Salem (N.H.).

Annual report of the Town of Salem, New Hampshire (Volume 1971) online

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SALEM

NEW HAMPSHIRE




ANNUAL REPORT



Uiilv:




Ubrary




Selectmen: (I. to r.) Bert Ford, Michael J. Carney, Chairman Laurence Belair, Bessie Morrison and Richard I. Barron.




imm m mmmii



Town Managers Report 2

List of Town Officers 4

ADMINISTRATION

Town Clerk 7

Fire Department 7

Police Department 9

Salem District Court 11

Tax Collector 12

Industrial Consultant 13

Building Inspector 14

Health Off icer 15

PROGRAMS AND COMMISSIONS

Recreation Department 17

Group Living Program 19

Trustees of the Kelley Library 20

Salem District Nursing Association 21

Historical Commission 22

Housing Authority .22

Fine Arts Council 23

Regional Planning 23

FINANCES

Summary Inventory 25

Statement of Appropriations and Taxes Assessed .25
Report of Municipal Accounting Division —

State Tax Commission 26

Statement of Bonded Debt ........ .31

Treasurer's Report ........... .38

Summary of Receipts .......... .38

Summary of Payments .......... .39

Trustees of Trust Funds . .40

Vital Statistics ............. .47

Town Warrant .89

Town Budget ............. .86

Index ......... .96




Town Manager William L. Kelly



TOWN MANAGER'S REPORT



The year 1971 saw many changes come to Salem in both people and things.
Fred Staples, who had served the rapidly growing Town well for nine years,
departed just prior to year's end to conquer new worlds in Groton, Connecticut.
It was my pleasure to be asked to come to Salem, arriving in time for Town
Meeting 1971. As most of you know, events in the last few years have sometimes
happened so quickly and so overwhelmingly, that it is difficult to keep up with
the changes. This past year has not been noted for an appreciable reduction in
the changes to our community profile.

As the fastest growing area of the rapidly growing Rockingham County, our
population exceeded 23,500 by July 1, at best estimate, and continues to grow.
This single factor of people and more people conditions what we can do and
must do now and in the future for Salem. In a continuing effort to broaden the



tax-base, and provide a more diversified community, we were successful in
bringing additional commerce to Town this past year. These new enterprises
provide not only a broadened tax-base, but as importantly, sources of
employment for our citizens. Salem is primarily an exporter of labor to other
areas, but this is gradually changing as more businesses and industry move to
Salem. This is important as every dollar of payroll is spent at least three times
and becomes a big part of the economy of a community.

The 1971 Town Meeting took some steps which will be of long range benefit
to Salem. Putting motion to our concern for our elderly and the increasing
burdens many of them feel, a Housing Authority was established to secure 75
units of a housing in Salem in conjunction with Federal funds. The Town voted
to participate with the State in a Comprehensive Traffic Survey to outline the
problems and solutions to the myriad traffic problems experienced due to our
being a commercial and recreation center for all of southeastern New Hampshire.
Affirmative action was also taken to continue improvements and expansions of
our municipal water and sewer services, by voting funds to sewer additional areas
and build a new 1.5 million gallon water reservoir.

As we move into 1972, hopefully Salem is approaching at least a year of
breath-catching before our next giant strides forward, be they by design or by
necessity. A long-range Special Study Committee has been established to assist in
developing a five-year expandable plan for our water and sewer systems. We
must seek additional sources of quality water to meet our increasing demand and
hopefully we can start on this project in 1972. As our population continues to
increase, sanitation problems likewise are increasing and it is imperative that we
pursue equitable and economical solutions to these problems. The efforts to
abate pollution in whatever form must be pursued, priorities determined and
dollars allocated: for solid waste, septic waste, sewerage, water pollution, air
pollution, etc.

To meet the ever-changing needs of the Town, every effort is being made to
identify our needs, cooperate with other groups and organizations, provide the
organization and man-power to satisfy the needs and to, hopefully, provide a
continuing high level of service to the community with a sharp eye on the overall
economics of operating the Town government.

