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ficers throughout the state to take such action as is neces-
sary with the local authorities to secure target ranges
and competent instructors. Remember this: Practice is
of little or no value without previous expert instruction.
There are two great national organizations which are
both eager and anxious to help you to organize and to
assist and advise you expertly at all times. I refer to the
United States Revolver Association, address 5 Oak street,
Springfield, Massachusetts, and the National Rifle As-
sociation, Barr Building, Washington, D. C.

I believe this convention should take some steps to
effect a statewide organization of peace officers for the
purpose of adopting a uniform system of target practice.
The advantages of such an organization are many:

First, it would have a tendency to awaken interest
and enthusiasm by competitive shoots between the var-
ious departments;

Secondly, the meeting in friendly competition of the
different units of membership and the consequent inter-
changing of ideas would result not only in increased
knowledge of the work, but would tend to increase and
cement that feeling of friendship and fraternity so neces-
sary in the successful co-operation of an organization
such as ours.



STOOLPIGEONS OUT IN NEW YORK

New '^'ork City officials have decided stool pigeons
are as useful as an extra set of adenoids.

Commissioner Edward P. Mulrooney announced this
month that hereafter these professional snitchers will be
abolished. The decision came after revelations of black-
mailing of innocent women and sending some of them to
prison, as well as extortion of known prostitutes.

A few days later, 300 men, members of the vice squads,
were sent hack to their original stations. Many, and we
believe the majority of them were good officers, not
mixed up in the shameful state of affairs revealed in the
press, but had to suffer for the actions of a few who
.sought in a miserable manner to enlarge their bankrolls.



April, 1931



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL



Page 19



World's Seven Wonders Duplicated



np HERE is nothing new under the sun. Things which
caused millions to marvel a few short years ago are
today looked upon as commonplace. The world is
changinK with kaleidoscopic, hewilderins; rapidity. People
of this day can certainly lay modest claim to bcinu alive
at the period of the world's most startling changes.

Two thousand years ago a mental giant in Byzantium
undertook to list the then known seven greatest wonders
of the world. When he got through with his undertaking
he issued a list of the seven wonders of the world, and,
to his credit, we have to admit that his preferred list
stood the test of time.

Lest some of our readers should have forgotten the
"cut and dried" information amassed during their gram-
mar school course we will here set down the seven won-
ders of the world :

\. The Pyramids of Egypt and the Sphinx.

2. The Hanging Gardens of Babylon.

,3. The Temple of Diana.

4. The Statue of Juniper Olympus.

5. The Tomb of Mausolus.

6. The Pharaohs of Alexandria.

7. The Colossus of Rhodes.

Modesty is not a national virtue in these United
States, knowing that we are the world's greatest ad-
vertisers of our wares. No apologies are being offered
to Philo, that great ancient, who made the original clas-
sification. A citizen of the United States recently made
public seven United States wonders of the world, which,
for magnitude and usefulness and expense will easily
parallel the age old seven wonders.

The original seven wonders were really wonders. But
where are these wonders of the ancients? Only the Py-
ramids and the Sphinx remain. The rest but one were de-
stroyed by earthiiuake. The Temple of Diana was burned
down by Hcrostratus, a crank who wanted notoriety.
Herostratus certainly got what he wanted.

Consider Our Seven Wonders:

1. The Mississippi Flood Prevention Work, which will
cost $325,000,000.

2. The $165,000,000 Boulder Dam, Colorado River
and All-American canal project, with possible addition
of the $150,000,000 water supply line to Los Angeles.

3. The 200-inch telescope for Mount Wilson Observa-
tory which will cost a mere $6,000,000. but which will
reach millions of miles into the unknown.

4. The electrified Cascade Tunnel system, eight miles
long, costing $25,000,000.

5. The skyscrapers of New ^'ork, climaxed by the $50,-
000,000 Empire State Building and the $500,000,000
Radio City and amusement center, still on paper.

6. The $365,000,000 Panama Canal and its promised
parallel waterway through Nicaragua, that might run up
to a billion dollars.



