Roper Lethbridge.

The golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon online

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Pancharanga was properly rendered
as " A Barry of 5 — yules, vert, argent,
azure, or"; and the solar lineage of
the Kachhwaha Prince was indicated
by the device " In chief a Sun in its
splendour." The late Maharaja died
in 1880; and was succeeded by his
adopted son, a scion of the Kachhwaha



112



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



race, the present Maharajd. The area
of the State is 14,465 square miles ;
and its population 2,534,357, chiefly
Hindus, but including more than
170,000 Muhammadans and nearly
60,000 Jains. Jaipur is therefore larger
than either Holland or Belgium, and
more populous than Greece. The Ma-
hard j 4 maintains a military force of
3578 cavalry, 16,099 infantry, and 281
guns; and is entitled to a salute of
19 guns (including 2 guns personal).
There are many Rajput Chiefs who
are feudatories of His Highness.
Arms. — Barry of 5, gules, vert, argent,
azure, or ; in chief a Sun in its splen-
dour. Crest. — A kuchnar tree proper,
bearing cinquefoils argent. Support-
ers. — A tiger and a white horse.
Motto. — "Jato Dharma Stato Jayo."
Residence : Jaipur, Rajputana.

JAIPUR, Maharaja Sri Vikrama Deo
Garu (of Vizagapatam), Maharaja
of. See Vikrama.

JAISAIMIR, His Highness Maharawal
Salivahan Bahadur, Maharawal of.
A ruling chief; b. 1886. Succeeded
to the gadi as a minor April 12, 1891.
Is the Chief of the Jadu Bhatti Raj-
puts, claiming direct descent from
the divine Krishna, and undoubtedly
boasting a lineage hardly less ancient
than that of the great Maharana of
Udaipur himself. The tribe takes its
name from Bhati, who was its leader
in very remote ages, when Settled in
the Punjab; whence it appears to
have been driven by conquerors from
Ghazni, and to have gone to the oasis
of the Great Indian Desert, which it
has ever since inhabited. Deoraj, born
in 836 a.d., was the first to take the
title of Rawal, and he founded the
city of Deorawal. One of his descend-
ants, the Rawal Jaisal, founded the
city of Jaisalmir, and built a strong
fort there, about the year 1156 a.d.
More than a century later, when Mul-
raj II. was Rawal, Jaisalmir was cap-
tured and sacked by the Moslem troops
of the Emperor Ala-ud-din, in 1294
a.d., after a siege that had lasted eight
years; and this was the occasion of
one of the great Sakas so famous in
Rajput history— when Mulraj and
his warriors, having slain all their
women and children, cased themselves
in armour, put on the saffron robe,
bound the mor or nuptial crown on



their heads, and then sword in hand
sallied forth to die amid the slaugh-
tered heaps of the foe. Again a similar
disaster befell the city in 1306 a.d.,
not long after it had been repaired
by the Rawal Dudu. Finally, in the
reign of the Rawal Sabal Singh, the
brave Bhattis were compelled to be-
come feudatories of the Emperor Shah
Jahan. Outlying provinces were sub-
sequently wrested from them by the
neighbouring States of Jodhpur and
Bikanir; till at length in 1818, under
the rule of the Rawal Mulraj, the
State came under the protection and
control of the British Power, and has
enjoyed the blessings of peace. On
the death of the Rawal Ranjit Singh,
his younger brother, the late Mahara-
wal Bairi Sal, succeeded to the gadi in
1864; and he was succeeded in 1891
by the present Maharawal. The area
of Jaisalmir is 16,447 square miles;
its population about 109,000, chiefly
Hindus, but including about 28,000
Muhammadans. In extent it may be
compared with Switzerland or Hol-
land; but is larger than either. His
Highness maintains a military force of
140 cavalry, 353 infantry, and 25 guns,
and is entitled to a salute of 15 guns.
Residence : Jaisalmir, Rajputana.

JAISINGH RAO ANGRIA, Rao Baha-
dur. The title is personal, and was
conferred on May 24, 1889. Residence :
Baroda.

