Roper Lethbridge.

The golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon online

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Sundrabai. Residence: Narayan Pet,
Poona, Bombay.

LAKSHMAN JIVAJI TILVE, Rao Sa-

heb. Granted the title, as a personal
distinction, January 2, 1893, for emi-
nent services in the Postal Department.
Residence : Ahmedabad, Bombay.

LAKSHMAN SINGH MATHURA
SINGH, Rao Bahadur. The title was
conferred on January 1, 1891. Resi-
dence : Poona, Bombay.

LAKSHMI CHAND, Rai Bahadur. The
title was conferred on January 1, 1894.
Residence : Karnal, Punjab.

LAKSHMI CHELLAYA (of Bobbili).

See Venkatasveta Chalapathi Ranga
Rao, Ravu, Raja.
LAKSHMI KUMARA SHATAKOPA
CHARIAR, Mahdmahopddhydya. The
title was conferred on January 1,
1898, for eminence in oriental learning.
Residence: Cochin, Madras.

LAKSHMI SHANKAR MISRA PANDIT,

Rai Bahadur. The title is personal,
and was conferred on January 1, 1890.
Residence : Benares, North-Western
Provinces.
LAKSHMILAL DAULATRAI, Rao Sa-
heb. Granted the title, as a personal
distinction, January 2, 1893, for emi-



nent services in the Baroda Residency.
Residence : Baroda.

LAL BEG, Khdn Saheb. Granted the
title, as a personal distinction, January
2, 1893, for eminent magisterial ser-
vices in the Ganjam Hill Tracts,
Madras. Residence: Russell Konda,
Madras.

LAL BIHARI LAL, Rai Bahadur. Re-
ceived the title on January 1, 1898.
Residence : Sutna, Central India.

LAL MADHAVA MUKARJI, Rai Ba-
hadur ; b. in 1841. Belongs to a Ku-
lin Brahman family, and is the son of
Ishwar Chandra Mukarji, an old and
much-respected merchant of Calcutta.
Educated at the Free Church College
of the Calcutta University ; and sub-
sequently graduated at the Calcutta
Medical College. During the great
Orissa famine of 1886 he was appointed
Medical Officer in charge of the famine
Itospitals that were opened at Chitpore
and Sealdah for the relief of the
famine-stricken. His good services
there were duly acknowledged by the
Government of Bengal. He then
successively held the appointments of
House Surgeon of the Calcutta Oph-
thalmic Hospital for thirteen years,
and teacher of Ophthalmic Medicine
and Surgery in the Campbell School for
three years. He has taken a very
prominent place among the great
oculists of the world, and was deputed
by the Government of India to Rajpu-
tana, to attend upon His Highness
the Maharaja of Jaipur, whose eye-
sight he successfully restored. He
translated into Bengali the English
text-book on the Diseases of the Eye,
by Dr. Macnamara, which has been
highly eulogized by the most com-
petent authorities. In 1879 he was
elected a Municipal Commissioner for
the town of Calcutta, and has been
re-elected in many subsequent elec-
tions. Has been several times Mem-
ber of the Town Council of Calcutta.
Was appointed a Fellow of the Cal-
cutta University in 1881, and in 1890
became a Member of the Syndicate.
He is an elected Member of the Council
of the Calcutta Bethune Society ; of
the Calcutta Health Society ; and of
the India Club. He is a Justice of
the Peace for the town of Calcutta.
He is the first native gentleman who
has been honoured with the President-



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



161



ship of the Calcutta Medical Society.
He is also the President and Honorary
Lecturer of Ophthalmic Medicine and
Surgery in the Calcutta Medical
School. When Her Majesty the Em-
press,in recognition of his distinguished
medical services, was pleased to confer
upon him the title of Rai Bahadur,
the Government of India also pre-
sented him with a handsome sword
and a richly-embroidered sword-belt.
Residence: Calcutta.

