Roper Lethbridge.

The golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon online

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Munawar Ali Khan. The family
banner is green, bearing on its field
a crescent. The area of the State is
about 140 square miles ; its population
is 24,631, chiefly Hindus, but including
3609 Muhammadans. The Nawab
maintains a military force of 12
cavalry, 190 infantry, and 9 guns.
Residence: Kurwai, Bhopal, Central
India.

KURWAR, Rdjd of. See Partab Ba-
hadur Singh.

KUSALPURA, Thdlcur of. See Kassal-
pura.

KUSHABA CHAPAJI KALE, Rao Ba-
hadur. Received the title on Janu-
ary 1, 1899. Residence: Bombay.



KUTCH, His Highness Maharao Shri
Mirza Raja Sawai Sir Khengarji, Ba-
hadur, G.C.I.E., Rao of. A ruling
chief; b. August 16, 1867. Succeeded
to the gadi December 19, 1875. Is
Chief of the Jareja Rajputs, who came
to Kutch from Sind early in the 14th
century, under the leadership of his
ancestor, the Jam Lakha Phulani, son
of Jara, from whom the clan takes its
name. Lakha is said to have com-
pleted the conquest of Kutch in the
year 1320 a.d. His descendant, Khen-
gar, when oidy a lad of fourteen, slew
a Hon with his sword at a hunting
party with the King of Ahmadabad,
who was so much pleased with this
feat that he conferred on the young
prince the territory of Morvi, in the
north of Kathiawar, with the title of
Rao. After this the Rao Khengar
succeeded in making himself the
master of the whole of Kutch, with
the city of Bhuj for his capital, in
1548 a.d. Khengar's uncle, the Jam
Eawal, fled to Kathiawar, and founded
the State of Nawanagar, the rulers
of which are still called Jams. The
Rao Khengar I. was succeeded by Rao
Bharmal L, during whose reign, from
1585 to 1631 a.d., the government of
Gujarat passed from the Kings of
Ahmadabad to the Mughal Emperors.
Bharmal , who was at the head of a
large military force, visited the
Emperor Jahangir in 1617, and re-
ceived from him most costly presents,
including his own horse, elephants,
dagger, and a sword with diamond-
mounted hilt. A descendant, Rao
Lakhpatji, who reigned from 1741 to
1760 a.d., set up a cannon-foundry,
and introduced other manufactures
from Europe by the aid of an ad-
venturer named Ramsingh ^ and the
mechanical skill and working in metals,
for which the craftsmen of Kutch are
still famous, date from this reign. In
1809 the rulers of Kutch sought British
help; the Rao Raidhan II. being on
the gadi, but the administration of
the State being carried on by a very
powerful and ambitious Prime
Minister named Fatheh Muhammad.
A treaty was signed in that year, and
again another in 1812. In 1813 both
Fatheh Muhammad and the Rao died.
The latter was succeeded by his son,
Rao Bharmal II. ; but there was so
much disorder in the State that the



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



155



British Power was compelled to in-
tervene, and to send troops into the
Principality in 1816, and again in
1818-19. On the latter occasion the
Rao was deposed, and his son, the
Rao Desalji II., succeeded as a minor,
and ruled happily for more than forty
years, till 1860. He took vigorous
measures to suppress infanticide, sati
(or the burning of widows on the
funeral pile of their deceased hus-
bands), and the trade in slaves. On
the death of Rao Desalji in 1860,
the Government of Bombay thus
recorded the official appreciation of
his career : " Marked by a love of
truth and plain dealing, Rao Desalji
was probably more than any one else
in Kutch learned in the traditions and
customs of the Province. He was a
careful and painstaking judge, and a
staunch and devoted ally of the
British Government. With the help
of a few Chiefs and Court servants he
managed the whole business of the
country, and by his knowledge of
their character, friendly intercourse,
and timely concessions, avoided any
struggle with the Jareja chiefs." The
"Jareja chiefs" referred to are the
Bhdyad — brotherhood or frerage of
the ruling family, being all descend-
ants of the first Rao. The Rao
Desalji II. was succeeded by his late
Highness the Maharao Pragmalji,
father of the present Rao. During
the fifteen years of his rule, 1860 to
1875, he showed himself anxious to
improve the management of the State.
He framed codes for the guidance of
his officers in matters of civil and
criminal justice, he undertook works
of public usefulness, and introduced
State systems of public instruction
and of vaccination. In recognition of
his excellent administration he was in
1871 honoured with the title of Knight
Grand Commander of the Star of India.
Unlike his forefathers, none of whom
left Kutch, he thrice visited Bombay
— in 1870 to meet His Royal Highness
the Duke of Edinburgh, in 1871 to
take part in a Chapter of the Star of
India, and in October 1875 to meet
His Royal Highness the Prince of
Wales. These happy visits are marked
by important public works dedicated
to their Royal Highnesses — the Albert
Edward Breakwater and Harbour
Works at Mandvi, which have cost



