Roper Lethbridge.

The golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon online

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time his rise was very rapid. Eight
years later he had become the Com-
mander-in-Chief of the Peshwa's
armies, had conquered the Imperial
Subahdar of Malwa, and had received,
from the gratitude of the Peshwa,



106



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



the territory of Indore, with most of
the conquered territory. He continued
to strengthen his position, and at the
great battle of Panipat, in conjunction
with Sindhia (see Gwalior, Maharaja
of), he commanded one division of
the Mahratta hosts. After that
disaster he retired to Indore, and
devoted himself to the development
of this great Principality, which he
left in 1765 to his grandson, a minor
named Mali Rao Holkar, in a state of
prosperity. The latter died in a few
months ; and the administration was
then assumed by his mother, Ahalya
Bai, the daughter-in-law of the first
Holkar. Aided by her Commander-
in-Chief, Tukaji Rao Holkar, this
clever and courageous lady ruled for
thirty years, and left Indore, at her
death in 1795, in a well-ordered and
prosperous condition. Thereon much
disorder ensued. At last Jeswant Rao
Holkar, an illegitimate son of Tukaji,
amid many vicissitudes of fortune,
managed to maintain the position of
the family. He defeated the combined
armies of Sindhia and the Peshwa in
1802, and took possession of the
Peshwa's capital of Poona ; which,
however, reverted to the Peshwa by
British intervention after the Treaty
of Bassein in the same year. Again,
after the Treaty of Sarji Anjengaon,
war ensued between Jeswant Rao
Holkar and the Paramount Power,
with varying fortune, till at length, in
1805, Holkar was forced to surrender
to Lord Lake, and sign a treaty on the
banks of the river Bias in the Punjab.
He died in 1811, leaving a minor son,
Malhar Rao Holkar ; and the adminis-
tration was carried on by Tulsi Bai,
one of the concubines of the late
Maharaja, as Queen Regent. She was
murdered in 1817 by her own officers ;
but the Indore army was defeated by
the British forces at the battle of
Mehidpur, and the Treaty of Mandesar
followed in 1818, by which Malhar
Rao Holkar became a feudatory Prince
of the British Empire. He died in
1833 without issue. Martand Rao
Holkar was adopted as his successor,
but was speedily deposed by his cousin,
Hari Rao Holkar. The latter, dying
in 1843 without issue, was succeeded
by his adopted son, Kandi Rao, who
died in 1844, and was succeeded by
adoption by his late Highness the



Maharaj-Adhiraj Tukaji Rao Holkar,
father of the present Chief. Tukaji Rao
was only eleven years old at the date of
his accession, and was the second son
of Bhao Holkar. In 1852 he attained
his majority, and was invested with
the full management of the State.
In 1857 the Indore army mutinied, and
besieged the British Resident, Sir
Henry Durand, at Indore, who was
exposed to much difficulty and danger
in taking off the women and children
to a place of safety at Bhopal. The
Maharaja, however, remained loyal,
and his rebellious troops soon after
were forced to lay down their arms.
The Maharaja subsequently received
a sanad of adoption, an increased
personal salute, and the rank of a
Knight Grand Commander of the Most
Exalted Order of the Star of India. He
died in 1886, and was succeeded by
the present Maharaj-Adhiraj Bahadur.
His Highness has visited England,
and is known as a Prince of great
enlightenment and ability. Like his
illustrious father, he has received the
rank of a Knight Grand Commander
of the Most Exalted Order of the Star
of India. The area of his State is
8400 square miles ; its population
about 1,055,000, chiefly Hindus, but
including about 73,000 Muhammadans,
and 86,000 belonging to various ab-
original tribes. In size the State of
Indore may be compared with the
kingdoms of Saxony or Wiirtemburg,
but is larger than either. In popula-
tion it may be compared with the
Grand Duchies of Hesse or Baden,
being more populous than the former,
and less so than the latter. His
Highness maintains a military force
of 3231 cavalry, 6128 infantry, and 65
guns. He is entitled to a salute of
21 guns within the limits of Indore
territory, and 19 guns elsewhere.
Residence : Indore, Central India.