7. The new Hudson River Bridge, costing $60,000,-
000, or the Golden Gate Bridge costing $35,000,000.

This list is not compiled in order of importance. Only
two of these modern world wonders have been declared
completed — the Cascade Tunnel and the Panama Canal.

The Mississippi River flood control prevention work
entails the enlargement of nearly 1,500 miles of levees
on both sides of the great river for a distance of 600
miles, the dredging of a gigantic spillway above New
Orleans, construction of levees, to guide floodwaters
down the man-made canal, removal and piling up of
more than half a billion cubic yards of earth, and costly
construction of concrete aprons and mattresses of willow
saplings to protect the levees against inroads of the river.
For 10 years this work is to go on. It will cost, when
completed, $325,000,000, almost the cost of the Panama
Canal.

The Boulder Dam project includes the construction
of the largest dam in the world, to be called Hoover
Dam, and digging of a canal .southwest from the Colo-
rado River just above the Mexican Border for the irriga-
tion of Imperial and Coachella Valleys in California. It
is to be followed up, according to present plans, by an
aqueduct running for 250 miles from the river to the
Los Angeles area, and costing $165,000,000. The entire
project will take seven years to build. Completed, the
project will supply water to 7,000,000 acres and will
prevent floods in the Imperial and Coachella Valleys.
The power plant at the foot of the dam will deliver up
to a million horsepower of hydro-electric energy, more
than half of it constantly available.

The new 200-inch reflecting telescope being built for
the California Institute of Technology near Mount Wil-
son is surely a wonder of modern scientific progress. The
marvel of it lies in its cost of $6,000,000 as well as in the
enlarged vistas it will open up to astronomers. The 200-
inch "eye" will penetrate as far into space as a billion
light years. Remembering that a light year is equal to
6,000.000,000,000 miles, we shall learn of stars through
this telescope to 6,000,000,000,000,000.000— *ix quin-
tillion — miles away! This will be made possible not only
by the immense quartz mirror, 200 inches in diameter,
that has already taken more than two years to complete,
but by means of a large "interferometer." which will be
able to measure the diameter of stars millions of light
years away, and particularly by means of an ingeniously
contrived heat measuring instrument called a "thermo-
couple," which is so sensitive that it will detect a star 631
times fainter than the faintest star man can see with his
unaided eyes.

The Cascade Tunnel of the Great Northern Railway
is the marvel of modern railway construction. It is unique
not only in the method of its construction, but par-
(Continued on Page 39)



Vage 20



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL



April, 1931




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WILLIAM J. QUINN, Chief of Police

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of Chiefs of Police

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Captain of Detectives Captain JOHN J. O'MEARA

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Vol. IX



APRIL, 1931



No. 4



DALTON WRONG ON MURDERS

Emmett Dalton, 60 years of age, and the last of the
notorious Dalton Gang, train robbers, who has reform-
ed and is now a Los Angeles real estate man, took a
trip to Sacramento the other day to tell Governor James
Rolph about his ideas of capital punishment.

Without attempting to go into the merits of capital
punishment, we find some glaring misconceptions in Mr.
Dalton 's statements as set forth in the daily press.

For instance he says, "murders are never committed
in cold blood, but are the result of a moment's passion,"
and that "all killers are crazy."

Would he have us believe the ruthless slaying of a
group of gangsters in Chicago on St. Valentine's Day a



couple of years or so ago was the result of a moment's
passion, or that the over 150 machine gun murders in
the Windy City were the result of the same sort of pas-
sion ; or that these murderers were crazy?

Would he have us believe that a half dozen killings
in this region, where the victims were shot somewhere
else and the bodies taken into another county and dumped
over a cliff or into a steep canyon, were the results of a
moment's passion, or that the murderers were crazy?

We don't think Mr. Dalton believes any such thing,
no more than he could believe that the racketeers through-
out the country who are hiring men to put enemies on the
spot and brutally and cold bloodedly riddle the victims
with bullets, are actuated by a sudden impulse, or are
mentally deficient.

One cannot but commend Dalton for his splendid re-
formation after serving 14 years for murder, but one is
apt to question his ideas when he says murders are all
committed on the spur of the moment.



