Roper Lethbridge.

The golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon online

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succeeded to the gadi in 1497 a.d.
From him the fourth in succession,
Raja Chutum-Hla, adopted the Hindu
name of Jayadhajiya Singh ; and he
was reigning at the time of the Mughal
invasion by Mir Jumla under the orders
of the Emperor Aurangzeb. The in-
vasion was unsuccessful, and the Ahom
Raja extended his frontier to Goal-
para. The greatest of the dynasty
was Raja Rudra Singh, who succeeded
to the gadi in 1695 ; and in the next
century their power decayed. Raja
Gaurinath Singh was the titular Raja
when the British first sent a force into
Assam in 1792 to restore him after his
expulsion by the Koch Raja of Darrang.
Then followed an invasion of the
Burmese, who ruled the country till
the first Burmese war ; at the close of
which Assam was ceded by Burma to
the British Power. Raja Gaurinath
Singh had been succeeded in title by



his brother, Raja Chandra Kanta
Singh ; and the grandson of the latter
is the present Raja. The family
cognizance is an Arowan (Royal
Umbrella) and Sripus Kalki (Golden
Head-dress). Residence : Gauhati,
Assam.

KESHAVRAO BHASKARJI, Rao Ba-
hadur. The title is personal, and was
conferred on January 1, 1877, on the
occasion of the Proclamation of Her
Most Gracious Majesty as Empress of
India. Residence: Bombay.

KESOBATI KUMARI, Musjamat, Rdni.
The title was conferred on January 1,
1898. Residence: Hemuie, Santal
Parganas, Bengal.

KESOWJI NATHU SAILOR, Rao
Bahadur. Received the title on
January 2, 1899. Residence : Bombay.

KESRI. See also Kishori.

KESRI NARAYAN, Rai ; I. November
24, 1864. Succeeded to the title on
March 16, 1895. The title is heredit-
ary, and of ancient origin. Residence :
Allahabad.

KESRI SINGH (of Lakhnadon), ThdAr.
The title is hereditary, the Thaknr
being the representative of one of tie
ancient Chiefs of the Seoni district.
Residence : Lakhnadon, Seoni, Centrd
Provinces.

KET, Maung, Kyet thaye zaung shnn
Salwe ya Min. The title is personal
and was conferred on June 1, 1888. Ii
means "Recipient of the Gold
Chain of Honour," and is indicated by
the letters K.S.M. after the name.
Residence : Yaw, Burma.

KEUNJHAR, Maharaja Dhanurjai
Narayan Bhanj Deo, Rdjd of. A
ruling chief ; b. July 27, 1849 ; suc-
ceeded to the gadi as a minor
September 4, 1861. Belongs to a
Rajput (Hindu) family, claiming
descent from Joti Bhanj, a brother
of Adi Bhanj, the founder of the
Moharbhanj State (q.v.), thirty-four
generations back. The following is
the local tradition as to the way in
which the Keunjhar Rajas got the
patronymic of Bhanj, in which the
State got the name of Keunjhar, and
in which its borders were enlarged : —
Jai Singh, a son of Man Singh, the
Maharaja of Jaipur in Rajputana,
came to visit the shrine of Jagannath



