Roper Lethbridge.

The golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon online

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the year 1242 a.d. The flag of the
family is coloured yellow, with the
motto Sri Rangesh Bhagt Bundesh Ram
Singhe, meamng "Raja Ram Singh,
ruler of Bundi, is a believer in Rag-
hunathji." The State is situated in
that part of Rajputana known as the
Haraoti and Tonk Agency. Its area
is 2300 square miles ; its population
about 254,701, chiefly Hindus, but
with 9477 Muhammadans and 3101
Jains. His Highness was created a
K.C.I.E. on January 1, 1894, and a
K.C.S.I. on January 1, 1897. He
maintains a military force of 446
cavalry, 1835 infantry, and 144 guns,
and is entitled to a salute of 17 guns.
Residence : Bundi, Rajputana.

BUNYAD HASAN, Mir, Khan Bahadur.
The title was conferred on January 1,
1898. Residence : Bara Banki, Oudh.

BURDWAN, Maharaj-Kumar Bijai
Chand Mahtab, Mahdrdj-Kumdr of ;
b. October 19, 1881. Succeeded the
late Maharaja Aftab Chand Mahtab
Bahadur, Maharaja of Burdwan.
Belongs to a Kapur Kshatriya family
of Kotli in Lahore, Punjab, whence
Abu Rai, the founder of the Burdwan
Raj family, migrated to Bengal. Was
adopted by the late Maharaja, and is
the son of Raja Bun Behari Kapur of
Burdwan (q.v.), a scion of the same
family, who is also the guardian and
manager of the large estates of the
young Maharaj-Kumar. Abu Rai
Kapur settled in district Burdwan,
and in 1657 a.d. was appointed Chau-
dhri and Kotwal of Rekabi Bazar, etc.,
under the Fauzdar of Chakld Burdwan.
He was succeeded by Babu Rai, who
owned Pargand Burdwan and three



46



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



other estates, and also succeeded his
father as Chaudhri. Then followed in
succession his son Gyaneshyam Rai,
and his grandson Krishna Rama Rai ;
the latter received & farmdn from the
Emperor Aurangzeb, dated 24th
Rabiwal Akhir, in the thirty-eighth
year of his reign (1695 A.D.), confirming
him as Zamindar and Chaudhri of
Burdwan. Succeeded by his son
Jagat Rama Rai, who received a
similar farmdn from the Emperor
Aurangzeb, dated 5 th Jamadiwal Awol,
in the forty-third year of his reign
(1700 a.d.) ; and again his son, Kirti
Chandra Rai, who succeeded, received
a similar farmdn from the same
Emperor, dated 20th Sawab, in the
forty-eighth year of his reign (1705
a.d.), mentioning him as Zamindar
and Chaudhri of forty-nine Mahals in
Pare/and Burdwan. Kirti Chandra
Rai received a second farmdn from the
Emperor Muhammad Shah, adding
some Mahals, in the year 1736 a.d.
He was succeeded by his son Chitra Sen
Rai, who in the twenty-first year of
the reign of the Emperor Muhammad
Shah (1740 a.d.), received a farmdn
recognizing him as Zamindar of Chakld
Burdwan, and giving him the title of
Raja. He was succeeded by his cousin,
the nephew of Kirti Chandra, Raja
Tilak Chandra Rai ; who received a
sanad from the Emperor Ahmad Shah,
dated 7th Rajab, in the seventh year
of his reign (1753 a.d.), confirming
him as Raja of Burdwan, etc. In 1765
he received another sanad, from the
Emperor Shah Alam, granting an
increase of the Zaminddri, and the
additional title of Bahadur , and about
the same time the same Emperor wrote
him a friendly letter, intimating his
creation as Raja Bahadur, and also as
a Commander of 4000 infantry. To
this, in the official /armom that followed,
was added also the command of 2000
cavalry ; and lastly, in the ninth year
of the Emperor Shah Alam (1768 a.d.),
he received from the Commander-in-
Chief, by order of the Emperor, a, sanad
conferring the title of Maharaja Adhi-
raj, and making him a Commander of
5000 infantry and 3000 cavalry, with
authority for guns, bands, nakara, etc.
He was succeeded by his son, the
Maharaja Tej Chandra Rai, who, in
1771 a.d., received a similar sanad to
the last-named. He was succeeded by