NEW POLICE RADIO STATION

During the time he has served as head of the San
Francisco Police Department, Chief of Police William
J. Quinn has made it his object to utilize every modern
contrivance to bring his department to the highest state
of efficiency.

Many improvements have been made, numerous chang-
es introduced and the mechanical equipment increased,
that the work of the police would be made more certain,
and the lives of the crooks made more miserable.

The latest innovation is the installation and operation
of the new radio broadcasting station, details of which
will be found on another page.

The time has come when no metropolitan police can
be without the radio. It has proven its worth in nearly
two dozen cities that have adopted it. In San Francisco
during an experimental trial lasting for several months
when local radio stations donated time of their stations
for use by the department to flash information to cars
equipped with receiving sets, notably KJBS and KGGC,
the necessity for a broadcasting station e.xclusively for
police and fire department's use, was impressively de-
monstrated.

Many captures were made by the quick relaying of in-
formation to the men patrolling the city in automobiles.
And to the fire department the radio during this experi-
menting proved of value. It was through the efforts of
Chief Quinn and Charles Brennan, Chief of the Fire
Department, that the supervisors granted a request for
money to erect a broadcasting station in Jefferson Square.

Chief Wiley of the Department of Electricity super-
vised the erection of the station, and the installation of
a remote control at the Hall of Justice, as well as the
installation of receiving sets in the police and fire de-
partments' cars.

The adoption of the radio in the San Francisco Police
Department is a forward step that is going to prove its
worth every day, as well as being another safeguard for
the people of this city against criminals.



April. 1931



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL



Page 21



THE

CHIEFS PAGE

WILLIAM J. QUINN
CHIEF OF POLICE






"VVc wish to tiimplinunt you upon the very efficient
worlc which your department did in the recovery of
our Ford Coupe. License 9J 35 80. It was noticed that
this car was stolen ahout 2:30 P. M. of January 29th,
1931. At 3:30 P. M. they phoned me and told me that
they had recovered this car and it ftas apparent that they
liad found the person who had stolen it, in the car.

"Wc think that your department should be commend-
ed upon the wonderful work that was done in this case
and we are thankful.

"Steel Bag Co., Inc.
"By T. L. Stevens."

(Report on above from Capt. Chas. Dulle.i — Det. Bur.)
"Ford Coupe 9J 35 80 was reported stolen at 2:30 P.
M., and was given out over radio. Radio message picked
up by Detectives Johnson and Badaracco and Earle
Marchi was arrested at Columbus Ave. and Green St.
Marchi was brought to this office, a statement taken and
car delivered to owner — all within one hour. This re-
covery and arrest again demonstrates the efficiency of
the radio."

• • •

"Kindly accept thanks for your department's splendid
service which Captain Peter M. McGec and his officers
rendered to us on Sunday, March 8, 1931 — the day on
which our new hospital wing was dedicated.

LOUIS A. SCHWABACHER, Pres.,

"Hebrew Home for Aged Disabled,

"302 Silver Avenue, S. F."

• • •

You have no doubt already learned thru the medium
of official reports, as well as through the medium of the
press, that differences which have heretofore been exist-
ing between the owners and operators of the Castro,
Royal and Alhambra Theatres and various unions in
San Francisco have been completely and satisfactorily
adjusted. We therefore take this occasion to extend to
you our very genuine appreciation for the great public
service which you have rendered to the community at
large in San Francisco and to the theatre-going public
and the owners and operators of the theatres in particu-
lar, in the protection of life and property. We know-
that you have in every way sought to be eminently fair
to all contending factions, and we commend you for the
efficient supervision which has been detailed to render



specific services. We will appreciate it if \ou will con-
vey to each and every member of the squad which was
detailed to render service at either the Royal, Alhambra
or Castro Theatres, our personal appreciation for the
individual attention which e.ich member of the squad
gave to the discharge of the duties which were assigned
to him.

MR. GEORGE NASSER.

(Mr. George Nasser of Nasser Bros., with above let-
ter enclosed a check for $1000.00 — made payable to the
Widows' and Orphans' Aid Ass'n, of this department
— which check has been turned over to said association
by Chief Quinn.)