over 12 lakhs of rupees, and the Alfred
High School at Bhuj, the provincial
centre of education ; and the establish-
ment of two "Rao Shri Pragmalji
Scholarships" in the Elphinstone
College, and two in Sir Jamsetji Jijib-
hai's School of Art, Bombay. His
Highness Rao Pragmalji was described
by the British authorities as "most
enlightened and liberal," as well as a
"loyal, consistent, and devoted friend"
of the British Government. Rao
Pragmalji built a palace at Bhuj at
a cost of about Rs.2,000,000 ; con-
structed the Pragsar Tank, which is
an immense reservoir of rain-water
in the Chadwa range of hills, and a
causeway in the large Hamirsar tank ;
he also built the Jail (Rs.79,509), the
Hospital, the Horse and Elephant
Stables (Rs.184,303), and the Schools
at Bhuj and Mandvi ; remitted transit
duties, and occasionally remitted im-
port duties in times of scarcity or
deficient rainfall. He ordered out
cotton gins, and introduced screw
presses, and finished the Bhuj-Mandvi
road. He was a great sportsman, and
killed many wild animals, including a
number of panthers. The total ex-
penditure on public works started
during His Highness Rao Pragmalji's
reign amounted to Rs.3,241,435. He
was succeeded in 1876 by His High-
ness the present Maharajd, Rao Khen-
garji, who was described at that time
by the British Political Agent as "a
most promising boy of ten." In 1877
Sir Richard Temple, as Governor of
Bombay, visited the State, and com-
plimented the young Prince on his
general progress, and on the accuracy
and ease with which he could converse
in English — his education having been
mainly in the hands of M. Chhotalal
Tewakram and Captain J. W. Wray
of the Staff Corps. He was admitted
into the Council of Administration, at
an unusually early age, in 1882; and
on August 11, 1884, having attained
his majority of eighteen years of age,
he was invested with full powers of
State. On November 14 of that year
Sir James Fergusson, as Governor of
Bombay, visited Bhuj, and held a
grand Darbar for the purpose of
formally installing His Highness, in
the name of the Queen Empress, as
Rao of Kutch. In the course of his
speech on that occasion Sir James



156



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



Fergusson said : " I venture to augur
very favourably of His Highness's
reign. His natural intelligence has
been well developed, his mind has
been instructed by a liberal education,
he possesses a complete knowledge of
the circumstances and wants of his
country and people, but more hopeful
still are his disposition and character.
The frequent opportunities which I
have had of judging of them, as well
as the unanimous testimony of those
who have known him from childhood,
convince me that he possesses a kind
heart as well as a clear judgment, and
cherishes a resolute adherence to the
call of duty. These qualities are not
unknown to his subjects, and they
cannot fail to deepen their hereditary
attachment to his family and person,
which is so remarkable. It may indeed
actuate him to deserve and reciprocate
it. I doubt not that it will. I shall
deem myself very ignorant of character
if His Highness does not realize our
best anticipations."