JAISINGHNAGAR, Rao of See Ganpat
Rao ; also Govind Rao ; also Ram-
chand Rao.

JAKHNODA, Thdkur of. See Jiwan
Singh.

JALAL-UD-DIN KHAN, .Kazi, Khan
Bahadur, CLE. An Extra Assis-
tant Commissioner in Baluchistan.
Granted the title of Khan Bahadur,
as a personal distinction, on January 2,
1893. Received the CLE. on June 3,
1899. Residence : Quetta, Baluchistan.

JALAL-UD-DIN, Maulavi, Shams-ul-
Ulama. The title was conferred, for
eminence in oriental learning, on
January 1, 1891. Residence: Fatwa
and Patna, Bengal.

JALAM SINGH (of Amoda), Rdwat.
The title is hereditary, and the
present Rawat succeeded to the title
and estates on the death of his father,



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



113



the late Eawat Lakshmi Singh of
Amoda. Belongs to a Tuar Rajput
family, descended from Jet Singh.
Residence: Amoda, Nimar, Central
Provinces.

JAIIA DEVANI, Jareja Mansinghji,
Tdlukdcirof. A ruling chief ; b. 1852.
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor
December 31, 1868. Belongs to a
Rajput (Hindu) family. The area
of the State is about 36 square miles ;
its population 2383, chiefly Hindus.
The Talukdar maintains a military
force of 4 cavalry and 35 infantry.
Residence : Jalia Devani, Kathiawar,
Bombay.

JAM KHAN walad MUHAMMAD
KHAN, Mir. The title is hereditary,
the Mir being a representative of one
of the Mirs who were Chiefs of Sind
at the time of the annexation. Resi-
dence : Hyderabad, Sind.

JAMAL-UD-DIN, Fakir Sayyid, Khan
Bahadur. The title is personal, and
was conferred on January 1, 1892.
Residence : Lahore, Punjab.

JAMASPJI, Bamanji, Dastur, CLE.
See Bamanji.

JAMBULINGAM MUDALIYAR, Karan-
guli, Rao Bahadur. The title is per-
sonal, and was conferred on January
1,1892. Residence: Cuddapah, Madras.

JAMIAT RAI, Diwan, Rai Saheb. Re-
ceived the title on January 1, 1898,
for services in the Bolan Pass. Resi-
dence : Bolan Pass, Baluchistan.

JAMIAT SINGH (of Ghoriwaha), Sar-
dar. The title is hereditary, the Sar-
dar being of a Jat family, descended
from Sardar Sukha Singh, who in
1759 established his power at Ghori-
waha in the Hoshiarpur district. The
family subsequently fell under the
power of Maharaja Ranjit Singh of
Lahore. Sukha Singh's grandson was
the Sardar Partab Singh, father of
the present Sardar. Residence : Ho-
shiarpur, Punjab.

JAMKHANDI, Ram Chandra Rao Gopal,
Chief of. A ruling chief; b. 1834.
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor
November 18, 1840. The Chief of
Jamkhandi also bears the name of
Appa Saheb Patwardhan. Belongs to
a Br&hman (Hindu) family. The area
of his State is 492 square miles ; its
population is 83,917, chiefly Hindus,



but including 7628 Muhammadans.
The Chief maintains a military force
of 52 cavalry, 943 infantry, and 1 gun.
Residence : Jamkhandi, Southern Mah-
ratta Country, Bombay.

