Roper Lethbridge.

The golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon online

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proper. The crest is a mount vert,
thereon a peacock amidst wheat, and
in the beak an ear of wheat, all proper.
Residence : Mazagon Castle, Bombay.

JETPUR, Azam Vala Lakshman Meran,
Tdlukdur of. A ruling chief; b.



118



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



1849, Succeeded to the gadi September
17, 1883. Jointly rules Jetpur with
vseveral other Talukdars. The State is
tributary to Baroda and Junagarh.
Residence: Jetpur, Kathiawar, Bom-
bay.

JETPUR, Azam Vala Surag Ganga,

Tdlnkddrof. A ruling chief ; b. 1799.
Succeeded to the gadi September 1,
1847. Joint-Talukdar of Jetpur With
several others. Residence: Jetpur,
Kathiawar, Bombay.

JETPUR, Azam Vala Naja KalaDeodan,

Tdlukddr of. A ruling chief ; b. 1865.
Succeeded to the gadi June 14, 1890.
Is joint-Talukdar of Jetpur with
several others. Residence: Jetpur,
Kathiawar, Bombay.

JHA. See Dukha Mochin Jha.

JHABUA, His Highness Raja Gopal
Singh, Rdjd of. ,A ruling chief; b.
February 22, 1841 ; succeeded to the
gadi as a minor in October 1841. Be-
longs to the great Rathor Rajput
family of the Maharajas of Jodhpur,
Idar, etc. The title of Raja was be-
stowed on Kishan Das, a remote an-
cestor of the present Raja, by Ala-ud-
din, the Emperor of Delhi, as a reward
for a successful campaign in Bengal,
and for punishing the Bhil Chiefs of
Jhabua, who had murdered an Imperial
Viceroy of Gujarat. The State, which
was at one time tributary to Indore,
has an area of 1336 square miles ; and
a population of 92,938, chiefly Hindus,
but including nearly 50,000 belonging
to the aboriginal Bhil and other tribes.
The State flag is red. The Raja
maintains a military force of 64 cavalry,
253 infantry, and 4 guns ; and is en-
titled to a salute of 11 guns. Resi-
dence: Jhabua, Bhopawar, Central
India.

JHALARIA, Thdkur of. See Jhalera.

JHALAWAR, His Highness Maharaj
Rana 2alim Singh, Bahadur, Mahdrdj
Rand of. A ruling chief ; b. 1864.
Succeeded to the gadi June 24, 1876,
as a minor. Is a Chief of the Jhala
Rajputs, whose ancestors came from
Jhala war in Kathiawar. In 1709 a.d.
Bhao Singh, a younger son of the
Chief of Halwad in Kathiawar, took
some retainers with him and went to
Delhi. His son Madhu Singh rose to
high favour and rank in the service of
tbe Mah£ra;ja of Kotah ; his sister was



married to the heir, and his descend-
ants thus acquired the title of Mama
("maternal uncle") in Kotah. Ulti-
mately, in 1838, a portion of the State
of Kotah was cut off, with the consent
of the Maharaja and of the British
Government, and erected into the
State of Jhala war, under one of Madhu
Singh's descendants, Madan Singh, son
of Zalim Singh, who had long been the
successful administrator of Kotah.
Madan Singh received the title of
Maharaj Rana. His son, Prithi Singh,
did good service during the Mutiny ;
and was succeeded in 1876 by his
adopted son, the present Maharaj
Rana, as a minor. His Highness was
educated at Mayo College, Ajmir ;
and was invested with full powers of
government on attaining his majority
in 1884. The State has an area of
2694 square miles, and a population
of 340,488, chiefly Hindus, but includ-
ing 20,863 Muhammadans. His High-
ness maintains a military force of 403
cavalry, 3873 infantry, and 94 guns,
and is entitled to a salute of 15 guns.
Residence : Jhalra Patan, Rajputana.

