Royal Society (Great Britain).

The celebration of the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Royal Society of London, July 15-19, 1912 online

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of conquests over Nature, conquests differing from other conquests in that they



105

have been achieved, not by resistance to Nature, but by an ever increasing
knowledge of and obedience to her laws. It is a further subject for
congratulation that the true method by which these results have been
achieved, the method of experiment and test, which was from the first laid
down by your Society, was truly laid, and has since been universally acknow-
ledged. We acknowledge also the large share which, on a survey of your
successes, must be attributed to the principle represented by the words which
you have adopted as your motto and have so greatly fortified in action, the
principle of the independence of the human intellect. We acknowledge it with
the more gratitude, since in supporting that principle you have conferred
benefits on mankind not limited to the particular subjects which you have
made more especially your own. We know, from the account which has been
preserved, the ideas which actuated the founders of your Society, and it is very
fitting that we of the present day, who can judge by the event the value of
those ideas, should join with you in celebrating, and render our respectful
homage to, the memory of those gifted men who formulated the principles and
laid down the lines of your work, though they could only prophetically foresee
the grandeur of the results to follow. May the Royal Society long continue
its glorious career to the increase of true knowledge, the honour of our nation,
and the welfare and happiness of the whole human race.

HORACE CULLEN, Master.
July, 1912.



MlNERALOGICAL SOCIETY, LONDON

SOCIETAS MINERALOGICA SociETATi REGALi S. P. D. Gratulamur Societati
vestrae quod annos ducentos et quinquaginta ab origine vestra feliciter
peractos mox estis celebraturi. Simul maximas gratias agimus quod scientias
illas quae ad terrae structuram mineralem pertinent auxilio vestro et hortatione
semper fovistis.

W. J. LEWIS, Praeses.
W.P. BE ALE, Thesaurensis.
GEORGE T. PRIOR, Secretarius.

Datum Londini, die XVIII mensis lunii, MCMXII.



PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY, LONDON

SOCIETATIS PHARMACEUTICAE MAGNAE BRITANNIAE PRAESES, CONCILIUM,
SODALES SOCIETATI REGALI Salutem. Gratulamur animo quam amicissimo
Societati vestrae illustrissimae doctissimaeque natalem ducentesimum quinqua-
gesimum celebranti, speramusque fore ut ita in posteros annos floreat ut cumu-



106 THE ROYAL SOCIETY

latis quae iam antea laudanda effecit, rerum naturae scientiam proferat atque
augeat, totiusque human! generis utilitatibus serviat. Illud quoque nobis
pergratum est recordari, quod Gulielmus ille Allen, qui primus fuit Societatis
Pharmaceuticae anno MDCCCXLI praeses, et ipse Societatis Regalis sodalis
fuit, quodque Societas Regalis semper et sua opera et aliis incitandis magno
fuit adiumento Societati nostrae, per hos septuaginta annos id agenti ut
artium chemicae et pharmaceuticae scientia apud Britannos amplificaretur.
Datum Londinii, die III mensis Iulii, MCMXII^pro Societate Pharmaceutica
Magnae Britanniae.

CHAS. B. ALLEN, Praeses.



PHYSICAL SOCIETY, LONDON

To THE PRESIDENT, COUNCIL, AND FELLOWS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY. Many
illustrious names have been inscribed on the roll of the Royal Society during
the 250 years which have elapsed since its foundation ; but none have added
a greater lustre to the fame of the Society and to the glory of their country
than those of the men who devoted themselves to the study of Physics.
Newton firmly planted the Tree of Science, Young, Joule, Faraday, Maxwell,
Stokes, and Lord Kelvin have spread its branches in many directions. May
we, therefore, a young Society specially devoted to the study of Physics pay
our warm tribute of regard and affection to the parent body whose members
have laid the foundation on which we are trying to build ! May the record
of the Royal Society be as glorious in the future as it has been in the past,
and may she continue to possess the confidence and admiration of all who seek
the advancement of Natural Knowledge ! On behalf of the PHYSICAL SOCIETY

OF LONDON :

ARTHUR SCHUSTER, President.