INDRA BIXRAMA SINGH (of Raipur
Ikdaria, Itaunja), ,Rdjd; b. November
21, 1864. The title is hereditary, having
been assumed by Rai Dingar Deo,
ancestor of the Raja, and having been
recognized as hereditary by the Govern-
ment in 1877. Belongs to a Puar
Rajput (Hindu) family, of the Vasishta
Gotra or clan, tracing their descent
from Deo Ridh Rai, eighth son of
Raja Rudra Sah of Dharanagar or



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



107



Deogarh, who took service under the
King of Delhi, and obtained from him
important commands. The Rdjds have
before their residence a large square
stone, which they hold in almost
sacred reverence. They say that they
brought it from Delhi, and that it is
the symbol of their right to the estates
granted to them by the Emperors of
Delhi. The late Rdjd Jagmohan Singh
died in 1881, four months after attain-
ing his majority, and was succeeded
by his brother, the present Rdjd, then
sixteen years old, as a minor under
the Court of Wards. Educated at
Canning College, Lucknow; attained
his majority, and received possession
of his estate on January 2, 1886. Resi-
dence : Itaunja, Mahona, Lucknow,
Oudh.

INJHAR SINGH, Rao Bahadur. The
title is personal, and was conferred on
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of
the Jubilee of the reign of Her Most
Gracious Majesty. Residence : Chark-
hdri, Central India.

ISHAK HAJI ISA, Haji, Khdn Saheb.
Received the title on June 3, 1899.
Residence : Bombay.

ISHAN CHANDRA MITTRA, Rat

Bahadur. The title was conferred on
January 1, 1892. Residence : Hughli,
Bengal.

ISHRI PARSHAD TEWARI, Rat. The
title is personal, and was conferred on
May 20, 1890. Residence: Central
Provinces.

ISHRI SINGH (of Nadaun), Mian. The
title is hereditary. Is a near relative
of the Rdjd Narindar Chand of Nadaun
(q. v.), and a descendant of the Rdjd
Sir Jodhbir Chand, K.C.S.I. Resi-
dence : Kdngra, Punjab.

ISHWAR CHANDRA MITTAR, Rai

Bahadur. The title was conferred on
June 3, 1893. Residence : Calcutta.

ISHWAR CHANDRA SIL, Rai Bahddur.
The title was conferred on January 1,
1892. Residence : Dacca, Bengal.

ISHWAR DAS, Rai Bahddur, Rdjd
Ddyawant; b. June 13, 1826. The
titles are personal, and having been
conferred by the Nawdb of the
Carnatic, were recognized by the
Government in 1890. His grandfather,
the Rai Rdjd Makhan Lai Bahadur,



and his father, Rai Rdjd Tikam
Chand Bahddur, both successively held
important posts under the Nawdbs of
the Carnatic. Belongs to a Kayastha
family, claiming descent from the
famous Chitragupta. Has received the
thanks of Government for his public
services and his benevolence. His
adopted son is named Lachmi Das.
Residence: Madras.

ISHWAR DAS, Pandit, Rai Bahddur.
The title is personal, and was conferred
on May 24, 1889. Residence: Pesha-
war, Punjab.

ISHWAR LAL OCHHAVARAM, Rao

Saheb. The title was conferred Janu-
ary 1, 1895. Residence: Ahmadabad,
Bombay.

ISKHAN KHAN, Malik, Tarin, KUn
Saheb. Received the title on June 3,
1899. Residence: Peshin, Baluchistan.

ISMAIL BEG AMIR BEG, Khdn Saheb.
Received the title on June 3, 1899.
Residence : Poona, Bombay.