An aware and interested Board of Selectmen and a dedicated group of Town
employees will continue to examine, question, and serve. I personally am
pleased to be a part of such a group and would like to thank all for their attitude
of cooperation in making Salem a better place to be.

Respectfully Submitted,

William L. Kelly
Town Manager



TOWN OFFICERS



ADMINISTRATION

SELECTMEN -



TOWN MANAGER-
TOWN CLERK -
MODERATOR -

Chief of Fire Department _
Forest Fire Wardens —



Chief of Police Department —

Justice of District Court -
Special Justice -



Laurence Belair, Chairman

Bessie M. Morrison

Richard i. Barron

Michael J. Carney

Bert Ford

William L. Kelley

Eleanor B. Barron
James A. Sayer, Jr.



Raoul Lavoie

John Dawson
Richard Spofford

Francis Frame
William Kingdon

George Taylor

Everett B. Dowe

Kenneth F. Romprey
James A. Sayer, Jr.



Building Inspector —
Electrical Inspector —
Highway Supervisor —
Health Officer -
Engineer —

Planning Board -



Board of Adjustment —



Harold G. Bailey

Joseph Bourque

Byron Harding

James Falls

Frank Hebert

Terence McGrath, Chairman

John Sununu

Henry Corcoran, Jr.

Thomas Rushton

Marshall Decker

Walter Tusen

Bert Ford, Selectman Member

Kenneth E. Folsom, Chairman

Arthur R. Little

Maurice Murphy

Douglas Seed

Charles McMahon

Peter Tokanel, Alternate

Richard Tibbetts, Alternate

Carnick Kachadorian, Alternate

Thomas Eden, Alternate

Leonard Kabala, Alternate



Clerk of Court —



Representatives to General Court -



Collector of Taxes -
Industrial Consultant —
Industrial Executive Commitee —



Mary Kitson

Laurance N. Belair

Jeannette Gelt

Bessie Morrison

Robert O'Neil

James A. Sayer, Jr.

Philip Smith

John H. Lamprey
John L. Farrell



Supervisors of Check List —



Edmund Cote, Jr.

Frank Bowser

Elmer Story

George Khoury

Michael J. Carney, Selectmen Member

Walter Tusen, Planning Board Member

Douglas Seed, Board of Adjustment Member



John Grant, Chairman

William Knightly, Jr.

Vesta Roy



PROGRAMS AND COMMISSIONS



Director of Recreation —
Recreation Committee —



Group Living ■



Arthur D. Corbett

Bernard Campbell, Chairman

Lloyd Miller

Robert Upton

John Pierro

Clarence Hall

Ben Holmes

Leonard Michaud

Beatrice Laycock

Alternates:

Steve DeCesare

Merle Centner

Stephen Leone

Donald and Terry Jutton



Trustees of Public Library ■



Librarian —

IVlerrlmacl< Valley

Health Planning Council, Inc.



Earl Woodbury, Chairman

Robert Kelly, Treasurer

Katharine Bowser

Edward V. Reed, Jr.



William Land, M.D.
Bart N. Quirinale, M.D.



Mid Merrimack Health Planning Council

William L. Kelly, Town Manager
Margaret Lemay

Historic District Commission —

Howard E. Turner, Chairman

Evelyn Seed

Muriel Killam

Conservation Commission -John Watkevich, Chairman

Gerard Bauters
James Falls
Mrs. Joseph Schultz
William Schultz
Leonard Smith
William Taylor

Council on Aging — Alfred Collins

Rev. Zaven Dohanian

William Stevens

Maxine E. Fournier

Jeannette Gelt

Paul Hill

Vesta Roy

Harold Telfer

Richard Carter

Frances Mclniyre

Sel. Laurence N. Belair

Sel. Bessie Morrison

President of Golden Age Club, Honorary Member

Salem

Highway Safety Coordinating Committee

Selectman, Richard Barron

Police Chief, Everett B. Dowe

Town Engineer, Frank Hebert

Town Manager, William L. Kelly

Highway Supervisor, Byron Harding

Planning Board Chairman, Terence McGrath

School District Representative, Eugene Morgan



Director of Civil Defense —
Housing Authority -



Melvin Marsh

George Gelt, Chairman

Harold Telfer

Walter Stickney, Jr.