his adopted son, Maharaja Mahtab
Chand, who, in 1833 a.d., received a
farmdn from Lord William Bentinck,
Governor-General, confirming him in
the title of Maharaja Adhiraj Bahadur.
In 1868 he obtained for himself and his
descendants the licence of Her Majesty
to bear the arms and supporters de-
scribed below ; and at the Imperial As-
semblage at Delhi on January 1, 1877,
on the occasion of the Proclamation
of Her Most Gracious Majesty as
Empress of India, he was granted, as
a personal distinction, the right to
receive a salute of 13 guns. He managed
his great estates with so much success
that they became some of the most
prosperous in Bengal ; and at the time
of the Santal Rebellion in 1855, and
again during the troubles of the Mutiny,
the Maharaja did everything in his
power to strengthen the hands of the
Government, by placing elephants and
bullock-carts at the disposal of the
authorities, and by keeping open the
communications in the neighbouring
districts. On his death in 1879 he was
succeeded by his adopted son, the late
Maharaja Aftab Chand Mahtab, who,
on attaining his majority in 1881, was
installed at the Palace, Burdwan, in
all his father's honours and possessions.
He died prematurely in 1888, and was
succeeded by his adopted son, the
present Maharaj-Kumar, who is still a
minor. The family colour is dark blue
with scarlet facings. The arms are
azure, an ancient Hindustani shield
proper, between in chief a crescent
argent and in base two swords in saltire,
points downwards, also proper. The
crest is an iron-gray horse's head,
couped, around the neck a riband azure,
and pendent therefrom an escutcheon
of the last, charged with a lotus-flower
proper. The supporters are, on either
side an iron-gray horse regardant,
around the neck a riband gules, and
pendent therefrom an escutcheon of
the last, charged with a lotus- flower
proper. Residences: The Palace, Burd-
wan, Bengal; Mahtab Manzil, and
Dilaram, and Dar-ul-Bahr (Dilkusha
Gardens), Burdwan ; The Rajbati,
Chinsurah, Bengal; The Rajbati,
Kalna, Bengal; The Aftab House,
Alipur, Calcutta ; The Rosebank, Dar-
jiling; The Retreat, Kurseong, Bengal;
and other residences at Bhagalpur,
Benares, Cawnpur, and Agra.



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



Al



BURHAN-UD-DIN-KHAN, Fakir Say-
yid (of Lahore), Khan Bahadur. The
title is personal, and was conferred on
January 22, 1888. Residence: Bhopal,
Central India.

BTJTA MALL, Rai Bahadur. The title
was conferred on January 1, 1894.
Residence : Lahore, Punjab.

BTJTA SINGH, Rai Bahadur. See Boota.

BTA GALE, Maung, Ahmudan gating
Tazeik-ya Min. The title is personal,
and was conferred on January 1, 1889.
It means " Recipient of the Medal of
Honour for Good Service," and is indi-
cated by the letters A.T.M. after the
name. Residence : Pegu, Burma.

BYRAMJEE DADABHOY, Khan Baha-
dur. See Behramji Dadabhai, Khan
Bahadur.

BYRAMJI SORABJI CARDMASTER,

Khan Saheb. Received the title on
May 21, 1898. Residence: Ahmadnagar,
Bombay.

