Samuel Harden.

Early life and times in Boone County, Indiana, giving an account of the early settlement of each locality, church histories, county and township officers from the first down to 1886 ... Biographical sketches of some of the prominent men and women ... online

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Online LibrarySamuel HardenEarly life and times in Boone County, Indiana, giving an account of the early settlement of each locality, church histories, county and township officers from the first down to 1886 ... Biographical sketches of some of the prominent men and women ... → online text (page 16 of 38)
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Hard gravel . ■* "•

•Hardpan— gravel . . . . • • • . 4 ft.

White sand 6 ft.

Sand and clay — bluish 18 ft.

Black muck and loam, with branches of trees and other

vegetable matter . . . . - • • . 1- it-
Blue clay . • . 4 ft.

Gray sand, gravel, etc. 26 it.

Total 88 ft.



BOONE COUNTY, INDIANA. 189

On the farm of Mr. Isaac Eraerts, two and one-half miles
north of Jamestown, a well was bored in which the swamp
was reached at a depth of sixty feet. A considerable layer of
blue clay lies over it. The following section was obtained from
Mr. James A. Ball, of Thorntown, who bored the well. At
the depth of seventy-five feet the rock was reached, and the
boring was continued through the shale, or "soapstone," as the
workmen termed it, to the depth of 235 feet :

SECTION OF MR. ISAAC EMERTS' WELL.

Soil 2 ft.

Yellow clay and sand 28 ft.

Quicksand . . . . . . . . 1 ft. 6 in.

Blue clay 29 ft.

Black muck, leaves, twigs and branches of trees . 3 ft.

Sand and clay 12 ft.

Silicious shale — "soapstone" .... 160 ft.

Total, • . 235 ft. 6 in.

A well was dug on the farm of Mr. Seth. W. Porter, six
miles west of Lebanon, in which a walnut branch, five inches
in diameter, was found in the blue clay a few feet below the
surface. The well was only eighteen feet deep, and the follow-
ing is the

SECTION :

Soil 2 ft.

Blue clay . . • 11 ft.

Sand . . 5 ft.

Total, 18 ft.

In digging a well on Main street, just east of the Public
Square,- in Lebanon, the workmen passed through two feet of
soil and twelve feet of blue clay, when a stratum of sand vras
reached in w^hich were a large number of shells in a good state
of preservation. Dr. A. G. Porter pronounced them to be
fresh-water shells. About four feet lower down, in gravel, a
number of Lower Silurian fossil-shells — Rhy nchonella capax —
were found.



190 EAELY LIFE AND TIMES IN

At Witt & Klizer's flonring-mill, at Thorntown^a well was
dug to the depth of 104 feet, and then continued by boring to
the depth of 343 feet. At the depth of 100 feet, the trunk of
a tree, apparently northern cedar, several inches in diameter,
was found. The trunk of the tree extended entirely across
the well. The exposed portion of the tree was nearly perfect,
showing no scars nor affects of abrasion, such as would have
resulted from violent contact with rocks or other hard
substances.

The following is the entire section of the well, obtained
from Mr. Ball, who superintended the boring:

SECTION OF WITT & KLIZER's WELI>, THORNTOWN.

Soil 2 ft.

Yellow clay 19 ft.

Quicksand .....*... 4 ft.

Blue clay 125 ft.

Silicious shale — "soapstone" 193 ft.

Total, 343 ft.

A section of the same well obtained from the engineer at
the mill, who assisted in digging the well and also in the work
of boring, differs very materially from that given by Mr. Ball.
As no notes were taken by either of the gentlemen, and the
sections were given from memory, it is not to be assumed that
either should be absolutely correct.

SECTION OF WITT & KLIZEr's WELL, THORNTOWN.
(Obtained from the Engineer at the MiU.)

Soil 2 ft.

Yellow clay 13 ft.

Gravel 3 ft.

Blue clay 82 ft.

Cedar tree

Blue clay 37 ft.

"Soapstone" 60 ft.

Gray limestone 136 ft.

' Total, 333 ft.



BOONE COUNTY, INDIANA. 191

It is quite probable that the carbonated hydrogen gases sa
frequently found in the drift clays of northern Indiana are
gases that were generated in the masses of buried vegetation
so frequently occurring throughout the drift area. The gas is
found at depths varying from twenty to seventy-five feet —
depths correspouding with those at which the buried vegetation
occurs. The flow of gas is always much stronger when it is
first struck, and it gradually diminishes in volume until it
finally ceases altogether. Tliis indicates that the gas is con-
fined in a pocket, or limited reservoir, from which no con-
tinned supply may be expected. Confined in the ancient swamp
beds beneath the impervious, massive layers of indurated blue
clay, it will remain imprisoned for ages without sensible
change in volume or chemical composition.