JHALERA, Thakur Hatte Singh, Thd-
kur of. A ruling chief ; b. 1858.
Succeeded to the gadi May 22, 1884.
This is a Girdsia State, connected with
Gwalior. Residence : Jhalera, Bhopal,
Central India.

JHAMARI, Rao of. See Jawahir.

JHAMAR0, Rao of. See Kaliyan Singh.

JHANDA SINGH, Subadar-Major, Rai
Bahddur. The title was conferred on
June 3, 1893. Residence: Meiktila,
Burma.

JHARAULI, Sarddr Bahddur of. See
Jwala Singh. *

JHARI GHARKHADI, Naik Sukrona
loalad Chambarya Reshma, Chief of.
A ruling chief; b. 1850. Belongs to
a Bhil (aboriginal) family. The State
(which is one of the Dang States of
Khandesh) has an area of 8 square
miles, and a population of 167, chiefly
Bhils. Residence: Jhari Gharkhadi,
Khandesh, Bombay.

JIGNI, Rao Lakshman Singh Bahadur,

Rao of. A ruling chief; b. 1860.
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor
September 16, 1871. Belongs to the
great Bundela Rajput family, des-
cended from the founder of the Orchha.



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



119



State, which has given ruling families
to Panna, Datia, Ajaigarh, Char-
khari, Jaso, and most of the States of
Bundelkhand. The founder of Jigni
was the Rao Padam Singh, one of the
sons of the great Maharaja Chhatarsal.
His great-grandson was the Rao Prithi
Singh, who received a sanad from the
British Government in 1810. His
grandson hy adoption (being adopted
from the kindred ruling family of
Panna) is the present Rao, who re-
ceived the additional title of Bahadur
at the Imperial Assemblage of Delhi,
on the occasion of the Proclamation of
Her Most Gracious Majesty as Empress
of India. The area of the State is 22
square miles; its population is 3427,
chiefly Hindus. The Rao Bahadur
maintains a military force of 47 in-
fantry and 3 guns. Residence : Jigni,
Bundelkhand, Central India.

JIND, His Highness Farzand-i-Dilband
Rasikh-ul-itikad Daulat-i-Inglishia
Raja-i-Rajagan Raja Ranbhir Singh
Bahadur, Rdjd Bahadur of. A ruling
chief ; b. 1878. Succeeded to the gadi
as a minor March 7, 1887. Belongs to
the famous Phulkian family of Sidhu
Jats, descended from Phul, the com-
mon ancestor of the ruling families of
Patiala, Jind, Nabha, and other Pun-
jab States. Phul was twenty-ninth in
descent from the Rawal Jaisal Singh,
the head of the Jadu Bhati Rajputs,
who founded Jaisalmar in 1156 a.d.
A great-grandson of Phul, named
Gajpat Singh, obtained the title of
Raja of Jind from Shah Alam,
Emperor of Delhi in 1772. His son,
Raja Bhag Singh, aided Lord Lake in
his pursuit of Holkar in 1805, and was
accordingly confirmed by the British
Government in his possessions. In
1857 Raja Sarup Singh of Jind was
the first to march against the mutineers
of Delhi ; and he and his troops took
a prominent part in the siege and
capture of the city, for which services
he received large extensions of his
territory. He died in 1864, and was
succeeded by his son, the Raj 4 Ragbir
Singh, who was created a Knight
Grand Commander of the Most Ex-
alted Order of the Star of India ; and
at the Imperial Assemblage at Delhi,
January 1, 1877, on the occasion of
the Proclamation of Her Most Gracious
Majesty as Empress of India, he was



appointed a Councillor of the Empress.
The present Raja succeeded in 1887.
The area of his State is 1259 square
miles ; and its population is 249,862,
chiefly Hindus, but including 34,247
Muhammadans and 4335 Sikhs. His
Highness maintains a military force of
379 cavalry, 1571 infantry, and 12
guns, and is entitled to a salute of
11 guns. Residence : Jind, Punjab.