On March 2, 1885, a Darbar was held
at the Bhuj Palace for the investiture
of His Highness with the hereditary
distinction of "Sawai Bahadur," con-
ferred on the rulers of Kutch by the
British Government. In 1887 His
Highness proceeded to England to
represent the Princes of the Bombay
Presidency on the occasion of the
celebration of the Jubilee of the Queen
Empress, and during his absence he
entrusted his State to his Diwan, Rao
Bahadur Motilal Lalbhai. Whilst in
England His Highness was created a
Knight Grand Commander of the
Indian Empire. He takes a deep
interest in education, and especially
in the education of women. He
founded a Sanskrit school or Pathshala,
at a cost of Rs. 25,000, and named it
after his mother. He also founded
the Fergusson Museum and Library
at Bhuj, an institution erected as
a memorial of the Governorship of
Sir James Fergusson. This last cost
Rs.32,000. To encourage learning he has
founded various scholarships of more
or less importance, and has also in-
augurated a fund from which deserving
scholars desirous to study in England
or America can obtain their expenses.
Among the scholarships for females
may be mentioned the one to Kutch
females attending the Grant Medical



College in Bombay, the " Kutch Barton
Scholarship " to Kutch females attend-
ing the Training College at Ahmadabad
or Rajkot, scholarships for female as-
sistant-teachers at Bhuj, the Rao Shri
Khengarji scholarships, and one for
girls attending the High School at
Puna. For males the Rao has founded
scholarships for Kutchis receiving
scientific and technical education in
England, for students receiving agri-
cultural or other scientific education
in India, for Kutchis attending the
Veterinary College at Bombay, the
Veterinary School at Puna and the
College of Science at Puna ; also
scholarships open to any citizen of
Bombay attending the Ripon Technical
School, Bombay; and further gives
annual prizes for qualifying for auy
professional function in connection
with a mill, and for the work of a
captain of a steamer. It should be
mentioned that the scholarships for
Kutchis resident in Bombay alone
were established at a total cost of
Rs.25,000. As a further stimulus to
education, and especially with the
object of encouraging native talent
and spreading knowledge amongst the
people, the Darbar annually com-
missions competent persons to write
essays on various subjects, and to
translate standard English works into
the Gujarati language. In the matter
of public works considerable improve-
ments have been effected witliin recent
years in connection with the extension
of roads, the pier and reclamation
works, and the erection of new build-
ings. Since the accession of His
Highness to the gadi the expenditure
incurred by the Darbar on works
of public utility has amounted to
Rs.6,624,672. Great attention is paid
by His Highness to well-irrigation,
which has been found by experience to
be most suited to the peculiar require-
ments of the Province, the rainfall
being limited and precarious. Other
means of irrigation have also been
adopted. Under his guidance strenu-
ous efforts have also been made in the
direction of reclamation of waste land.
In the course of the last fifteen years
the number of acres of waste land
brought under the plough amount to
83,890, and fifteen new villages have
been established. His Highness is a
thorough sportsman, fond of pig-stick-



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



157



ing, shooting, and all manly exercises.
He is, moreover, a firm though con-
ciliatory ruler, and is regarded hy his
subjects with a deep and ardent at-
tachment. He married the daughters
of the Thakur Saheb of Sayla, and of
the Rana Jalamsinghji, cousins of His
Highness the Raj Saheb of Dhranga-
dra, in Kathiawar (q.v.), on February
19, 1884. The occasion of this marriage
was remarkable for the substitution
for the old custom of giving Fulekas
(grand dinners and a nightly pro-
cession, according to old practice) of
a small Darbar, at which nazars were
paid, which His Highness touched, and
remitted to be utilized in furthering
the cause of female education. His
sons are named — Madhubha, otherwise
called Vijayarajji, born September 2,
1885 ; and Manubha, born September
12, 1888. #

His Highness's brother is named Ka-
ransinghji, born in 1870, and educated
at the Rajkumar College, Rajkot ; he
visited England on the occasion of
Her Majesty's Jubilee in 1887, and
was then created a Companion of the
Most Eminent Order of the Indian
Empire, and married a daughter of
the House of Aramda, in Okha, Ka-
thiawar, in March 1889.