Southern Rockingham

County Regional Planning Agency



Michael Carney
Francis DeCesare
Terence McGrath



FINANCES

Treasurer -

Budget Committee



Richard A. Willis



Robert O'Neil, Chairman

Arthur Campbell

Ralph Brandano

Richard Lock hart

Ronald Cabral

Kelly Dahood

Richard Barron, Selectman Member

Eugene Morgan, School Board Member



Trustee of Trust Funds -

Superintendent of School —
School Board —



Ivan Gile, Treasurer

George Longworth

Claude Jobin



Paul 0. Johnson

Fred Kruse, Chairman

Bernard Campbell

Eugene Morgan

Urville Beaumont

Margaret Lemay




PUBLIC SERVICE -The Rev. Abner Bayley, Salem's first
minister, set a record of public service which would be hard to
improve upon. The minister in those days was an elected
public official, and the Rev. Mr. Bayley was called here by
formal vote Nov. 13, 1739, even before there was an
incorporated town. The warrant for Salem's second actual
Town Meeting in 1751 carried an article calling upon voters to
see what terms could be made with "the Revern Mr. Bayley to
settel amongst us." The slate stone, picture above, stands near
the east wall of the old cemetery at Salem Center. It carries
this inscription.

" To perpetuate

the memory of the

Rev. Abner Bayley

who like a shock of corn

fully ripe departed this

life March 10th A.D. 1798

in the 87th year of his age

and 68th of his ministry."



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in 2010 with funding from

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TOWN QERK



FACTS AND FIGURES

Automobile Tax Permits $278,844.68

Dog Licenses 3,407.00

Junk Licenses 9-00

Title Fees 4,822.00

Uniform Commercial Code &

Certified Copies ■ .2.164.98

$289,247.66



Vital Statistics Registered in the Town of Salem for the
year ending December 31, 1971.

Births 414

Deaths 121

Marriages 527

Eleanor B. Barron
Town Clerk



FIRE DEPARTMENT



Appropriated at 1971 March Town Meeting
Actual expenditures during 1971
Returned to town



Breakdown of the
Fire Department
Expenditures



$449,471

444,506

4,965




CAPITAL EXPENDITURE 18»i



AUTOMOTIVE 1.1°=

CONTRACTUAL

COMMUNICATION

UTILITIES



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The department has a fire fighting force of 33 men, 13
vehicles, and 1 rescue boat.



MEN

1 Chief

2 Deputies

3 Lieutenants

1 Lieutenant Inspector
1 Firefighter Mechanic
25 Firefighters



VEHICLES

5 Pumpers (Engines)

1 Ladder Truck

2 Tank Trucks

1 Rescue Truck

2 Ambulances

2 Cars



At present the town has two fire stations, the central
station in Salem Depot and the North Salem station. The



central station is manned 24 hours a day year round and
each firefighter is on duty 48 hours a week. The North
Salem station is manned during the day, year round, by a
lieutenant and one firefighter.

TYPES OF FIRES DURING 1971

Grass, Brush, Rubbish 145

Buildings 106

Motor Vehicles 75

Oil Burners 39

Mobile Homes 9

False Alarms 30

In addition to the above types of fires the department
responded to 9 mutual aid calls from neighboring
communities.

There were also 180 miscellaneous calls that required fire
department participation during the year.

During the year the total value of property that was
covered by insurance and lost through fire was $186,645 an
increase of $17,748 over 1970.