ISMAIL KHAN walad SALE KHAN,
Khdn Saheb. The title was conferred
on June 22, 1897. Residence : Kolaba,
Bombay.

ITAUNJA. See Raipur Ikdaria; see
also Indra.

ITHAR KHAN AIMAT KHAN, Khdn
Saheb. Received the title on May 21,
1898. Residence: Jalgaon, Bombay.

JABRIA BHIL and JABRI, Mian Yusuf
Muhammad, Mian of. A ruling chief;
b. 1874. Succeeded to the gadi May
10, 1888 as a minor. Belongs to a
Pinddri (Muhammadan) family, de-
scended from Rajdn Khdn, brother of
the Pinddri leader Chitu. The State
is tributary to Gwalior, and contains
a population of about 1000, chiefly
Hindus. Residence : Jabria Bhil, Bho-
pdl, Central India.

JACOB, Elijah, Khdn Saheb. The title
was conferred on January 1, 1898.
Residence : Jabalpur, Central Provinces.

JADAB CHANDRA BARTJA. Rai Ba-
hadur. The title is personal, and was
conferred on August 30, 1888. Re-
sidence : Nowgong, Assam.

JADAB CHANDRA DEB, Rai Bahddur.
The title was conferred on June 22,
1897. Reside nee : Malda, Bengal.

JADAV. See Jadab.



108



THE GOLDEN BOOK OP INDIA



JADU. See Yadu.

JADUNATH DEO (of Aul), Kumdr. Is
the son of the late Raja Padmalabh
Deo of Aul, who was born in 1830,
succeeded to the gadi in 1840, and has
recently died. Is descended from the
ancient Royal family of Orissa. The
Maharaja Makund Deo, the last Maha-
raja of Orissa, was conquered by the
Raja Man Singh {see Jodhpur) as
Viceroy of the Mughal Emperor to-
wards the close of the 16th century.
When subsequently Ram Chandra
Deo, belonging to another family, was
proclaimed Maharaja of Orissa by the
headmen of the country, his title was
disputed by the two surviving sons of
Makund Deo, of whom the elder was
also called Ram Chandra Deo, and the
disputes were finally settled by Raj 4
Man Singh in 1580 A.B., who appointed
Ram Chandra Deo, the son of Maha-
raja, Makund Deo, to be Raja of Aul,
and his brother to be Raja of Sar-
ungar of Patiya, while the other
Ram Chandra Deo was made Raja
of Khurda. In 1803 the Raja of Aul
acknowledged fealty to the British
Government. Residence : Aul, Orissa,
Bengal.

JADUNATH HALDAR, Rai Bahadur;
b. April 5, 1832. The title is personal,
and was conferred on May 24, 1889.
His great-grandfather was in the
service of the Nawab of Murshidabad
in Bengal, and was granted by him the
appellation of Haldar, which his de-
scendants retain as their family name.
After the British conquest of Bengal
he was appointed Tahsildar of Khas
Mahal in Barrackpore. During the
Mutiny the Rai Bahadur was a prisoner
in the hands of the rebels for five
months, and has subsequently ren-
dered excellent service in the Police
of the North-Western Provinces. Re-
sidence : Allahabad, North- Western
Provinces.

JADUNATH MUKHARJI, Rai Bahadur.
The title is personal, and was conferred
on May 22, 1876, "for liberality dis-
played by him in various matters of
public progress and improvement."
Granted the title of Rai Bahadur, as
a personal distinction, January 2, 1893.
Residence : Haz^ribagh, Bengal.

JAFAR ALI KHAN, CLE. Was
created a Companion of the Most



Eminent Order of the Indian Empire,
June 25, 1887. Is an officer in Her
Majesty's Army, with the rank of
Risaldar. Residence: Caloutta.

JAFAR All KHAN, Nawab Bahadur.
The title is personal. Is the grandson
of the late Amjad Ali Shah, King of
Oudh, being the younger son of Nizam-
ud-daula, who married a daughter of
the King. Residence: Lucknow, Oudh.