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



137



in Puri. He married Padmavati, the
daughter of the Gajapati King of
Puri, Prattlpendra Deb, and received
as her dowry the State of Hariharpur,
which then comprised the two States
of Moharbhanj and Keunjhar. Two
sons were horn to him, the elder of
whom was named Adi Singh and the
younger Joti Singh. In Mauza
Rarua in killa Hariharpur there was
a petty Zamindar named Mayura
Dhwaja in possession of five pirs.
He was conquered by Prince Adi
Singh, and deprived of his Zarnindari.
The Gajapati King of Puri, hearing of
the success of Prince Adi Singh,
conferred on him the title of Bhanj.
Since that time the title has been
hereditary in the Moharbhanj and
Keunjhar Rd,j families. Adi Singh on
his accession to the gadi changed the
name of Hariharpur into Moharbhanj,
and in commemoration of his conquest
of the territory of Mayura Dhwaja,
called it and the villages comprised in
it Adipur Pir, after his own name.
Prior to his death, Jai Singh separated
from his killa a portion of land which
at present goes by the name of Ni jgarh
zillah, and left it in possession of his
younger son, Joti Bhanj. Thereupon
the latter left Moharbhanj, and estab-
lished a garh (fort) at Jotipur, where
he dwelt. Subsequently he removed
his headquarters to a place where
there was a spring (Jhar) in an ebony
(kendu) forest ; and since then the
headquarters and the killa itself are
called Khendu-Jhar or Keunjhar.
Jotipur Garh, with its adjoining
villages, was annexed to killa Keun-
jhar and called Jotipur Pir. The
boundaries of killa Keunjhar since its
foundation by Joti Bhanj up to the
reign of Govind Bhanj are laid down
in the topographical maps which were
prepared by Government between
1850 and 1862. Govind Bhang being
offended by some reason or other with
his father, Trilochan Bhanj, retired to
Puri and lived there He was ap-
pointed Commander-in-Chief of the
army of the Gajapati King of Puri,
and gained a victory for him in the
battle of Kanchi-Cavery in the
Madras Presidency. Soon after, be-
ing informed of his father's death, he
got the permission of the Puri Raja
to return home. Before his departure
he obtained as a reward from the |



Ra ja the ^ Zamindari of Athgarh,
which adjoins the eastern border of the
Keunjhar State, and on his return
from Puri he was installed on the
Keunjhar gadi. Since that date the
zillah of Athgarh has remained an-
nexed to killa Keunjhar. It is
commonly known as Anandpur. In
1794 a.d. Jainirdan Bhanj married
Krishnapriya, the daughter of Man-
ipal and grand-daughter of Arnapurna,
the R&ni of Pal Lahera, and received
as dowry the Zamindari of Pal Lahera.
On the death of Krishnapriya in 1825,
the petty Zamindars of Pal Lahera
combined with the ryots of that
State and opposed Janardan Bhanj 's
possession of Pal Lahera. From 1794
to 1825 the Raja of Keunjhar had
full authority over P&l Lahera ; and
though the latter was subsequently
made independent, it still pays its
tribute through the former. The title
of Raja is hereditary in this family,
and dates from the period of the
Mahratta dominion in Orissa ; it was
formally conferred by the British
Government in 1874. The title of
Maharaja was conferred on the
present Chief as a personal distinc-
tion, January 1, 1877, on the occasion
of the Proclamation of Her Most
Gracious Majesty as Empress of
India. The cognizance of the family
is a peacock with the tail spread.
The area of the State, which is one of
the Orissa Tributary Mahals, is 3096
square miles ; its population is 215,612,
chiefly Hindus, but including nearly
20,000 belonging to various aboriginal
tribes. The Mahar4ja maintains a
military force of 2949 infantry and 32
guns. Residence: Keunjhar, Oinssa,
Bengal.
KHACHAR ALA CHELA, C.S.T. Created
a Companion of the Most Exalted
Order of the Star of India on June
22, 1897. Residence: Jasdan, Kathi-
dwar, Bombay.

KHADIJA BEGAM SAHIBA. Princess.
The title is personal, and was conferred
on March 11, 1866. Residence:
Madras.

KHAEtBAKHSH KHAN, Mir, Marri,
Khan Bahadur. The Mir received the
title of Khan Bahadur on May 20, 1896.
Residence : Baluchistan.

KHAIRA, Raja of. See Ramnarayan
Singh,



138



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



KHAIR-UN-NISA BEGAM, Her High-
ness the Nawab. The title is personal ;
it was originally conferred by the
Nawab of the Carnatic, and recognized
on December 16, 1890. Her Highness
is the Shadi widow of His Highness
the late Nawab Ghulam Muhammad
Ghaus Khan, last titular Nawab of the
Carnatic. Residence: Madras.