At many points throughout Boone County this gas has
been found in the drift. In a well three miles southeast of
Elizaville, on the Michigan Road, which was bored by Mr.
Ball, of Thorntown, gas was found at a depth of forty-one
feet. It flowed strongly for a short time from a stratum of
fine, white sand, which probably accumulated on the margin
of a small lake. The following is the

SECTION OF THE GAS WELL.

Soil and yellow clay . , . . . . . 18 ft.

Quicksand . . .3ft.

Blue clay 20 ft.

White sand— gas 11 ft.

Blue clay 6 ft.

Swamp muck, leaves, twigs, etc. . . . . . 7 ft.

Blue clay 19 ft.

• Total 84 ft.

In a well bored upon the farm of Clairborne Cain, five
miles west of Lebanon, gas flowed from a stratum of gravel
five feet in thickness, which was reached at a depth of seventy-
three feet.



192 EARLY LIFE AND TIMES IN

SECTION OF MR. CALn's WELL.

Soil and yellow clay 17 ft.

White quicksand . 5 ft.

Blue clay . . 51 ft.

Dry gravel — gas seam . . . . . . . 5 ft.

Blue clay . 165 ft.

Total . . 243 ft.

At the depth of two hundred and forty-three feet obstruc-
tions accumulated in the pipes, and the boring had to be dis-
-continued. It is unfortunate that the obstructions should
occur before the entire thickness of the great stratum of blue
clay was ascertained.

At Jamestown, and many other localities throughout the
county, gas, in small quantities, has been found in boring and
digging wells. But in every instance the flow of gas is
strongest when it is first reached, and it saon gradually ceases
altogether. In no instance has a continuation of the bore ever
resulted in developing a stronger flow of gas, and in no
instance has it ever been fou ad in bores continued into the
paleozoic rocks. The futility, then, of expecting to find the
great reservoir from which the gas accumulated in the drift
has escaped is very apparent. The gas of the drift areas is
merely local accumulations resulting from the decay of buried
vegetable matter. Although this gas will burn, it has never
yet been found in a quantity sufficient to entitle it to consid-
eration from an economic standpoint.

The blue clays of Boone County are generally in dense,
stiff, indurated masses, unlaminated, and without evidence of
stratification. At many points they form the surface soil,
where they may be recognized by their ash-gray or whitish
■color, and uniformly fine and even texture. The whitish
appearance is due to years of leaching and bleaching. In
their natural state these clays form an unproductive soil, which
can only be made profitable by a liberal use of manures.

The well on Washington Street, Lebanon, shows a varying




%













'^/^Itifv



IJOHX'M. BURNS.



BOONE COUNTY, INDIANA. 193

condition of strata to a depth of about forty feet. The fol-
lowing is the

SECTION OF THE WELL ON WASHINGTON STKEET, LEBANON :

Soil 7 ft.

Yellow sand 1 ft.

Yellow clay . 3 ft.

Bluish sand and clay . . . . . . . 1 ft.

Sand . . 4 ft.

Blue clay 3 ft.

Sand and gravel ........ 4 ft.

Blue clay 2 ft.

Oray clay . . , . , . . . . 3 ft.
Hard-pan — indurated clay . . . . . . 4 ft.

Blue (laminated) clay 14 ft.

Orr.y clay 3 ft.

Sand and clay - . . 10 ft.

Blue clay 23 ft.

Coarse gravel ........ 1 ft.

Blue clay 25 ft.

Total 108 ft.

The well of Air. D. M. Burns, Civil Engineer, which is
located on his farm, two miles north of Lebanon, on the
Frankfort road, exhibited the following

SECTION :

Soil 2 ft.

Yellow clay 7 ft.

Gravel and sand 2 ft.

Blue clay . . . 22 ft.

Gravel 2 ft.

Gravel and clay 3 ft.

Blue clay , , . 50 ft.

Bowlder 1 ft.

Blue clay 23 ft.

Total 112 ft.

In the vicinity of Ratsburg no accurate knowledge of the
depth or character of the drift could be procured. Water is
obtained in required quantities at from ten to twenty feet
13



194 EARLY LIFE AND TIMES IN

below the surface. The following section of Mr, J. M.
Chambers's well illustrates the character of the deposits there
so far as known :

SECTION OF MR. CHAMBER'S WELL, RATSBURG.