CALICUT, Raja Kizhakke Kovilagam
Mana Vikrama Bahadur, Zamorin of;
b. 1832. Succeeded to the gadi on the
decease of the late Zamorin, the
Maharaja Sir Mana Vikrama Baha-
dur, K. C.S.I. The present Zamorin
is believed to be the 120th in descent
from the founder of the family, who
derived his title from Cheraman
Perumal, the last Emperor of Malabar.
The tradition is that there were two
youths of the Eradi caste from Pum-
thura, near Erode, who rendered
Cheraman Perumal, the last Emperor
of Malabar, signal service in subduing
the stronghold of an eastern invader,
the Chola King of Choladesh. When
Cheraman Perumal became a Buddhist
in 352 a.d., and retired from political
life, dividing his empire of Malabar
among his eighteen feudatories, it
chanced that these two youths were
absent on a pilgrimage to Benares, so
they were overlooked in the distribu-
tion of territory. At the last moment
they returned, and were presented by
the Emperor with his Imperial sword,
and a small piece of land called Koko-
rikot — whence the modern Calicut —
Cheraman Perumal bidding them win
what more they wanted with the sword.
Accordingly, when Vasco da Gama
arrived at Calicut in 1498, he found
the descendant of one of these youths,



the Zamorin of Calicut, ruling over the
greater part of South Malabar. From
that time the Zamorins were mainly
engaged in wars with the Rajas of
Cochin and their allies, the Portuguese.
The family follows the well-known
Marumaklcatayam law of inheritance,
by which the succession is always to
the offspring of its female members
only ; among these the next eldest
male to the Zamorin is the heir-ap-
parent. In 1766 the then Zamorin,
being beleaguered by Haidar Ali of
Mysore, set fire to his palace, and
voluntarily perished in the flames.
Thenceforward the Zamorins were
(with short intervals of attempts at
rebellion) the subjects of Haidar and
Tippu, until the Calicut territory was
ceded to the English by the treaty with
Tippu in 1792. The late Zamorin was
appointed a Fellow of the Madras
University in 1882, created a Maharaja
Bahadur in 1878, and a Knight Com-
mander of the Most Exalted Order of
the Star of India on May 25, 1892. He
died shortly afterwards, and was suc-
ceeded by the present Zamorin. The
heir-apparent of the Zamorin under
the Marumakkatayam law bears the
interesting courtesy-title of "The
Eralpad." Residence: Calicut, Malabar
District, Madras.

CAMALESHWARI. See Kamaleshwari.

CAMBAY, His Highness Nawab Jafar
Ali Khan Saheb Bahadur, Naxoab of.
A ruling chief; b. in the year 1848.
Succeeded to the gadi June 11, 1880.
Belongs to a Mughal (Shiah Muham-
madan) family, descended from Mirza
Jafar Nizam-ud-daula, who married
the daughter of Momin Khan Dehlami,
agent for Surat and Cambay. The
Nawab at the time of the Treaty of
Bassein in 1802 was Fateh Ali Khan,
who was succeeded by his brother
Bandeh Ali Khan, and the latter by
his nephew, the Nawab Husain Yar
Khan, father of the present Nawab.
The full title of His Highness is Sardar
Nawab Najib-ud-daula, Mumtaz-ul-
Mulk, Munim Khan Bahadur, Dilawar
Jang Dawe Ekbalu, His Highness Jafar
Ali Khan Saheb Bahadur, Nawab of
Cambay. His Highness married in
1876 the Bibi Gauhar Khanum Saheb,
and in 1882 the Bibi Khurshid Jahan
Begum. The area of the State is about



48



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



350 square miles ; its population about
86,000, chiefly Hindus, with about
12,000 Muhammadans. The Nawab
maintains a military force of 36 cavalry,
496 infantry, and 12 guns, and is
entitled to a salute of 11 guns. Resi-
dence : Cambay, Kaira, Bombay.

CANNAN0RE, Ali Raja, Sultan of. See
Musa.

CARSEDJEE. See Kharsedji.

CASHINATH. See Kashi.

CASHMERE, His Highness the Maharaja
Bahadur of. See Jammu and Kash-
mir.

CHADCHAT, Thdlcur of. See Santalpur
and Chadchat, Thdlcur of.

CHAIT. SeeChet.

CHAKUR KHAN toalad AHMAD ALI
KHAN, Mir. The title of Mir has
been continued by the Government for
life. Residence : Shikarpur, Sind.