JAFAR ALI KHAN, Muhammad, Na-
wab Bahadur. See Muhammad.

JAFAR YUSUF, Khan Bahadur. The
title was conferred on June 22, 1897.
Residence : Poona, Bombay.

JAFARABAD, Chief of. See Janjira.

JAGADINDRA NATH RAI (of Nator),
Maharaja. The title is personal, and
was conferred on January 1, 1877-
Belongs to a Saritra Brahman family,
who were eminent for many genera-
tions as Maharajas of Nator, and at
one time owned the greater portion of
the Rajshahi district. It is stated
that the title of Maharaja Bahadur
was conferred on Ram Jiban Rai by
the Emperor of Delhi, and another
sanad from Delhi was conferred on his
grandson, the Maharaja Ram Krishna
Rai Bahadur of Nator. His son was
the Maharaja Bisvanath Rai Bahadur
of Nator, who is said by the family to
have been granted a political pension
by the British Government in 1806.
His grandson was the Maharaja Go-
bindanath Rai Bahadur of Nator, the
(adoptive) father of the present Ma-
haraja. Residence: Nator, Rajshahi,
Bengal.

JAGADISHWAR CHATTARJI, Rai Ba-
hadur; b. March 17, 1846. The title
is personal, and was ' conferred on
January 2, 1888, for long and approved
service in the Opium Department, in
which he held an important position.
Belongs to a Brahman family of
Bengal. Residence: Benares, North-
Western Provinces.

JAGAMANPUR, Raja of. See Rup Sah.

JAGAN PARSHAD, Munshi, Rai Ba-
hadur. The title was conferred on
May 26, 1894. Residence: Agra, North-
western Provinces.

JAGANNADHA CHETTIAR, P. K, Rao

Bahadur. Received the title on Janu-
ary 2, 1899. Is Tahsildar of Karnul,
Madras. Residence : Karnul, Madras.



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



109



JAGANNADHA RAO, Valluri, Rai Ba-
hadur. The title is personal, and was
conferred on February 16, 1887. Re-
sidence : Vizianagram, Madras.

JAGANNATH, Lala, Rai Bahadur. The
title was conferred on January 1, 1896.
Residence : Pilibhit, North-Western
Provinces.

JAGANNATH BARUA, Rai Bahadur.
The title was conferred on June 22,
1897. Residence : Jorhat, Assam.

JAGAT BAHADUR (of Umri), Rdjd; b.
November 17, 1850. Succeeded to the
gadi October 23, 1872. The title is
hereditary. Is the senior represent-
ative of the ancient Bilkhari (Rajput)
Chiefs of Fort Bilkhar, the vast ruins
of which remain to this day in the
mauza of Agyapur; descended from
Ghaibar Sah, fourth son of Jaswant,
and great-grandson of Balbhaddar
Dikhit, who built Fort Bilkhar after
the fall of Kanauj. About 600 years ago
one of his descendants, Raja Ram Deo,
was the Bilkharia Chief of Patti and
Fort Bilkhar, but was deposed by his
son-in-law, Bariar Singh Bachgoti (see
Madho Prasad Singh, Rai), who slew
his son Dalpat Sah, and seized the
fort, leaving only a few villages to
the descendants of Raj 4 Ram Deo.
The present Raja has a son and heir,
named Lai Krishna Pal Singh. Re-
sidence : Umri, Partabgarh, Oudh.

JAGAT SINGH, CLE., Sarddr Baha-
dur. The Sardar Bahadur Jagat
Singh, Kalalwala, CLE., was formerly
Subadar-Major, 29th jPunjab Infantry.
He was created a Companion of the
Most Eminent Order of the Indian
Empire on January 3, 1893. Residence :
SiaTkot, Punjab.

