Roper Lethbridge.

The golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon online

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Patai Rdwal, the last Chauhan Chief
of Champanir. The area of the State
is 873 square miles ; its population is
66,822, chiefly Hindus. The Mahara-
wal maintains a military force of 38
cavalry, 250 infantry, and 3 guns, and
entitled to a salute of 9 guns. Resi-
dence: Bariya, Rewa Kantha, Bombay.

BARJORJI DORABJI PATEL, Khan
Bahadur. The title is personal, and
was conferred on May 24, 1889. Resi-
dence : Quetta, Baluchistan.

BARJORJI RTJSTAMJI, Mistry, Khdn
Bahadur. The title is personal, and
was conferred on May 20, 1890. Resi-
dence : Bombay.

BARKAT ALI KHAN, Muhammad,

Khdn Bahadur. See Muhammad.

BARODA, His Highness Maharaja
Sayaji Rao III., G.C.S.I., Maharaja
Gaekwdr of. A ruling chief, and one
of the Premier Princes of the Empire ;
b. March 17, 1863. Succeeded to the
gadi on May 27, 1875. The Gaekwar's
full titles are — His Highness Farzand-
i-Khas-i-Daulat-i-Inglishia Maharaja
Sayaji Rao Gaekwdr Sena Khas Khel
Shamsher Bahadur, Knight Grand
Commander of the Most Exalted
Order of the Star of India. He is
the descendant of the famous Mahratta
leader, Damaji Gaekwar, who obtained
from the Shahu Raja of Satara the
title of Shamsher Bahadur for his
bravery at the battle of Ballapur,
fought against the Imperial forces of
Delhi at the close of the 17th century.



Damaji Gaekwar died in 1721, and
was succeeded by his nephew and
adopted son Pilaji Gaekwdr, who
obtained from the Shahu Raja the
additional title of Send Khas Khel (see
Introduction, I 11) on the conclusion
of the wars with the Peshwa. Pilaji
was assassinated in 1731, and was
succeeded by his son Damaji II., who,
during a period of about forty years
of almost incessant warfare, played
a most prominent part in the history
of India, and firmly established the
Gaekwari power throughout Gujarat
and the neighbouring districts of
Western India. In 1732, the same
year in which his father was murdered
by a Mughal emissary, he reconquered
the capital of Gujarat, Baroda, from
the Mughal Viceroy; and that city
has been the capital of the Gaekwars
ever since. He commanded a division
at the great and decisive battle of
Panipat in 1761. He invaded Kathia-
war, and forced many of its princes
to pay him tribute ; he conquered the
ancient city of Anhalwara Patan, and
also Ahmadabad, the old capital of
Gujarat. After his death, his two
sons Govind Rao and Fatheh Singh
became Gaekwars in succession; and
the latter was succeeded by Ananda
Rao, a son of Govind Rao Gaekwdr.
In 1803 a treaty was concluded with
the British Power, under which a
British Resident was appointed to the
Court of Baroda, and provision was
made for the maintenance of a strong
subsidiary force. Ananda Rao was
succeeded by Sayaji Rao I., whose
reign was long and on the whole
prosperous; and he was followed by
three of his sons in turn, Ganpat Rao
Gaekwar, Khande Rao Gaekwar, and
Mulhar Rao Gaekwdr. His Highness
Khande Rao Gaekwdr rendered loyal
service to the Government at the time
of the Mutiny But the rule of his
successor was disgraced by misgovern-
ment; and it terminated in his de-
position under painful circumstances.

The reign of the Mahdrdjd Gaekwdr
Sayaji III. has been one of progress
and prosperity. For His Highness
himself, it has not been without the
deep shadows of domestic bereave-
ment; for in April 1885 he lost his
first wife, Her Highness the Mahdrdni
Chimnabdi, niece of the Princess of
Tanjore, whom he had married in



28



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



1880, and who had borne him three
children — two daughters, who had
died during the lifetime of their
mother, and a son and heir named
Fatheh Singh Rao, who has happily
survived. In December 1885 His
Highness took as his second wife a
Princess of the House of Dewas in
Central India, Her Highness Chimna-
bai, the present Maharani, who was
invested by Her Most Gracious Majesty
the Queen Empress with the insignia
of the Imperial Order of the Crown
of India in 1892. Of this marriage
there has been issue two sons, named
Jaisingh Rao and Sivaji Rao respec-
tively, and a Princess named Indira
Raja.