RESCUE AND AMBULANCE ACTIVITIES DURING 1971
No. of calls Rescue Truck responded to 103

No. of Rescues 26

No. of Ambulance calls 863

(7 handled by fire dept. cars)

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT ■
CALLS DURING 1971
Fire activities



Rescue & Ambulance Uses



593
889



FIRE DEPARTMENT RELATED ACTIVITIES
In December the municipal fire alarm system was



completed. There are 1 1 master boxes in the schools and 96

street boxes placed around town.

Also during the year the department conducted:

27 School Inspections

23 School Fire Drills

284 Business I nspections

110 Fire Investigations



Donald Ralston (3 years)
Alfred Demers (3 years)
Donald Spofford (2 years)
Bruce Henning (2 years)



Civil Defense Fire School
Civil Defense Fire School
Civil Defense Fire School
Civil Defense Fire School



The number of years each man has been in the
department is shown after his name.



COMPLETED COURSES AND AWARDS

The following firefighters have completed job related
courses during the year or have received an award.

FIREFIGHTER COURSE OR AWARD

William E. Scott (10 Years) F ireman of the Year Award
William E. Scott Emergency Medical Technician Course



FACTS AND FIGURES



FUTURE ADDITIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS

It is hoped that in the near future the town will be able
to build a station in the southern part of town and also
expand on the fire alarm box system. In addition one tank
truck will have to be replaced soon and the department
increased by six firefighters.

Raoul Lavoie - Chief



MONTHLY MSniaunON OF
mi DEPARTMINT CALLS (1971)



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253035404550556065 70 75 80 85 90



FIRE CALLS — — — — —
A*«ULANCE CALLS — — —



POLICE DEPARTMENT



FACTS AND FIGURES

THE DEPARTMENT RECORDS INDICATE THE
FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR OF 1971 :



Total Mileage Patrols

Total Number of Complaints Investigated

Motor Vehicle Accidents:

Personal Injury 229

Property Damage 899

Pedestrian 12

Fatal 1
Number of Summons orSubpoenasServed
Motor Vehicle Warnings Issued
Number of Complaints or Investigations
with other departments
Property Checks Made:

Recreational 3,225

Vacant or Vacation 1 ,880
Motor Vehicles Stolen in Salem
Motor Vehicles Recovered in Salem
Receipts for Photostatic Copies
Receipts for Pistol or Revolver License
Receipts for Bicycle Registrations
Total Number of Arrests for the year

Motor Vehicle Violations

Misdemeanors other than

Motor Vehicle

Felony Arrests



272,830
4,917
1,141



226

155

210
5,105



139

64

$1,656.

244.

140.

1,293

923

298
72



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE JUVENILE

BUREAU FOR 1971

COURT CASES FROM JANUARY 1 TO

DECEMBER 31, 1971 - INCLUSIVE - J. Oakes





MALES


FEMALES


LARCENY


14




M/V VIOLATIONS


4




TRUANCY


4


4


BURGLARY


1




TRESPASSING


1-




WAYWARD OR DISOBEDIENT


4


9


NEGLECTED CHILD


1


2


DRUGS


1




ASSAULT


4




MALICIOUS ACTS


2




LASCIVIOUS ACTS


2






38


15





37


40


Total 77








37


39


76








75


42


117








39


8


47








6


2


8







Total 53



MISSING YOUTHS

RETURNED

COUNSEL WITH YOUTHS

VIOLATIONS WITH RELEASE

VIOLATIONS OF PROBATION



INVESTIGATIONS 216

CONFERENCES WITH PARENTS 156

CONFERENCES WITH RESOURCE PEOPLE . 268

REFERRED TO OTHER AGENCIES 23

COUNSEL WITH YOUTHS AT THE

BOYS CLUB (Potential Run Aways) 58

PROBATION INQUIRES AND REPORTS . . 25

GENERAL MEETINGS "62

SEMINARS OR LECTURES 38

ASSISTANCE TO OTHER POLICE

DEPARTMENTS 32

TOTAL YOUTH CONTACTED,

INTERVIEWED AND COUNCILLED 299

TOTAL CASES REQUIRING COURT

ACTION 53

TOTAL POTENTIAL DELINQUENTS

NOT BROUGHT TO COURT 266

PRESENT

The Juvenile Bureau has been in full operation for the
year of 1971.