JAGAT SINGH (of Singhpur), Thdkur.
The title is hereditary. Residence:
Singhpur, Narsinghpur, Central Pro-
vinces.

JAGATJIT SINGH BAHADUR, His
Highness Sir, Rdjd. See Kapurthala.

JAGGAN. See Jagan.

JAGJIWAN, Mehta (of Bhuj), Rai
Bahadur. The title is personal, and
was conferred on May 26, 1894. Re-
sidence : Jaisalmir, Rajputana.

JAGJODH SINGH, Sarddr. The title
is hereditary. Is the son of the late
Kunwar Peshawara Singh of the La-



hore family. Residences: Sialkot,
Punjab; and Bahraich, Oudh.

JAGJOT SINGH, Sarddr. See Jagjodh
Singh.

JAGMOHAN SINGH, CLE. (of Atra
Chandapur), Rdjd; b. August 21,
1841. Succeeded 1864. The title is
hereditary. Belongs to the great
Kanhpuria (Rajput) family (see Surpal
Singh Bahadur, Raja of Tiloi), being
descended from Raja Madan Singh of
Simrauta, third son of Prasad Singh,
who was seventh in descent from
Kanh, the Kshatriya founder of Kanh-
pur in the time of the great Manik
Chand. The seventh in descent from
Madan Singh was the Raja Mandhata
Singh, who was in possession of
Chandapur at the time of the conquest
of Oudh by Saadat Khan. The Raja
Shiudarshan Singh had half the estate
confiscated at the time of the Mutiny in
1857. His grandson, the present Raja,
is an Honorary Magistrate, and re-
ceived a Medal of Honour at the
Imperial Assemblage at Delhi on
January 1, 1877, on the occasion of
the Proclamation of Her Most Graci-
ous Majesty as Empress of India; and
subsequently for good services he was
created a Companion of the Most
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire
on January 1, 1891. Residence : Chan-
dapur, Rai Bareli, Oudh.

JAGODESHWAR CHATTERJI, Rai Ba-
hadur. See Jagadishwar Chattarji.

JAHANDAD KHAN (of Khanpur), Rdjd,
Khdn Bahadur. The first title (Raja)
is hereditary, and the second (Khan
Bahadur) is personal, and was con-
ferred on May 24, 1881. Belongs to
a family of the Gakkar tribe, who
overran Kashmir in early times, and
were formidable opponents of the
Emperor Babar. Is the son of Raja
Haidar Bakhsh Khan; has acted as
Extra Assistant Commissioner of the
Punjab. His son and heir is named
Fazaldad. Residence: Hazara, Punjab.

JAHANGIRABAD, Rani of. See Zeb-
un-nisa.

JAI CHAND (of Lambagraon), Rdjd; b.
1870. The title is hereditary, and was
conferred on December 12, 1851. Be-
longs to the Katoch family of Rajputs,
and is head of the Kangra family.
Raja Parmad Chand died childless in
exile at Almora, and was succeeded by



110



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



his relative, Raja Partab Chand, the
father of the present Raja. Residence :
Kangra, Punjab.
JAI KISHAN DAS, C.S.I., Rdjd Ba-
hadur. See Jaikishan.

JAI SINGH (of Guler), Rdjd. The title
is hereditary, and was conferred on
February 28, 1878, the Raja being
the brother of the late Raja Sham-
sher Singh of Guler, and having pre-
viously enjoyed the hereditary title
of Mian. His son and heir is named
Rughnath Singh. The family is con-
nected with that of His Highness the
Maharaja of Jammu and Kashmir by
marriage. It is an offshoot of the
families of Kangra and Lambagraon.
Residence : Guler, Kangra, Punjab.

JAI SINGH (of Kot Khai), Rdnd. The
title is hereditary. Succeeded the late
Rand Ram Saran Singh in 1892. Re-
sidence: Simla, Punjab.