In 1875 the Gaekwar, attended by
Sir Madhava Rao and the chief officers
of the State, went to Bombay to meet
His Royal Highness the Prince of
"Wales ; and shortly afterwards was
honoured by a visit of His Royal
Highness to the capital of Baroda,
where the auspicious event was
celebrated by the most magnificent
hospitalities. On January 1, 1877,
His Highness, on the invitation of
H.E. the Viceroy, attended the Im-
perial Assembly at Delhi to celebrate
the Proclamation of Her Most Gracious
Majesty the Queen as Empress of
India, and on that occasion was in-
vested with the title of Farzand-i-Khds-
i-Daulat-i-Inglishia by Lord Lytton
as the representative of the Empress.
On December 5, 1887, His Highness
having previously received the honour
of Knighthood, was personally invested
by the Queen Empress with the in-
signia of a Grand Commander of the
Most Exalted Order of the Star of
India.

The State is one of the largest,
richest, most populous, and most
advanced in India. It contains an
area of 8570 square miles. Its popula-
tion is about 2,185,005, chiefly Hindus ;
but there are 174,980 Muhammadans,
46,718 Jains, and 8118 Parsis. The
revenue of the State is about
Rs. 15,300,000 per annum (at par
£1,530,000). In area the State of
Baroda is considerably larger than
either Saxony or Wiirtemberg: its
population is greater than that of
Greece, and not much less than that
of Switzerland. The Maharaja Gae-
kwar maintains a military force of



3562 cavalry and 4988 infantry, with
38 guns. His Highness is entitled to
a salute of 21 guns. The family
colour is that red which is called
Bhagwd, the colour of the red earth of
the Mahabaleshwar hills. Residence:
Baroda, Western India.

BARODA or SHE0PUR (GWALI0R),
Raja Bijai Singh, Rdjd of. A ruling
chief; b. 1862. Succeeded to the gadi
on September 27, 1865. Is a Kshatri
Gaur (Hindu). The area of the State
is 150 square miles; its population
9000, chiefly Hindus. The Raja main-
tains a military force of 50 cavalry,
400 infantry, and 5 guns. Residence :
Baroda, Gwalior, Central India.

BARRA or BARDIA, Rao Daukal Singh,
Rao of. A ruling chief; b. 1850.
Succeeded to the gadi on August 25,
1865. Is of a Rajput (Hindu) family.
The population of the State is about
650, chiefly Hindus. Residence: Barra,
Western Malwa, Central India.

BARU VENKATA RAMANARASU
PANTULU, Rai Bahadur. The title
was conferred on January 1, 1892.
The Rai Bahadur is a Tahsildar of
Vizagapatam. Residence: Vizagapa-
tam, Madras.

BARWANI (BH0PAWAR), Rana Ran-
jit Singh, Rdnd of. A ruling chief;
b. 1888. Succeeded to the gadi as a
minor on December 14, 1894. Is a
Sisodiya Rajput, akin to the ruling
House of Udaipur. The area of the
State is 1362 square miles ; its popula-
tion 56,445, chiefly Hindus, with 8605
belonging to aboriginal tribes. The
Rana maintains a military force of 17
cavalry, 225 infantry, and 9 guns. He
is entitled to a salute of 9 guns. Re-
sidence : Barwani, Central India.

BARWARA, Thdkur of. See Hanuman
Singh.

BARWARI, Rdjd of See Surendra Na-
rayan Singh.

BASANT SINGH, Bhai, Rai Saheb. The
title was conferred on May 25, 1895.
Residence. Baluchistan.