Soil 1 ft. 6 iu.

Gray clay . . . ... . . . 16 ft.

Sand 6 in.

Total 18 ft.

In this locality water is always found iu the first layer of
sand.

In the vicinity of Slabtown water is obtained at depths
varying from twenty to fifty feet. The well of Mr. George
Dischman, at that place, presents fairly all that could be ascer-
tained regarding the drift in that locality.

SECTION OF GEORGE DISHMAN's WELL, SLABTOWN.

Soil 2 ft.

Blue clay 30 ft.

Gravel 6 in.

Blue clay 14 ft.

Total 46 ft. 6 in.

In the neighborhood of Big Springs, water is abundant in
wells at from eight to ten feet below the surface. The surface
deposits are soil and gravel, no clay being reached at that
depth. Numerous springs throughout this region flow out at
the surface of the ground.

At Ropston water is obtained at from eight to twenty feet
below the surface.

SECTION OF AVERAGE WELLS AT EOSSTON.

Soil 1 ft. 6 in.

Red clay 8 ft.

Sand and gravel 1 to 10 ft.



Total . , 19 ft. 6 in.

At Northfield, water is obtained at from twenty to forty
feet below the surface.



BOOXE COUXTY, INDIANA. 195

SECTION OF AVERAGE WELL AT NOHTHFIELD.

Soil 2 ft.

Yellow clay 10 to 20 ft.

Sand or gravel 10 to 20 ft.

Total . 42 ft.

The wells at Clarkstown are from fifteen to forty-five feet
deep..

SECTION OF AVERAGE WELL AT CLARKSTOWN.

Soil 2 ft.

Yellow clay 6 to 10 ft.

Blue clay . • 10 to 30 ft.

Total ....... 42 ft.

Tiie wells at Zionsville are from twenty to sixty feet in
depth.

AVERAGE OF WELLS AT ZIONSVILLE.

Soil 2 ft.

Yellow clay 10 ft.

Blue clay 4 to 10 ft.

Gravel . . 1 to 3 ft.

Blue clay . . . . . . . 20 to 40 ft.

Total 65 ft.

At Royalton water is usually obtained at depths varying
from ten to forty feet. Messrs. Foster & Leap, however, had
a well bored to the depth of ninety-five feet.

SECTION OF FOSTER & LEAp's WELL, ROYALTON.

Soil 3 ft. 6 in.

Yellow clay 17 ft.

Gravel 5 ft.

Blue clay, with frequent thin layers of sand and

gravel 70 ft. 6 in.

Total 96 ft.

Water is usually procured at Jamestown at depths varying
from twenty-five to thirty feet. The deepest well in the town
is located at the saw mill.



196 EARLY LIFE AND TIMES IN

SECTION OF WELL AT THE SAW MILL, JAMESTOWN.

■•Soil 3 ft.

TTellow clay 8 ft.

"Quick sand . . . . . . . . . 1 ft.

Blue clay 28 ft.

<Gravel . . 2 ft.

Blue clay 48 ft.

Total 90 ft.

SECTION OF WELL AT THE GRIST MILL, JAMESTOWN.

Soil • . . . . ft. 8 in.

Yellow clay , . . 10 ft.

Sand . . . , 2 ft.

Blue clay . 49 ft.

Total 61 ft. 8 in.

In digging a well just south of the railroad, near the dcpoi,
at Jamestown, a few years ago, a small reservoir of gas was
struck which exploded with some force, and burned with some
violence, but the flow lasted only a few minutes, when it
ceased altogether.

The wells at Brunswick vary from eleven to thirty-five feet
in depth.

AVERAGE SECTION OF WELLS AT BRUNSWICK.

Soil 1 to 2 ft.

Yellow clay or gravel 5 to 10 ft.

Sand and gravel 1 to 3 ft.

Blue clay 4 to 20 ft.

Total . 11 to 35 ft.

AVERAGE SECTION OF WELLS AT MILLEDGE\TLLE.

. Soil 1 to 2 ft.

Yellow clay or gravel . . . . , . 5 to 10 ft.-

Gravel and sand 1 to 10 ft.

Blue clay 5 to 20 ft.

Total 12 to 42 ft.

By digging through the soil and sand in the vicinity <•!
Dover to the depth of seven feet an abundance of water i-
found. A short distance north of Dover, on the farm of ^'t'-



BOONE COUNTY, INDIANA. 197

Thomas McDaniel, a well was dug to the depth of twenty-two
feet six inches.

