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The homilies of S. John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople, on the Gospel of St. John (Volume 28) online

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BR 60 .L52 v.28
John Chrysostom, d. 407.
The homilies of S. John
Chrysostom, Archbishop of



v.



LIBRARY OF FATHERS



OF THE



HOLY CATHOLIC CHURCH,



ANTERIOR TO THE DIVISION OF THE EAST AND WEST:



TRANSLATED BY MEMBERS OF THE ENGLISH CHURCH.




VET SHALL NOT THY Τ Π AC HERS BE REMOVED INTO A CORNER ANY MORE; BUT
THINE EYES SHALL SEE THY TEACHERS. fsauih XXX. 20.



OXFORD,

JOHN HENRY PARKER;

F. AND J. RIVINGTON, LONDON

MDCCCXLVIII.



TO THE MEMORY

OF THE
MOST REVEREND FATHER IN GOD

WILLIAM

LORD ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY,

PRIMATE OF ALL ENGLAND,

FORMERLY REGIUS PROFESSOR OF DIVINITY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD.

THIS LIBRARY

OF

ANCIENT BISHOPS, FATHERS, DOCTORS, MARTYRS, CONFESSORS,
OF CHRIST'S HOLY CATHOLIC CHURCH,

UNDERTAKEN AMID HIS ENCOURAGEMENT,

AND

CARRIED ON FOR TWELVE YEARS UNDER HIS SANCTION,

UNTIL HIS DEPARTURE HENCE IN PEACE,

IS

GRATEFULLY AND REVERENTLY

INSCRIBED.



THE



HOMILIES



OF
/

y

S. JOHN CHRYSOSTOM,



ARCHBISHOP OF CONSTANTINOPLE,



GOSPEL OF ST. JOHN,



TRANSLATED,



WITH NOTES AND INDICES.



PART I. HOM. I.— XIX



OXFORD,

JOHN HENRY PARKER \

F. AND J. RIV1NGTON, LONDON

MDCCCXLVIII.



BAXTER, PRINTER, OXFORD.



:



THEG~







PREFACE.



The Benedictine Editor has already noticed the principal
points in which these Homilies differ from others in which
St. Chrysostom comments upon Holy Scripture. They are
far more controversial than is usual with him, and the part
devoted to moral exhortation is shorter. This may be partly
owing to the number of passages in St. John which bear on
the doctrine of our Lord's Person and His Divine and Human
Natures. But it seems further that they were delivered to a
select audience at an early hour of the day. For toward the
latter part of Horn. xxxi. he contrasts the coolness of the
morning, in which they were assembled, with the mid-day
heat, in which the woman of Samaria listened to our Lord.
And the character of the instruction given almost unques-
tionably marks the hearers as having been less miscellaneous,
and less liable to be supposed wanting in points of common
duty, than those whom he generally addressed.

They do not give their own date, but are referred to by the
Author, while still at Antioch, as already published, in Horn,
vii. on 1 Cor. ii. 8. Tr. p. 82. ( However, the manner of this
way of knowledge and of that hath already been declared in
the Gospel; and, not to be continually handling the same
topic, thither do we refer our readers.' The place is St. John
viii. 19. treated in Horn. xlix.



IV PREFACE.

And since the three first years after St. Chrysostom was
ordained Priest, A. D. 386-8, seem completely filled up, and
the Homilies in St. Matthew were probably prior to these,
it is most likely that they were not begun before A. D. 390,
while those on some of the Epistles of St. Paul seem to
have come after them, and still before the year 398, in
which he was removed to Constantinople.