GHAMBA, His Highness Raja Sham
Singh, Rdjd of. A ruling chief ; b. in
1866. Succeeded to the gadi as a
minor in 1873. Belongs to a Rajput
(Hindu) family, descended from the
Raja Sail, who in very early times
came from Marwar to Chamba. In
1846 the State came into the possession
of the British Government after the
first Sikh war, and a part of it was
made over to the Maharaja Golab
Singh of Jammu and Kashmir. Sub-
sequently, however, by an arrangement
made with the latter in 1847, Chamba
came again entirely under British
control, and it was assigned to the then
Raja, Raja Sri Singh, and his heirs.
On his death in 1870 he was succeeded
by his brother, Raja Gopal Singh, who
abdicated in 1873, and was succeeded
by the present Raja. In 1854 the
sanitarium of Dalhousie was sur-
rendered to the Government by the
Raja of Chamba, in consideration of
the remission of part of the yearly
tribute, and in 1867 the cantonments
of Bakloh and Balun. The area of
the State, which is very mountainous,
being situated in the Himalayas, on
the frontiers of Kashmir, is about 3092
square miles ; its population 115,773,
chiefly Hindus, but including 6859
Muhammadans. The Raja maintains
a military force of 12 cavalry, 200
infantry, and 3 guns, and is entitled



to a salute of 11 guns. Residence :
Chamba, Punjab.

CHAMPA LAL, Seth, Rai Bahadur.
The title was conferred on June 22,

1897. Residence: Beawar, Rajputana.

CHAND MAL, Seth, Rai. The title is
personal, and was conferred on January
1, 1877, on the occasion of the Pro-
clamation of Her Most Gracious
Majesty as Empress of India. Resi-
dence : Ajmir, Rajputana.

CHANDAR SHIKHAR (of Sissaindi),

Rdjd ; b. October 29, 1860. Succeeded
the Raja Kashi Prasad in 1873. Be-
longs to a Tiwari Brahman family, on
whom the title of Raja was conferred
by King Amjad Ali Shah of Oudh, and
it was recognized as hereditary by the
British Government in 1877. Raja
Kashi Prasad was consistently loyal
during the Mutiny, and gave great
assistance to British officers. He was
specially mentioned in Lord Canning's
Proclamation of March 1858 as one of
the six loyal Oudh Talukdars, and was
granted large estates as a reward.
Residence: Sissaindi, Lucknow, Oudh.

CHANDASINGH KANSINGH SHA-
HANI, Rao Bahadur. The title is
personal, and was conferred on May
20, 1890. Residence: Hyderabad,
Sind.

CHANDRA KANTA TARKALANKAR,

Mahdmahopddkydya. The title is
personal, and was conferred on Feb-
ruary 16, 1887, in recognition of emin-
ence in oriental learning. Residence :
Mymensingh, Bengal.

CHANDRA KUMAR DUTT (or Datta),

Rai Bahadur. Received the title on
June 3, 1899. Residence: Bakarganj,
Bengal.

CHANDRA KUMAR RAI, Rai Bahadur.
Received the title on January 1, 1898.
Is Zamindar of Dalai Bazar. Residence :
Dalai Bazar, Noakhali, Bengal.

CHANDRA NATH MITTRA, Rai Baha-
dur. Received the title on January 1,

1898. Was formerly Superintendent
of the Government Press, Lahore.
Residence : Lahore, Punjab.

CHANDRA SIKHAR SINHA HARI
CHANDANA MAHAPATRA SAMA-
NTA, Mahdmahopddhydya. The title
is personal, and was conferred on June
3, 1893, in recognition of eminence in



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



40



oriental learning. Residence : Khand-
para, Bengal.

CHANDRABHAN BAM SINGH, Rao

Bahadur. The title was conferred on
May 26, 1894. Residence: Kutch,
Madras.

CHANDULAL MATHURADAS, Rao

Saheb. The title was conferred on
January 1, 1895. Residence: Kutch,
Bombay.