W. DUDDELL, Treasurer.
SILVANUS P. THOMPSON, Foreign Secretary.
W. R. COOPER )
S. W.J. SMITH \ Secreta s '
June, 1912.

ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, LONDON

To THE PRESIDENT, COUNCIL, AND FELLOWS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON.
We, the President, Council, and Fellows of the ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL
INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND, desire to offer to you our hearty
congratulations on the occasion of the completion of the two hundred and
fiftieth year of your glorious history. Your Society has during that long
period been the centre of scientific thought, the home of the most illustrious
workers and discoverers in science, the representative throughout the world



CELEBRATION ADDRESSES 107

of British scientific research and the constant and trusted adviser and almoner
of the Crown and the Government of the country in respect of all matters
relating to the progress of Science. Our Institute has less than seventy years 1
record to look back upon, for the Ethnological Society of London, which forms
part of it, was founded in 1843, and the Anthropological Society of London,
which forms the other part of it, in 1863. The two Societies were combined in
1871, and it is to one who conferred lustre on your Society, our then President,
Thomas Henry Huxley, that that happy combination was due. We have
owed much to other great men who, belonging to your body, have devoted
themselves especially to the work of Anthropological Science, and have
presided over our Institute. Among these are George Busk, Francis Galton,
John Evans, John Beddoe, Augustus Franks, Augustus Pitt-Rivers, Daniel
Cunningham, and others who are departed, as well as Lord Avebury, Alexan-
der Macalister, Edward Burnet Tylor, and other distinguished members of
your body who happily remain with us. It is to one of the ornaments of your
Society Charles Darwin that the science of Anthropology owes its most
powerful inspiration. The Origin of Species and the Descent of Man
gave a new impulse and direction to the students of our science and formed
for them a fresh starting-point for laborious and fruitful investigation. We
have for many years felt the assured conviction that your body, as the
acknowledged leaders of scientific thought, had the most complete sympathy
with our work ; that you viewed the growing development of it with cordial
satisfaction ; and that you had thus contributed much towards its successful
prosecution. It is accordingly with a special feeling of gratification that we
have deputed our President, Dr. A. P. MAUDSLA,Y, to be our representative at
the Celebration of your auspicious Anniversary and to present to you in our
name this our Address of Congratulation.

ALFRED P. MAUDSLAY.

Dated the llth day of June, 1912.



ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY, LONDON

WE, the President, Vice-Presidents, and Council of the ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL
SOCIETY, desire to offer our most hearty congratulations to the Royal Society on
the celebration of the 250th Anniversary of its foundation. We would testify
to the unceasing efforts of the Royal Society to promote the advancement of
Natural Knowledge, which have eminently contributed to the present remark-
able development of the sciences and their application to technical and
industrial arts. Particularly do we desire to acknowledge the beneficial
influence of the Royal Society on the study of Astronomy evidenced by the
large number of important memoirs on Astronomical Science found in its
publications. We note with pride the long roll of distinguished Astronomers



108 THE ROYAL SOCIETY

who have been Fellows of the Society ; and we are mindful that it was the
extensive progress of Astronomy made in Great Britain under the encourage-
ment of the Royal Society, which led to the formation of the Royal Astro-
nomical Society. We are confident that the Royal Society will in the future,
as in the past, continue to exercise the same fostering and effective influence
upon the progress and development of all branches of Natural Knowledge.

F. W. DYSON, President.
ARTHUR R. HINKS, Secretary.
June 1



ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY, LONDON

To THE PRESIDENT AND COUNCIL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY, FROM THE PRESIDENT
AND COUNCIL OF THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY. Gentlemen, On behalf
of the Council of the Royal Geographical Society, and as representing the
Fellows, I desire to convey to you our warmest congratulations on the occasion
of the celebration of the 250th Anniversary of the foundation of your Society.
It would be superfluous for me to point out the claims which the Royal
Society possesses upon the admiration and gratitude of all who have the
interests of scientific progress at heart. Through long years it was the only
Institution in this country devoted to the encouragement and publication of the
results of scientific research on purely disinterested lines, and without any hope
of reward, except the satisfaction which follows the successful search for truth.
The most illustrious names in all departments of Science have been connected
with the Royal Society from its foundation. From the very first every serious
research into any of the many aspects of the universe was welcomed by the
Society, and the results were impartially considered. In time, and largely due
to the action of the Royal Society, this work of scientific research became so
multifarious that other Societies grew up alongside the parent Society, and
co-operated in the common object of seeking after the truth, and attempting
to interpret the phenomena of the universe. In past generations the subject
with which the Society is directly concerned had its fair share of attention at
the hands of the Royal Society, many of whose Fellows were specialists in
Geography ; and the influence and example of the Royal Society have not been
without their effect in inducing British geographers to apply scientific methods
in an ever increasing degree to their own department of research. In
pursuing its work the Royal Society has rendered eminent services to the
Empire and to the world, and we confidently hope that in the future it will
continue to occupy the commanding position in Science which it has attained
in the past. On behalf of the Council and Fellows of the Royal Geographical
Society, I am, Gentlemen, Your obedient servant,

CURZON OF KEDLESTON, President R.G.S.