BASANTA SINGH, Chaudhri, Rai Ba-
hadur. Granted the title, as a personal
distinction, January 2, 1893. Is a land-
holder in the Bijnor district, North-
western Provinces. Residence: Bijnor,
North- Western Provinces.



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



29



BASAWA SINGH (of Laroa), Sarddr.
The title is hereditary. Residence:
Jalandhar, Punjab.

BASHAHR, Raja Shamsher, Singh,
Rdjd of. A ruling chief; b. 1839.
Succeeded to the gadi in 1849. Be-
longs to a Rajput (Hindu) family
claiming descent, through 120 gener-
ations, from Sri Krishna. Between
1803 and 1815 Bashahr was overrun
by the Gurkhas; but on their expulsion
in the latter year, the British Govern-
ment granted, a sanad to the Raja,
confirming him in the possession of
all his territories, except Rawani,
which was given to Keonthal. The
area of the State (which is one of the
Simla Hill States) is 3257 square
miles ; its population is 64,345, chiefly
Hindus. The Raja has a son named
Tika Raghunath Singh. He maintains
a military force of 100 infantry and 2
guns. Residence : Bashahr, Punjab.

BASHIR AHMAD, Khan Bahadur; b.
1860. Is the son-in-law of His late
Highness Prince Intizam-ul-Mulk,
third Prince of Arcot. Granted the
title as a personal distinction in 1887.
Residence: Madras.

BASHYAM AIYANGAR, Venbakam,
C.I. E.,Diwdn Bahadur. The title of Rai
Bahadur was conferred as a personal
distinction on February 16, 1887, and
that of Diwan Bahadur on May 25,
1895. Created a CLE. on May 25,
1895. Residence: Madras.

BASITNAGAR, Amanat Fatima, Begum
of; b. 1832. Is the widow of the
Nawab Dost Ali Khan of Basitnagar,
who was succeeded on his death in
1864 by the Nawab Husain Ali Khan.
On the death of the latter in 1871 the
Begum succeeded to the title and
estates. The family is of Pathan
origin, and is descended from Kildar
Khan, third son of the Nawab Diler
Khan of Shahabad. The latter was
a distinguished Afgh&n officer under
the Emperor Aurangzeb, who sent him
to Shahabad to punish the Pande
Panwar Brahmans, who had plundered
a convoy of Imperial treasure on its
way from Khairabad to Delhi. He
slew all the bandits, and was granted
their extensive possessions in jdgir,
with the titles of Nawab and Haft



Hazdri, or commander of seven thou-
sand. He founded the city of Shaha-
bad, and built the great fort known
as the Bari Deohri ; and his descend-
ants held the grants rent free till
Saadat Ali Khan resumed them. The
title of Nawab was recognized by
Government as hereditary in 1864.
Residence : Shahabad, Hardoi, Oudh.

BAS0DA (BH0PAL), Nawab Muham-
mad Haidar Ali Khan, Nawdb of. A
ruling chief ; b. 1856. Succeeded to
the gadi in October 1897. The Nawab
is a Pathan (Muhammadan) descended
from the Nawab Dalel Kh&n, founder
of the Kurwai State (q.v.). The area
of the State is about 22 square miles ;
its population 7772, chiefly Hindus,
but with 1454 Muhammadans. Re-
sidence: Basoda, Bhopal, Central
India.

BASTAR, Raja Bhairam Deo, Rdjd of.
A ruling chief; b. May 21, 1839.
Succeeded to the gadi August 27, 1853.
Belongs to an ancient Rajput family
of high caste, whose founder, Kakati
Partabrudra, came from Warangal in
the Deccan, and settled at Bastar
about the beginning of the 14th
century. The area of the State is
13,062 square miles ; its population
196,248, of whom over 36,000 belong
to Gond, Bhil, and other aboriginal
tribes, the rest being chiefly Hindus.
Residence : Jagdalpur, Bastar, Central
Provinces.