KHAIRAGARH, Kamal Narayan Singh,

Rdjd of. A ruling chief; b. 1879.
Succeeded to the c/adi on the death of
Lai Umrao Singh, February 19, 1891,
and received the title of Rajd as a
personal distinction on January 1, 1896.
Belongs to a Kshatriya family that
claims descent from the ancient Maha-
rajas of Chutia Nagpur. On January
1, 1898, the title of Raja was declared
hereditary. The area of the State is
941 square miles ; its population is
86,000, chiefly Hindus. Residence:
Khairagarh, Raipur, Central Provinces.

KHAIRIGARH. Rani of. See Surat
Kunwar.

KHAIRPUR, His Highness Mir Sir Faiz
Muhammed Khan, Talpur, G.C.I. E. }
Mir of. A ruling chief. Has recently
succeeded his father, the late Mir His
Highness Sir Ali Murad Khan, Talpur.
Is the representative of the historical
Baluch family called Talpur, that con-
quered Sind in 1783 a.d. In that year
Mir Fateh AM Khan Talpur established
himself as Rais of Sind ; and subse-
quently his nephew, Mir Sohrab Khan
Talpur, with his two sons, named
respectively Mir Rustam and Ali Murad
— the last-named being the late Mir
of Khairpur — founded the Khairpur
branch of the Talpur rulers of Sind.
Mir Sohrab Khan gradually extended
his dominions until they extended from
the Jaisalmir Desert on the east to
Kachh Gandava in Baluclustan on the
west. In 1813 he ceased to pay tribute
to Afghanistan, and in 1832 Khairpur
was recognized as a separate State from
the rest of Sind, in a treaty with the
BritishPower. During the first Afghan
war, when most of the Sind Mirs were
believed to be hostile, the Mir Ali
Murad Khan cordially supported the
British policy. Consequently, when,
after the close of that war, the victory
of Miani (Meeanee) effected the con-
quest of Sind, and the rest of Sind was
annexed and incorporated in the British
territory, the State of Khairpur re-



tained its political existence as a
feudatory of the Empire. In 1866 a
sanad was granted to His Highness's
predecessor, guaranteeing the succes-
sion according to Muhammadan law.
His Highness was created a Knight
Grand Commander of the Most Emin-
ent Order of the Indian Empire on
June 22, 1897, on the auspicious oc-
casion of the Diamond Jubilee of Her
Most Gracious Majesty the Queen
Empress. The area of the State is
6109 square miles ; its population is
129,153, chiefly Muhammadans, but
including more than 26,000 Hindus.
His Highness maintains a military
force of 700 cavalry, 774 infantry, and
32 guns, and is entitled to a salute of
15 guns. Residence: Khairpur, Sind,
Bombay.

KHAJURGA0N, Rand of. See Shankar
Bakhsh Singh ; see also Sheoraj Singh.

KHAJURIA, Mian Karim Bakhsh, Midn
of. A ruling chief; b. 1859. Suc-
ceeded to the gadi December 24, 1863.
Belongs to a Pindari (Muhammadan)
family. The population of the State
is 467, chiefly Hindus. Residence:
Khajuria, Bhopal, Central India.

KHAKSIS, Rdjd of. See Raghunath.

KHALAK SINGH (of Mohli), Thdkur.
Succeeded his father, the late Thdkur
Hamir Singh, in 1894. The title is
hereditary, and was originally con-
ferred by the Raja of Benares. Be-
longs to the same family as the Rajas
of Hatisi in Damoh district, Central
Provinces. This branch of the family
obtained the jdgir of Mohli from the
former Government of Sagar. Resi-
dence : Sagar, Central Provinces.

