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1918




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NEW

ENGLAND




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The Guyde Publishing Co.



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Hartford, Connecticut




We Don't Have to Touch It, My Dear—
The MTNA Checks Are Ample

They wore ample. As rep-ularly as the month rolled around, the i?iltna check
arrived — n(jt only while he was in bed — but until he was ready to g-o to work. All
he had to start with was a cold — but the results of that cold would have drained the
bank account dry if he hadn't l)een far-sighted when he was well. Every man is
sick sometime. Heart disease and Bright's disease and rheumatism and pneumonia
and colds and indigestion and nervous prostration — one or more of them gets every
man sometime. They give but little warning. Act now — protect your bank account—

# >CTNA-IZE




^ Send this fouprin and find oP.t'ahdut ihe

>^ ^tna Disability Policy. It brings you —

\. $25 a week up to 52 weeks while you

•^ \ are ill. $25 a week for 100 weeks —

^^ \ nearly two' years — if you lose the

o *•. \ sight of both eyes by disease, or the

'K \ V use of both hands or feet or one

\ \ \ hand and one foot by paralysis.

%^ \ ': \ Also payment of hospital charges

"or for a surgical operation.

V $50 a week as long as you

\ are disabled by a railway






(including trolley cars) or steamship accident,
$25 a week if disabled by an ordinary a.
cident. If you are killed in an accideiu
or lose two limbs or both eyes, we will pa
from $5,000 to $15,000. Half as much f.
loss of one hand, foot or eye.

When your serious illness comes and y^
have to quit work, you will be too lati
Now is the time to make yourself safe — no.'
while you are well. Let ^tna work for you
when you can't work for yourself.

Send the coupon now.

X^TNA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

Drawer 1341 HARTFORD, CONN.

The lurffest company in the world writing Life.
Accident, Health, and Liabiliti/

^M^-^ - y\\\^i 19 1918 Insurance.






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'I Know a Beach Road'



"I know a beach road,

A road where I would go. . .
And there, in the High Woods,

Daffodils grow.

"Once before I die

I will leave the town behind,
The loud town, the dark town

That cramps and chills the mind.
And I'll stand aga'in bareheaded there

In the sunlight and the wind.

"And there shall rise to me

From that consecrated ground
The old dreams, the lost dreams

That years and cares have drowned :
Welling up within me

And above me and around.
The song that I could never sing

And the face I never found. '\

—A SOLDIER POET.




TROLLEY TRIPS

TIIROLGII

NEW ENGLAND

ILLUSTKATED

1918

OFFICIAL

Copies of this hook irill bf tHttilctf by thr Publis/trr on receipt
Of' eif/htcen eents.

AT ALL BOOK STOKES AND NEWS STANDS

Copyrighted 1918 by

THE CLYDE PUBLISHING CO.

IIAKTFORD, CONN.



For Trolley Timetables — See Back of Book




The Gateway to New England



CONTENTS



"TROLLEY RIDES"

N. Y. to Boston via Springfield 4

N. Y. to Boston via New London 51

Boston to Portland, Maine 39

The Heart of Rhode Island 58

"Around the Triangle" 67

Upper Connecticut Valley 68

The Berkshire Hills 70

The Way to Cape Cod 72

Short Trips Around Boston 79

The Way to the White Mountains 90

The Hudson River 96



MAPS

Complete Map of New England Trolleys

Middle Connecticut

Eastern Connecticut

Northeastern Massachusetts .

Southeastern Massachusetts

Middle Massachusetts

Buzzards Bay — Cape Cod

Boston City

Boston Environs

Maine



56-57
17
53
64
65
66
72
78
86
47



Trolley Trips Throuah New England



Brooklyn




Bridge



'•FARES PLEASE!"

''TROLLEY TRIPS" makes its bow for 1918, its twentieth con-
secutive year of publication.

The book is, we hope, a Httle better than ever!

There are many new and good things in New England, which may
be enjoyed, reached and enjoyed by means of the trolley.

In the face of increasing cost of material and labor, one can still
purchase at the original quotation, a dime's worth of fresh air and new
vistas, seen from the interurban car — at one nickel.^ The only question
is "Can the nickel stand the strain?"