JAI SINGH (of Siba), Rdjd. The title
is personal, and was conferred on
August 7, 1878. The Siba family is
an offshoot of the Guler family (see
Jai Singh, of Guler, Raja), which itself
was an offshoot of that of Kangra.
Is descended from Sibaru Chand, a
younger son of the Raja of Guler, who
conquered the Siba territory, calling
it Siba after his own name. Raja Ram
Singh, the last of the old hereditary
Rajas of Siba, died without male issue
in 1875. The territory lapsed to the
Paramount Power, but as an act of
favour to His Highness the Maharaja
of Jammu and Kashmir, who is related
to the family by marriage, the territory
and title was continued to a scion of
the family named Raj d Bije Singh.
He died in 1878, and was succeeded
by his son, the present Raja. Re-
sidence : Siba, Kangra, Punjab.

JAIBANS KTJNWAR (of Kaithola),
Rdni; b. 1849. The title is heredi-
tary. The Chief of Kaithola is the
head of the great Kanhpuria family
(see Surpal Singh), being the repre-
sentative of Sahas, the eldest son
of Kanh. From him a line of twenty
descents from father to son ends in
the late Raja Mahesh Bakhsh of Kai-
thola, who died without male issue
in 1881. The estates were under
Government management for some
time, and were then handed over to
the present Rdni, the widow of the



late Raja. Residence : Partabgarh,
Oudh.

JAIKISHAN DAS, C.S.I., Rdjd Bahadur;
b. November 24, 1832. The title is
personal, and was conferred on Janu-
ary 18, 1860. Belongs to a family of
Chaube Brahmans, who fled to Etah
from Muttra in the reign of Ala-ud-
din Ghori, because they had slain the
Kazi of Muttra. Chaube Ghansham
Das, having long been in Government
service, and having retired on pension,
in 1857 rendered most valuable aid to
the Government, although blind and
infirm; and ultimately was surprised
and slain by the rebels at Kasganj.
His brother, the present Rdjd Jai
Kishan Dds Bahddur, had loyally sup-
ported him, and was rewarded with
the title and a grant of lands and
other honours in 1860. He was created
a Companion of the Most Exalted
Order of the Star of India in 1870.
Is a Fellow of the Allahabad Uni-
versity, and Deputy Collector of Bare-
illy. Residence : Moradabad, North-
western Provinces.

JAIKISHAN DAS, Lala, Rai Bahddur.
The title is personal, and was conferred
on January 1, 1894. Residence:
Kashmir.

JAIPUR, His Highness Sir Madho
Singh Bahadur, G.C.S.I., Mahdrdjd
of. A ruling chief; b. 1861. As-
cended the gadi as a minor September
18, 1880, and was invested with full
governing powers on attaining his
majority in September 1882. Is the
Chief of the famous Kachhwdha tribe
of Rdjputs, descended from the le-
gendary hero Rdma, and therefore of
the Swryavansi or Solar race. Tod
devotes a large part of his learned
Annals of Rdjdsthdn to the history of
this family, which, indeed, is no un-
important part of the history of India.
Tod says of the ruling familv of Jaipur
(otherwise called Amber or Dhundar) :
"A family which traces its lineage
from Rama of Koshala, Nala of
Nishida, and Dola the lover of Ma-
roni, may be allowed 'the boast of
heraldry'; and in remembrance of
this descent, the Cushites [Kachhwd-
ha] of India celebrate with great
solemnity the annual feast of the sun,
on which a stately car, called the
Chariot of the Sun, Surf/a ratha, drawn
by eight horses, is brought from the