JIND WADO walad AMIR ALI KHAN,

Mir. The title is hereditary, the Mir
being a representative of one of the
Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time of
the annexation. Residence: Shikarpur,
Sind.

JIT SINGH (of Maheru), Sarddr. The
title is hereditary. Belongs to a Jat
family, descended from Sardar Ramdas
Singh and Sardar Gurdas Singh, two
brothers, who took possession of
Maheru at the time of the decline of
the Mughal power. In 1799 a.d.,
when the Maharaja Ranjit Singh be-
came all-powerful in the Punjab,
Sardar Charat Singh of Maheru made
his submission to him, and retained
his possessions. His son, Sardar
Jawahir Singh, succeeded, and was
confirmed in eleven villages. But on
his death, and the succession of Sardar
Jaimal Singh, these were resumed
with the exception of Maheru. The
Sarddr Jaimal Singh did good service
in the time of the Mutiny in 1857, and
on his death was succeeded by the
present Sardar. Residence: Maheru,
Jalandhar, Punjab.

JITMAN GURANG, Subadar-Major,
Rai Bahadur. The title was conferred
on May 25, 1895. Residence : Shillong,
Assam.

JIVANJI JAMSHEDJI MODI, Shams-
ul-Ulama. The title was conferred
for eminence in oriental learning on
June 3, 1893. Residence : Bombay.

JIWAN SINGH, C.S.I. (of Shahzadpur),
Sarddr; b. 1860. The title is heredi-
tary. Belongs to a Jat (Sindhu)
family, descended from Sarddr Dip
Singh, who was the Mahant of the
" Damdama Saheb," or resting-place,
which was the retreat of the Guru
Govind Singh, the tenth and last Sikh
Guru, after his defeat by the Imperial
army of Delhi. A large number of
Sikhs assembled around Dip Singh,
who was ultimately slain in a battle



120



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



with the Governor of Lahore. Dip ]
Singh was succeeded by Sudha Singh, i
who fell in a battle with the Governor
of Jalandhar, and has always been
known among the Sikhs as " Shahid,"
or the Martyr, which became a family
name. His successor was Sardar Ka-
ram Singh, who took possession of
some territory in the Singhpura dis-
trict, which, with the other Cis-Sutlej
territories, came under British control
in 1808-9. Sardar Sheo Kirpal Singh,
Shahid, did good service in the time of
the Mutiny of 1857, and was rewarded
by Government; and his son is the
present Sardar, who was created a
Companion of the Most Exalted Order
of the Star of India on January 1,
1891. Residence: Shahzadpur, Am-
bala, Punjab.

JTWAN SINGH (of Atari), Sardar; b.
1835. The title is hereditary. Be-
longs to a Sidhu Jat (Rajput) family,
descended from Kanh Chand. His
great-grandson was the famous Sardar
Sham Singh, whose daughter was be-
trothed to the Prince Nau Nihal Singh,
grandson of the Maharaja Ranjit
Singh. When the Sikh army invaded
the Cis-Sutlej territory, Sardar Sham
Singh disapproved of the war, but be-
ing reproached with his inaction he
joined the camp, and fell in battle in
1846. His sons were Sardar Thakur
Singh and Sardar Kanh Singh, and
after the annexation much of the
family estate was confirmed to the
latter. He died without issue in
1872, and his estates were allowed to
devolve on Sardar Ajit Singh, son of
Sardar Thakur Singh, and a younger
brother of the Sirdar Jiwan Singh.
The latter is the eldest son of the late
Sardar Thakur Singh. He has two
sons, named Partab Singh and Changa
Singh. Residence: Atari, Amritsar,
Punjab.

JIWAN SINGH, Thakur (of Jakhnoda),
Rao Bahadur. The title is personal,
and was conferred on May 20, 1890.
Residence : Alirajpur, Central India.