BASTI, Raja Patesri Partab Narayan
Singh, Rdjd of; b. August 8, 1870.
Succeeded the late Raja Mahesh Sitla
Bakhsh Singh on May 5, 1890. The
title is hereditary, the Rajds of Basti
belonging to a Kshattriya family claim-
ing descent from a scion of the ancient
Rajds of Kalhans. The founder of
the latter family was Sej, who, with
Tej his brother, in the 14th century,
came to Oudh and conquered the
territories of the Dom Rdjd of Gonda.
Tenth in descent from Sej was Rajd
Achal Singh, who granted Basti to his
cousin, ancestor of the present Raja.
Residence : Basti, North-Western Pro-
vinces.

BAW, Maung Hlaing, Ngwegunhmu of.
A ruling chief. The Ngwegunhmu
is one of the Shan Chiefs, and rules
over a State of about 350 square miles.
Residence : Baw, Shan States, Burma.



30



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



BAWNIN, Saw Kin, Myoza of. A ruling
chief. The Myoza is one of the Shan
Chiefs, and rules over a State of 30
square miles. Residence : Bawnin,
Shan States, Burma.

BAWZAING, Maung Kya Ywet, Ngwe-
gunhmuof. A ruling chief . TheNgwe-
gunhmu is one of the Shan Chiefs, and
rules over a State of 20 square miles.
Residence: Bawzaing, Shan States,
Burma.

BECHARDAS VEHARIDAS, Desai,

Sarddr, Rao Bahadur ; b. February 26,
1844. President of the Municipal
Committee, Nadiad, from 1886 to 1889 ;
received the title of " Rao Bahadur "
from Government in 1887 ; elected a
Member of the Legislative Council,
Bomba, in 1888 ; and granted the title
of " Sarddr " in the same year. Resi-
dence : Kaira, Bombay.

BED SARAN KUNWAR (of Agori
Barhar), Rani; b. 1851. The title is
hereditary, the Chandel Rajas of Ba-
rhar being descended, it is said, from
Pari Mai and Bari Mai of Mahoba in
Bundelkhand, who some hundreds of
years ago took service with Raja
Madan of the Baland family of the
Kharwdr tribe, and after killing him,
divided his country and founded the
three principalities of Barhar, Bijai-
garh, and Bardi, in Rewah. The Raja
Kesho Saran Sah, died without issue
in 1871, leaving his widow, the present
Rani, in possession of the estates for
her life. Her heir is Babu Jagannath
Prasad Singh of Jamgaon, and is about
41 years of age. Residence: Rajpur,
Mirzapur, North-Western Provinces.

BEDLA, Rao of. See Karan Singh.

BEHARI. See Bihari.

BEHRAMJI DADABHAI, Khdn Ba-
hadur; b. October 23, 1831. The
Khan Bahadur's name is also some-
times spelt Byramjee Dadabhoy. The
title was conferred on April 3, 1880,
as a personal distinction, in recognition
of highly meritorious service in many
important and responsible public offices.
The Khdn Bahadur is the eldest son
of the late Khan Saheb Ddddbhdi
Shapurji, an eminent public servant,
who had received a sherpao (or " Dress
of Honour") from the Bombay Govern-
ment in 1837, and the title of Khan
Saheb in 1847. Educated at Thanna,