KHALTHAUN, ThakurHargayan Singh,
Thdkur of. A ruling chief; b. 1864.
Succeeded to the gadi in 1883. Belongs
to a Kshatriya Yadav (Hindu) family.
The area of the State is 5 square miles ;
its population is about 8000, chiefly
Hindus. The Thakur maintains a
military force of 15 cavalry and 50
infantry. Residence : Khalthaun,
Gwalior, Central India.

KHAM HS0I, Ahmudan gaung Tazeik ya
Min. This Burmese title {see Intro-
duction) was conferred on May 30,
1891. Residence: Mongye, Burma.

KHAN BABA KHAN, Khdn Bahddvr.
The title is personal, and was con-



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



139



ferred on February 16, 1887, on the
occasion of the Jubilee of Her Majesty's
reign. Residence: Peshawar, Punjab.

KHAN MUHAMMAD KHAN walad
WALI MUHAMMAD KHAN, Mir.
The title has been continued for life, the
Mir being a representative of one of the
Mirs or Chiefs of Sind at the time of
the annexation. Residence: Shikar-
pur, Sind.

KHANDERAO APPAJI, Gupte, Rao Sa-

heb. The title is personal. Residence :
Thand, Bombay.

KHANDERAO SIDRAMAPA DESAI
NADGAODA (of Kurbet), Shriman
Maha Naik Nadgaoda Nagnuriebirada
Himori. The title is hereditary,
having been originally conferred by the
Chief of Anigundi on an ancestor, for
having cleared the jungles of Gokak of
the bandits who frequented them — and
having been recognized by the British
Government. Belongs to a Mahratta
(Hindu) family claiming descent from
Jogi Nikumbi Naik, through a long
series of generations. Khanderao
Baba Saheb succeeded his father
Sidramapa Balapa Desai. Residence:
Belgaum, Bombay.

KHANDERAO VISHWANATH RASTE,

Rao Bahadur; b. 1845. The title of
Rao Bahadur is personal, and was
conferred on January 1, 1877, at the
Imperial Assemblage at Delhi, on the
occasion of the Proclamation of Her
Majesty as Empress of India — when
he also received a Medal of Honour.
Is also a First Class Sardar of the
Deccan, and claims the hereditary
rank of Sardar. Belongs to a Kon-
kanasth Brahman family, resident
from early times in Velneshwar, in the
district of Ratnagiri ; originally the
family name was "Gokhle," changed
at a later date for " Raste." The
founder of the family was named
Ballah. His descendant Shamji Naik
had three sons, who entered the service
of the Shahu Raja of Sat&ra, in which
they acquired important positions.
The second of these, named Bhikaji,
had a daughter married to the Peshwa
Narayan Rao ; the eldest, named
Haribaji Naik, was the ancestor of
this family. His great-grandson,
Khanderao Nilkant Raste, was ap-
pointed to a military command by the
celebrated Nana Farnavis under the



Peshwa Mahadeo Rao Narayan ; he
served with great success in many
campaigns, and rose to high honours,
with considerable grants of land. His
son, Vishwasrao Khanderao, was a
Sardar of the Deccan of the second
class ; he was granted a pension by the
Government in 1819, and was suc-
ceeded by his son, the present title-
holder. The Rao Bahadur was
educated at the Poona College ; was a
Member of the Bombay Legislative
Council, 1884-86 ; is a Magistrate for
Poona, and also for Kolaba, and a
Justice of the Peace for the town and
island of Bombay. Residence : Poona,
Bombay.

KHANDHAI SINGH, Subadar-Major,
Bahadur. Received the title of Baha-
dur on July 24, 1896. Residence : Ba-
hadurpur, Rai Bareilly, North- Western
Provinces.

KHANDKAR FAZL-I-RABBI, Khan Ba-
hadur. See Fazl-i-Rabbi, Khwandkhar.