SECTIOX OF THOMAS m'dAXIEL'S WELL.

Soil 1 ft.

Yellow clay . . . . . . • 6 ft.

Blue clay . • 15 ft.

Gravel 6 in.

Total 22 ft. 6 in.

Mr. Ball, of Thorntown, bored a well for Mr. Gar. Vande-
veer, six miles south of Lebanon, in which a large amount of
vegetable matter was found in an ancient swamp, now buried
sixty-five feet beneath the surface.

SECTION OF MR. VANDEVEER's WELL.

Soil 2 ft.

Yellow clay 18 ft.

Blue clay 45 ft.

Swamp muck, leaves, twigs, etc. .... 10 ft.

Blue clay .25 ft.

Sandstone . 9 ft.

Total 109 ft.

Three miles north of Thorntown Mr. Ball bored two wells
on opposite sides of the road, one of which was for Mr. S.
Dukes, and the other was for Mr. Al. Wetherald. The depths
of the wells were 185 and 187 feet respectively. The strata
were the same in both wells. The following is the

SECTION :
Soil and yellow clay . . . . . . 18 ft.

Quicksand . ' 12 ft.

Blue clay 153 ft. 6 in.

Eed sandstone 3 ft. 6 in.

Total 187 ft.

In the vicinity of the ]Montgomery County line the thick-
ness of the drift is much less than it is in the central part of
county. The following section of Mr. Louis Dunbar's well,
just over the line in Montgomery County, is about an average



198 EARLY LIFE AND TIMES IX

of the wells iu that vicinity. The paleozoic rocks are usually
reached at a depth of from 20 to 40 feet.

SECTION OF MR. DUNBAr'S WELL.

Soil and yellow clay . . . . . . . 20 ft.

^ Dry white sand ........ 2 ft.

White " sandstone " — probably chert . . . . 44 ft.

Total 66 ft.

North of Sugar Creek, in Montgomery County, near the
Boone County line, Mr. Ball states that the cherty layers of
stone are always found at from 20 to 30 feet below the
surface.

SECTION OF WELL ON MR. WM. MILLS' FARM, ONE 3ULE WEST OF THORNTOWN.

Soil and yellow clay 25 ft.

Quicksand 3 ft.

Blue clay 80 ft.



Total 108 ft.

On the farm of Mr. Frank Harris, one mile south of Thorn-
town, a well was bored to the depth of 132 feet, which showed
great thickness of blue clay, which is underlaid by a cemented
gravel.

SECTION OF MR. HARRIS* WELL.

Soil and yellow clay

Quicksand . . . . .

Blue clay

Cemented gravel ......



. 19 ft.


4 ft.


. 103 ft.


6 ft.



Total ... 132 ft.

West of Thorntowu about one and one-half miles is a heavy
deposit of dry gravel. The total thickness of the bed is nut
known. On the farm of Mr. Charles Moffitt a well was dug
through -1 feet of soil and 40 feet of gravel, when the work
was discontinued without finding water. At other points in
the same locality the gravel is known to be of a very great
depth. Also in the vicinity of Lebanon there are numerous
thick beds of gravel. Gravel occurs all over the county at



BOONE COUXTY, INDIANA. 199

points sufficiently convenient of access to be economically
used for road-making.

Sand of good quality for plastering and building purposes
and for the manufacture of tiles, brick, etc., is readily obtained
in any part of the county. It is often found in beds of great
thickness. On the farm of Robert Woody, three and one-half
miles west of Thorntown, a stratum of sand fifty-five feet in
thickness was passed through in boring a well. The follow-
ing is the

SECTION OF MR. WOODY's AVELL.

Soil and yellow clay ...... IS ft.

Fine white sand ....... 55 ft.

Blueclav 71 ft.

Limestone . . . . . . . . 3 ft.

Total, 147 ft.

Throughout the northwestern part of the county cjuicksand
almost uniformly occurs under the yellow clay. The thickness
of the ])eds of quicksand varies from two feet to fifteen feet.
The yellow clay runs from three to thirty feet in thickness.
The section of a well three miles east of Thorntown, near the
Union Church, illustrates the character of the deposits
throughout that region :

SECTION OF WELL NEAR UNION CHURCH.

Soil and yellow clay ...... 27 ft.

Quicksand . . . . . . , . . 9 ft.

Bine clay ........ 75 ft.

Total, Ill ft.

PALEOZOIC GEOLOGY.