JAMMU AND KASHMIR, Major-
General His Highness Sir Partab
Singh Indar Mahindar Bahadur Sipar-
i-Saltanat, G.C.S.I., Maharaja of. A
ruling chief; b. 1850. Succeeded to
the gadi September 12, 1885. Is the
son of the late Maharaja Ranbhir
Singh, G.C.S.I. ; and grandson of the
late Maharaja Ghulab Singh, the
founder of the dynasty, who was
constituted Feudatory Chief of the
hill-territories east of the Indus and
west of the Ravi (with certain specified
exceptions) by the treaty of March
1846, concluded after the close of the
first Sikh war. Belongs to a Dogra
or Jamwal Rajput family (Hindu) of
ancient lineage, claiming descent from
that of the former Rajas of Jammu.
The Maharaja Ghulab Singh was the
great-grandson of the Raja Dharab-
deo ; and a grandson of the Mian
Jorawar Singh, who was a brother
of Raja Ranjit Deo. He began life
as a cavalry soldier, and became a
trusted officer under Maharaja Ranjit
Singh of Lahore, who conferred on
him the principality of Jammu. At
the outbreak of the first Sikh war he
had been elected Minister of the
Khalsa, and was one of the most con-
spicuous Sikh leaders ; and after the
battle of Sobraon he negotiated a
separate treaty with the British Power,
by which he acquired the Feudal
Chiefship of Jammu and Kashmir on
payment of a sum of 75 lakhs of
rupees. In the Mutiny of 1857 he
rendered excellent service, and sent
a contingent to Delhi. He died in
August 1857, and was succeeded by
his third and only surviving son, the
late Maharaja Ranbhir Singh, G.C.S.I.,
who was a munificent patron of learn-
ing, and did good service in connection
with the British Mission to Yarkand.
He had the distinguished honour of
receiving His Royal Highness the
Prince of Wales at Jammu in 1876;
he also had his salute raised to 21
guns, by the addition of 2 guns as a
personal distinction. In January 1877,
on the occasion of the Proclamation
of Her Majesty as Empress of India,
I



114



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



he was gazetted a General in the
Army and created a Councillor of the
Empress. The Maharaja died on
September 12, 1885, and was succeeded
by his eldest son, the present Maha-
raja, who was created a Knight Grand
Commander of the Most Exalted
Order of the Star of India on May 25,
1892. The area of his State is 79,784
square miles; and its population is
about 1,500,000, including nearly a
million Muhammadans, about half-a-
million Hindus, and over 20,000
Buddhists. In point of area, the
State is more than double the com-
bined area of Bavaria and Saxony, and
equal to that of any three or four of
the smaller European kingdoms put
together. His Highness maintains a
military force of about 8000 cavalry
and infantry, and 288 guns; and is
entitled to a salute of 21 guns within
the limits of the State, and to one of
19 guns in the rest of India. Resi-
dence: Srinagar, Kashmir; and Jammu,
Punjab.

JAMNIA, Bhumia Hamir Singh, Bhumia
of. A ruling chief; b. 1855. Suc-
ceeded to the gadi in 1863 as a minor.
Belongs to a Bhilala family — the Bhi-
lalas being reputed to spring from the
intermarriage of Rajputs and Bhils.
The founder of the family was Nadir
Singh, a famous Bhumia of Jamnia.
Residence: Kunjrod, Jamnia, Bhopa-
war, Central India.

JAMRAT HUSAIN KHAN, Maulavi,
Khan Bahadur. Received the title
on June 3, 1899. Residence: Police
Department, Bengal.

JAMSETJI. See Jejeebhoy; see also
Jam shed ji.

JAMSHEDJI DHANJIBHAI WADIA,

Khan Bahadur. The title is personal,
and was conferred on January 1, 1877,
on the occasion of the Proclamation
of Her Most Gracious Majesty as
Empress of India. Residence: Bom-
bay.

JAMSHEDJI FRAMJI PALKIWALA,

Khan Bahadur. The title is personal,
and was conferred on May 24, 1883.
Residence: Bombay.

JAMSHEDJI H0RMASJI MASTER,

Khan Saheb. Received the title on
May 21, 1898. Residence: Karachi,
Sind, Bombay.



JAMSHEDJI RUSTAMJI, Khan Baha-
dur. The title is personal, and was
conferred on June 3, 1893. Residence :
Mhow, Central India.

JAMSHEDJI RUSTAMJI, Khan Saheb.
The title is personal, and was con-
ferred on August 18, 1881. Residence :
Bombay.