LAL MADHUB MOOKERJEE, Rai Ba-
hadur. See Lai Madhava Mukarji.

LAL MUHAMMAD, Shaikh, Khdn Sa-
heb. Received the title on January 2,
1899. Residence : Baroda, Bombay.

LAL MUHAMMAD KHAN, Achakzai,
Khdn Saheb. Received the title on
May 21, 1898. Residence: Gulistan,
Baluchistan.

LAL PERTAB SINGH, Rao Bahadur.
The title was conferred on January 1,
1898. Is Assistant Diwan of Rewa.
Residence : Rewa, Central India.

LAL RAGHURAJ SINGH (of Pandaria),
Thdkur. The title is hereditary. The
founder of the family was Sham
Chand ; and the late Thakur Gajapal
Singh was thirteenth in succession.
He was the younger brother of the
Thdkur Rajpal Singh, feudatory Chief
of Kawardha (q.v.). Thakur Gajapal
Singh has been recently succeeded, at
Pandaria, by Thakur Lai Raghuraj
Singh. Residence : Pandaria, Bilaspur,
Central Provinces.

LAL RAMANAJ PARSAD SINGH, Hira
Saheb, CLE. Was created a CLE.
on June 1, 1888. Residence: Rewa,
Central India.

LAL SINGH, Rai Bahadur. The title
was conferred on May 25, 1895. Resi-
dence : Naiui Tal, North-Western Pro-
vinces.

LAL SINGH (of Bheri), Sarddr. The
title is hereditary. The Sarddr is
the cousin of Sarddr Bishan Singh
(q.v.) of Bheri, in the district of Lu-
dhiana, Punjab. Belongs to a Jat
(Sikh) family, descended from Sardar
Mahtab Singh, Miran Kotia, a Sikh
Chief, well known for his prowess,
who flourished about the year 1761
a.d. ^ His son, Sarddr Rai Singh,
acquired by conquest some territory in
the Ambala district more than a cen-



tury ago. The family came under
British protection, with the other Cis-
Sutlej Chiefs, after the first Sikh war.
Sarddr Ratan Singh succeeded his
father, Rai Singh ; and his grandsons
are the Sarddrs Bishan Singh (son of
Sarddr Sarmukh Singh) and Ldl Singh
(son of Sarddr Gurmukh Singh) of
Bheri. Residence : Bheri, Ludhidna,
Punjab.

LAL SINGH (of Talwandi), Sarddr; b.
1822. The title is hereditary. The
Sarddr is the grandson of the Sarddr
Dal Singh Naharna, who was adopted
by the widow of the great Sarddr
Fateh Sing, Kdlidnwdla, and inherited
his large possessions. He died in 1823,
and was succeeded by his eldest son,
Sarddr Atar Singh, who, about the
year 1846, received a seat in the Coun-
cil of Regency, which he retained until
the annexation of the Punjab. On
the occasion of the outbreak at Multdn,
Sarddr Atar Singh joined the British
under Major Edwardes. His son, the
present Sarddr Lai Singh, was at first
carried off by the troops, but after-
wards escaped, and joined the same
side. Sarddr Atar Singh died in 1851,
and was succeeded by the present
Sarddr. Residence: Talwandi, Am-
ritsar, Punjab.

LALA GOVIND JAS, Rai Bahadur. See
Govind.

LALA SAHEB (of Imlai), Rdjd; b. 1862.
The title is hereditary. Belongs to a
Rdj Gond (aboriginal) family, whose
ancestors came from Dhamda to
Mandla, and obtained some jdgirs from
Sheo Rdj Rai, the Gond Rdjd of
Mandla, because they were caste-fel-
lows of the Rdjd. This was in 1624
a.d., and the family have been settled
at Imlai in the Jabalpur district ever
since. One of their ancestors married
a daughter of the Rdjput house of
Ratanpur. Residence: Jabalpur, Cen-
tral Provinces.