KHANDPARA, Raja Natobar Singh
Mardraj Bhramarbar Rai, Raja of.
A ruling chief ; b. 1837. Succeeded to
the gadi February 28, 1867. Belongs
to a Rajput (Hindu) family, claiming
descent from a younger son of the
Nayagarh family, seventy-one genera-
tions ago. The RaVjii Raghunath
Singh of Nayagarh had two sons.
The elder son, Harihar Singh, became
Raja of Nayagarh, and the younger,
Jadunath Singh Mangraj, retained
possession of four Garhs or forts, as
his share, viz. Kadua, Ghuntsahi,
Sardhapur, and Khedpada, all in Naya-
garh. There was at that time a Chief
ruling over a tract from Ogalpur to
Harichandanpur in Khandpara. Him
the said Mangraj defeated, and took
possession of his territory. Gradually
in course of time and by dint of arms,
his son Pitabas Singh, his grandson
Narayan Singh, and his great-grandson
Balunkeswar Singh extended their
dominions, and strengthened the State
of Khandpara. The petty Chiefs who
ruled within the jurisdiction of this
State during these times, and their
subjects, were savage aborigines. The
Rajas of Khandpard defeated these
petty Chiefs, gave education to the
savages, cleared the jungle, formed
villages and civilized the country. Up
to the reign of Raja Narayan Singh
Mangraj, Khandpara extended on the



140



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



east up to Banki, on the west to Bala-
ramprasad in Daspalla, on the north to
Kantilo, and on the south up to Jogia-
pali in Nayagarh. During the reign
of Banamali Singh Mardraj Bhra-
marbar Rai, son of Raja Balunkeswar
Singh Mangraj, the Raja of Bod did
not give the State to his adopted son
Makund Deb Bhanj, whom he had
brought from Moharbhanj, but gave it
to another person whom he subse-
quently adopted as his son. This gave
offence to Makund Deb Bhanj, and he
consequently sought help from the
Raja of Khandpara, Banamali Singh
Mardraj Bhramarbar Rai. This Bana-
mali was a brave and powerful Raja,
and expert in war. He engaged the
Raja of Bod, and after defeating him
made the said Makund Deb Bhanj
Raja over a part of Bod territory, and
gave the new State the name of
Daspalla. Raja Jadunath Singh Man-
graj, the founder of the Khandpara
State, got the title of Mangraj from
the Maharaja of Orissa, and it was
enjoyed from this time down to
Balunkeswar Singh. Banamali Singh,
the son of Balunkeswar Singh, was a
very powerful Chief, and defended the
Maharaja of Orissa from the attacks
of his enemies. The latter gave him
as a reward the title of Bhai Mardraj
Bhramarbar Rai, which has been
enjoyed by successive Chiefs to the
present day. During the reign of Raja
Niladri Singh Mardraj Bhramarbar
Rai, Raghuji Bhonsle, the Maharaja
of Nagpur, gave the Raja a flag, which
is still used., When Orissa was first
conquered by the British Government,
Raja Narsingha Singh Mardraj Bhra-
marbar Rai gave assistance to the chief
military officers of the British Govern-
ment, and received an elephant and a
cannon in recognition thereof. The
present Raja is a son of the late Raja
Krishna Chandra Singh Mardraj Bhra-
marbar Rai ; and succeeded his brother,
the late Kunja Vihari Singh Mardraj
Bhramarbar Rai, who died without
issue in 1867. The title of Raja is
hereditary in the family, and dates
from the period of the Mahratta
dominion in Orissa; it was formally
recognized by the British Government
in 1874. The cognizance of the family
is a tiger's head. The State, which is
one of the Orissa Tributary Mahals,
has an area of 244 square miles, and a



population of 66,296, chiefly Hindus.
The Raja maintains a military force of
1085 infantry and 12 guns. Residence :
Khandpara, Orissa, Bengal.