109



ROYAL INSTITUTION OF GREAT BRITAIN, LONDON

THE MEMBERS OF THE ROYAL INSTITUTION OF GREAT BRITAIN congratulate
the Royal Society of London on the occasion of the celebration of its two
hundred and fiftieth Anniversary, and wish the Society all prosperity and

success in the future.

DONALD W. C. HOOD,

Delegate of the Royal Institution of Great Britain.

21 Albemarle Street, London, W.
July 16th, 1912.

ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY, LONDON

To THE ROYAL SOCIETY, LONDON. WE, THE PRESIDENT AND COUNCIL OF THE
ROYAL METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY, desire to offer to the Royal Society our sincere
congratulations on the occasion of the two hundred and fiftieth Anniversary of
its foundation. We are deeply sensible of the pre-eminent position which the
Royal Society has always held in the promotion of natural knowledge, and of
the beneficial influence it has exerted upon the advancement of learning and
also upon the scientific development of the technical and industrial arts, by its
unceasing efforts. We recognize with especial satisfaction the support which
the Royal Society has afforded to the science of Meteorology, as exemplified
particularly in the labours of the Meteorological Committee. Many names
eminent in meteorological science occur in the Roll of Fellowship of the
Royal Society, and the published records of the Society contain numerous
contributions of outstanding importance to our knowledge of the mechanics
and physics of the atmosphere. In congratulating the Royal Society upon
a long and brilliant record of past achievement we are assured that it will
continue in the future to take an equally important part in the progress of
all branches of science.

Given under the Seal of the Society, June 19th, 1912.

H. N. DICKSON, President.

FRANCIS CAMPBELL-BAYARD)

W. F. CABORNE ^Secretaries.



THE COUNCIL AND FELLOWS OF THE ROYAL MICROSCOPICAL SOCIETY have
commissioned HENRY GEORGE PLIMMER, a Fellow of the Royal Society, and
their own President, to act as their Delegate at the 250th Anniversary of the
foundation of the Royal Society. They have desired him to convey the



110 THE ROYAL SOCIETY

heartiest greetings and congratulations of one of the younger of its daughters
to the Royal Society on this the occasion of its 250th Anniversary, and thus
to testify to the honour and respect in which they hold the great Mother
of the Learned Societies. Signed on behalf of the Royal Microscopical
Society, by

H. G. PLIMMER, President.

WYNNE E. BAXTER, Treasurer.
JNO. EYRE



F. SHILLINGTON SCALES fSecretanes -



ROYAL SOCIETY OF ARTS, LONDON

THE ROYAL SOCIETY FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF ARTS, MANUFACTURES,
AND COMMERCE welcomes the opportunity which has been afforded to it of
offering its warm congratulations and best wishes to the Royal Society on
the 250th Anniversary of its foundation. Among the many services which
the Royal Society has rendered to this country and to Science in general,
one not the least has been that in proportion as the increase of knowledge
has rendered necessary special and separate study of each branch of in-
vestigation, the Society has been instrumental in the formation of fresh
Associations for this purpose, while itself maintaining a general interest in
the whole field of progress and discovery. The Society of Arts, in whose
foundation a century and a half ago several Fellows of the Royal Society
took a prominent part, has from its commencement looked to the Royal
Society as the parent of such Associations in this country, no less than the
model for similar combinations abroad, and congratulates itself on the close
connexion between the two Societies, which has been maintained throughout
its existence by the presence in its ranks of many distinguished Fellows of
the Royal Society. The Council have had pleasure in deputing their CHAIRMAN
to represent them among the distinguished crowd of Delegates who have
come from all countries of the world to take part in the celebration of this
auspicious Anniversary, and they desire to express their earnest hope that
the future may have in store for the first and greatest of English Scientific
Societies achievements no less illustrious and beneficial to mankind than those
which are recorded in its past history. Sealed with the Seal of the Royal
Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce in the
presence of .