His Highness's sister was married to
His Highness the Maharaja of Bikanir
(q.v.), in Rajpatana. The State has an
area of 6500 square miles, exclusive of
the Runn of Kutch, which is about 9000
square miles ; its population is 512,084,
chiefly Hindus, but including 118,797
Muhammadans and 66,663 Jains. His
Highness maintains a military force of
354 cavalry, 1412 inf antry,and 164 guns,
and is entitled to a salute of 17 guns.
Arms. — The coat-of-arms adopted by
His Highness's family is most inter-
esting, as illustrating oriental heraldry.
The coat is shown in a document
kindly supplied by the Kutch Darbar,
and was described by His Excellency
the Diwan of Kutch in 1876 in the
following I words : — "(1) The Fort of
Bhujia, which overlooks the capital of
Bhuj. (2) The Moon, showing that
the reigning family belongs to the
Lunar dynasty. (3) The Crown, and
the Jari Patha flag (with repre-
sentations of the sun and the moon),
emblematic of royalty. (4) The Mahi
Muratab, a flag with a gold-fish at the
top, presented to a former Rao of



Kutch by an Emperor of Delhi. This
is considered a valued present, and is
carried in State in all ceremonials by
sowaris on the back of an elephant.
(5) The Trident of the family goddess,
and old weapons of the family. (6)
A Boat, showing that Kutch is a
maritime Power. (7) Two Horsemen,
representing Kutch as a horse-pro-
ducing country, and showing specimens
of her military retainers. (8) A Cow,
representing the customary title of a
native potentate. (9) A killed Tiger,
indicating the great historical event
from which the title of Rao was
derived. (10) The Motto adopted by
the family, showing the attributes by
wbich the first Rao Khengar suc-
ceeded in regaining his lost patri-
mony." Residence : The Palace, Bhuj,
Kutch, Western India.

KUTHAR, Rana Jaichand, Rana of. A
ruling chief; b. 1845. Succeeded to
the yadi as a minor December 27,
1848. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu)
family, claiming descent from Surat
Chand, who came in early times from
Kishtwar in Jammu, and conquered
this territory. The State was overrun
by the Gurkhas between 1803 and
1815, and after their expulsion by the
British was confirmed to the then
Rana by a British sanad dated
September 3, 1815. The area of the
State (which is one of the Simla Hill
States) is 19 miles square ; its popula-
tion is 3648, chiefly Hindus. The
Rand maintains a military force of 40
infantry. Residence: Kuthar, Simla
Hills, Punjab.

KUTLAHR, Rdjd of. See Rampal.

KUVARJI K0WASJI, Khan Bahadur;
b. March 1, 1822. The title was con-
ferred on February 16, 1887, as a
personal distinction, on the occasion
of the Jubilee of the reign of Her
Most Gracious Majesty. Appointed to
the service of the Bombay Government
in 1840, and during a service of forty-
six years held various important posts
with credit to himself and advantage
to the State. Retired in 1886 on a
special pension, on account of his
''long and highly meritorious services."
Was appointed in the same year a
Delegate in the Parsi District Matri-
monial Court of Surat. Is " an
Honorary Magistrate of the First



158



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



Class. Has a son named Pestanji
Kuvarji Kowasji, born 1860. Resid-
ence: Surat, Bombay.

KUVERJI BHAIDAS, Rao Saheb. Re-
ceived the title on May 21, 1898.
Residence: Bulsar, Bombay.

KYAING KAN, Kim Un, Myoza of. A
ruling chief. This Chief is Myoza of
one of the Shan States on the frontier
of Burma. Its area is about 450 square
miles ; its population chiefly consists
of Shans. Residence: Kyaing Kan,
Shan States, Burma.

KYAING LUN, Kun Maung, Myoza of.
A ruling chief. This Chief is Myoza
of one of the Shan States on the
frontier of Burma. Its area is about
30 square miles ; its population almost
entirely Shans. Residence: Kyaing
Lun, Shan States, Burma.

KYAING TON, Sawbwa of. A ruling
chief. This Chief is the Sawbwa of
one of the Shan States on the frontier
of Burma. He has four feudatory
chiefs tributary to him — those of
Kyaing Thingyi, Maingthal, Thinaung,
and Thin Nyut. The population con-
sists chiefly of Shans, with a few Yins.
Residence: Kyaing Ton, Shan States,
Burma.

KYAING YONGYI, Chief of. A ruling
chief. Is Chief of one of the Shan
States on the Burma frontier. Re-
sidence : Kyaing Yongyi, Shan States,
Burma.

KYAUKKULEYWA, Maung Thaing,
Ngwegunhmu of. A ruling chief. The
Ngwegunhmu is Chief of one of the
Shan States on the frontier of Burma.
The area of the State is about 80
square miles. Residence: Kyaukku-
leywa, Shan States, Burma.