and Surat, and Elphinstone College,
Bombay. Entered the Government
Service in 1853, and having dis-
tinguished himself in various civil
capacities, was specially selected in
1865 to succeed Colonel Dunsterville
as Deputy Registrar-General and Re-
gistrar of Bombay — being the first
gentleman of Indian birth ever ap-
pointed to fill that high office. Ap-
pointed J. P. in 1869 ; in 1872 a Dele-
gate of the Parsi Chief Matrimonial
Court in Bombay; in 1879 acted as
Inspector-General of Registration ; in
1878, and again in 1880, elected a
Member of the Municipal Corporation
of the City of Bombay ; and served
in many other public offices "with
credit to himself and advantage to the
public," as testified by the Bombay
Government when in 1880 he was re-
commended for the title of Khdn
Bahddur. He was married, February
1848, to Baie Sonabaie, eldest daughter
of Khdn Saheb Cowashaw Sorabshaw
Taleiyarkhan of Surat ; and has issue.
His sons are — (1) Jehangeer Byramjee
Dadabhoy, born 1864, married 1885
to Khorsetbanu Hormusjee Pestonjee
Cama; and (2) Manikji Behramji
Ddddbhdi, born 1865, barrister-at-law
of the Middle Temple 1887, J.P. for
Bombay 1888, Municipal Councillor
for Bombay 1889; married 1884 to
Jerbanu Ddddbhdi Pdlanji Bhedwdr.
His daughters are (1) Awabaie, born
1851, married 1865 to Ardasir Cursetji
Ghandie, who died in 1874 ; (2) Dhan-
baiji, born 1859, married 1877 to Dhan-
jibhoy Nasirwdnji Ghista; (3) Phero-
zebaie, born 1861, married 1877 to
Framji Cursetji Rustamji Thdndwdld.
His brothers are — (1) Cowashaw Dada-
bhoy, born 1845, married 1865 to Jer-
baie Bargorji Hadda"; (2) Cursetjee
Dadabhoy, born 1850, married 1886 to
Gulbaie Jamsetjee Seendwdld. Re-
sidence: Foras Road, Byculla, Bom-
bay.

BEHRAMJI JEHANGIRJI RAJ KOT-
WALA, Khdn Bahddur. The title is
personal, and was conferred on May
24, 1889, in recognition of his public
services. The Khdn Bahddur"s name
is also sometimes spelt Byramjee (or
Byramji) Jehanghirji Rajkotwdla. Is
a Delegate of the Parsi Matrimonial
Court at Kardchi, and Member of the
Sindh Sabha; was Honorary Special



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



31



Magistrate at Nasik and Karachi from
1869 to 1890; acted as Chairman of
the Nasik Municipality in 1880 and
1883. Residence: Karachi, Sind.

BELASAR PARIDA, Sdmant Rai. This
is one of the titles that appear not to
have been formally recognized by
Government. It was originally ob-
tained from one of the old Rajas of
Kujung. Residence : Cuttack, Orissa.

BELI RAM, Rai Bahadur. Granted the
title, as a personal distinction, January
2, 1893. Residence : Batala, Punjab.

BELKHERA (MATANPUR), TMkur of.
See Purandhar Singh.

BENARES, His Highness Sir PRABHU
NARAYAN SINGH, G.C.I.E., Maha-
raja Bahadur of; b. November 26,
1855. Succeeded June 13, 1889; has
issue — Kunwar Aditya Narayan Singh,
born November 6, 1875. The family are
Brahmans of the Bhuinhar clan, and
their traditions go back to the year
1000, when a Brahman ascetic of
Utaria, a village near Benares, foretold
the succession of his posterity to the
dominions then governed by a Hindu
Raja. Some centuries later, in the
decay of the Mughal Empire, some of
the family who attempted to assert a
turbulent independence were severely
chastised by one of the lieutenants of
the Emperor Farrukhsiyar. In the
succeeding reign Mausa Ram, the
eldest brother of the branch occupying
the ancient seat of the family in
Utaria, rose to great favour with the
Governor of Benares under the Nawab
Vazir of Oudh. On the death of
Mausa Ram in 1739 his son Balwant
Singh sent an offering to Delhi, and
received from the Emperor his con-
firmation in the government of the
Jaunpur, Benares, and Chunar dis-
tricts, with the possession in his own
right of four Parganas, and the title
of Raja Bahadur, which the family
has held as an hereditary title ever
since. In 1763, when the Emperor and
the Nawab Vazir of Oudh marched
eastward to expel the British from
Bengal, Raja Balwant Singh was com-
pelled to join them, but his troops
took no part in the battle of Baksar,
being stationed on the other side of
the Ganges, and when he fled to one
of his hill fortresses he was called back
to receive confirmation of his posses-