CHANG BHAKAR, Bhaya Mahabir
Singh Deo, Bhaya of. A ruling chief ;
b. April; 15, 1879. Succeeded to the
gadi June 17, 1897. Belongs to a
Rajput (Hindu) family, that is a
collateral branch of the Korea Chauhan
Rajputs, descended from Jorawal
Singh, a younger step-brother of Raja
Garib Singh of Korea. The State is
one of those known as the Chota
Nagpur Tributary Mahals. Its area is
about 906 square miles, and its popu-
lation about 13,466, chiefly Hindus.
Residence : Chang Bhakar, Chota
Nagpur, Bengal.

CHARKHARI, His Highness Maharaj-
Adhiraj Sipadar-ul-Mulk Mulkhan
Singh Bahadur, Maharaja of. A rul-
ing chief; b. January 1872. Succeeded
to the gadi July 10, 1880. Belongs to
the famous Bundela Rajput family
founded by Bir Singh in the 13th
century, who first took the clan name
of Bundela, and from whom are de-
scended a very large number of cele-
brities in Central Indian history, in-
cluding the royal families of Orchha,
Panna, Dattia, Ajaigarh, Charkhari,
Bijawar, Sarila, Jigni, Jaso, Lughasi.
One of these descendants, the Maha-
raja Chhatarsal, acquired the sove-
reignty of Eastern and Northern
Bundelkhand. Being hard pressed
by the Mahrattas, he adopted the
Peshwa as one of his sons, who thus
obtained one-third of his dominions,
including Sagar, Kalpi, etc. His eldest
son inherited Panna, while from the
second son, Jagat Raj, descended the
Chiefs of Ajaigarh, Charkhari, Bija-
war, and Sarila. The son of Jagat
Raj was Kirat Singh ; and the grand-
son of the latter, the Maharaja Vikra-
maditya of Charkhari, received a sanad
from the British Government in 1804.
His grandson was the Maharaja Jai
Singh, who attended the Imperial As-
semblage at Delhi in January 1877,



and in celebration of the Proclamation
of Her Gracious Majesty as Empress
of India received the additional title
of Sipadar-ul-Mulk. His son is the
present Maharaja, who succeeded as
a minor in 1880, attained his majority
in January 1892, and assumed the
Government of his State at a grand
Darbar held at Charkhari on Novem-
ber 10, 1892. At this Darbar were
present, besides the Maharaja and the
young Raja of Sarila, all the principal
jagirdars, thakurs, and officials of the
State, numbering more than a hundred.
The area of the State is 788 square
miles ; its population about 143,000,
chiefly Hindus, with 6000 Muhamma-
dans. The motto of the family is
Singhasanesho ran Vijayi (" The Master
of the Throne is the Victorious in
War"). The Maharaja maintains a
military force of 188 cavalry, 1552
infantry, and 42 guns, and is entitled
to a salute of 11 guns. Residence:
Charkhari, Central India.

CHATAR. See Chhatar.

CHAUBE. See Chowbe.

CHAUMA, Thdkur of. See Gobind
Singh, Thakur.

CHAVAN, Dr. V. P., Rao Saheb. Re-
ceived the title on January 2, 1899.
Residence: Bombay.

CHEIK, Maung, Ahmudan gaung Tazeik
ya Min. This Burmese title (on which,
see Introduction, page xii) was con-
ferred on January 1, 1895. Residence :
Toungoo, Burma.

CHENTSAL RAO, P., C.I.E.; b. 1832.
Sarishtadar of the Madras Revenue
Board, 1872; Fellow of the Madras
University, 1875; Superintendent of
Stamps and Stationery, 1882; Member
of the Legislative Council of Fort St.
George, 1887, and of the Governor-
General's Council, 1892; cr. CLE.,
1887. Residence: Madras.

CHEPPUDHtA S0MIAH, Rai Bahddur.
The title was conferred on January 1,

1892. Residence : Mercara, Kurg.

CHEPPUDIRA THIMURIAH, Rai Ba-
hddur. Is the Subahdar of the Ye-
denalknad, Kurg, and received the
title as a personal distinction on May
25, 1892. Residence : Mercara, Kurg.