Since no exposure of paleozoic rocks occur in any part of
Boone County, any statements concerning the underlying
formations and groups would be unreliable and gratuitous.
The workmen who continued the bores in wells until the rocks
were reached were barelv able to distinguish the various kinds
of rocks — shales, sandstones or limestones — and from the lim-



200 EARLY LIFE AND TIMES.

ited information obtained from them no sufficient knowledge
of the strata was acquired to enable one to form definite or
reliable conclusions. However, as limestones underlie the
drift in the western part of the county, it is quite likely they
are St. Louis or Keokuk — most probably the latter. It is
uncertain whether the sandstone reached in a few instances is
Knobstone or not. Although no bores, have ever touched the
rocks underlying the drift in the eastern part of the county, it
is altogether probable that they are Devonian. The particles
of rock taken from the bores in different parts of the county
contained no organic remains so far as observed by the

workmen.

ARCH.i:OLOGY.

There are no walled enclosures in Boone County, nor any
mounds of great interest. Occasionally small mounds are
seen, but explorations in them have not disclosed any facts
other than are generally known concerning these works.
Ashes, charcoal, and occasionally implements have been found
in them. Granite and flint implements, while not so common
as in many other counties, are still frequently found in the
county. Mr. Tribbets, of Thorntown, has quite a valuable col-
lection of stone implements, collected partly from this county,
but principally from Montgomery. There are a few other
small collections in the county.

THANKS.

Many courtesies were received from the citizens in general
during the progress of the survey, and especially from Dr.
Lane and Attorneys Stokes and Wesner, at Lebanon ; Dr.
Curryer, at Thorntown; Dr. Heady, at Jamestown, and
James Dye, at Xorthfield.



CHURCHES.



EAGLE CREEK REGULAR BAPTIST CHURCH.

Located ou Eagle Creek. This is the mother of churches
in Boone County, being constituted in the year 1829. The
following are among the first members : George Dodson,
Elizabeth King, Frederick Brendell and wife, John King,
Thomas and Polly Dodson, Robert Dodson, Mary Dodson,
Samuel Laine and wife, Edward Bradley, David Marsh, John
Dulin and wife, Squire Dulin and wife, James Peters and wife,
Robert Duly and wife. The first clerk was James Bradly.
The first house was a log building, rather rough, but it an-
swered the above persons to worship in. A second house was
built about the year 1850, this time a frame, costing about
$600. Among the early preachers were Isaac Cotton, Bcnj.
Harris, Isaac Jones, George Dodson. Xoah Gilford was for
many years the church clerk, followed by Bennett Isaacs,
Thomas Hand, Benj. Cox, Andrew Harvey. The present
clerk is Benj. Shelburu. Tlie society meets every month,
keeps up the church organization. Around this old church
cluster many pleasant reminiscences of the ])ast. The prisent
preacher is James W. Sherley.



ANTIOC OR POPLAR GROA^E BAPTIST CHURCH.

Tiie above church is located in the southwest part of Har-
rison Township, and about one and one-half miles south of
Xew Brunswick. A log house was first built here many years.



X



■202 EARLY LIFE AND TIMKS IN

ago (1856) by the M. E. Cluu'ch, and occupied by them for
several years, until they organized at Brunswick, when the
Baptist brethren occupied it and organized a church, with the
following as some of the first members: George Johnson and
wife, William Joseph and wife, John D. Fear and family,
Jacob Dimsniore and wife, Elisha Higgins and wife, Robert
Walters and wife, Elizabeth Myers. iVmong the ministers are
the following: John Clemens, Joseph Hoover, John Case,
John Joseph, George Dodson, Peter Keeny, Franklin Keeny.
The first clerk was Wm. Perkins, the present one J. PI. Diras-
more. The present house was built in 1867; cost, $1,000;
will seat about four hundred persons. Adjoining on the north
and east is the cemetery, which is one of the most ])opuIar
burying places in the county. Antioc has been for years one of
the most popular preaching places in this part of the county.
We are indebted to Noah Chitwood and James Myers for the
iibove.

BAPTIST CHURCH AT DOVER.

BY LEW^IS DENNEY.