LALA SUNDAE LAL, Rai Saheb. See
Sundar.

LALCHAND KEVABRAM, Rao Saheb.
On retirement from the public service,
the Rao Saheb was permitted to re-
tain this title. Residence : Shikdrpur,
Sind.

LALGARH, Diwan Hari Singh, Biwdn
of. A ruling chief ; b. 1877. Succeeded
to the gadi as a minor December 22,
M



162



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



1888. Belongs to a Rajput (Hindu)
family. The State contains a popula-
tion of about 2500, chiefly Hindus.
Residence: Lalgarh, Western Malwa,
Central India.

LALIT MOHAN SINGH, Rai Bahadur.
The Rai Bahadur has rendered good
service as an Honorary Magistrate,
and as Vice-Chairman of the District
Board of Hughli, Bengal. Received
the title as a personal distinction on
May 25, 1892. Residence: Hughli,
Bengal.

IALJI PURSHOTAM RAI, Rao Baha-
dur, Biwdn Bahadur. Both these
titles are personal. The former was
conferred on December 15, 1881. The
second title, that of Diwan Bahadur,
was conferred on May 25, 1892, for
good service as an assistant to the
Resident at Baroda. Residence: Ba-
roda.

LALJI WALJI SETH, Khan Bahddur.
The title was conferred on May 21,
1898. Residence: Madras.

LALLTJ LACHHMAN SINGH, Rao Ba-
hddur. The title is personal, and was
conferred on May 24, 1869. Residence :
Dholpur, Rajputaua.

LALTA PERSHAD, Lala, Rai Bahddur.
Received the title on January 1, 1898.
Residence : Pilibhit, North- Western
Provinces.

LALUBHAI NANDLAL, Rao Bahddur.
The title is personal, and was conferred
on February 3, 1886. Residence:
Ahmadabad, Bombay.

LAMA.— A title.

LAMBAGRAON, Mian of. See Kirat
Chand.

LAMBAGRAON, Raid of. See Jai
Chand. 9 J

LANGRIN, U., Bor Sing, Seim of. A
ruling chief ; b. 1850. Succeeded to the
gadi September 23, 1874. The popula-
tion of the State (which is one of the
Khasi and Jaintia Hill States, Assam)
is about _ 1200, and consists of Khasis
and Christians. Residence: Langrin,
Khasi Hills, Assam.

LANKA KRISHNA AIYANGAR, Rao

Bahddur. The title was conferred on
May 25, 1892. Residence: Srirangam,
Madras.



LAS BELA, Jam of. A ruling chief.
Succeeded to the gadi January 14,
1896. The Jam was formerly a feu-
datory of the Wali of Kalat, but
has now the direct protection of the
British Government, through the
Governor-General's Agent for Balu-
chistan. The area of the State is
about 8500 square miles, and its popu-
lation about 56,000, chiefly Muham-
madans. The Jam maintains a mili-
tary force of 33 cavalry, 276 infantry,
and 4 guns, and is entitled to a salute
of 9 guns as a personal distinction.
Residence : Las Bela, Baluchistan.

LATARIA BHA0 (of Kamtha), Rao Ba-
hadur. The title was conferred on
May 20, 1896. Residence : Bhandara,
Central Provinces.