KYAW GAUNG, Maung, Myothugyi,

Thuye gaung ngwe Da ya Min. The
title is personal, and was conferred on
May 20, 1890. It means "Recipient
of the Silver Sword for Bravery," and
is indicated by the letters T.D.M. after
the name. Residence : Ye-u, Burma.

KYAW ZAW, Maung, Thuye gaung
ngwe Da ya Min. The title is personal,
and was conferred on February 16,
1887, on the occasion of the Jubilee
of the reign of Her Most Gracious
Majesty. It means " Recipient of the



Silver Sword for Bravery," and is in-
dicated by the letters T.D.M. after the
name. Residence : Pagan, Burma.

KYE, Maung, Myook, Kyct thaye zaung
shwe Salwe ya Min. The title is per-
sonal, and was conferred on May 20,
1896. It means " Recipient of the
Gold Chain of Honour," and is in-
dicated by the letters K.S.M. after
the name. Residence : Burma.

KYETHI BANSAN, Kun Than, Myoza
of. A ruling chief. The Myoza is
Chief of one of the Shan States on
the Burma frontier. The area of the
State is about 300 square miles. Re-
sidence : Kyethi Bansan, Shan States,
Burma.

KYM0RI. See Kaimori.

KY0N, Maung Po, Ngiocgunhmu of A
ruling chief. The Ngwegunhmu is
Chief of one of the Shan States on
the Burma frontier. The area of the
State is about 15 square miles. Re-
sidence : Kyon, Shan States, Burma.

KYWE 0, Maung U, Kyet thaye zaung
shwe Salwe ya Min. The title is
personal, and was conferred on June
6, 1885. It means " Recipient of the
Gold Chain of Honour," and is in-
dicated by the letters K.S.M. after the
name. Residence: Rangoon, Burma.

LACHHMAN. See Lakshman.

LACHHMAN DAS, Seth, C.I.E., Raja.
Was created a Companion of the Most
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire,
May 26, 1886. The title of Raja was
conferred as a personal distinction on
June 22, 1897. Residence: Muttra,
North- Western Provinces.

LACHHMAN DAS, Thakur, Rai , Saheb.
Received the title on January 2, 1897.
Residence : Dir, Punjab Frontier.

LACHHMAN DAS, Lala, Poplai, Rai
Saheb. Received the title on January
1, 1898. Is Extra Judicial Assistant
Commissioner. Residence: Punjab.

LACHHMAN DAS HAZARIKA, Rai

Bahadur. The title is personal, and
was conferred on March 3, 1880.
Residence: Lakhimpur, Assam.

LACHHMAN SINGH, Rai Bahadur.
The title is personal, and was conferred
on May 24, 1882. The Rai Bahadur



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



15!



belongs to a family from Cawnpur,
North-Western Provinces. Residence :
Bombay.

LACHHMAN SINGH (of Kakarbai),
Rao. The title is an ancient hereditary
one. The Rao Lachhman Singh was
born about the year 1866, and suc-
ceeded his father, the late Eao Udiajit,
in 1890. This family of Bundela Tha-
kurs is descended from Bharat Chand,
grandson of Raja Malkhan of Orchha.
The title of Rao is said to have been
conferred on the great-grandfather of
the present holder by the Maharaja of
Panna. Arjun Singh, the Rao's grand-
father, assisted in restoring order in
the Garotha Tahsil towards the close
of the Mutiny. Residence : Kakarbai,
Jhansi, North-Western Provinces.

LACHHMAN SINGH (of Wazirpur),
Rdjd; b. October 19, 1826. The title
was conferred on January 1, 1877, as a
personal distinction, at the Imperial
Assemblage of Delhi, on the occasion
of the Proclamation of Her Most
Gracious Majesty as Empress of India.
Belongs to a Rajput family of the
Jadon clan, originally resident at Ka-
remna in Ra jputana. About 130 years
ago Karemna was burnt by the troops
of the Raja of Macheri (Alwar) in his
war with the Raja of Bhartpur ; and
Kalyan Singh, the ancestor of Lachh-
man Singh, took refuge in Bhartpur.
His eldest son was appointed Fotehdar
of Pargana Ruphas by the Raja of
Bhartpur, but was subsequently
poisoned ; and the younger son, Lachh-
man Singh's grandfather, took service
in Sindhia's army. He died at Aligarh
a few months before the capture of
that fortress by the British, and his
sons removed to Agra. His grandson,
the present Raja, entered the Govern-
ment service in 1847, and for his
services during the time of the Mutiny,
and generally to the cause of educa-
tion, he has received the title of Raja,
a hhilat, and various grants. Resi-
dence : Agra, North-Western Pro-



LACHHMI. See also Lakshmi.