JOB AT, Bana Indarjit Singh, Rand of.
A ruling chief ; b. 1889. Succeeded to
the gadi on August 14, 1894, as a
minor. Belongs to the Rahtor tribe
of Rajputs (Hindu) ; occupies a fort
picturesquely situated on the summit
of a steep rocky hill, shut in on three



sides by forest-clad mountains, and
overlooking the town of Jobat. The
area of the State is 132 square miles ;
its population 9387, chiefly Hindus,
but including 3916 belonging to Bhil
and other aboriginal tribes. The Rana
maintains a military force of 5 cavalry
and 44 infantry. Residence: Jobat,
Bhopawar, Central India.

JODHA SINHA (of Kakhauta), Rao; b.
1838. The title is hereditary. The
Rao belougs to an old Sengar family,
who settled in Pargand Auraiya in
Etawah. He has a son and heir,
named Lala Guman Singh, born Febru-
ary 27, 1870. Residence: Kakhauta,
Etawah, North- Western Provinces.

J0DHPUR, His Highness Raj Rajesh-
war Maharaj-Adniraj Sard&r Singh
Bahadur, G.CjS.I., MaMrdjd of. A
ruling chief; b. 1880. Succeeded to
the gadi October 24, 1895. Is the
Chief of the great Rahtor tribe or
clan of the Rajputs, claiming direct
descent from the legendary hero Rama,
and, like the Sesodias of Udaipur and
the Kachhwahas of Jaipur, represent-
ing the royal line of the Surya Vansa
or Solar race. The proper name of
the State, the capital of which is Jodh-
pur (from the name of its founder),
is Marwar — anciently Marusthdn,
"the land of death," a term applied
formerly not only to the country of
Marwar, but to the whole of the great
Indian Desert from the Sutlej to the
Indian Ocean. Tod, in his learned
Aninah of Rdjdsthdn, says of the
family of the Jodhpur Maharaja —
" It requires neither Bhat nor Bard
to illustrate its nobility ; a series of
splendid deeds which time cannot ob-
literate has emblazoned the Rahtor
name on the historical tablet. Where
all these races have gained a place in
the Temple of Fame it is almost in-
vidious to select, but truth compels
me to place the Rahtor with the
Chauhan on the very pinnacle." In
Tod's work the Annals of J f dried r
occupy a place only second to those
of Me war (or Udaipur), and present a
most interesting view of feudalism in
India. Even to the present day the
feudal Thakurs of Rajputana — feuda-
tories of their Highnesses the Maha-
rana of Udaipur, the Maharajas of
Jodhpur and Jaipur, and the other



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



121



Princes of this territory — are nobles
of high account and great local power.
Up to 1194 a.d. the Rahtor family
were rulers of the vast Empire of
Kanauj. The famous Jai Chand was
the last King of Kanauj, and his
grandson, Sivaji, migrated westward
to Marwar. Scions of the family be-
came rulers of Bikanir and Kishangarh
in Raj pu tana, of Idar and Ahmadnagar
in Gujarat, and elsewhere. Mandor,
the ancient capital of Marwar, was
conquered by Rao Chanda, who was
tenth in descent from Sivaji, about
the year 1382 a.d. His grandson
Jodh, the eldest of twenty-four sons
of Kinmal, moved the capital from
Mandor to Jodhpur 1459 a.d. After
resisting the Emperor Babar, and the
Afghan Sher Shah, Jodh ultimately
had to submit to the Great Mughal,
Akbar, and sent his son Udai Singh to
take service at Delhi ; and ultimately
Udai Singh's sister, the famous Jodh
Bai, became the consort of the Mughal
monarch. When Udai Singh's son,
Raja Sur Singh, succeeded to the gadi
of Jodhpur, he rose to high favour
with his Imperial uncle, and was the
general of Akbar's troops who added
Gujarat and the Deccan to the Mughal
Empire. His son, Raja Jaswant Singh,
was the general whom the Emperor
Shah Jahan sent against his rebellious
son Aurangzeb, and was defeated by
the latter. The successor of Jaswant
Singh was a posthumous son, the
famous Ajit Singh. In his time
Aurangzeb in person attacked Rajpu-
tana, sacked Jodhpur, and ordered the
conversion of the Rajputs to Muham-
madanism. But Ajit Singh formed a
league with Udaipur and Jaipur, and
the combined forces of the three great
Rajput States held in check the armies
of Aurangzeb. One stipulation of this
league is famous, and was disastrous
to Jodhpur and Jaipur by reason of
the domestic feuds it caused. It was
to the effect that the Jodhpur and
Jaipur families, who had lost the
privilege of marrying Princesses of
Udaipur because they had given their
own daughters to the Mughal Em-
perors, should recover this privilege,
on condition that the issue of any
marriage with an Udaipur Princess
should succeed to the Raj before all
other children. Ajit Singh was mur-
dered by his son Bakht Singh, and