JAN KHAN, Malik, Khan Bahadur.
The title was conferred on June 3,
1893. Residence: Shahpur, Punjab.

JAN MUHAMMAD NASIR-UD-DIN
KHAN, Khan Saheb. Received the
title on June 3, 1899. Residence:
Medical Department, India.

JAN MUHAMMAD WALI All MU-
HAMMAD KHAN, Mir. The title is
hereditary, the Mir being a represent-
ative of one of the Mirs who were
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the
annexation. Residence: Sind.

JANAK PRIYA, Rani. The title is
hereditary, the Rani being the last
surviving Rani of the late Raja Nara-
yan Singh of Sambalpur. The Rajas
of Sambalpur were Chauhan Rajputs
of very ancient lineage. Balram Das
Chauhan conquered Sambalpur about
the year 1445 ; and left it to his elder
son Raja Hirda Narayan, while his
younger son became Raja of Sonpur
(q.v.). The Chauhan device is the
chakra — a circle with four tridents
(trisul) as radii, pointing north, east,
south, and west. The Rani uses this
device on her seal, and for signature.
Residence: Sambalpur, Central Pro-



JANAKIBALLABH SEN (of Mahiganj),

Raja. The title was conferred " for
liberality and public spirit," on Janu-
ary 1, 1891. Residence: Rangpur,
Bengal.

JANARDAN SINGH, Rai Bahadur. The
title was conferred on January 1,
1896. Residence: Madras.

JANG BAHADUR KHAN, CLE. (of

Nanpara), Raja; b. 1845. The title
is hereditary, and the Raja succeeded
his father, the late Raja Munawar Ali
Khan, in 1847. Belongs to a Pathan
family, descended from Rasul Khan,
Togh Pathan, a Risaldar in the service
of the Emperor Shah Jahan, who in
1632 sent him to Salonabad to coerce
the Banjaras who had overrun the



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



115



jagir of Salona Begam, the wife of
Prince Dara. For his performance
of this duty he received the grant of
Nanpara. In 1763 his descendant
Karam Khan of Nanpara obtained
the title of Raja from the Nawab
Shuja-ud-daula. The present Raja
was created a Companion of the Most
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire
in 1886. He is an Honorary Magis-
trate ; and has a son and heir named
Muhammad Sadiq Khan, born 1870.
Residence : Bahraich, Oudh.
JANJIRA, Nawab Sir Sidi Ahmad Khan
Sidi Ibrahim Khan, K.C.I.E., Nawab
of. A ruling prince ; b. 1863. Suc-
ceeded to the gadi January 28, 1879.
Belongs to an Abyssinian family of
Sunni Muhammadans, claiming descent
from Sidi Sarul Khan. The family
were Abyssinian admirals of the fleet
of the Muhammadan kings of Bij&pur,
who in 1670 transferred their allegiance
to the Emperor of Delhi, Aurangzeb.
The Mahrattas often tried to conquer
the island of Janjira ; but were always
successfully resisted. The Nawab is
also Chief of Jafarabad, a small
State in Kathiawar. He was created
a Knight Commander of the Most
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire
on January 1, 1895. The area of the
State is 324 square miles ; its popula-
tion is 76,361, chiefly Hindus, but
including 13,912 Muhammadans. The
Nawab maintains a military force of
310 infantry and 179 guns; and is
entitled to a salute of 9 guns. Resi-
dence: Janjira, Kolaba, Bombay.

JANJIT, alias NANBI RAJA (of Darri),
Sawai. The title is hereditary. Resi-
dence : Sagar, Central Provinces.