The major goal of the Juvenile Bureau is that of the
prevention of delinquency. During 1971 the Bureau was
involved in investigation and disposition of cases of
delinquency, predelinquency, and delinquency control, and
disposition of cases as the court directed.

The bureau has expanded its communication with
existing social agencies and other facilities for social
adjustment as well as community resources in order that
the citizens of Salem may realize the benefits therefrom.

The Juvenile Bureau has been participating in programs
to prevent delinquency by involvement in school group
discussions covering juvenile law.

The Bureau, during 1971, has delivered speeches and
participated in panel discussions, as well as being a resource
agency.

The bureau wishes to thank Police Chief Everett B.
Dowe, the Juvenile Court, Rockingham County Probation
Department, the Salem Boy's Club and all other town,
county, state, and federal agencies as well as the citizens of
the town of Salem for the support and cooperation
received. The encouraging picture of delinquency in Salem
in 1971, considering the nationwide trend towards an



increasing crime rate, is due to our combined efforts to
reduce delinquency.

TRAFFIC CONTROL AND HIGHWAY SAFETY

The traffic survey should be completed this year and this
report will substantiate the need for resurfacing all of the
main highways in the compact area, the proposed
modernization of our street lights, an expanded program
for adequate sidewalks and whatever improvements
suggested by the survey.



EDUCATION AND TRAINING

All of our officers were required to attend a small arms
training program, conducted by a training officer from the
F.B.I.

Several members are continuing advance courses in
criminal justice and related subjects at St. Anseim's College
for the purpose obtaining an associates degree.

Three Lieutenants and three Sergeants have been
enrolled at Babson Institute to attend the (Command
Training Institute) all of which is to improve the efficiency
of the department.

Everett B. Dowe
Chief of Police



i




10



DISTRICT COURT



FACTS ArJD FIGURES



RECEIPTS




Cash on hand January 1, 1971


$200.00


Fines Imposed


$43,680.00


Bail Forfeitures


2,458.50


Small Claims Receipts


258.25


Civil Writs


232.00


Copies and Miscellaneous Receipts


646.31


Receipts transferred


ISQOq




$47,625.06


DISBURSEMENTS




N. H. Motor Vehicle Dept.


$20,874.20


Witness Fees and Travel


1,141.10


Expenses of Court:




Telephone


400.08


Stationery and Supplies


828.61


Books, Memberships and Supplements


252.27


Clerical


2,442.31


Special Sitting Fees


240.00


Blood Bills


130.00


Postage


225.23


Small Claims - Judge's fees


164.00


Small Claims - Clerk's fees


41.00


Service calls


25.00


Clerks Bonds


42.50


Transfer funds


173.90


Uncollected bad check


1.00


Cash paid out


30.59


TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS


$27,011.79


Paid to Town of Salem, Accumulated Surplus


20.313.27




$47,325.06



1971 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SALEM
DISTRICT COURT - BREAKDOWN

TOTAL CRIMINAL CASES FOR 1971 2422

Cases brought by Salem Police 1,293

Cases brought by State Police 794

Cases brought by Windham Police 135

Cases brought by Boat Inspectors 2

Cases brought by Motor Vehicle Inspectors 154

Cases brought by private parties 39

Cases brought by Fish & Game Dept 2

Cases brought by Health Officer 1

Cases brought by Building Inspector 1

Cases brought by Windham Dog Officer 1

2,422

JUVENILE CASES FOR 1971 77

Cases of neglected children 8

Cases of Delinquent Children 69

-77

SMALL CLAIMS FOR 1971 171

CIVIL CASES FOR 1971 142

Naomi M. Savoie
Acting Clerk



Cash on hand December 31, 1971



11



TAX COLLECTOR



PAST ACHIEVEMENTS

In 1961 the warrant committed was $1,217,570.19. In
1971 the warrants totaled $5,877,373.02, or nearly a 500%
increase. This was the fourth largest warrant committed to
a collector in the state.