• • •

"I want to write you in commendation of the effi-
ciency of your Taraval Station. At about four o'clock
this morning, March 23, 1931, a burglar was attempt-
ing to enter our house in St. Francis Woods, 85 San
Benito Way. I called your Taraval Station and two of-
ficers were on hand in less than live minutes. They
were extremely courteous and created a very fine im-
pression. (Officers concerned are Officers Albert Birds-
all, Jr., and Chas. Borland, of H. Q. Co., Motorcycle
Sidecar Corps).



Patronize






SHUMATE'S




PRESCRIPTION PHARMACIES




Sutter and Dlvlsadero St».


W KBt


oe«<


Halght St. and MaionIc Ave.


INderhlll


0427


Sacramento and Prealdio Ave.


WKst


083S


Post and Kearny Sis.


DOuKlas


0807


Carl and Cole SU.


UNdcrhlll


1234


Union and Stelner Sta.


WEst


0273


Powell and Sutter Sts.


GArfleld


1177


Valencia and 16th Sts.


UNderhlll


4320


California St and 23rd Ave.


EVenrrcen


4828


Buflh and Hdye Sts.


GRaystone


0242


07 Market St., S P. Bld».


DAvenport


0367


Clement St. and 2nd Ave.


BAyvlew


683S


Polk and Washlnxton Sta.


(IRaystone


0038


Geary St. and 18th Ave.


K\ entreen


1800


Eddy and Taylor Sts.


PRospect


0081


Fillmore and Sacramento Sts.


WEst


0628


Oeary St. and 10th Ave.


EVerrreen


0480


I'aclflc and Mason Sts.


GArfleld


5463


Fulton St. and Masonic Ave.


WEnt


7467


Judah St. and 9Ih Ava.


LOckhaven


2121


1217 Market St.


UNderhlll


0070


Post and Mason Sts.


KEIarny


8018


Chestnut and Pierce Sts.


WAlr.ut


4539


Balboa and 38th Ave.


BAyvltw


1489


Taraval and 19th Ave.


LOckhaven


0303


Weat Portal Ave. and Vicente St.


LOckhaven


0202


Ocean and Faxon Aves.


PElawar*


6788


Bush and Octavia Sts.


WAlnut


3040


SAN FRANCISCO





Page 22



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL



April. 1931




Written Especially for the Police and State Peace Officers' Journal — By the Observer



George Steveus, 35, is still in jail
at Cleveland, O., trying to figure out
why he has been denied parole for
killing his wile. He made his appli-
cation tor rfelease on the ground that
it was his first murder.

* * *

IE you chance to see a tiny painting
by Honore Daumier called "The Print
Collectors" it is worth $35,000. It was
stolen from a Daumier-Corot exhibi-
tion at New York's Museum of Mod-
ern Art. The owner is Josef Stran-
sky, former conductor of the New
York Philharmonic Orchestra.
» * *

Of course the Fleagles can't be
blamed for the last train robbery
across the bay, but it must look like
easy picking to the train-robbing gen-
try when they would try it a second
time in the same place. And such a
short time after the first train job in
that vicinity.

* ♦ ♦

Deeds Done for Dimes
James Mason was arrested in Al-
bany, N. Y., for assaulting James Gil-
more and stealing a dime from him.
Mason was given a prison term of
from seven and a half to fifteen years.
And in Los Angeles, when Emory
Ells, restaurant worker, wanted to
have his wife put out of the way, he
gave Benjamin Franklin Brown, a
glass molder, twenty-two dimes, for
which Brown killed Mrs. Ells as she
lay asleep beside her infant son.

* * +

Great Britain has a commission at
work which is similar in many re-
spects to the law enforcement com-
mission appointed by President
Hoover and headed by George Wick-
ersham. It is called the Royal Com-
mission on Licensing Laws, and re-
cently two star witnesses appeared
before it. One was Sir Arthur Key-
sail Yapp, deputy president of the
British Y. M. C. A. He testified that
in England (which has no prohibi-
tion) the trend of British youth since
the war has been toward moderation
In drinking, "toward beer," he said.