In either city there were numerous heretics of the sect
against which he is most careful to supply arguments, the
Anomceans, who held that the Son is not even of like
Substance with the Father. And even in his less generally
controversial works, we often meet with discussions of their
tenets. But in these Homilies he is continually meeting
with texts which they perverted to the maintenance of their
heresy, and turning them into weapons for its confutation.
And tins he usually does with great success, since the
Catholic Doctrine of the true and perfect Godhead, united
in One Person with true and perfect Manhood, affords a key
that easily opens texts which most stubbornly resist any
confused notion of an inferior Divinity, or an unreal
Humanity. The texts urged by the heretic, put to this
test, are found not really to belong to him. They are not
even arguments so far for his view of the case, but perfectly
consistent with the truth always held by the Church. There
may remain a few cases, after attentive study, in which it is
difficult to be sure what is the exact meaning, or even
whether a given text speaks of the Godhead or of the
Manhood, but as to the general doctrine of the whole Scrip-
ture, or the consistency of that doctrine with any and every
text therein contained, there is no reasonable doubt. There
are those whose faith seems to tremble on the balance when
such a passage of Scripture is under discussion, but this
must be either from an inveterate habit of doubting, or an
imperfect apprehension of the real meaning of the Catholic
doctrine. The most skilful commentator may occasionally
fall into a critical error, but no one who has ever fairly



PREFACE.



entered into the sense of Holy Scripture will dream of the
alternative being between such and such an exposition and
the acceptance of heresy. Enough is clear to make us very
sure what will be the doctrine of any difficult passage,
though we may be in doubt of its interpretation. St. Chry-
sostom is usually right, and not only so, but most ingenious
in detecting the rhetorical connection of sentiments and
arguments. If any where he fails, it is from some over-
refinement in rhetorical analysis, and not from any want of
apprehension of the main truths concerned.

In the first volume of the Benedictine Edition there is a
series of Homilies against the Anomceans, in the first of
which he states that he had been unwilling for some time to
enter on the controversy, for fear of driving away hearers
who held those opinions, but that he had now taken it up at
their earnest request. These Homilies were delivered some
time before those on St. John, beginning in the first year
after his ordination with those * On the Incomprehensible
Nature of God,' in opposition to the pretensions of that sect
to perfect knowledge of Divine things. And the Benedictine
editor refers to them as containing a more complete array of
the positive evidence of St. John to the Catholic doctrines
than even this commentary affords.

The history of the woman taken in adultery is omitted in
this Commentary, and the Benedictine Editor was not able
to trace it in any of the Works of St. Chrysostom. It is
suggested that his copies may have wanted the passage, or
that he may have omitted it for fear it should be taken as an
encouragement to vice. But he was not the man to shrink
from so slight a difficulty, nor would he have failed, in com-
menting on it, to leave an impression on the hearer by no
means calculated to lessen his dread of sin. Such a reason
may have prevailed with some copyists to suppress the
passage, and it is probable that it was not found in the copy
which he used. It is omitted in like manner by St. Cyril of
Alexandria.



VI PREFACE.

The Text of Savile has been followed, except where
the Benedictine Edition has supplied improvements. The
Benedictine sections are numbered throughout: where the
division seemed to be inconvenient, the number is given in
the margin. In the earlier Homilies a second series of
numbers is employed to mark the sections in the translation ;
this was discontinued as unnecessary, and the Benedictine
only retained. In some of the references to the Psalms,
where the Septuagint differs much from the Hebrew, the
numbers given are those of the Greek. Care will be taken
in the Index of Texts to give always the reference to the
Psalm and Verse according to the Hebrew reckoning followed
in our own Version.

The Editors are indebted for the present Translation to
the Rev. G. T. Stupart, M.A. late Fellow of Exeter
College. It has been kindly carried through the Press by
the Rev. J. G. Hickley, B.D. Fellow of Trinity College,
Oxford. The translation of the remaining Homilies is com-
pleted, and will shortly be in the Press.



C. M.



Oeiel College,
Feast of St. Andrew, 1848.



CONTENTS,



HOMILY I.

Page 1.

PREFACE.

HOMILY II. — -"

Page 9.

John i. 1.
In the beginning was the Word,

HOMILY III. — *

Page 22.