50



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



CHERRA, Hajan Manik, Seim of A
ruling chief; ft. about 1833. Succeeded
to the gadi May 24, 1875. The chief
and his people (said to number about
9000) are Khasis. This is one of the
Khasi and Jaintia Hill States. Re-
sidence: Cherra, Khasi Hills, Assam.

CHET SINGH (of Bhikra), Rao; b. April
15, 1851. The title is hereditary, and
has long been recognized. The family
are Sengar Rajputs, descended from
the Rajas of Rura in Etawah. The
Rao has a son and heir, named Lala
Tej Singh, born October 8, 1866. Re-
sidence: Bhikra, Etawah, North-
western Provinces.

CHETAN SHAH, Khan Bahadur. The
title is personal, and was conferred on
January 1, 1877, on the occasion
of the Proclamation of Her Most
Gracious Majesty as Empress of India.
Residence : Shdhpur, Punjab.

CHHALIAR, Rawal Chhatrasinghji,
Rdwal of. A ruling chief; b. about
the year 1863. Succeeded to the gadi
June 21, 1888. Belongs to a Rajput
(Hindu) family, which pays a tribute
to the Gaekwar of Baroda, as well as
to the Paramount Power. The area
of the State is about 9 square miles.
Residence: Chhaliar, Rewd Kantha,
Bombay.

CHHATAR. tfeeChhatra.

CHHATAR SAL, Thakur of Mangalgarh,
Rai Bahadur. The title of Rai Baha-
dur was conferred on the Thakur of
Mangalgarh as a personal distinction
on May 20, 1896. Residence : Bhopal,
Central India.

CHHATARPUR, His Highness Maha-
raja Vishwanath Singh Bahadur,
Mahdrdjd of. A ruling chief; b.
August 29, 1866. Succeeded to the
gadi November 14, 1866. Belongs to
a Puar Rajput (Hindu) family; de-
scended from the Sarddr Soneh Sah,
a Sarddr of the Panna Raj, who was
in military possession of the Chha-
tarpur jdgir when the British acquired
Bundelkhand. He was granted a
sanad by the British Government in
1806, and was succeeded by his son,
the Raja Partab Singh. The grand-
nephew of the latter was the Rdjd
Jagat Raj, the father of the present
Raja, who received the title of Maha-
raja as a personal distinction on May



25, 1895. The family motto is Agni
pratdp Vishweshah ("As fire resplen-
dent, Lord of the World "). The area
of the State is 1169 square miles ; its
population about 167,700, chiefly
Hindus, with about 5500 Muhamma-
dans and 749 Jains. The Maharaja
maintains a military force of 39
cavalry, 814 infantry, and 39 guns,
and is entitled to a salute of 11 guns.
Residence : Chhatarpur, Bundelkhand,
Central India.

CHHATRA KUNWAI (of Amgaon),
Rdjd. The title is hereditary, and was
originally derived from Rdjd Hindi
Shah of Garha-Mandla. The family
is Lodhi. Residence: Jabalpur, Central
Provinces.

CHHATRA SINGH, Subaddr- Major,
Rai Bahadur. The title is personal,
and was conferred on June 24, 1887,
for eminent military service. Re-
sidence: Burma.

CHHEDI LAL, Lala, Rat Bahddur. The
title is personal, and was bestowed on
June 1, 1888. The Rai Bahadur's
grandfather, Lala Sadasukh, was a
wealthy grain and cotton merchant in
Cawnpur. Residence: Cawnpur, North-
western Provinces.

CHH0TA BARKHERA, Bhumia Mugat
Singh, Bhumia of. A ruling chief;
b. 1865. Succeeded to the gadi Sep-
tember 14, 1889. Is descended from
a Bhilala family. The population of
the State is about 125, chiefly Hindus.
Residence: Chhota Barkhera, Bhopa-
war, Central India.