heavy troubles thereafter befell the
Rahtor family. There was a long war
between the Rajas of Jaipur and
Jodhpur, who were rival suitors for
the hand of a Princess of Udaipur.
Amir Khan, the great Pindari leafier
(afterwards Nawab of Tonk), took
sides, first with Jaipur, then with
Jodhpur, and plundered and utterly
exhausted both States in turn. At
last the British Government inter-
vened, and by a treaty in 1818 Jodhpur
became a feudatory of the Paramount
Power. Raja Man Singh died in 1843,
leaving no son, and the nobles and
Court officials, with the consent of the
British Government, elected Takht
Singh, Raja of Ahmadnagar, a des-
cendant of A jit Singh, to the vacant ^as/t .
The Raja Takht Singh did good service
during the Mutiny of 1857. He died
in 1873, and was succeeded by the
late Maharaja Sir Jaswant Singh, who
was subsequently created a Grand
Commander of the Most Exalted Order
of the Star of India. The same ex-
alted dignity, that of G.C.S.I., was
conferred on the present Maharaja on
June 22, 1897. The area of his State
is 37,000 square miles ; its population
is 1,750,403, chiefly Hindus, but in-
cluding about 155,000 Muhammadans
and about 172,000 Jains. In point of
extent the Jodhpur State is larger
than any of the smaller European
States, and is somewhat larger than
Bavaria and Saxony combined; in
population it surpasses the Grand
Duchy of Baden. The Maharaja
maintains a military force of 3162
cavalry, 3653 infantry, and 121 guns,
and is entitled to a salute of 21 guns
('including 4 guns personal). The
family cognizance is the falcon, the
sacred garur of the Solar Rajputs. The
arms of His Highness were displayed
on the banner presented to his prede-
cessor by the Empress of India at the
Imperial Assemblage of Delhi in
January 1877, on the occasion of the
Proclamation of Her Most Gracious
Majesty as Empress. Rexidemce : Jodh-
pur, Rajputana.

J0GESH CHANDRA CHATTARJI (of
Annliya, Ranaghat,), Rai Bahddmr,
The title is personal, and was con-
ferred on February 16, 1887, on the
occasion of the Jubilee of Her Majesty's
reign. Residence: Assam,



122



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



JOGESHWAR CHANDRA CHANDRA,

Rai Bahadur. The title was conferred
on June 22, 1897. Residence: Cut-
tack, Bengal.

JOGINDRA CHANDRA MITTRA, Rai

Bahddur. The title is personal, and
was conferred on January 1, 1895.
Residence : Calcutta, Bengal.

JOGINDRA KISHOR RAI CHANDHRI,

Rai Bahddur. The title is personal,
and was conferred on May 25, 1895.
Residence: Maimansingh, Bengal.

JOGINDRA NATH MITTRA, Rai Ba-
hddur. The title is personal, and was
conferred on June 3, 1893. Residence :
Bengal.

JOGINDRA NATH RAI (of Nator),
Kumar. The title is personal. The
Kumar is the son of the late Raja
Anandanath Rai Bahddur, C.S.I.
Residence: Rajshahi, Bengal.