The above society was first organized in 1869, as a joint
■society, and the house was built as such between the Newlights
and Baptists. The house cost fourteen hundred dollars. Ded-
icated January, 1870, by Rev. Harry Smith, of Indianapolis.
The first trustees on the part of the Xewlights were, A. D.
Beck and James Irwin, and Jesse Jackson on the part of the
^Baptists. The Baptists organized March 26, 1870, with six
members by letter and three by baptism, Fielding Denny, Lucy
S. Denny, W. B. Denny, Elizabeth F. Denny, Amanda M.
Denny and Grace Dinsmoro by letter. Jesse Jackson, Amelda
Jackson, Mary J. Custer (the last one by baptism). Present
trustees are W. R. Roberts, William M. Kerns, John F.
Campbell. Soon after the organization, the Baptists bought
out the interest of the Newlights, paying five hundred dollars
for their part of the house. The present deacons are W . R.



BOONE COUNTY, INDIANA.



203



Roberts, W. B. Denny, Wm. Service. Among the pastors are
R. B. Craig, C. B. Allen, John F. Cruse, W. K. ^yilliaras, H.
R. Todd. Present number of members, 110. Clerk and
treasurer, E. M. Denny.

SKETCH OF THE ELIZAVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH.

About the year 1850 the Baptist families in and around the
village ofElizaville determined on an organization. But not
until the 13th day of August, 1853, was an organization eft'ected,
when a number of brethren and sisters met at the school
house one-half mile south of town for the purpose of organiz-
ing a " regular Baptist Church." The council ^vas composed
of brethren from the following churches, viz: Freedom, Mid-
dlefork of Sugar Creek and Crooked Creek. The council was
organized by appointing Brother Dooley Moderator and Dr.
A. J. McLeod Clerk, when the following persons became
members: Lindsy Powell, Matilda Powell, Harry Harris,
Susannah Harris, Henry Padgett and Kitty Jones. Elder John
Hawkins was chosen pastor for one year, who appointed Henry
Harris clerk. The name of the church was first called " Friend-
ship," but in August, 1865, it was changed to that of "Eliza-
ville." The society now owns a comfortable house 4.0x60 feet,
which will seat five hundred persons; hold regular meetings;
and the society is kept up and is a power in the neighborhood.
It has a membership of nearly fifty. The following pastors
have served this church since its organization : John Haw-
kins, A. H. Dooly, II. B. Craig, Beuj. Daily, C. B. Allen, F.
M. Huckleberry, B. A. Melson, B. W. Harmon, J. F. Creams
and H; R. Todd. The following have served as deacons:
Lindsy Powell, W. C. Wylie, James R. Everman, John Carr,
Sydna Marsh and A. S. Campbell. The following have served
as church clerks: Harry Harris, Benj. Garrett, William C.
Wylie, A. S. Campbell, John Silver, John Carr, Marion Eaton,
J. R. Wylie, T. R. Caldwell and Edward Silver. The church
here has had upon its rolls some of the best men and women



204 EARLY LIFE AND TIMKS IN

in the county, some of wliom are yet living here an'I are active
and influential members; others have gone to other parts of
the country and have become members of other societies;
while others have gone to their reward, never to meet here
again. L?t us hope that in the final day those who have wor-
shiped here in days gone by will worshij) in the church
triura{)haut.

MOUNT TABOR BAPTIST CHUHCH.

The above church is located one-half mile north of Fay-
ette in Perry Township. It was first constituted the third
Saturday in July, 1835, when the following sister churches
were represented: Eagle Creek Church, by George Dodsou.
Thomas Bradley and John Phillips; Thorntown Church, by
John Turner and 'Squire Osburn ; Mt. Gilead Church, by
Jacob Jones and Lewis Dewees; Union Church, by Thomas
Heathen and Hampton Peningtou ; Big White Lick, by Par-
sly Sherley, Ezekiel Shirly and Abraham Spekelman ; Little
White Lick, l)y James Parsley and Caleb Sherley. We, the
above representatives of the above churches, being convened
at the house of William Turner, having examined into the
propriety of organizing a church, and finding the articles ot
faith to be in accordance to our church, we find them duly
qualified to keep house as a regtdar Baptist Church, with th<-
following named brothers and sisters as constituted memljcrs
thereof: Edmond Shirly, Benjamin Smitii, Lcwi< Smitli,
Daniel Shirly, James Smith, ^Villianl Smith, William Edv/ard-.
William Turner, Philadelphia Shirly, Susan Smitii, Xancy
Smith, Elizabeth Shirly, Nancy Smith, S. E,. Francis Xash,
IMatilda Turner, E. P. Harding. We therefore pronounce
them a regular Baptist Church, and give them the right hano



Online LibrarySamuel HardenEarly life and times in Boone County, Indiana, giving an account of the early settlement of each locality, church histories, county and township officers from the first down to 1886 ... Biographical sketches of some of the prominent men and women ... → online text (page 16 of 38)