CHHOTA UDAIPUR, Maharawal Shri
Fattehsinghji, Maharawal of. A rul-
ing chief; b. October 22, 1884. Suc-
ceeded the late Maharawal Motisin-
ghji on February 29, 1895. Belongs
to a Chauhan Rajput (Hindu) family ;
descended from the famous Patai
Rawal, the last Chauhan Chief of
Champaner, from whom also descend
the Chiefs of Baria. When Cham-
paner was captured by the Muham-
madans under Muhammad Begar in
1484, the Chauhans moved to Chhota
Udaipur and to Baria. The Rdjd
Jitsinghji, grandfather of the present
Mahdrdwdl, bravely resisted Tantia
Topi during the Mutiny of 1857 ; and
the latter was defeated by General
Parke when encamped before the town
of Chhota Udaipur. The family at



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



51



one time occupied a fort at Mohan ; it
pays tribute to the Gaekwar of Ba-
roda. The area of the State is about
873 square miles ; its population about
71,000, chiefly Bhils or Kolis or other
aboriginal tribes. The Maharawal
maintains a military force of 50 cavalry,
256 infantry, and 4 guns; and is en-
titled to a salute of 9 guns. Residence:
Chhota Udaipur, Rewa Kantha, Bom-
bay.
CHIKLI, Guman Singh, Chief of. A
ruling chief; b. about the year 1864.
Succeeded to the gadi November 1,
1888. Is a Muhammadan, but de-
scended from a Wasava Bhil (ab-
original) family. The area of the State
is about 200 square miles ; its popula-
tion about 1444, chiefly (aboriginal)
Bhils. Residence: Chikli, Khandesh,
Bombay.

CHIKTIABAE, Bhumia Umed Singh,
Bhumia of. A ruling chief ; b. about
1845. Succeeded to the gadi in 1864.
The population of the State is about
415, chiefly Hindus. Residence : Chik-
tiabar, Bhopawar, Central India.

CHIKURDE, Deshmukh of. See Vithal-
rao.

CHINCHLI, Naik Jinmya naiad Gudad
Bhavan, Chief of. A ruling chief.
The State is also called Dang Chinch-
ligadad, being one of the numerous
Dang States in Khandesh; and the
Chief or Naik, sometimes called Zimna
walad Bhawan, is a minor and un-
married ; belongs to an aboriginal Bhil
tribe. The area of the State is about
27 square miles; and its population
about 1668. Residence: Chinchli, Khan-
desh, Bombay.

CHINGACHUN VITTIL G0PALAN
NAYAR, Rao Bahadur. The title
was conferred on January 1, 1894.
Residence: Madura, Madras.

CHINTAMANI DE, Rai Bahadur. The
title was conferred on June 3, 1893.
Residence: Howrah, Bengal.

CHHIAKAL, Kerala Varma Raja, Va-
liya Rdjd of; b. 1849. Is the head of
one of the branches of the Kolattiri
House, the Raja of Kolattiri having
been one of those ?chief tains among
whom Cheraman Perumal, Emperor
of Malabar, divided his dominions
when he became a Buddhist and re-
tired from the world in 352 a.d. In
1734 the Chirakal Raja was acknow-



ledged by all members of the Kolattiri
House as the head of the family, and
was entrusted with the administra-
tion. The Raja at the time of Tippu's
invasion in 1789 was named Rama
Yarma, and he committed suicide
to avoid falling into the hands of the
conqueror. A prince, who took refuge
in the jungles until the English ob-
tained possession of the country, was
recognized by them in 1795 as R&ja.
The family, like that of the Zamorin
of Calicut and other Chiefs of Mala-
bar, follows the Marumakkatayam
law of inheritance, by which the suc-
cession is to the offspring of its female
members, among whom the next eldest
male after the Raja is his heir-appar-
ent. The late Valiya Raja of Chirakal
was called Rajaha Raja, and he was
succeeded by the present Valiya Raja
under the Marumakkatayam law. He
receives an allowance from Govern-
ment, in compensation for the estate



Online LibraryRoper LethbridgeThe golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon → online text (page 11 of 63)