JANKI KTJNWAR (of Paraspur), Rani:
!>. 1839. The title is hereditary ; the
Rani succeeded her late husband,
Raja Randhir Singh, on June 16, 1878.
The head of the family is the chief
of the six Thakurs of Chhedwara,
famous for their turbulence in the
times before the annexation of Oudh.
They claim descent from the Kalhans
Rajas of Khurasa, through Maharaj
Singh, second son of Achal Narayan
Singh. A descendant, named Newal
Singh, obtained the title of Raja while
on a visit to the Court at Delhi ; and
it was recognized as hereditary in
favour of the late Raja, Randhir
Singh. The Rani's son and heir is



Bikramajit Singh. Residence: Paras-
pur, Gonda, Oudh.

JANKI NATH, Pandit, Rai Bahadur.
Received the title on May 21, 1898.
Residence : Rajputana-Malwa Railway.

JANKI PARSHAD (of Pamakheri),
Thdkur. The title is hereditary. Resi-
dence : Sagar, Central Provinces.

JANKI PARSHAD, Pandit, Rai Baha-
dur. Is an Extra Assistant Com-
missioner in the Punjab. Received
the title on January 2, 1899. Resi-
dence: Punjab.

JANKI PERSHAD, Kamdar (of Datia),
Rao Bahadur. The title was conferred
on January 1, 1898. Residence : Datia,
Central India.

JANNAT HUSAIN KHAN, Maulavi,

Khan Bahadur. Received the title on
June 3, 1899. Residence : Bengal.

JAORA, Major His Highness Ihtisham-
Ud-Daula Nawab Muhammad Ismail
Khan Bahadur Firoz Jang, Nawab of.
A ruling chief; b. 1855. Succeeded
to the gadi April 30, 1865, as a minor.
Belongs to a Pathan (Muhammadan)
family, descended from Nawab Gha-
fur Khan, an Afghan of the Swati
tribe, brother-in-law of the famous
Amir Khan of Tonk, whom he repre-
sented at Holkar's Court. After the
battle of Mehidpur, Nawab Ghafur
Khan, being in possession of this terri-
tory as a grant from Holkar, was con-
firmed by the British Government.
The present Nawab has been appointed
an Honorary Major in the British
Army. The State, which is feudatory
to Indore, has an area of 581 square
miles ; and a population of 119,945,
chiefly Hindus, but including 13,318
Muhammadans and over 2000 Jains.
His Highness maintains a military
force of 63 cavalry, 177 infantry, and.
15 guns, and is entitled to a salute of
13 guns. Jaora,the capital of the State,
is a station on the Rajputana-Malwa
railway. The Nawab has a son and
heir named Muhammad Sher Ali Khan.
Residence: Jaora, Malwa, Central
India.

JASDAN, Khachar Ala Chela, C.S.T.,
Chief of. A ruling chief; b. 1833.
Succeeded to the gadi in 1852. Be-
longs to a Kathi (Hindu) family. The
State, which is tributary to Baroda
and Junagarh, contains an area of



116



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



283 square miles, and a population of
29,037, chiefly Hindus. The Chief,
who was created a C.S.I, on June 22,
1897, maintains a military force of 60
cavalry, 354 infantry, and 5 guns.
Residence : Jasdan, Kathiawar, Bom-
bay.

JASHPUR, Raja Pratap Narayan Singh
Deo Bahadur, CLE., Rdjd of A
ruling chief; b. 1822. Succeeded to
the gadi October 24, 1845. Belongs
to a Kshatriya (Rajput) family, form-
erly feudatories of the Mahrattas of
Ndgpur, that came under British con-
trol in 1818. Rendered good service
in the military operations in 1857
against the mutineers and rebels in
Udaipur and Palamau. Was created
a Companion of the Most Eminent
Order of the Indian Empire, May
21, 1890. The area of the State is
1947 square miles; its population is
90,240, chiefly Hindus. The Raja has
a military force of 2 guns. Residence :
Jashpur, Chota Nagpur, Bengal.