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



111



temple, and the descendant of Ramesa,
ascending therein, perambulates his
capital." The full title of the Maha-
raja is โ€” His Highness Saramad-i-Ra-
jaha-i-Hindustan Raj Rajendra Sri
Maharaj-Adhiraj Sawai Sir Madho
Singh Bahadur, Knight Grand Com-
mander of the Most Exalted Order
of the Star of India (see Introduction,
ยง 11). From Rama, the hero of the
Rdmdyana,the greatest of the legendary
heroes of India, to Dhola Rao, the
founder of the Jaipur State in 967
A.D., there are enumerated 34 genera-
tions; and from Dhola Rao to the
present Maharaja, 106 generations.
Early in the 11th century a descendant
of Dhola Rao named Hamaji conquered
Amber from the Minas, and fixed his
court there ; and Amber remained the
capital of the dynasty until the time
of Jai Singh II., who transferred it to
Jaipur in 1728. In the time of the
Great Mughal, the Emperor Akbar,
Raja Bhagwan Das of Jaipur was one
of the first Princes of the Empire.
Overcoming Rajput pride of race, he
gave his daughter in marriage to the
Emperor's son and heir, Prince Salim,
afterwards the Emperor Jahangir, and
was himself one of the greatest Im-
perial commanders. But his adopted
son and successor, the Raja Man
Singh, was the most famous of all
the Imperial generals. He and his
Rajputs carried the arms of the Empire
successfully into Orissa, Bengal, As-
sam, and Kabul ; the chronicles of the
age are full of the exploits of the
brother-in-law of the Emperor, and he
was successively Governor of Kabul,
Bengal, Behar, and the Deccan. His
nephew, the Raja Jai Singh, known as
the Mirza Raja, was equally famous
throughout the wars of Aurangzeb in
the Deccan ; he it was who effected
the capture of the famous Sivaji,
founder of the Mahratta Power; and
he is said to have fallen a victim to
the jealousy of the Emperor, who
caused his death by poison. Some
generations later, in the time of the
Emperor Muhammad Shah, the second
Jai Singh was famous, not only as a
warrior, but also as an astronomer.
He built observatories at Jaipur (to
which place he removed his capital
from the hills of Amber, five miles
off), Delhi, Benares, Muttra, and Uj-
jain. After the death of the Raja Jai



Singh II., the subsequent history of
the family is much occupied with
leagues with Udaipur and Jodhpur
against the Imperial Power, with con-
tests with Jodhpur for the honour of
marrying a Princess of Udaipur, with
Rajput rivalries and defections, and
with Mahratta raids. In order to
regain the privilege of marrying
Princesses of the House of Udaipur
โ€” which honour they had forfeited by
marrying a daughter to the Mughal
Emperor โ€” the Rajas of Jaipur agreed
that the issue of the marriage with an
Udaipur Princess should succeed to
the Raj even before an elder brother
by another Rani; and this promise,
coupled with the rivalry of the Rajas
of Jodhpur for the same privilege,
produced endless troubles and dis-
asters. In the time of the Raj 4 Jagat
Singh, Amir Khan, the notorious
Pindari leader (afterwards Nawab of
Tonk), sided first with the Raja of
Jaipur against Jodhpur, and then with
the Raja of Jodhpur against Jaipur;
and devastated each country in turn.
At last, in 1818, the British Govern-
ment intervened ; took the Jaipur
State under its protection, and the
Raja became one of the great feu-
datories. The late Maharaja Sawai
Ram Singh succeeded to the garli in
1835. He rendered excellent service
throughout the Mutiny of 1857, and
again in the famine of 1868. As a
reward, he twice received an increase
to his salute ; he was created a Knight
Grand Commander of the Most Ex-
alted Order of the Star of India ; and
on the occasion of the Imperial As-
semblage at Delhi, and the Proclama-
tion of Her Most Gracious Majesty as
Empress of India, he was appointed a
Councillor of the Empire, and received
a suitable addition to his titles and
territory. The banner of His High-
ness that was unfurled at Delhi on
that auspicious occasion was exceed-
ingly interesting, as showing the close
approximation of Rajput and Euro-
pean heraldic devices ; for the Ra jput



Online LibraryRoper LethbridgeThe golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon → online text (page 21 of 63)