SANDERSON, Chairman of the Council.

H. T. WOOD, Secretary to the Society.
5th November, 1912.



CELEBRATION ADDRESSES 111



ROYAL SOCIETY OF MEDICINE, LONDON

THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF MEDICINE. The President, Council, and Fellows
of the Royal Society of Medicine very heartily congratulate the President,
Council, and Fellows of the Royal Society on the completion of two hundred
and fifty years spent in the execution of the very important duties with which
it is entrusted. A Society which has for its object the improvement of the
Art and Science of Medicine in all its branches, towards which improvement
the advancement in knowledge in various other Sciences so largely contributes,
cannot but take the warmest interest in the continued prosperity and use-
fulness of the Royal Society, especially as there were among the original
members of that Society several Fellows of the Royal College of Physicians
of London, and as moreover several of its Presidents have been Fellows
either of that College or of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. In
former times when the power of Analysis had outrun the means of obtaining
knowledge, natural Philosophy and Metaphysics and the analysis of Sense
and the analysis of Thought were hopelessly confused by the attempt to
solve them, not through an appeal to facts, but by the help of general
theories respecting the nature of the Universe. In the philosophy of
Antiquity the meaning of the word 'Science' could scarcely be explained
to students, except from the mathematical sciences, which alone offered the
type of Universality and Certainty. Geometry was regarded as the pro-
paedeutic to philosophy. Somewhat of this view perhaps lingered at the
time when those who afterwards gave birth to the Royal Society had 'a
designe of founding a Colledge for the promoting of Physico-Mathematicall-
Experimentall Learning '. But the Royal Society having arisen out of the
'Invisible College 1 of which Boyle the disciple of Francis Bacon (both of
imperishable fame) speaks in sundry letters, having been granted a Charter
on July 15th, 1662, by Charles II, mathematical pupil of Hobbes, and
having adopted as its title the name first applied to it by the celebrated
diarist Evelyn directed its inquiries, particularly, to what was then called
the ' New Philosophy ' or ' Experimental Philosophy ' ' for the improving of
natural knowledge by experiments \ True to its origin and history, the
Royal Society still elects Princes of the Blood, and persons selected by the
Council from among men distinguished in walks of life other than Science ;
whilst by the restrictions made during the presidency of Sir Joseph Banks,
and subsequently, the number of Candidates recommended for election has
been limited to fifteen annually. Concurrently with this restriction of the
Fellowship, Science has grown enormously ; and as a consequence, other
Scientific Societies have been established, some under the auspices of several
Fellows of the Royal Society and by Royal Charter, some independently of
either of these advantages, but all active in the promotion of special branches



112 THE ROYAL SOCIETY

of Science. The Royal Society is 144 years younger than the Royal
College of Physicians of London, but it is the oldest exclusively scientific
body in Great Britain, and one of the oldest in Europe. That it may
continue in the successful performance of its various functions as the promoter
of scientific investigations and researches, as the adviser of the Government
in connexion with national scientific works, and as the administrator of
Government grants and trust funds for experiments and for the publication
not only of its own invaluable Transactions and Proceedings but also of
scientific papers issued through other channels, is the earnest wish of the
Royal Society of Medicine, which shares with other learned bodies the honour
and special pleasure of taking part in the festivities of this Commemoration.

HENRY MORRIS, President.
July 15th, 1912.

ROYAL STATISTICAL SOCIETY, LONDON

To THE PRESIDENT, COUNCIL, AND FELLOWS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY. WE, THE
PRESIDENT AND COUNCIL, representing the general body of Fellows of THE
ROYAL STATISTICAL SOCIETY, desire to present to the President, Council, and
Fellows of the Royal Society on the occasion of the two hundred and fiftieth
Anniversary of its foundation, our sincere congratulations and greetings.
We are proud to claim association with your illustrious Society, not only
because in the pursuit of exact knowledge we look to you for guidance and
inspiration, but also because since the earliest days the Royal Statistical
' Society has received the active support of many who are eminent in Science.
We recall with satisfaction that among the great names which adorn your
roll are included those of many of our Presidents, while other Fellows of our
Society intimately associated with our aims and activities, have added to
their distinction as Statisticians the lustre of the Fellowship of the Royal
Society. Among our Presidents the names of Lord John Russell, Lord
Houghton, William Newmarch, Dr. William Farr, Dr. Guy, Lord Goschen,
Sir Robert Giffen, Lord Avebury are prominent ; while our list of Treasurers
includes Henry Hallam and George Richardson Porter. It is of interest also
to record that Charles Richard Weld, the historian of the Royal Society, was
at one time Assistant Secretary to the Royal Statistical Society. On the
maintenance of your high traditions and the continuance of your labours
depend in a large degree the future welfare and greatness of our nation.
Now more than ever must your researches, by their breadth, by their
penetration, by their originality, give an impulse to the force and variety
of our national life. Great, however, as is your national mission, there is
a greater still ; for Science recognizes no geographical frontiers nor is
national advancement alone its incentive. Your high ideals touch the
welfare of all mankind, and your labours are illumined by the whole