JORA MAL, Rai Saheh. The title was
conferred on January 1, 1892. Resi-
dence : Delhi, Punjab.

JOTINDRA KRISHNA DEB, Kumar.
The Kumar holds this title as a per-
sonal distinction, as the eldest sur-
viving son of a Raja. Residence :
Calcutta, Bengal.

JOTINDRA MOHAN TAGOR, Sir,

K.C.S.I. Mahdrdjd Bahddur. See
Tagore.

JOWAHIR MAL, Diwan, Diwan Bahd-
dur. See Diwan.

JOY GOBIND LAW, CLE. Created a
CLE. on January 1, 1899. Residence:
Calcutta.

JUBBAL, Rana Padam Chand, Rand of.
A ruling chief; b. 1861. Succeeded to
the gadi as a minor March 17, 1877.
Belongs to a Rahtor Rajput family
{see Jodhpur), claiming descent from
the ruling family of Sirmur, which
preceded the present dynasty. Origin-
ally tributary to Sirmur, this State
(which is one of the Simla Hill States)
was freed by the British after the
conclusion of the Gurkha war, and the
Rana, Puran Singh, received a sanad
from Lord Lake in 1815. After great
vicissitudes of fortune, Puran Singh
(who had given up his State to the
British Government) died in 1849, and
it was then resolved to restore the
State to his son, Rana Karm Chand.
The Jatter died in 1877, and was suc-



Rc-



ceeded by his son, the present Rana.
The area of the State is 257 square
miles ; its population is 19,196, chiefly
Hindus. The Rana maintains a military
force of 50 infantry. Residence : Jubbal,
Simla Hills, Punjab.

JUGAL KISHOR, Rai Bahddur.
ceived the title on January 1,
Residence : Gwalior, Central India.

JUGAL KISHOR, Rai Saheb. Received
the title on January 1, 1898. Is dis-
trict engineer of Hardoi. Residence:
Hardoi, Oudh.

JUGAL KISHOR, Lala> Rai Saheb. The
title was conferred on May 21, 1898.
Residence: Delhi, Punjab.

JUJHAR SINGH JU DEO, Rao Bahddur
Diwan, CLE. Created a Companion
of the Most Eminent Order of the
Indian Empire on January 1, 1895.
Residence : Charkhari, Central India.

JUMKHA, Becharbha Baryal, Chief of.
A niling chief; b. 1836. Belongs to
an aboriginal tribe. Residence: Jum-
kha, Rewa|Kantha, Bombay.

JUMM00 AND CASHMERE, His High-
ness the Maharaja Bahddur of. See
Jammu and Kashmir.

JUNAGARH, His Highness Sir Rasul
Khanji Muhabat Khanji, K.CS.L,
Nawab of, A ruling chief. Belongs
to a Babi Pathan (Muhammadan)
family. Is tenth in succession from
Sher Khan Babi, the founder of the
State, who about the year 1735 ex-
pelled the Mughal Governor and estab-
lished his own power. The Nawab
Sir Muhabat Khanji, was created
Knight Commander of the Most Ex-
alted Order of the Star of India in
1871. He died in 1882, and was suc-
ceeded by his son, the late Nawab Sir
Bahddur Khanji, who was invested
with the insignia of a Knight Grand
Commander of the Most Eminent
Order of the Indian Empire on
November 20, 1890. His Highness
the present Nawab was created a
K.C.S.I. on January 1, 1899. The
area of the State is 3279 square miles,
and its population is 387,499, chiefly
Hindus, but including 76,401 Muham-
madans. His Highness maintains a
military force of 251 cavalry, 1972
infantry, and 66 guns, and is entitled
to a salute of 11 guns. Residence:
Junagarh, Kdthi&w&r ? Bombay



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



123



JWALA PERSHAD, Rai Bahadur. The
title is personal, and was conferred on
January 7, 1876. Residence: Ujjain,
Central India.

JWALA PERSHAD, Rai Bahadur; b.
July 13, 1848. Received the title on
January 1, 1898. Residence: Faru-
khabad, North-Western Provinces.