Trinity




Church



'TOR 1918"

"TROLLEY TRIPS THROUGH NEW ENGLAND" remains, as
before, a story-book of New England's history and romance; a picture-
book of her scenic hills, her breezy shore; a guide-book to points of
interest in town and country; and a complete time-table of electric
trolley line?.

Of many new things, we now mention only : the line all the way
along shore to New London and thence through Providence to Boston;
the great new "summer way" from Springfield to the Berkshire Hills;
the direct path into the heart of Maine by the splendid new trolleys
from Portland, etc., etc., etc.



Fop Trolley Timetable' See Back of Book




Will You Choose the Hills -

NEW YORK TO NEW HAVEN
''Along Long Island Sound"

You wish to ride thro old New England, the great Playground
of the East. Our first great "Trolley Way" runs all along shore
to New Haven and offers the coolest, cleanest, breeziest way
"out of town."

Train, steamboat or subway has landed you in New York.
Sooner or later you will find yourself standing in Times Square
at the very center of the city's teeming life. Dive into the
subway or go east to the Third Avenue "L," as you please.

We are off!

Those who take the Third Avenue "L." change at 129th Street
to shuttle train to the Harlem River station of the "West-
chester." Those who leave by Subway should alight at 180th
St., and board the "Westchester" there. This line represents
the last word in electric oontruction. and will repay inspection.




or Old Ocean?



Trolley Trips Through New England




I



Sunnyside-on-the-Hudson

The cars pass thro MT. VERNON to NEW ROCHELLE.

Board here the "Stamford" car. We are "on our way."

Here we get a fine view of Long Island Sound, and also first
enter the old Boston Post Road. Along this, perhaps the most
characteristic of New England streets, galloped in olden days the
post, or rolled the stage-coach, from New York to the Hub.
This fine old road, extending all along the shore, keeps through-
out a note of peace and pleasant order. Its great days have
returned.

LARCHMONT is a pleasant shore resort and yacht station; day
and night and water pageant of the Sound passes to and fro be-
fore it. A car runs to the harbor and the yacht clubs.

At MAMARONECK— musical Indian name! — a pleasant, his-
toric pilgrimage leads thro WHITE PLAINS to TARRYTOWN
(Florence Inn). Here may be seen the old church and bridge
of the "Headless Horseman" celebrated in Irving's "Legend of
Sleepy Hollow." A little south of the town stands Sunnyside.




Larchmont-on-the-Sound



For Trolley Timetables — See Back of Book






n



Oakland Beach — White Sand and Clear Water

OAKLAND BEACH

OAKLAND BEACH is doubtless the prettiest bathing beach
near Nev/ York, and is managed by the town of Rye. Here is
white sand, pure water, and no undertow. Little steamers ply
across the Sound to Sea Cilff, Long Island, or along shore to
Hudson Park. Assuredly we recommend a stop-over.

PORT CHESTER is last outpost of the Empire State, survey-
ing from its heights Greenwich and the Connecticut shore.
All these places are very gay in summer, and many beautiful
villas may be seen on all sides.

Now we roll over the Byram River, crossing from "York
State" into Connecticut, the "Land of Steady Habits."




Port Chester has a Fine Soldiers' Monument



Trolley Trips Through New England




We pass by Stamford's Town Hall

GREENWICH, the most westerly of Connecticut towns, has
been the scene of many striking events since the first purchase
of land from the Indians in 1640. It will be remembered that
this was the scene of Putnam's famous leap, February 26, 1779,
when, as he was riding towards Stamford for reinforcements
to aid in withstanding the British raid upon Tryon, he was
pursued, and plunged down the face of the bluff near the old
chapel. The British dared not follow and he escaped with
only a bullet hole in the brim of his hat. The place has ever
since been known as "Put's Hill."

STAMFORD (HOTEL: New Davenport, $1; restaurant)

This spick-and-span town of STAMFORD has several hand-
some buildings, the Town Hall being an especially fine structure.

In Atlantic Square, we board a "Norwalk" car, which twists
its wav thro NOROTON, DARIEN, and ROWAYTON.