KHANIADHANA, Raja Chhatar Singh,
Jdgircldr of. A ruling chief ; b. 1863.
Succeeded to the gadi December 13,
1869. Belongs to the great Bundela
(Rajput) family of Orchha, that has
given ruling families to Panna, Datia,
Ajaigarh, and most of the States of
Bundelkhand. Amresh was a younger
son of the Maharaja Udit Singh of
Orchha, and received the territory of
Khaniadhana as his portion. Much of
this territory was taken away by the
Mahrattas. Fourth in descent from
Amresh was the Raja Guman Singh,
who received a sanad from the British
Government in 1863. Guman Singh
died in 1869, and was succeeded by the
present Jagirdar, who on January 1,
1877, at the Imperial Assemblage at
Delhi, on the occasion of the Pro-
clamation of Her Majesty as Empress
of India, received the title of Raja as
a personal distinction. The area of the
State is 84 square miles; its population
is 13,494, chiefly Hindus. The Raja
maintains a military force of 5 cavalry,
65 infantry, and 2 guns. Residence:
Khaniadhana, Bundelkhand, Central
India.

KHANPUR, Rdjd of. See Jahandad
Khan.

KHARAL, Mian Sursinghji Sardar-
singhji, Mian of. A ruling chief ; b.
1860. Succeeded to the gadi April 20,
1884. Belongs to a Koli (Muhamma-
dan) family. The area of the State is
16 square miles ; its population 3189,
chiefly Hindus. Residence: Kharal,
Mahi Kantha, Bombay. *

KHARAN, Sarddr of. See Naoroz Khan.

KHARDA, Rdjd of. See Mukund Deb.

KHARIAR, Thdknr of. See Padman
Singh.

KHARSEDJI RUSTAMJI THANA-
WAIA, Khan Bahadur, CLE. Re-
ceived the CLE. on June 3, 1899. Is
Diwanof Ratlam. Residence: Ratlam,
Central India.

KHARSEDJI RUSTAMJI, Khan Bahd-
dnr. The title is personal, and was
conferred on January 1, 1877, on the
occasion of the Proclamation of Her



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



141



Majesty as Empress of India. Resi-
dence : Baroda.

KHARSIA, Thakur Balwant Singh,
Thdlcur of. A ruling chief; b. 1855.
Succeeded to the gadi September 26,
1876. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu)
family. Residence : Kharsia, Bhopal,
Central India.

KHARSOWAN, Thakur Mahendra Na-
rayan Singh Deo, Thakur of. A
ruling chief; b. 1869. Succeeded his
father, Thakur Raghunath Singh Deo,
March 2, 1884, as a minor. Belongs to
a Rajput (Hindu) family, descended
from a younger son of the ancient
Porahat family, that came into Orissa
in very early times from Jodhpur in
Rajputana. The title of Thakur was
originally bestowed by the Raja of
Porahat, and has been conferred on
the Chief as a personal distinction. The
State (which is one of the Chota
Nagpur Tributary Mahals) has an area
of 149 square miles, and a population
of 31,051, chiefly Hindus. The Thakur
has a military force of 3 guns. Resi-
dence : Kharsowan, Singhbhum, Chota
Nagpur, Bengal.

KHEM SINGH, Bedi, The Hon. Baba
Sir, K.C.I.E. See Baba.

KHEMCHAND, Tahilrdm, CLE. See
Tahilram.

KHENDA, Thakur of. See Rani Singh.

KHERAWARA, Thakur Vajesinghji,
Thakur of. A ruling chief; b. 1847.
Belongs to a Koli (aboriginal) family.
The area of his State is 27 square
miles; its population is over 1300,
chiefly Hindus. Residence: Kherawara,
Mahi Kantha, Bombay.

KHERI, Chief of. Is a feudatory of the
Raja of Keonthal (q.v.), and rules over
one of the Simla Hill States. Resi-
dence : Kheri, Simla Hills, Punjab.

KHERWASA, Thakur Partab Singh,
Thakur of. A ruling chief; b. 1880.
Succeeded to the gadi as a minor in
1887. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu)
family. The population of the State is
about 500, Hindus and Muhammadans.
Residence: Kherwasa, "Western Malwa,
Central India.