LATHI, Thakur Sursinghji Takat-
singhji, Thakur of. A ruling chief ;
b. 1875. Succeeded to the gadi as a
minor November 4, 1878. Belongs to
a Gohel Rajput (Hindu) family, which
claim to be Suryavansi (of the Solar
race), as descendants of the legendary
hero Rama. The Gohel sept of Raj-
puts are said to have occupied a part
of Marwar for twenty generations,
until they were expelled by the Rah-
tors {see Jodhpur) at the end of the
12th century. Thence, under their
Chief, Sejak, they migrated to K&thia-
war, about the year 1260, and are at
present represented in Kathiawar by
the ruling families of Bhaunagar, Raj-
pipla, Palitana, and Lathi. The
founder of the Lathi State was Sa-
rangji, second son of Sejak, whose
eldest son became the ancestor of the
Chiefs of Bhaunagar, whilst the third
son was the ancestor of the Chiefs of
Palitana. One of the Thakurs of
Lawa married his daughter to Damaji
Gaekwar, the great ancestor of the
Gaekwars of Baroda; and gave the
estate of Damnagar as a dowry, being
in return exempted personally from
tribute. The State is tributary both
to Baroda and to Junagarh ; and in
addition to the tribute the Chief of
Lawa annually offers a horse to the
Gaekwar of Baroda, probably in com-
memoration of the relationship be-
tween the families. The town of
Lathi, which is the capital, is now a
station on the Bhaunagar-Gondal rail-
way ; it has the palace of the Thakur,
a Dharmsdla, a good Dispensary, Post



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



163



and Telegraph Office, and the Lathi
Anglo- Vernacular School. The area
of the State is 42 square miles ; its
population 6804, chiefly Hindus. The
Chief maintains a military force of 12
cavalry, 25 infantry, and 10 guns.
Residence: Lathi, Kdthidwdr, Bom-
hay.

LATIF HUSAIN KHAN walad IMAM
BAKHSH KHAN, Mir. The title has
been continued for life, the Mir being
a representative of one of the Mirs or
Chiefs of Sind at the time of the an-
nexation (see Khairpur). Residence :
Shikdrpur, Sind.

LAW YAN, Mating, Kyet thaye zaung
shwe Salwe ya Min. The title is
personal, and was conferred on Feb-
ruary 16, 1887, on the occasion of the
Jubilee of the reign of Her Most
Gracious Majesty. It means " Re-
cipient of the Gold Chain of Honour,"
and is indicated by the letters K.S.M.
after the name. Residence : Mandalay,
Burma.

LAWA, Thakur Dhirat Singh, Thakur
of. A ruling chief. The Thdkur be-
longs to the Kachhwdha Rajput family
— that is, the ruling family of Jaipur
(g.v.), the State having originally
belonged to Jaipur, and having been
granted by the Maharaja of Jaipur to
one of the scions of his family. It
was conquered by the Pinddri leader,
Amir Khan, in the course of his
Jaipur and Jodhpur campaigns, and
the Thdkur of Lawa then became a
feudatory of Amir Khan's State of
Tonk. In 1867, however, this con-
nection was terminated, and Lawa
came under the direct protection of
the British Government. The area
of the State is 18 square miles ; its
population is 2682, chiefly Hindus.
Residence : Lawa, Rdjputdna.

LAXAMAN. See Lakshman.

LAXMI. See Lakshmi.

LAXUMAN JAGANNATHJI, Vaidya,
Diwd n Bahadur. See Lakshman Jagan-
nath.

LE BUN YTJ, Kyet thaye zaung since
Salwe ya Min. Granted the title, as
a personal distinction, January 3,
1893. It is indicated by tbe letters
K.S.M. after the name, and means
"Recipient of the Gold Chain of
Honour." Residence: Rangoon, Burma.



LEE BOON YEW. See Le Bun Yu.

LEE KIM SENG, Ahmudan gaung Tazeik
ya Min. Granted the title, as a per-
sonal distinction, on January 1, 1891.
It is indicated by the letters A.T.M.
after the name, and means " Recipient
of a Medal for Good Service." Resi-
dence : Rangoon, Burma.

LEGYA, Ktin Le, Sawbwa of. A ruling
chief. The Sawbwa is Chief of one
of the Shan States on the Burma
frontier, the area of which is about
1000 square miles. The population
consists almost entirely of Shans.
Residence : Legya, Burma.

