, we should have bad many more
brought to God. For these eamp-meel-
ings are the most calculated to free the
mind from the cares of the world, to di-
vest it of pride and selt-love, and to work
upon the tender feelings of the heart, of
any thing I ever saw. The appearance
of the place at night was very solemn >
and at the same time romantic. When
going to the place, a person heard the
preaching, singing, and other exercises
of devotion at some distance off; and
coming by a winding path through a



18 OMNIANA.

(hick wood,, all on a sudden he beheld a-
large congregation of people, and a whole
train of fires all around them ; candles
and Janlhorns hung on the trees in every
direction, and the lofty oaks with their
spreading boughs formed a canopy over
our heads, while every thing conspired
with the solemnity of the night, to make
the place seem aweful. This is only a
faint description."

In the same magazine for February,,
1806, Mr. John Wright describes another
of these meetings, where there were two
methodUt bishops, about 100 preachers,
between 4 and 5000 people, pnd about
S00 waggons, all encamped in the woods
in a square. This meeting lasted four
daj's, and " although the rain began on
Friday evening, and continued, till Sun-
day morning very heavy and without in-
termission, there was no cessation of di-
vine worship :, it continued night and
day, and the sermons, exhortations, and
prayers, says the writer, were the most



OMNI AN A. 19

powerful I ever heard. The power of
God was there, and sinners were cut to
the heart, and fell down under the wovd
like grass before the scythe. There was
no respect of persons, but high and low,
voting and old, were arrested by the
mighty hand of God. Some seemed to
have the most aweful apprehensions, and
were in the greatest distress of any I ever
saw, under a sense of their guilt and a
fear of Hell, whilst others were apparent-
ly lifeless for three or four hours. The
first word they are generally heard to
speak after they are delivered, is ' glory/
and they generally whisper it before they
have strength to speak aloud. Afterwards
they usually call on their wicked compa-
nions, and pray and exhort them to (lee
to Jesus."

Another writer, (Methodist Mag. April
180() ; ) describes the ceremonies at break-
ing vr>. " At seven o'clock, we prepared
for our christian parting, it was usher-
ed in by two of the preachers walking



£0 OMN1ANA.

around the camp, blowing the trumpets :
after this, the preachers all assembled on
the preaching stand, with the congrega-
tion before them. Brother J. Lee spoke
a little upon the occasion. The preach-
ers then fell upon each other's necks and
wept; after which we took leave of the
people, expecting to see many of them
no more, until we meet in our Father's
house. The place was truly a Bochim."
At this Camp there were from 9 to
10,000 persons; and " people of all
descriptions, from the grey-headed,
down to little children, were crying for


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