John i. 1.

In the beginning toas the Word,

HOMILY IV. .—

Page 37.

John i. 1.
In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God.

HOMILY V.

Page 48.

John i. 3.

All things were made by Him; and without Him was not



\y thing made that was made.



Vlll CONTENTS.

HOMILY VI.

Page 59.

John i. 6.

There was a man sent from God, whose name was John.

HOMILY VII.

Page 63.

John i. 9.

That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that
cometh into the world.

HOMILY VIII.

Page 68.

John i. 9.

That was the true Light, which lighteth every man that
cometh into the world.

HOMILY IX.

Page 71.

John i. 11.

He came unto His own, and His own received Him not.

HOMILY X.

Page 81.

John i. 11.

He came unto His own, and His own received Him not.

HOMILY XI.

Page 88.

John i. 14.

And the Word was made Flesh, and dwelt among us.



CONTENTS. IX



HOMILY XII.

Page 94.

John i. 14.

And ive beheld His glory, the glory as of the Only-Begotten
of the Father, fall of grace and truth.



HOMILY XIII.

Page 102.

John i. 15.

John beareth witness of Him, andcrieth, saying, This is He
of Whom I spake, saying, He that cometh after me is pre-
ferred before me, for He was before me.



HOMILY XIV.

Page 111.

John I 16.

And of His fulness have all we received, and grace for
grace.



HOMILY XV.

Page 120.

John i. 18.

No man hath seen God at any time; the Only-begotten Son,
which is in the bosom of the Father, He hath declared
Him.



HOMILY XVI.

Page 128.

John i. 19.

And this is the record of John, when the Jews sent priests

and Levites from Jerusalem to ask him, Who art thou?



\ CONTENTS.

HOMILY XVII.

Page 138.
John i. 28, 29.

These things were done in Bethany beyond Jordan, where
John was baptizing. The next day he seeth Jesus coming
unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, Which
taketh away the sin of the world.



HOMILY XVIII.

Page 148.
John i. 35, 36, 37.

Again the next day after John stood, and two of his disciples;
and looking upon Jesus as He walked, he saith, Behold
the Lamb of God. And the two disciples heard him speak,
and they followed Jesus.



HOMILY XIX.

Page 159.
John i. 41, 42.

He first findelh his own brother Simon, and saith unto him,
We have found the Messias, which is, being interpreted,
the Christ. And he brought him to Jesus.



HOMILY XX.

Page 166.
John i. 43, 44.'

The day following Jesus would go forth into Galilee, and
findelh Philip, and saith unto him, Follow Me. Now
Philip was of Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter.



CONTENTS. χΐ

HOMILY XXI.

Page 173.
John i. 49, 50.
Nathanael answered and said auto Him, Rabbi, Thou art
the Son of God, Thou art the King of Israel. Jesus
answered and said unto him, Because J said unto thee,
I saw thee under the fig-tree, believest thou ? Thou shalt
see greater things than these.



HOMILY XXII.

Page 182.

John ii. 4.

Woman, what have J to do with thee? Mine hour is not
yet come.

HOMILY XXIII.

Page 190.

John ii. 11.
This beginning of miracles did Jesus in Cana of Galilee.



HOMILY XXIV.

Page 199.

John ii. 23.

Now when He was in Jerusalem at the Passover, in the
feast, many believed on Him.



HOMILY XXV.

ι

Page 207.

John iii. 5.

Verily I say unto thee, Except a man be bom of water and
of the Spirit, lie cannot enter into the Kingdom of God.



XII CONTENTS.

HOMILY XXVI.

Page 215.

John iii. 6.

That which is born of the flesh is flesh: and that which is
bom of the Spirit is spirit.



HOMILY XXV1L.

Page 222.

John iii. 12, 13.

If I have told you earthly things, and ye believe not, how
shall ye believe, if I tell you of heavenly tilings ? And no
man hath ascended up to heaven, but He that came down
from heaven, even the Son of Man Which is in heaven.