sions under the British Power. On the
death of Balwant Singh in 1770 the
Nawab Vazir of Oudh desired to seize
the Benares territory, but the British
Government compelled him to recog-
nize Chait Singh, the son of Balwant
Singh, as Raja under the British
suzerainty, and by the treaty of 1775
the territory was finally declared
British. The differences between Raja
Chait Singh and the Calcutta Govern-
ment under Warren Hastings are
historically famous, as they became
the subject of one of the articles of
the impeachment that was framed
against the great Governor-General.
The Raja was deprived of his govern-
ment, which was given on conditions
to his nephew, Raja Mahip Narayan,
son of Balwant Singh's daughter, and
he died in exile at Gwalior under the
protection of the Maharaja Sindhia.
Raja Mahip Narayan died in 1795, and
was succeeded by his son Udit Narayan
Singh; and the latter in 1835 by his
nephew and adopted son, Raja Ishri
Parshad Narayan Singh Bahadur, who
for his loyal services at the time of
the Mutiny, received in 1859 the title
of Maharaja Bahadur as a personal
distinction. On January 1, 1877, on
the occasion of the Proclamation of
Her Most Gracious Majesty as Empress
of India, the Maharaja Bahadur was
created a Knight Grand Commander
of the Most Exalted Order of the Star
of India ; and on his death in 1889 he
was succeeded by his nephew and
adopted son, the present Raja. On
February 8, 1889, the late Maharaja
Bahadur had been granted the privilege,
as a personal distinction, of being
addressed as " His Highness," and in
September of that year the present
Raja was granted the same privilege,
with the title of Maharaja Bahadur,
also as personal distinctions. The
Maharaja was created a Knight Grand
Commander of the Most Eminent
Order of the Indian Empire on Janu-
ary 1, 1898. His Highness has been
exempted from personal appearance in
the Civil Courts, and has been assured
by sanad, that, in the case of failure of
natural heirs, the Government will
permit and confirm any adoption of a
successor made by himself or any
future Raja that may be in accordance
with Hindu law and the customs of his
family. He is entitled to a salute of



32



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



13 guns. Residences : Ramnagar, Be-
nares; Chakya, Mirzapur.

BENI MADHAB BANEBJI, Rai Baha-
dur. The title was conferred on Janu-
ary 1, 1894. Residence: Calcutta,
Bengal.

BENI MADHO, Rai Bahadur. Eeceived
the title, for services as Secretary of
the local Famine Committee, on May
21, 1898. Residence : Sehore, Bhopal,
Central India.

BENJAMIN, Elijah, Khan Saheb. Re-
ceived the title on May 21, 1898.
Residence : Sukkur, Sind, Bombay.

BENKAT RAO. See Vyankat Rao.

BEONA, Raja of. See Gobind Singh.

BEPIN. See Bipin.

BERI (BUNDELKHAND), Rao Bijai

Singh, Jdyirddr of. A ruling chief;
b. February 14, 1848. Succeeded to
the yadi on March 18, 1862. Is a Puar
Rajput, descended from Acharjya, who
married a daughter of the Maharaja
Jagat Raj, son of the Maharaja
Chhatarsal of Jaitpur, and received
the jdgir of Beri. He was succeeded
by his son, Khuman Singh, whose son,
Jugal Prasad, received a sanad from
the British Government. His grand-
son, Bishnath Singh, adopted the
present Jagirdar, who is a descendant
from the Maharaja Jagat Raj by a
collateral line. The title is hereditary;
the Jagirdars have sometimes been
styled Sawai Rao, from their ancestor
Jagat Raj. The present Rao's son is
Kunwar Bahadur Noni Raghuraj
Singh. The State has an area of about
28 square miles, and a population of
about 5000, chiefly Hindus. The Rao
maintains a military force of 10 cavalry,
66 infantry, and two guns. Residence :
Beri, Bundelkhand, Central India.

BEYPORE, Valiya Raja of. See Rama
Varma Raja, Raja.