LEHNA SINGH (of Manasawal), Rdnd;
b. 1801. The title is hereditary. Be-
longs to a very ancient Rajput family,
that claims to be descended from the
legendary hero Krishna, through Basu
Chand, who is said to have taken
possession of G arhmuktesar, and to
have reigned there about 2000 years
ago. His descendant, Jodh Chand,
with three brothers, is said to have
visited Jwalamukh on a pilgrimage,
and on that occasion to have taken
possession of Manasawal and the sur-
rounding territory in the Hoshidrpur
district. Rdnd Chigar Chand, thirty-
third in descent from Basu Chand,
made his submission to the Mahdrdjd
Ranjit Singh, and is said to have been
confirmed by him in some of his lands.
The Rdnd has four sons — Opindar
Singh, Madho Singh, Jandrdhan, and
another. Residence: Manasawal, Ho-
shidrpur, Punjab.

LIAKAT HUSAIN, Khan Bahddur.
The title is personal, and was conferred
on May 20, 1890. Residence : Meerut,
North-Western Provinces.

LIDHBAN, Sarddr of. See Mahtab
Singh; also Albel Singh; also Saheb
Singh ; also Sheonarayan Singh ; also
Sher Singh.

LIKHI, Thakur Jaswant Singhji, Thd-
kur of . A ruling chief; b. 1886. Has
recently succeeded to the gadi as a
minor. Belongs to a Koli (aboriginal)
family. The area of the State is 30
square miles; its population is 1307,
chiefly Hindus. Residence: Likhi,
Mdhi Kantha, Bombay.

LIMBAJI BA0 TUKAJI BA0, Rao

Saheb. The title is personal, and was



164



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



conferred on May 4, 1885. Residence ,
Bijapur, Bombay.

LIMBDI, Thdkur Saheb of. See Limri.



LIMRI, Thakur Saheb Sir Jaswant-
singhji Fatehsinghji, K.C.I.E., Thd-
kur Saheb of. A ruling chief ; b. May
23, 1859. Succeeded to the gadi as a
minor January 30, 1862. Belongs to
a Jhala Rajput (Hindu) family,
claiming a common descent with the
Chief of Dhrangadra from Harpaldev,
who came from the north in very early
times, and established himself in that
part of Kathiawar called Jhalawar
from the name of his sept. The
present Chief, who succeeded his
father, the Thakur Saheb Fatehsinghji,
was educated at the Rajkumar College,
Rajkot, and finished his education by
visiting England in company with the
Principal of that College. He attained
his majority in 1877, and on August
1 of that year was installed as ruler.
In 1884 the Government of Bombay,
in recognition of the ability and in-
dustry with which he conducted the
administration of his State, appointed
him a Member of the Legislative
Council of Bombay. In 1887 he was
selected as one of the representatives
of the Princes of Western India to
present their loyal congratulations to
the Queen Empress on the auspicious
occasion of the Jubilee of Her Majesty's
reign ; and on that occasion he had
the honour of receiving from the
Empress in person the insignia of a
Knight Commander of the Most Emin-
ent Order of the Indian Empire. He
extended his tour to all the chief
places of interest in the United King-
dom, in Canada, and in the United
States ; and was the guest successively
of the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, of
the Viceroy of the Canadian Dominion,
and of the President of the United
States. He has the reputation of being
a most able and painstaking ruler, and
has received high acknowledgment _ of
his ability and success from successive
Governors of Bombay. The area of
the State is 344 square miles; its
population is about 43,000, chiefly
Hindus, but including more than 4600
Muhammadans. The Thakur Saheb
maintains a military force of 35 cavalry,
174 infantry, and 28 guns, and is en-
titled to a salute of 9 guns. Resi-



dence : Limri (or Limbdi), Kathiawar,
Bombay.
LIN, Mating, Myook, Ahmudan gaung
Tazeik ya Min. The title was con-
ferred on January 1, 1891. It is in-
dicated by the letters A.T.M. after the
name, and means " Recipient of a Medal
for Good Service."