HOMILY XXVIII.

Page 229.

John iii. 17.

For God sent not His Son to condemn the world, but to
save the world.



HOMILY XXIX.

Page 237.

John iii. 22.

And He came and His disciples into the land of Judcea,and

there He tarried with them {and baptized).

HOMILY XXX.

Page 246.

John iii. 31.

He that cometh from above is above all ; he that is of the

earth is earthly, and speaketh of the earth.



CONTENTS. X1U

HOMILY XXXI.

Page 253.

John iii. 35, 36.

The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into
His hand. He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting
life, and he that believeth not the Son shall not see life ;
but the wrath of God abideth on him.

HOMILY XXXII.

Page 260.

John iv. 13, 14.

Jesus answered and said unto her, Whosoever drinketh of this
water shall thirst again: but whosoever drinketh of the
Water that I shall give him, shall never thirst; but the
Water that I shall give him, shall be in him a well of
water springing up into everlasting Life.



HOMILY XXXIII.

Page 273.

John iv. 21, 22.

Jesus saith tint ο her, Woman, believe Me, the hour comelh,
when ye shall neither in this mountain, nor yet at Jeru-
salem, worship the Father. Ye worship ye know not
what; we know what we worship, for salvation is of the
Jews.

HOMILY XXXIV.

Page 283.

John iv. 28, 29.

The woman then left her water pot, and went her way into
the cify, and saith to the men, Come, see a Man which told
me all things that ever I did; is not this the Christ?



XIV CONTENTS.

HOMILY XXXV.

Page 292.

John iv. 40—43.

So when the Samaritans were come unto Him, they besought
Him that He would tarry with them: and He abode there
two days. And many more believed because of His own
Word; and said unto the woman, Now we believe, not
because of thy saying : for we have heard Him ourselves,
and know that This is indeed the Christ, the Saviour of the
world. Now after two days He departed thence, and went
into Galilee.

HOMILY XXXVI.

Page 300.

John iv. 54. v. 1.

This is again the second miracle that Jesus did, when He
was come out of Judaea into Galilee. After this there was
a feast of the Jews ; and Jesus went up to Jerusalem.

HOMILY XXXVII.

Page 307.

John v. 6, 7.

Jesus sailh unto him, Wilt thou be made whole ? The im~
potent man answered Him, Tea, Sir, but I have no man,
when the water is troubled, to put me into the pool.

HOMILY XXXVIII.

Page 314.

John v. 14.

After ward Jesus findeth him in the Temple, and said unto
him, Behold, thou art made whole; sin no more, lest a
worse thing come unto thee.



CONTENTS. XV

HOMILY XXXTX.

Page 328.

John v. 23, 24.

For My Father jitdgeth no man, but hath committed all judg-
ment to the Son ; that all men should honour the Son, even
as they honour the Father.



HOMILY XL.

Page 343.

John v. 31, 32.

//' / bear witness of Myself, My witness is not true ; there is
another that beareth tmtness of Me, and I know that the
witness which he witnesseth of Me is true.



HOMILY XLI.

Page 354.
John v. 39, 40.

Search the Scriptures ; for in them ye think ye have eternal
life ; and they are they which testify of 3Ie. And ye will
not come to Me that ye might have [eternal] life.




ρ BIB

HEQLOGIC&L
MILIES

OP

S. JOHN CHRYSOSTOM,

ARCHBISHOP OF CONSTANTINOPLE,

ON THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO

ST. JOHN.



HOMILY I.



PREFACE.



I. They that are spectators of the heathen games, when
they have learned that a distinguished athlete and winner of
crowns is come from any quarter, run all together to view his
wrestling, and all his skill and strength ; and you may see
the whole theatre of many ten thousands, all there straining
their eyes both of body and mind, that nothing of what
is done may escape them. So again these same persons, if
any admirable musician come amongst them, leave all that
they had in hand, which often is necessary and pressing
business, and mount the steps, and sit listening very atten-
tively to the words and the accompaniments, and criticising
the agreement of the two. This is what the many do.