KHET SINGH (of Gobra), Rdjd; b.
February 4, 1842. The title is heredi-
tary, having been originally conferred
by one of the old Gond Rajas of Garha-



Mandla, and confirmed by Government .
Is a descendant of Raja Karan, and
rendered good service in the campaigns
that followed the Mutiny of 1857.
Residence: Gobra, Damoh, Central
Provinces.

KHETTAR (KSHETTRA) CHANDAR
ADITYA, Rai Bahadur. The title
was conferred on May 25, 1892. Resi-
dence : Bengal.

KHETTAR (KSHETTRA) CHANDAR
BANARJI, Rai Bahadur. The title
is personal, and was conferred on
December 6, 1884, for services rendered
in the Public Works Department.
Residence : Calcutta, Bengal.

KHLANDA, Madan Singh, Chief of . A
ruling chief ; b. 1880. Succeeded to
the gadi as a minor December 27, 1889.
The population of the State is about
1100, chiefly Hindus. Residence: Khian-
da, Guna, Central India.

KHTLCHIPUR, Rao Bahadur Amar

Singhji, Rao Bahadur of. A ruling
chief ; b. 1834. Succeeded to the gadi
November 27, 1868. Belongs to a
Khichi Rajput (Hindu) family, de-
scended from Durjan Sal, a Khichi
Chief. The area of his State is about
272 square miles ; its population 36,125,
chiefly Hindus. The Rao Bahadur
maintains a military force of 45 cavalry,
202 infantry, and 2 guns ; and is
entitled to a salute of 9 guns. The
family has a white banner (with black
silk tassel), bearing the effigy of Hanu-
man, the monkey-god. The Rao Baha-
dur's eldest son is named Lalji Bhawani
Singh. Residence: Khilchipur, Bhopal,
Central India.
KHIMSIPUR, Rao of See Baisni, Tha-
kurain.

KHIRASRA, JarejaRaisinghji Jijibhai,
Tdlukddr of. A ruling chief ; b. 1850.
Succeeded to the gadi January 1, 1872.
Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu) family.
The area of his State is 13 square miles ;
its population is 4377, chiefly Hindus.
Residence : Khirasra, Kathiawar, Bom-
bay.

KHIR0DA PRASAD PAL, Rai Bahddxir;
b. 1852. The title was conferred on
January 1, 1897, for liberality and
public spirit. Residence : Sikandarpur,
Hooghly, Bengal.

KHITABAT KHAN. See Muhammad
Ghaus, Shaikh.



142



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



KHITISH (KSHITISH) CHANDAR RAI

(of Nadiya), Maharaja Bahadur; b.
April 16, 1868. The title was con-
ferred on January 1, 1890, as a per-
sonal distinction, when the Maharaja
Bahadur came of age after a long
minority ; and it has been enjoyed by
the Rajas of Nadiya (or Nuddea) for
many generations, having been first
conferred by the Emperor of Delhi on
the Maharaja Rudra ten generations
ago. Belongs to a Kulin Brahman
family of the highest caste, claiming
descent from the famous Bhatta Nara-
yan, one of the five Brahman apostles
whom King Adisur brought to Bengal
from Kanauj. A far man bearing the
seal and signature of the Emperor
Alamgir is extant, in which the Raja
Rudra is addressed as Raja. His
great-grandson, the Maharaja Krishna
Chandra Rai, received two farmdns
from the Emperor Shah Alam, con-
ferring on him the title of Maharaja.
Since the establishment of British rule
in Bengal each Raja of Nadiya in suc-
cession has been created a Maharaja
Bahadur. The late Maharaja Satis
Chandra Rai Bahadur, Raja of Nadiya,
was eminently loyal to the Govern-
ment, and exceedingly liberal, especi-
ally to his tenants and to educational
institutions. He presented a beautiful
park as the site for the Krishnagar
State College of the Calcutta Uni-



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