ROTON POINT has a great reputation as a picnic resort.



ROTON POINT PARK

The Park has been generously accorded the credit of being the
prettiest spot on the Connecticut coast. Mr. and Mrs. Trolleyist,
stop over and decide this point.

Here are a spacious, sandy beach, pleasant woodlands, and a
grove for picnicers. Here are, too, the usual attractions to wile
the day away, viz.: athletic field, dancing pavilion, roller coast-
ers, bowling alleys, and all the amusements of a lesser Coney
Island with the objectionable features left out. There are some
500 bathhouses. Motor boats are here, and steamboats run across
the Sound and to the big cities.

There is here that rarity among shore resorts — a good restau-
rant.



For Trolley Timetables — See Back of Book




Fairfield is a typical New England Village

NORWALK, CONN. (HOTEL : Norwalk, $1 ; restaurant)

Quiet, sleepy NORWALK has an old-town charm all its own.
The name of the town is of Indian origin, and means "a point
of land." Here, near old Fort Point, east of the river, the first
white settlers located on the plain.

Take here the "Bridgeport" car, which passes Norwalk Green.
The route now goes thro WESTPORT and SOUTHPORT. The
scenery is interesting, with occasional glimpses of Long Island
Sound, and in Southport fine old houses.

Roger Ludlow, intimate of Hooker, came to the spot now called
FAIRFIELD at the head of a band of pioneers in 1639. Land
was purchased of the Indians, and with great foresight the
village was platted just as seen to-day. Among the things to
see here may be mentioned the Judge Roger M. Sherman man-
sion (The House with the Sixty Closets); the Four Houses left
standing after the burning of Fairfield; Old Powder House
(preserved by the D. A. R.) ; and the site of the whipping post
and stocks on the Green.



Kochelle Manor ^ p^^ /sLf^A^Q soujvo ^"•-'■'y.^ UZVJ RQCH^^ ELLE to^NQRW/lt K^-'



How to Get Out of New York into New England — by Trolley



10



Trolley Trips Through New England




Milford has a Quaint Memorial Bridge
BRIDGEPORT, CONN.

(HOTEL: Stratfield, $1- RESTAURANT: Irwin)

Bridgeport, owing to its excellent transportation facilities and
the energy of the public citizens, has become the strongest
industrial center in Connecticut. On every hand its immense
factories hum with industry. Munitions, sewing machines,
brass goods and graphophones are the leading products.

Bridgeport men were Elias Howe, who originated the placing
of the eye in the point of the sewing-machine needle, and Phineas
T. Barnum, originator of the "Greatest Show on Earth."

Those who have an afternoon to spare will find a pleasantly
cool Sound trip in the sail to Port Jefferson. This is new
England's natural entrance to Long Island.

The "New Haven" car soon runs thro the highway at STRAT-
FORD. Its beautiful streets (some of them run more than a
hundred feet wide) overarched with perfectly formed elms, and
its finely kept residences, some dating from about 1700, give the
town an old-time atmosphere.

Crossing near the mouth of the Housatonic River, we run
down to the sea at Meadow End, and then closely follow the
shore to Milford.





Bridgeport is Park and Harbor



For Trolley Timetables — See Back of Book



11




Savin Rock is Connecticut's Coney Island

Visitors will find many interesting things to see in Milford:
The Stowe House, which sheltered a body of released American
prisoners, in December, 1776; the Clark House (about 1650),
which v/as the first house built outside the Palisade; Old Tavern
(1724); and the modern Memorial Bridge, bearing on its rough
hewn blocks the names of the first settlers.

Once over the Indian River the road runs near the shore again,
and so close to the river that the waves almost reach the rails.
In a few minute we are at WOODMONT, a cottage resort.

SAVIN ROCK

SAVIN ROCK is undoubtedly the best known resort in Con-
necticut. It is a name on the lips of every Connecticut Yankee
in July • and August. A breezy, rollicking, surf-bathing resort
where we rub elbows with the clerk, mechanic, factory hand,
mill girl, all out to enjoy their swift-passing Sabbath; "to see
and to be seen."

There is here every possible device to "drive dull care away,"
from band concerts to baseball.