JASMER SINGH, Sardar; b. 1848. The
title is hereditary. Belongs to a Jat
family, descended from Sardar Gur-
bakhsh Singh, who acquired the terri-
tory of Thol Thangor, in the Ambala
district of the Punjab, by conquest
in 1759 a.d. During the Sikh rebellion
of 1848-49, and again in the Mutiny
of 1857, this family rendered good
service to Government, and were
rewarded for the latter service. On
the death of Sardar Jawahir Singh he
was succeeded by his two sons, the
present Sardars— Kishan Singh and
Jasmer Singh of Thol Thangor. The
Sardar Jasmer Singh has two sons—
Ram Narayan Singh (born 1863) and
Sheo Narayan Singh. Residence : Thol
Thangor, Ambala, Punjab.

JAS0, Diwan Jagatraj, Jagirdar, Diwdn
of A ruling chief; b. 1860. Suc-
ceeded to the gadi July 7, 1889. Be-
longs to the great Bundela Rajput
family, descended from the founder
of the Orchha State that has given
ruling families to Panna, Datia,
Ajaigarh, Charkhdri, and most of the
other States of Bundelkhand . Bharti-
chand, the founder of the Jaso State,
was the fourth son of the Maharaja
Chhatrasal; and his great-grandson,
Diwan Murat Singh, received a sanad
from the British Government in 1816.
The Diwan Bhopal Singh received the



additional title of Bahadur as a per-
sonal distinction, at the Imperial
Assemblage of Delhi on the occasion
of the Proclamation of Her Most
Gracious Majesty as Empress of India.
The area of the State is 75 square
miles; its population over 80,000,
chiefly Hindus. The Diwdn maintains
a military force of 2 horsemen, 60
infantry, and 4 guns. Residence : Jaso,
Bundelkhand, Central India.

JASWANT RAI, Rai BaJuidur. The
title is personal, and was conferred on
February 16, 1887, on the occasion of
the Jubilee of Her Majesty's reign, in
consideration of eminent services in
the Army Medical Department. Resi-
dence : Shahpur, Punjab.

JASWANT SINGH (of Nurpur), Rdjd;
i. 1836. The title is hereditary. Nurpur
is a hill principality to the west of
Guler. The Raja belongs to a Rajput
family, descended from Jit Pal, who
came from Delhi about 700 years ago,
and established himself at Pathankot.
Subsequently the family removed to
the hills ; and Nurpur became their
capital in the time of Raja Basu, about
the year 1640 a.d. At the time of the
conquests of the Maharaja Ranjit
Singh of Lahore, Raja Bir, father of
the present Raja, was Raja of Nurpur.
He endeavoured to resist Ranjit Singh ;
but being compelled to take refuge in
Chamba, was given up by the Raja of
Chamba, and imprisoned in the for-
tress of Gobindgarh. Subsequently he
was ransomed by his brother-in-law,
Sardar Charat Singh, for Rs. 85,000 ;
and in 1846 raised the standard of
revolt, besieged Nurpur, and died be-
fore its walls. He was succeeded by
the present Rdjd, who has received a
large grant from the British Govern-
ment. Residence: Nurpur, Kdngra,
Punjab.

JATH, Amritrao Rao Saheb Daphle,
Jagirdar of. A ruling chief ; b. 1835.
Succeeded to the gadi July 28, 1841,
as a minor. Belongs to a Mahratta
(Hindu) family. The late Jagirdar,
Rdmrao, died in 1841 without issue;
whereon his widow, Bhagirthibai,
adopted Amritrao, the present Jdgirdar.
The Daphle is also Chief of Kardsgi ;
and the jdgir of Daphldpur (or Dafld-
pur) is also really a part of this State,
and will revert to it on the demise of
the three widows of the late Chief.



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



117



The founder of the Jath State was the
hereditary pat el, or headman, of
Daflapur village. The area of the
State is 884 square miles ; its popula-
tion is 49,491, chiefly Hindus, hut
including 2842 Muhammadans. Resi-
dence : Jath, Bijapur, Bomhay.

JAWAHIR LAL, Lala, Rai Saheb. The
title is personal, and was conferred on
May 20, 1890. Residence : India.

JAWAHIR LAL, Pandit, Rai Bahadur ;
b. 1856. The title was conferred on
January 1, 1898. Is a Deputy-Col-
lector. Residence: Jalaun, North-
Western Provinces.