Again ; those who are skilled in rhetoric do just the same
with respect to the sophists, for they too have their theatres,
and their audience, and clappings of hands, and noise, and
closest criticism of what is said.

And if in the case of rhetoricians, musicians, and athletes^
people sit in the one case to look on, in the other to see at
once and to listen with such earnest attention ; what zeal,
what earnestness ought ye in reason to display, when it is no
musician or debater who now comes forward to a trial of
skill, but when a man is speaking from heaven, and utters a.

Β



2 Of the manner of St. John's appearing.

Homtl. voice plainer than thunder? for he haspervaded the whole earth
— : — with the sound ; and occupied and filled it, not by the loud-
ness of the cry, but by moving his tongue with the grace of
God.

And what is wonderful, this sound, great as it is, is neither
a harsh nor an unpleasant one, but sweeter and more delightful
than all harmony of music, and with more skill to soothe ;
and besides all this, most holy, and most awful, and full of
mysteries so great, and bringing with it goods so great, that
if men were exactly and with ready mind to receive and
keep them, they could no longer be mere men nor remain
upon the earth, but would take their stand above all the
things of this life, and having adapted themselves to the
condition of angels, would dwell on earth just as if it were
heaven.

'2. For the son of thunder, the beloved of Christ, the pillar of

the Churches throughout the world, who holds the keys of

heaven, who drank the cup of Christ, and was baptized with

His baptism, who lay upon his Master's bosom with much

1 •χλ}}π• confidence 1 , this man comes forward to us now; not as an

σ1αί - actor of a play, not hiding his head with a mask, (for he hath

■οκζίβαν another sort of words to speak,) nor mounting a platform 2 ,

nor striking the stage with his foot, nor dressed out with

apparel of gold, but he enters wearing a robe of incon-

Rom. ceivable beauty. For he will appear before us having put on

Gal! 3' Christ, having his beautiful feet shod with the preparation of

27• the Gospel of peace; wearing a girdle not about his waist,

15. ' but about his loins, not made of scarlet leather nor daubed

£»•'» outside 3 with gold, but woven and composed of truth itself.

w Now will he appear before us, not acting a part, (lor with

him there is nothing counterfeit, nor fiction, nor fable,) but

with unmasked head he proclaims to us the truth unmasked;

not making the audience believe him other than he is by

carriage, by look, by voice, needing for the delivery of his

message no instruments of music, as harp, lyre, or any other

the like, for he effects all with his tongue, uttering a voice

which is sweeter and more profitable than that of any

harper or any music. All heaven is his stage ; his theatre,

the habitable world; his audience, all angels; and of men as

many as are angels already, or desire to become so, for none



Why men should be earnest hearers. 3

but these can hear that harmony aright, and shew it forth by Pri



their works; all the rest, like little children who hear, but
what they hear understand not, from their anxiety about
sweetmeats and childish playthings ; so they too, being in
mirth and luxury, and living only for wealth and power and
sensuality, hear sometimes what is said, it is true, but shew
forth nothing great or noble in their actions through fasten-
ing 1 themselves for good to the clay of the brickmaking. l «ξ**η•
By this Apostle stand the powers from above, marvelling at
the beauty of his soul, and his understanding, and the bloom
of that virtue by which he drew unto him Christ Himself,
and obtained the grace of the Spirit. For he hath made
ready his soul, as some well-fashioned and jewelled lyre
with strings of gold, and yielded it for the utterance of
something great and sublime to the Spirit.