I



':^'*'"f










*r^.^



Woodmont has an Annual Water Carnival



12



Trolley Trips Through New England




The Good Old Summer Time at Momauguin

NEW HAVEN, CONN.
(HOTEL: Taft, $1.50. RESTAURANT: Childs)

New Haven, "City of Elms" and seat of old Yale, is the
largest city in the State, and as the home of the University is well
knovm throughout the country. A college city; a summer city.

The car drops us at the corner of the Green. Surely there can
be no better place for the stranger to become acquainted with
New Haven than here. This plot, with its old elms, fluttering
doves, three church spires, and the half-hidden rampart of the
college beyond, lends to the city an unforgettable note of peace.
It is the most characteristic public square in New England and
New Haven is indeed fortunate in its possession, unspoiled.

The Green was laid out about 1640, and has always been the
center of the public life of the city. The fine Library and the
Court House are on the north side, the magnificent new Post
Office on the east, while near the west corner towers the Hotel
Taft.

MOMAUGUIN PARK

MOMAUGUIN is a resort newly come into high favor, and
caters to the best class. There are near a thousand bathhouses
on what many consider Connecticut's finest bathing beach. And
a remarkably good shore restaurant.




New Haven Green is the City's Heart



NEW HAVEN



THE MOST DELIGHTFUL LUNCHEON
PLACE IN NEW HAVEN

Dainty Summer "Lunchctte" served

in refined cool surroundings.

Bouillons, Sandwiches, Salads, French Pastry,

Pies, Cakes, Ices, Sundaes.

II nilFpSQ Church and Chapel Sts., New Haven.

"^^' ' ^ All Trolleys Leave Opposite.



BRIDGEPORT
BRIDGEPORT AND PORT JEFFERSON STEAMSHIP CO.



Matinee and Sunday Excur- «^^ „,^^^— -^-_

ring summer season. ..i*-^ - "^^S^^^^'S^"

idgeport 1:30 p. m.,

returning leave Port Jeffer-



sions during summer season. r^_
Leave Bridgeport 1:30 p. va.JJj



son 4:30 p. m. Three hours' j?^ ^^^ Mw^Si lwMS."^" ^
sail, and one hour and thirty 'tTP g l ^mw^l' I.' J.v.V'. 'i^''^'-^^%=.„;;.-rr
minutes at Port Jefferson. ^^g t ^ ___ i - ■- — i^^^ ^

Subject to change without notice. ' '^' ' -^^^"-^•^^-a^^^^^S^^^
_ 75^, STEAMER PARK CITY

"A trip across the Sound where cool breezes blow."



SO. NORWALK

PLAISTED'S DRUG STORE

G. F. MOULTON, PROP.

Under Mahackemo Hotel
43 Washington Street. South Norwalk, Conn.

STAMFORD

Stepping Stone Alley

The quaintest little place to eat on the Post Road.

Home Cooking a Specialty

In the old Holly Inn, 575 Main St., between the Town Hall and St.
John's Park.

STAMFORD, CONN.

Antiques and Gift Suggestions for Sale in same building.



14



Trolley Trips Through New England




Yale College was founded in 1701, and named in honor of
Gov. Elihu Yale. Ex-President Taft is now a professor of
"Old Eli." The usual course of the visitor is to enter near the
corner of College and Chapel Sts. Free guides may be secured
in vacation, every hour, at Phelps gateway. Sheffield Scientific
School ("Sheff") lies northwest and Yale Field two miles west.





Battell Chapel— YALE COLLEGE— Vanderbilt Arch



For Trolley Timetables — See Back of Book 15




We Journey Up the Scenic Naugatuck River



FOUR WAYS TO BOSTON

Here in New Haven Green we have the choice of four pleasant
"Trolley Ways" to Boston: — over the hills to Cheshire — "the
country way;" or up thro Meriden and Middletown — "the town
way;" or even cast back to Derby and thence up the Naugatuck
to Waterbury — "the river way." Best of all, is the splendid
"NEW ROUTE" thro Saybrook to New London— "the shore way."