BEZONJI DADABHAI, Khan Bahadur.
The title was conferred on January 1,
1898. Residence •' Nagpur, Central
Provinces.

BHABAR, The Chief of. A ruling chief.
The area of the State is 80 square
miles; its population is 7222. Resi-
dence : Bhabar, Palanpur, Bombay.

BHADARVA, Rana Fat eh Singh Sardar
Singh, Rand of. A ruling chief ; b.



about 1850. Succeeded to the yadi on
January 26, 1888. The area of the State
is 27 square miles; its population
9185. Residence: Bhadarva, Rewa
Kantha, Bombay.

BHADAURA (GUNA), Raja Madho

Singh, Rdjd of. A ruling chief; b.
1876. Succeeded to the gadi on May
10, 1883. The Raja is descended from
a Sisodhiya Rajput (Hindu) family.
The State has a population of about
4000, chiefly Hindus. Residence: Bha-
daura, Guna, Central India.

BHADAWAR, Maharaja of. See Ma-
hendra Mahendra Singh.

BHADRI, Rai of. See Rai Krishna
Prasad Singh.

BHADVA, Jareja Bhav Singhji, Chief
of. A ruling chief; b. about 1826.
Succeeded to the yadi in 1843. The
area of the State is 7 square miles ;
its population 1231, chiefly Hindus.
Residence : Bhadva, Kathiawar, Bom-
bay.

BHAG RAM, Pandit (of Jalandhar),
C.I.E., Rai Bahadur. The title was
conferred on August 11, 1885. Created
a CLE. on January 1, 1897. Residence:
Kashmir.

BHAG SINGH (of Sikandra), Sardar.
Descended from Dargaha Singh, who
acquired a considerable territory by
conquest in 1759 a.d. His possessions
were subsequently reduced by other
Sikh Sardars. He had four sons, of
whom the third, Sardar Agar Singh,
was the father of Sardar Bhag Singh.
The Sardar has a son, named Jowahir
Singh. The title is hereditary. Resi-
dence : Ambala, Punjab.

BHAGA SINGH, Dharmsinghwala, Sar-
dar. The title of Sardar is hereditary
in this family. Residence : Firozpur,
Punjab.

BHAGABATTI CHARAN CHATTERJI,

Rai Saheb. The title was conferred
on January 1, 1894. Residence : Bar-
rackpore, Bengal.

BHAGAT SINGH, Sarddr Bahadur; b.
1846. The title is personal, and was
conferred on April 19, 1886, in recogni-
tion of eminent services in the Depart-
ment of Public Works, Rajputana.
Claims descent from an ancient Ksha-
triya family of Sikh Sardars, of the
"Party of Raja Sahibsingh," settled



THE GOLDEN BOOK OF INDIA



in the district of Gujrat, Punjab. The
Sardar Bahadur has four sons living —
Sardar Krishna Singh Kapur (barrister-
at-law of the Middle Temple, 1887),
Lahore ; Sardar Vishnu Singh Kapur
(of the Royal Agricultural College,
Cirencester, and of the Middle Tem-
ple) ; Govind Singh ; Hari Singh. Resi-
dence : Kapur Mahil, Gujrat, Punjab.

BHAGAT SINGH (of Kapurthala),
Sardar, C. I. E. The Sardar was created
a Companion of the Most Eminent
Order of the Indian Empire, January
1, 1890. Residence : Kapurthala.

BHAGAVAT DAYAL SINGH BAHA-
DUR,Thakurai, Rdjd. The title of Rai
Bahadur was conferred on January 3,
1893 ; and that of Rdjd on January 1,
1898. Residence: Chainpur, Palamau,
Bengal.

BHAGWAN BAKHSH (of Pokhra An-
sari), Rdjd; b. September 1, 1872.
The title is hereditary, and was recog-



Online LibraryRoper LethbridgeThe golden book of India; a genealogical and biograhical dictionary of the ruling princes, chiefs, nobles, and other personages, titled or decorated, of the Indian empire, with an appendix for Ceylon → online text (page 8 of 63)