L0GHASSI, Rao Bahadur of.
hasi.



See Lug-



L0HARTJ, The Hon. Nawab Sir Amir-
Ud-Din Ahmad Khan Bahadur, Fa-
khar-Ud-Daula, K.C.I.E., Nawab of.
A ruling chief; b. 1859. Succeeded
to the gadi October 31, 1884. Belongs
to an Afghan (Muhammadan) family,
descended from Ahmad Bakhsh Khan,
who was employed by the Raja of
Alwar in the negotiation with Lord
Lake in 1806. In recognition of his
services he received Loharu from the
Raja, and the feudal possession of
Firuzpur from the British Government.
His son, Shams-ud-din Khan, suc-
ceeded him, but was executed at Delhi
in 1835 for compassing the murder of
the British Resident at Delhi. In
consequence of this Firuzpur was
confiscated; but Loharu was subse-
quently restored to the brothers of
the Chief, who had no share in his
guilt, Amin-ud-din Khan and Zia-ud-
din Khan ; and Amin-ud-din was the
great-grandfather of the present Na-
wab. The title of Nawab was restored
to the family, in 1866, as a personal
distinction ; and in 1874 it was con-
ferred on the Chief in recognition
of good administration. Created a
Knight Commander of the Most
Eminent Order of the Indian Empire,
June 22, 1897. Has been a Member
of the Legislative Council of the
Viceroy. The area of the State is 226
square miles ; its population is 18,754,
chiefly Hindus, but including 1517
Muhammadans. The Nawab maintains
a military force of 94 men. Residence :
Loharu, Hissar, Punjab.

LOK SINGH (of Babhnipair), Rdjd.
Succeeded the late Raja Udai Narayan
Singh of Babhnipair in 1892. The
title is hereditary. The Raja is the
head of the only legitimate family of
descendants from the old Kalhans
Rajas of Khurasa, whose raj extended
from Hisampur in Bahraich far into
the Gorakhpur district. Their an-



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



165



cestor, Sahaj Sah, who traced his
descent from the great King Jura-
sindhu of Behar, is said to have come
from Rajputana in the 14th century,
and to have taken service with his
friend, Malik Ain-ud-din, who ruled
the south of Oudh from Karra Manik-
pur. That officer found him and his
band of Rajput soldiers useful in
suppressing the internal disorders of
the province, and assigned him in
jdgir the trans-Gogra district, after-
wards known as Khurasa, where he
settled after expelling the Doms.
Tradition says that the Dom Raja,
struck by the beauty of one of the
daughters of the Chhattri, demanded
her in marriage. The Kalhans Raja
dissembled his rage at the indignity
offered him, and pretended to comply,
but when the Dom came with his
followers to claim his bride, plied
them with strong drink till they were
insensible and then murdered them.
In the 16th century, seventh in suc-
cession from Sahaj Sah, was Achal
Narayan Singh, the last of the dynasty,
whose fall is related in a well-known
legend. He carried off to his fort of
Lurhiaghat near Khurasa the daughter
of Ratan Pande, a small Brahman
zamindar. The outraged father sat
for 21 days under a tamarind tree
at the door of the ravisher, refusing
meat and drink till death put an end
to his sufferings. Before his spirit
fled, he pronounced a curse of utter
extinction on the family of his
oppressor, modifying it only in favour
of the offspring of the younger Rani,
who alone had endeavoured to make
him break his fast, and to whom he
promised that her descendants (the
present Rajas of Babhnipair) should
succeed to a small Raj, but that as
his eyes had fallen out from hunger,
so should they also be blind. The
curse has only been partially ful-
filled, as though there have been one
or two blind Rajas of Babhnipair, the
majority of them have been unaffected
in their eyesight. The avenging ghost
of the Brahman obtained the aid of
the river Sarju. A lofty wave rusbed
up from that river, overthrew the
Raja's fortress of Lurhiaghat, and
left not a member of his household
alive. The Rani had fled, on the
Brahman's advice, to her father's home
in Rasulpur Ghaus, where the posthu-