[3.] Seeing then it is no longer the fisherman the son of (2.)
Zebedee, but He who knoweth the deep things of God i2 i°o.'
the Holy Ghost I mean, that striketh this lyre, let us
hearken accordingly. For he will say* nothing to us as a
man, but what he saith, he will say from the depths of the
Spirit, from those secret things which before they came to pass
the very Angels knew not ; since they too have learned by
the voice of John with us, and by us, the things which we
know. And this hath another Apostle declared, saying, To Eph. 3,
the intent that unto the principalities and powers might he
known by the Church the manifold wisdom of God, If then
principalities, and powers, and Cherubim, and Seraphim,
learned these things by the Church, it is very clear that they
were exceedingly earnest in listening to this teaching; and
even in this we have been not a little honoured, that the
Angels learned things which before they knew not with us;
I do not at present speak of their learning by us also. Let
us then shew much silence and orderly behaviour; not to-
day only, nor during the day on which we are hearers, but
during all our life, since it is at all times good to hear Him.
For if we long to know what is going on in the palace, what,
for instance, the king has said, what he has done, what
counsel he is taking concerning his subjects, though in
truth these things are for the most part nothing to us ; much
more is it desirable to hear what God hath said, especially

Β 2



4 77m/ it is The Holy Spirit Who speaketh.

HoMiL.when all concerns us. And all this will this man tell us

τ • exactly, as being a friend of the King Himself, or rather, as

having Him speaking within himself, and from Him hearing

John ΐδ, all things which He heareth from the Father. I have called

,5, you friends, He saith,/or all things that I have heard of My

Father, I have made known unto you,

[4.] As then we should all run together if we saw one

ι^ ίββ ν, from above bend down on a sudden 1 from the height of

E° mP H heaven, promising to describe exactly all things there, even

e!v. i.'so let us be disposed now. Tt is from thence that this Man

29 ' speaketh to us; He is not of this world, as Christ Himself

Johnio, d ec l a veth, Ye are not of the world, and He hath speaking

within him the Comforter, the Omnipresent, Who knoweth

the things of God as exactly as the soul of man knoweth

what belongs to herself, the Spirit of holiness, the righteous

Spirit, the guiding Spirit, which leads men by the hand to

heaven, which gives them other eyes, fitting them to see

things to come as though present, and giving them even in

the flesh to look into things heavenly. To Him then let us

"-<re7,\h yield ourselves during all our life 2 in much tranquillity.

ψταξίχω. l t none c jull, none sleepy, none sordid, enter here and

μίν την 7 x

ηηχΐΛ*. tarry ; but let us remove ourselves to heaven, for there He
speaketh these things to those who are citizens there. And
if we tarry on earth, we shall gain nothing great from thence.
For the words of John are nothing to those who do not
desire to be freed from this swinish life, just as the things of
this world to him are nothing. The thunder amazes our

3 ϋσνμο». souls, having sound without significance 3 ; but this man's
voice troubles none of the faithful, yea, rather releases them
from trouble and confusion ; it amazes the devils only, and
those who are their slaves. Therefore that we may know
how it amazes them, let us preserve deep silence, both
external and mental, but especially the latter; for what
advantage is it that the mouth be hushed, if the soul is
disturbed and full of tossing ? I look for that calm which is
of the mind, of the soul, since it is the hearing of the soul
which I require. Let then no desire of riches trouble us,
no lust of glory, no tyranny of anger, nor the crowd of other
passions besides these; for it is not possible for the ear,
except it be cleansed, to perceive as it ought the sublimity



The necessity of preparation for hearing. 5

of the things spoken; nor rightly to understand the awful Pref.
and unutterable nature of these mysteries, and all other
virtue which is in these divine oracles. If a man cannot
learn well a melody on pipe or harp, unless he in every way
strain his attention ; how shall one, who sits as a listener to
sounds mystical, be able to hear with a careless soul?

[5.] Wherefore Christ Himself exhorted, saying, Give (3.)
not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your Matt * 7 >
pearls before swine. He called these words pearls, though
in truth they be much more precious than they, because
we have no substance more precious than that. For this
reason too He is wont often to compare their sweet-



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