Ponder well your choice. Meanwhile, we will note briefly the
first three; the last, from here all the way to Boston, is fully
described on page 42 following, and makes up our second, fine,
new. Through Way to Boston:



Side Trip — Bridgeport to Waterbury. "the river way"

Bridgeporters! or those called to Bridgeport by care or
pleasure — take this scenic way north; it cuts across and rejoins
at Milldale our main route (New Haveners may join at Derby).

Beyond STRATFORD we obtain a splendid view of the Housa-
tonic, here broad and shoal. Running along the bluffs, we
eventually swing around a high out-corner, snatching a glimpse
of Derby Hill across the river, then descend the heights to the
little manufacturing village of SHELTON, and crossing thro
DERBY, connect with the "Waterbury" car at EAST DERBY.

The car now speeds along the east bank of the Naugatuck,
and thro Derby's sister village, ANSONIA. The road soon passes
high up above the rocky gorge of the river, and for several
miles the outlook is of wild grandeur.



16



Trolley


Trips


Through


New


England


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SI



Quasapaug — Where Waterbury Makes Merry

LAKE QUASSAPAUG

LAKE QUASSAPAUG is, next to Bantam, Connecticut's
largest fresh water sheet, and offers some vp-ry pretty scenery.
It is a great resort of campers and canoeists, launches, row-
boats and canoes; and the passer thro Waterbury cannot do
better than "run out to Quassapaug."

TORRINGTON, HIGHLAND LAKE, WINSTED

There lie in Northwestern Connecticut two towns of moderate
size, but great activity, linked by an electric line. These are the
manufacturing communities of TORRINGTON (Conley's Inn)
and WINSTED (Winchester). From Torrington, LITCHFIELD
and beautiful BANTAM LAKE may be reached by "jitney".
HIGHLAND LAKE PARK

This is the chief merry-making resort for the two towns. Here
is a dance hall, theatre,, and pavilion in a grove, seating 500.



MRS. THORPE'S ^'teTIo'^om''

46 HARRISON AVE. (Just Off Exchange Place)

S-^First turn to right down Bank St. Also entrance
directly opposite The Elton.

TABLE D'HOTE LUNCHEON, 50c.
Breakfast — Afternoon Tea — Supper

6:30-10 A.M. 2-5 P. M. 5-8 P. M.

ALL a la CARTE



J. H. DEVEREAUX & CO.

MAGAZINES— ALL LATEST FICTION
NEWSPAPERS
Blank Books, Memorandum Books, School and Office Supplies
25 EAST MAIN STREET, WATERBURY, CONN.



For Trolley Timetables — See Back of Book




Going Out from Waterbury— The Brink of the Mountain



Waterbury to Meriden or New Britain via Milldale

There's a new way from Waterbury east. A good way, a
short way (and all good ways are short) — and a most scenic
way.

Let us tell you about it. The "green car" runs from WATER-
BURY Green out East Main St., climbs Meriden Road, crosses
Mad River, and speeds across the summit of Southington Moun-
tain beside the main automobile highway.

We pass the well-known great boulder to the south and come
to MORRIS PARK on Hitchcock's Lakes. Many Waterbury,
Bristol and Southington people have cottages or bungalows
here, and the place is fast growing as a summer community.

Just beyond the lake we reach a spot where the mountain falls
abruptly away. A wonderful view is presented to the east. Five
miles away as the crow flies stand out in the clear air the Hang-
ing Hills, and the watchtower thereon, while below nestles the
city of MERIDEN, our destination. Mt. Carmel looms to the
south. To the north on a clear day may be descried the glint of
light where the golden dome of the State Capitol catches the
sun.

Near MILLDALE depot close connection is made with the
trolley for MERIDEN (one hour, five minutes total time), and
for the northbound car that passes through PLANTSVILLE,
SOUTHINGTON and PLAINVILLE to NEW BRITAIN, whence
HARTFORD is quickly reached by the hourly "suburban ser-
vice."

For business this line presents a much-needed "short cut" for
Waterbury, Meriden, Southington people; and for pleasure it
brings Lake Compounce — the most noted of Connecticut's inland
parks — within 1 1-4 hours from Waterbury. Unlike the railroad,
the line is "on the job" throughout the day, and on Sundays.