During these years Salem experienced an increase in the
head and poll tax warrants, from 4963 persons assessed in
1961 to 10,200 in 1971. In 1967 the tax collector's off ice
was given the responsibility of collecting the sewer rental
fees. These warrants have taken an even faster jump, from
$12,924.35 in 1967 to $61,044.72 in 1971. At the present
time we are discussing the possibility of having this Office
collect the water bills.

Unfortunately the staff, and facilities, of the tax
collector's office haven't increased with the growth of the
town. For ten years the office has had one full time clerk,
who is also the deputy, with part time help each fall; in
November of 1970 another full time clerk was obtained.

PRESENT

The biggest problem in the past has been in collecting the
personal property taxes, and it is felt these taxes vyill
continue to be unless we take advantage of the remedies
available to us under the present laws. With the present
work load it is impossible to give these accounts the
attention they need.



The problems facing the office now include trying to
keep up with the added accounts. Each year attempts have
made to offset this added work with changes in
bookkeeping and billing procedures. Tax billing has been
put on computer; a validating machine, a desk calculator,
micro-film viewer and filing cabinets have been added.

Through the efforts of the Rockingham County Tax
Collectors Association, and with the assistance of Mrs.
Edith E. Holland, Register of Deeds, the towns in this
county now get all copies of deeds and mortgages recorded
at no expense to the town. This saves the towns money,
and records are now more accurate.

FUTURE

In the near future a bigger validating machine and a better
method of billing the resident taxes and sewer rental fees
will be needed. At the present time the resident taxes are
not being properly handled and they create extra work for
the office, and a loss of revenue for the town. If these
accounts were put on a computer program, properly taken
care of, would save money.

Respectfully submitted,

John H. Lamprey
Tax Collector



1»70 1971



KESI-

DENT
TAX



12



Tax Base

Real Estate Warrants

1961-1971



INDUSTRIAL CONSULTANT



PRESENT

Despite the general economic slow-down prevailing
throughout the country and New England especially, New
Hampshire experienced a significent industrial and
commerical expansion.

Salem acquired a goodly share of this new industry and
commerce, and this activity has attracted even more
business to inquire about locating in Salem.

During March, K Mart started its 119,000 sq. ft.
shopping center and by April, 1972, it will be ready to hire
Salem residents to work.

The Hunneman Co., completed all negotiations for the
46 acres at the corner of Route 28 and Rockingham
Boulevard and 25 acres are now being prepared for their
200,000 sq. ft. Rockingham Mall. The remaining land will
be developed in the future.

Buy-Rite Corporation increased their business and added
an additional 20,000 sq. ft. This makes them the largest
food distributors under one roof, in New England.

It was with regret that we saw the Canobie Shoe Co.
close its doors. Its 23,000 sq. ft. of bright, clean space had
some of the most modern equipment and its plant layout
was one of the most efficient in New England. The section
vacated was soon taken by a manufacturer and packager of
medicinal products.

Keewaydin Shores decision to extend sewerage to the
four quadrants of their industrial park at the junction of
Rt. 93 and 97 sparked great interest in their land. Within a
matter of months, negotiations were completed and M.F.E.,
an electronics plant from Wilmington, Mass. was building a
30,000 sq. ft. building; investors purchased a site for a
Holiday Inn and a bakery equipment manufacturer from
New York, Universal Machinery Corporation, bought land

13



in the S.W. quadrant. The last two plan to start building in
the spring.

FUTURE

At this time particular attention should be paid to
sources of leads for new business. The regular sources are:
friends in the business, regular contacts with large
developers and industrial brokers, and going after businesses
that would be good for Salem. One of the best sources,
however, has been the people of Salem. Time and again our
Selectmen and Town Manager have provided names to
follow up. Local salesmen keep their ears open and call
with leads. The Universal Machine Corporation is here


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