LACHHMI PARSHAD, Rai Saheb. The
title was conferred on January 1, 1898.
Residence : Harda, Hoshangabad,
Central Provinces.

LACHHMI PRASAD SINGH, Rai Baha-
dur. Received the title on January 1,



1898. Residence : Sakarpara, Monghyr,
Bengal.

LACHHMI SAHAI, Sarddr Bahadur.
The title was conferred on January 1,
1894. Residence : Amritsar, Punjab.

LACHHMINARAYAN SINGH, Deo (of

Kera), Thdkur. The title was con-
ferred on January 1, 1877, as a personal
distinction, on the occasion of the
Proclamation of Her Most Gracious
Majesty as Empress of India. The
Thakur is one of the representatives
of the great Porahat family, from
which are descended the feudatory
Chiefs of Serikala and Kharsawan, and
other Chota Nagpur Chiefs in the dis-
trict of Singbhum. Residence: Kera
Singbhum, Bengal.

LACHHMIYA NAYUDU, Kamalapu-
ram, Rao Bahadur. The title was
conferred on January 1, 1895. Resi-
dence : Bangalore.

LAIHNA. See Lehna.

LAKHAN SINGH, Thakur, Rao Bahadur.
The Thakur was granted the title of
Rao Bahadur as a personal distinction
on January 1, 1878. Residence: Ba-
reilly, North-Western Provinces.

LAKHMICHAND, Pandit, Rai Bahadur.

Received the title on January 1, 1898.

Residence : Damoh, Central Provinces.
LAKHNADON, Thdkur of. See Delhi

Singh ; see also Kesri Singh.

LAKHPAT RAI, Rai; b. 1825. The
title was conferred on October 8, 1875,
as a personal distinction, in recogni-
tion of the Rai's exertions in improving
the city of Peshawar. He belongs to
a Kshatriya family, and is the son of
the late Diwan Bhawani Das, who
held the responsible and important
office of Baftri in Peshawar during
the Durani and Sikh rule. The Rai is
an Honorary Magistrate and a member
of the Municipal Committee of Pesha-
war. Residence : Peshawar, Punjab.

LAKSHMAN BHIKAJI WAKHAR-
KAR, Rao Saheb. The title was con-
ferred on January 1, 1895. Residence :
Khandesh, Bombay.

LAKSHMAN JAGANNATH, Biwdn
Bahadur; b. August 15, 1835. The
title was conferred on February 16,
1887, as a personal distinction, on
the occasion of the Jubilee of Her
Majesty's reign. Belongs to a Chan-



160



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



draseniya Kayastha Prabhu family ;
second son of Jagannath Baji Rao,
Mamlatdar in Khandesh. Prior to
his appointment as Prime Minister of
the Baroda State he had rendered long
and meritorious services to the Bom-
bay Government ; and while Deputy
Collector of Sholapur endeared him-
self to the people to such an extent
that they called their market after his
name, "Lakshmanpet." In 1874 he
became Assistant Revenue Commis-
sioner of the Northern Division of the
Bombay Presidency, and shortly
afterwards was invited to aid Mr.
Dadabhai Naoroji (subsequently M.P.
for Central Finsbury) in the adminis-
tration of Baroda. He became, first,
Subahdar of the Naosari district, then
head of the Revenue Department in
.1883, and finally in 1886 Diwan or
Prime Minister of the State. He re-
tired in 1890 with a pension from the
British Government, and handsome
allowances from the Gaekwar. He
married Bai Sitabai, and has issue
six daughters — Gujabai, Chandrabai,
Chingubai, Dhakubai, Naobai, and



Online LibraryRoper LethbridgeThe golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon → online text (page 29 of 63)