Here, then, at Milldale or Meriden, we rejoin our main route.



18 Trolley Trips Through New England



NEW HAVEN TO HARTFORD

New Haven to Hartford via New Britain
Here we bid au revoir to the salt water (we'll greet it again at
Boston) and leave NEW HAVEN by the way of Whitney avenue,
which, with its handsome homes, well-kept lawns, and glimpses
of East Rock, is the city's most pleasing thoroughfare, and
thence up thro the green countryside by Mt. Carmel to Cheshire.

Lake Compounce

LAKE COMPOUNCE is a sparkling sheet of water guarded by
a mountain. The lake is small, but in natural surroundings and
clearness of water it more than makes up what it lacks in size.
Lake Compounce uniquely combines a wealth of natural charms
with all the standard attractions of a well-equipped pleasure
ground; thus generously endowed, it cordially invites and amply
affords a pleasing welcome to both grave and gay.

In the morning hours this beautiful resort yields to nature
lover, trolley tourist, and city patron, inspiration and rest in
the quiet nooks along the water's edge and the beauty of its
woodland paths.

At noon-day among her summer visitors, holiday parties and
family reunions gather round the substantial tables, or meet in
the quaint pavilions scattered thro the grove, there to enjoy in
a merry way, an annual outing at Compounce.

On a summer's afternoon or evening, the younger set can join
the crowd at the vaudeville or the carrousel, or with bathing,
bowling boating, dancing, they can while away many happy
hours in innocently healthful recreation.

Take the wife and the children for a day at Compounce.
New Haven to Hartford via Middletown — ''the town way"

This route leads up thro WALLINGFORD, a manufacturing
tov/n. Soon we see ahead the curious "Hanging Hills" and the
watch-tower thereon. Below them nestles "Silver Plate" MER-
IDEN (Winthrop).. The city has two attractive parks, Hubbard
and Hanover.

HUBBARD PARK AND HANGING HILLS

Climbing the east slope of the mountain one soon reaches
HUBBARD PARK, a tract including the celebrated Hanging
Hills, some of the peaks of which have an elevation of 1,000 ft.
The scenery is very wild and picturesque, and the views from
Castle Craig tower are extensive in all directions. It is a very
popular place for an outing, not only for Meriden people, but
many who come on the trolley from points further away.

Academic MIDDLETOWN (Chafee), the seat of Wesleyan
University, the Reform School for Girls and the State Insane
Asylum, i.s attractively placed on a slope rising from the Con-
necticut.

Lake View Park is locally popular, and has, near a pretty lake-
let, a dance-hall, open-air theatre, and a picnic grove.



1




COMPOUNCE

LAKE AND MOUNTAIN

The Historic Summer Resort of Connecticut

NEW ATTRACTIONS THIS SEASON

A Natural Beauty Spot. Unequalled for Grandeur of Scenery

Boating. Bowling. Bathing. Dancing. Billiards. Swings.

Mcrry-Go-Rounds. Band Concerts. Summer Theatre.

Exhilarating Mountain Climbs.

FIRST CLAvSS RESTAURANT

DIWERS FOR LAR(^,E PARTIES A SPECIALTY

QUOTATIONS ON APPLICATION

Opening Decoration Day

PIERCE & NORTON, BRISTOL, CONN.



20



Trolley Trips Through New England



SPiiiri<;r,ei-D ifrtt S'iac ■ w/veiatf




HARTFORD, CONN.

(HOTEL: Heublein, $1. RESTAURANT Baldwin's)

Hartford ("That pretty city in New England") is celebrated
thro the East for its handsome parks, and not a few fine public
edifices. The Capitol City extends to its throngs of visitors a
stately and cordial welcome.

The stranger from the West usually avers that Hartford and
Springfield are two out of the three prettiest cities in the U. S.
the third being invariably his home town.

The old City Hall, used as a State House from its erection in
1796 to 1879, was planned by Bulfinch, who designed the capitol
at Washington. A short distance down Main Street is the Center
Church (1807). The Wadsworth Atheneum stands just below
and opposite. Do not fail to visit the adjoining Morgan Art


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