JWALA SINGH (of Jharauli), Sarddr
Bahadur; b. 1846. The title of Sar-
dar is hereditary, and the higher title
of Sardar Bahadur was conferred as a
personal distinction on May 25, 1892.
Belongs to a Sindhu Jat (Rajput)
family, descended from Dip Singh, the
Mahant of the " Damdama Saheb," or
resting-place of the Guru Govind Singh
(see Jiwan Singh, Shahid, Sardar).
His successor, Sudha Singh, falling in
battle with the Governor of Jalandhar,
the family have since been known by
the name of Shahid ("Martyr").
Sarddr Jwala Singh Bahadur, son of
Sardar Jit Singh of Jharauli, is the
present head of the Jharauli Shahids.
He has two sons, Devindar Singh and
Mohindar Singh. Residence : Jharauli,
Ambala, Punjab.

JWALA SINGH (of Wazirabad), Sar-
ddr ; b. 1822. The title is hereditary.
The Sardar is the youngest son of the
Sardar Ganda Singh, who was in at-
tendance on the Maharaja Sher Singh
when that prince was assassinated,
and Was severely wounded in the en-
deavour to defend him. Sardar Ganda
Singh was killed at the battle of Firuz-
shahr. Sardar Jwala Singh is an
Honorary Magistrate. Residence : Guj-
ranwala, Punjab.

JYOTI PRASAD GARGA (of Maisadal),
Rdjd. The title is personal, and was
conferred on January 1, 1890, for his
"liberality and public spirit." The
Raja is the present representative of
the Maisadal family. Their title of
Raja is said to have been conferred by
the old Nawabs of Bengal. The first
Raja was the Raja Janardhan Upad-
hyaya. Two ladies of this family at
different periods — the Rani Janaki
Devi and the Rani Mathura Devi —
have been in charge of the Raj. The
late Raja, Lakshman Prasad Garga of
Maisadal, is recorded to have rendered
good service during the Orissa famine
of 1866. Residence : Maisadal, Midna-
pur, Bengal,



KABLL SHAH, Sayyifl, Khan Bahadur.
The title is personal, and was conferred
on January 1, 1877, on the occasion of
the Proclamation of Her Most Gracious
Majesty as Empress of India. Resi-
dence : Thar and Parkar, Sind.

KABIR-UD-DIN, Shaikh, Khan Baha-
dur. The title was conferred as a
personal distinction on May 20, 1896,
for meritorious service in the Medical
Department. Residence: Bengal.

KACHESAR, Rao of See Umrao
Singh.

KACHI BARODA, Thakur Dalel Singh,
Thakur of. A ruling chief ; b. 1839.
Succeeded to the gadi 1864. The State
is tributary to Dhar, to which it is
adjacent, and contains a population of
about 3000. Residence : Kachi Baroda,
Bhopawar, Central India.

KADATTANAD, Valiya Rdjd of. The
title is hereditary, the present Raja
being the twenty-eighth in descent.
Belongs to a Samanda family, which
originally held the rule over a district
named Vatakumpuram. One of his
ancestors was driven out of Vatakum-
puram by the Zamorin of Calicut, and
thenceforward the family ruled a dis-
trict on the Malabar coast, extending
originally from Mahe to Badagara,
where the Raja now lives. This terri-
tory is said to have been granted by
the Cherakal Raja of Kolathiri. In
1766 Haidar Ali of Mysore invaded the
country, and the Raja took refuge with
the East India Company's officers in
Tellicheri ; and again, when the Sultan
Tippu invaded the country, the Raja
and his family took refuge with the
Maharaja of Travancore. In 1792 the
Raja entered into an agreement with
the British Government to receive an
annuity as compensation for the estates
of his ancestors. Like the other Mala-
bar Rajas, the family follows the Ma-



Online LibraryRoper LethbridgeThe golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon → online text (page 23 of 63)