JAWAHIR SINGH (of Garhwal), Rai
Bahadur. The title was conferred on
May 26, 1894. Residence: Azamgarh,
North-Western Provinces.

JAWAHIR SINGH (of Jhamari), Rao;
b. 1845. The title is hereditary, hav-
ing been originally granted by the
Raja Mori Pahlodh of Chanderi, and
subsequently confirmed under British
rule. Residence: Jhamari, Sagar,
Central Provinces.

JAWASIA, Rawat Lai Singh, Rdwat of.
A ruling chief ; b. 1858. Succeeded to
the gadi in 1882. Belongs to a Rajput
(Hindu) family. The population of
the State is about 607, chiefly Hindus.
Residence: Jawasia, Western Malwa,
Central India.

JAWHAR, Patangshah Vikramshah
Mukni, Raja of. A ruling chief ; b.
1855. Succeeded to the gadi June 29,
1866, as a minor. Belongs to a Koli
(Hindu) family, descended from Jaya
Mukni, a freebooter who possessed
himself of this territory about 1335,
His son, Nim Shah, obtained the title
of Raja from the Emperor of Delhi in
the year 1341. The late Raja Yi-
kramshah died in 1865 ; and his widow,
the Rani Lakshmibai Saheb, adopted
the present Raja, who was then called
Malhar Rao, son of Madhavrao Dewrao
Mukni, a descendant of Raja Krishna
Shah, ninth Raja of Jawhar. The
State has an area of 534 square miles,
and a population of 48,556, chiefly
Hindus. The Raja maintains a mili-
tary force of 8 cavalry and 25 infantry.
The family cognizance is an arrow,
barbed, point downward. Residence:
Jawhdr, Th&na, Bombay.



JEHANGIR PESTANJI VAKIL, Khan
Bahadur. The title was conferred on
May 25, 1895. Residence : Ahmadabad,
Bombay.

JEHANGIR, Pestanji, CLE. See
Pestanji.

JEJEEBHOY, Sir Jamsetjee, Baronet,
C.S.I. ; b. March 3, 1851. Succeeded
his father, the late Sir Jamsetjee
Jejeebhoy, second Baronet, in 1877,
when (in accordance with the special
Act of the Indian Legislature of 1860)
he assumed the name of Jamsetjee
Jejeebhoy in lieu of Manekjee Curset-
jee. Is the third Baronet ; and has
been created a Companion of the Most
Exalted Order of the Star of India.
Is a merchant of the city of Bombay,
a Magistrate and Member of the Legis-
lative Council of Bombay. Belongs
to a family that has long been regarded
as the leaders of the Parsi community
of Western India. The first Baronet,
Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, K.C.B., of
Bombay, was so created in 1857, in
recognition of his unbounded munifi-
cence, and public spirit, and of his
undoubted loyalty. His very great
wealth was used in promoting the
good of others ; and the second Baronet,
who died in 1877, also earned a similar
reputation for benevolence and liber-
ality. In 1860, the special Act of the
Indian Legislature, referred to above,
was passed with the sanction of Her
Most Gracious Majesty, enacting that
all future holders of the title, on suc-
ceeding to it, shall relinquish their
own names and assume those of the
first Baronet. The present Baronet,
in 1869, married Jerbai, daughter of
Shapurji Dhanjibhai, Esq. ; and has a
son and heir, Cursetjee,born November
11, 1878. Sir Jamsetjee's brothers
are: (1) Cowasjee Cursetjee, born
November 25, 1852, married, in 1869,
Gulbai Rustamji Wadia ; and (2) Jam-
setjee Cursetjee, born 1860, married,
1882, Awabai Shapurji Dhanjibhai.
The family arms are azure, a sun
rising above a representation of the
Ghats (mountains near Bombay) in
base, and in chief two bees volant, all



Online LibraryRoper LethbridgeThe golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon → online text (page 22 of 63)