mous son of Achal Narayan Singh,
Bhing Singh, the ancestor of the
present Raja, was shortly born. He
possessed himself, when he grew up,
of a small principality, including
Babhnipair and Burhapara in Gonda,
and Rasulpur Ghaus in Basti. He was,
however, stripped of the Burhapara
Pargana by Alawal Khan, the aggres-
sive leader of the Pathans of Atraula,
who after a long struggle finally ex-
pelled the Kalhans. For five genera-
tions the direct lineal descendants of
the last Raja of Khurasa held the
combined Parganas of Babhnipair and
Rasulpur Ghaus. Sixth in descent
from Bhing Singh was -Madhukar
Singh, whose sons, Raj Singh and
Himmat Singh, divided the inheritance,
the former taking Rasulpur Ghaus
with the title of Raja, the latter, as
Babu, Babhnipair. The grandson of
Raj Singh, Kesri Singh, was killed in
battle by the Raja of Bansi, who
forcibly possessed himself of the
Pargana of Rasulpur Ghaus. The
murdered man left an infant son,
Shuja Singh, who was adopted by his
cousin, the childless Babu Rani Singh
of Babhnipair, and transferred the
title of Rdja to the holder of that
estate. His son, Abdhut Singh, held
the Raj till 1821, and was succeeded
by the blind Raja Jai Singh, who died
only a few years before the annexation.
On the reoccupation of Oudh the
estate was settled with Rani Sarfaraz
Kumar, widow of Indrajit Singh, who
had an infant son, the present Raja.
In 1867 the estates were taken under
management of the Court of "Wards.
Raja Udhai Narayan Singh was
educated at Canning College, and
received possession of the estates in
1873. He has issue, two daughters.
Residence : Babhnipair, Gonda, Oudh.

LORINDA MAL, Rai Bahadur. The
title is personal, and was conferred on
January 2, 1888. Residence: Pesha-
war, Punjab.

LU NAING, Maung, Tlmye gaung ngwe
Da ya Min. The title is personal, and
was conferred on May 20, 1896. It
means " Recipient of the Silver Sword
for Bravery," and is indicated by the
letters T.D.M. after the name. Resi-
dence : Burma.

LUCHMI. Seelaahhmi.



166



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



LUGHASI, Rao Bahadur Khet Singh,
Rao Bahadur of. A ruling chief; b.
July 21, 1856. Succeeded to the gadi
January 3, 1872. Belongs to the
great Bundela Rajput (Hindu) family
of the Orchha House, from which are
descended the ruling families of Panna,
Datia, Ajaigarh, and most of the
other States of Bundelkhand ; all
tracing their lineage from the same
eponymous hero, Bir Singh, who first
adopted the clan name of Bundela.
His descendant, the Maharaja Chhat-
rasal, possessed large territories in
Bundelkhand ; and is famous for having
called in the aid of the Mahrattas
against the Mughal Power, and having
adopted the Peshwa as one of his sons,
who thereby acquired a third of his
dominions, and a footing in Bundel-
khand. Chhatrasal's eldest son, Hardi
Sah, succeeded him at Panna ; and he
had two sons, the elder of whom
became Raja of Panna, while the
younger, Salim Singh, became Diwan
of Lughasi. His son, the Diwan
Dhiraj Singh, received a sanad from
the British Government in 1808. Three
generations have intervened between
Dhiraj Singh and the present Chief.
In 1857 the Diwan Sardar Singh of
Lughasi was loyal to the Government
during the time of the Mutiny, though
half the villages of the State were
laid waste by the rebels in consequence
of his fidelity. As a reward for these
services, the Diwan received the
hereditary title of Rao Bahadur at



Online LibraryRoper LethbridgeThe golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon → online text (page 30 of 63)