The other star witness was none
other than Sir Arthur Balfour, the
great steel magnate; not the states-
man. Lord Arthur James Balfour. Sir
Arthur had much to say about the
United States and prohibition. He



has been here many times, both be-
fore and since the dry law, and he
told the commission that a visit to
the United States today is really a
"nuisance." He says you find busi-
ness men drinking in their offices, a'
thing they never used to do; that
they seek to force liquor on a visitor
as a gesture of real hospitality. He
concluded: "If you ask me if the
liquor situation in America is improv-
ing or growing worse, I'd say, from
my observations, worse — decidedly
worse."

* * ♦

How He Loved That Woman

Rose Provenzano, 19, of Brooklyn,
N. Y., jilted Ralph Ferrara, 20; told
him it was all off and to go on and
sell his apples. Ralph went out and
got himself a gun, fired six shots at
Rose, one of which hit her in the
shoulder, and then fired one at him-
self, which just creased his scalp.
Rose refused to sign a complaint
against him. "I never realized how
much Ralph loved me until he shot
me." she said, happily. "I'm going to
marry him!"

* * *

It was Percy Hevander's reputation
In Windsor, N. C, that he never took
a dare. McWebb Williams had a rep-
utation for always keeping his word.
Williams saw Hevander slapping a
young girl. He said: "It you slap that
girl again I'll shoot you." Hevandor
refused to take the dare. He slapped
her again. Williams kept his word.
He shot Hevander dead.

* » *

Dudley Mee of Chicago had had
several drinks too many. He missed
his house and tried to enter that of
Joseph Schefick. "Who's there?" de-
manded Scberick. "It's Mee," said
Mee. Scherick shot through the door
and hit Mee in the shoulder.

And once more, "A Merry Christmas
and a Happy New Year."

* * ♦

Here's how they keep 'em sober in
St. Helier, on the Isle of Jersey, where
they have no prohibition: Any person
convicted of drunkenness and disor-
derly behavior is sentenced to have
his picture with his name under it
hung in the bars and taverns that he
frequents.



There is something pathetic in the
little dispatch from London which
tells of 5,440 school children being
taken to the country tor an outing,
and of all that number only five ot
them had ever seen a live cow before.
And we claim that item belongs in the
Crime Digest, because if that isn't a
crime we don't know what is.



It is a horrible state of affairs that has
been uncovered in New York in the in-
vestigation into the manner in which
"wayward girls'' have been committed
to institutions. Without any hearings
whatever, without any verbal examina-
tion of which a record was kept, with-
out any official charges being preferred
in any manner, more than 400 young
girls {that is, the total discovered so far
as this is written) have been locked up
in Bedford Reformatory, the place where
prostitutes are sent. When Justice Nor-
man S. Dike of the New York Supreme
Court heard officials admit these things,
he looked at the 16-year-oId girl before
him (Lena Burlatt) and groaned:

"Pitiful! Horrible !" he declared. Then
he learned that the girl's mother had
taken her IS months before to Magistrate
Leo Healy and complained that "she stay-
ed out late." Forthwith, and without any
further investigation, hearing or any
semblance of formality, the magistrate
had ordered her committed to Bedford,
there to mingle and live with hardened
prostitutes and other female criminals.
When her year was up she stayed on
just the same for another six months,
and she might have been there yet but
for the recent investigation of New
York's corruption-riddled judiciary. And
i.n the end all the judge could do was
send the girl home with the mother who
had committed her because she "stayed
out late."



Pity the poor desk sergeant in Los An-
geles who had to book a "vag" giving
this name: LUeieusszuieusszei Harizzis-
steizzii Williminiddssteizzi. He is a Si-
amese, employed as a cook. He explained
that his name means "Great Mountains
Wonderful Strength Lion of the Sea,"
which didn't help the desk man who had
to write his name on the book.



^Pril. 1931



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL



Page 23



Here's one from New York: Marl-



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Police DeptPolice and peace officers' journal of the State of California (Volume Nov. 1930-Oct. 1931) → online text (page 49 of 97)