CELEBRATION ADDRESSES 113

firmament of Knowledge. It is because, in our more modest sphere of work,
we too are guided by the same standards and inspired by the same ideals
that we offer our sincere congratulations on this memorable occasion.

Given under the Common Seal of The Royal Statistical Society, llth
July, 1912.

F. Y. EDGEWORTH, President.
RICHARD B. MARTIN, Treasurer.

R. H. REW |

G. UDNY YULE [Honorary Secretaries.
A. W. FLUX



ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, LONDON

THE COUNCIL AND FELLOWS OF THE ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON send
greetings to the Royal Society. They have commissioned SIR HERBRAND
ARTHUR RUSSELL, DUKE OF BEDFORD, Knight of the Most Honourable Order of
the Garter, Fellow of the Royal Society, and their own President, to act as their
delegate at the celebration of the 250th Anniversary of the foundation of
the Royal Society and to testify to the honour and respect in which they hold
this great instrument for the advancement of natural knowledge. Signed for
the Council of the Zoological Society of London :

BEDFORD, President.

P. CHALMERS MITCHELL, Secretary.
July 15, 1912.



To THE PRESIDENT AND COUNCIL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY. WE, THE PRESIDENT

AND COUNCIL OF THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE,

offer our cordial congratulations to the Royal Society on the occasion of the
celebration of the two hundred and fiftieth Anniversary of the foundation of
the Society. The British Association, since its birth in 1851, has been
constantly in close relations with the Society. The great majority, not only
of those who took the leading parts in the foundation of the Association, but
of those who have filled its presidential chair, besides many others to whose
earnest co-operation the success of its Annual Meetings has been due, have
been Fellows of the Society. We would express the hope that the Society
may continue to prosper, and may always maintain that pre-eminent position
which is the fitting reward of its labours. Signed on behalf of the Council :

WILLIAM RAMSAY, President.
July, 1912.



114 THE ROYAL SOCIETY



CAMBRIDGE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY

WHEREAS on the eighth day of January of the year 1912 the President,
Council, and Fellows of the Royal Society invited the President and Council
of the CAMBRIDGE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY to send a representative to be
in London on the fifteenth day of July following at the celebration to be then
held of the two hundred and fiftieth Anniversary of the foundation of the
Royal Society, now the President and Council of the Cambridge Philosophical
Society hereby appoint their President, SIR GEORGE HOWARD DARWIN, Knight
Commander of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Plumian Professor of
Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy in the University of Cambridge, and
Fellow of Trinity College in the same University, to be their representative
on this occasion and to bear to the President, Council, and Fellows of the
Royal Society their felicitations on the long-continued and illustrious services
to science of the Society. The Fellows of the Philosophical Society desire to
avail themselves of the present opportunity of expressing their pride in the
fact that, from the days of Newton, members of the University of Cambridge
and in later times of their Society have always borne an important part in the
beneficent work of the Royal Society.

Sealed this sixth day of July, 1912.

G. H. DARWIN, President.

E. W. BARNES, Secretary.



MANCHESTER LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY

PRAESIDI CONSILIO SODALIBUS SOCIETATIS REGALIS PRO SCIENTIA NATURALI
PROMOVENDA ANNUM CCL SUUM FELICITER CELEBRANTIS S. P. D. SOCIETAS
LITTERARIA EX PniLosopHiCA MANCUNiENsis. Etsi vix omnibus persuadebit
poeta qui censebat

in magnis et voluisse sat est>

tamen cum praeclaros Societatis vestrae annales per tot iam saecula florentis


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Online LibraryRoyal Society (Great Britain)The celebration of the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Royal Society of London, July 15-19, 1912 → online text (page 11 of 13)