Sandown (N.H.).

Annual reports for the Town of Sandown, New Hampshire (Volume 1979) online

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Robert K. Towne



Health Officer
42



$511.20



IRS Withholding



$1960.00



Budget Committee



N.H.M.A. Seminar

Postage

G. Millard, reimbursement

Brown & Saltmarsh, ledger

Susan Carrington, minutes

Sandra Newton, minutes

TOTAL



$105.00
15.00
21.16
43.46
13.50
48.00

$246.12



ENCUMBERED FEDERAL REVENUE -1978
Town Hall

East Coast Lumber $1 17.66

Walter Pskowski 49.12

Drowne Enterprises 1786.82

Robert Baldwin, floor materials 448.00

J. Bassett, town hall floor 48.00

Robert Baldwin, labor 427.00

Edith Love, painting town hall 54.00

Herbert Messinger, suppHes 1 .50

Darlene Beattie, painting town hall 30.00

Salem Building Supply 18.24

Nelson Powell 19.66

Kitchen Stove 800.00

Plaistow Lumber 8.49

Trailer Rental 5.45

Granite State Telephone 41.51

Public Service 47.91

Norms Hardware 126.63

Hampstead Hardware 60.51

TOTAL $4090.50



Warrant Article #14
Vic Geary Drop In Center

Trustee of the Trust Fund

Capital Reserve

Warrant Article #16, Police Cruiser

Warrant Article #15, Fire Truck
TOTAL



$1500 00



$1000.00

2000.00

$3000.00



Warrant Article #17
Depot (Security)

Malcolm Cameron, Alarm System



$1963.35



43



Warrant Article #8
Greater Salem Mental Health Association

Warrant Article #13

Dependable Rubbish
Town of Kingston
TOTAL

Warrant Article #35

Portable Radio, Police Department

Timberlane Regional School District

Trust Funds

Treasurer, State of NH Bond Debt Retirement
Indian Head National Bank, library notes and interest
Derry National Bank, short term loans and interest
TOTAL

State of N.H. County Treasurer, County Taxes

Manpower



State Dog License Fees

Derry Bank & Trust, Co.

Derry Bank & Trust Co.,

Derry Bank & Trust Co. ,
Derry Bank & Trust Co.,
TOTAL



, transfer revenue sharing
from checking to savings
transfer revenue sharing
from checking to savings
Ninety day account
Ninety day account



$1197.00



$6450.00

5055.20

$11505.20



$725.00
$505788.70

$ 189.43

4034.90

207244.96

$211469.29

$31053.00

$2041.12

$150.50

$6247.74

$3058.00

$90000.00

$10000.00

$109305.74



44



LIBRARY REPORTS



RECEIPTS








Balance on Hand Jan. 1, 1979




$ 157.95




Received from Selectmen




6770.41




Book Sales




45.20




Donations




25.00




Copy Sales




25.46




Book Fines




70.70




Miscellaneous




11.54




TOTAL RECEIPTS






$7106.26


DISBURSEMENTS








Salary-Librarians








Susan Mast


1336.50






M.E. O'Neill


818.93






Cathy Pinard


887.40






Claire Mill


8.70






Dorothy Corbin


8.70






Pamela Elkins


5.80


3066.03




Salary-Janatorial








Richard Lister


240.70






R.S. Bassett


38.50


279.20




Books, Periodicals, Etc.




1310.38




Operating Expenses




507.95




Equipment




328.00




Telephone




217.08




Heat & Light




1106.49




Maintenance




158.15




Total Disbursements






6973.28


On Hand Dec. 31, 1979






$132.98



LIBRARY REPORT

CIRCULATION STATISTICS 1978 1979

Aduh fiction 1391 1618

Adult non-fiction 1045 1365

Children's fiction 1345 2226

Children's non-fiction 418 680

Non-book materials(paperbacks, 1858 2050

periodicals, puzzles, records)

TOTAL CIRCULATION 6057 7939



45



Fines


$63.70


$70.70


Volumes added


155


222


Volumes discarded


9


25


Requests filled by other sources


159


194


Visitors


3996


4460



It has been a busy year. The town's growth is reflected in the need for
more varied services within the library. Mary Ellen O'Neill and
Catherine Pinard have helped me attempt to fill these needs. Their
professional attitude and dedication is much appreciated.

As a small library, we rely heavily on outside resources. The N.H.
State Library filled 194 special requests for us this year and we make
liberal use of their films, large print books, extended reference service
and professional advice. We attended two ten week courses offered at
UNH in Public Library Techniques. Our own book collection is
supplimented by three visits from the Bookmobile. We borrow more
than 2,000 volumes from them.

Our local co-operative of sixteen libraries continues to benefit each
town by giving us additional discounts through co-operative buying
power, shared resources and meetings of professional interest.

The Sandown Elementary School has generously loaned us many
books and materials for the summer.

In addition to traditional library services, we have offered several
courses, held story hours, borrowed films, held a tee shirt contest,
conducted a summer reading contest and a reading program and
introduced elementary school classes and Girl Scout Troops to the
library. By writing early, we were included on Mrs. Santa Claus'
personal visiting list. When not in use, the downstairs room has been a
meeting room for five community screening programs and committees.

The Friends of the Library under the leadership of Catherine Pinard
and Nel Cameron held several programs and an historathon to further
the progress of the Sandown history being written by Matthew Sandy
Thomas.

Trustees Hazel Rogan, Eleanor C. Bassett and Emily Lovell join me
in thanking the indespensible volunteers who make our many programs
possible and who aid in day-to-day library business. We also thank the
many residents who thoughtfully donate books, displays and services in
an effort to make the library more reponsive to your needs.

Respectfully,

SUSAN MAST
46



FIRE DEPARTMENT REPORTS

The energy crunch has not forgotten Sandown residents in 1979 by the
number of stove and chimney problems that have required a call to the
Fire Department.

With the increased useage of wood as a major heating fuel the related
dangers will also become a larger problem to the users and the Fire
Department. There are many pitfalls to wood burning and if a user is
not aware of them he or she may be inviting a disaster, that is, a loss of
property or a loss of Ufe. With this thought in mind it becomes
necessary to point out that there are State rules and regulations to
comply with, also some Insurance Companies have stipulations in the
policies that should be checked.

After viewing some stove installations I wonder why there have not
been more fires (maybe the good fairy is looking over these people)
most people have not read the instructions that come with the stove. To
operate a wood stove or furnace there has to be an approved chimney,
not a smoke pipe stuck through a window or wall, any chimney flue that
is used for an oil burner furnace must not have a wood burning device
connected to it. This is a violation of codes.

Again anyone burning wood should have the chimney cleaned and
checked at least once a year before starting to use it for the season.
Homes that use wood stoves should have at least one smoke detector on
the floor level of the stove and an escape plan for all members of the
household, used with fire drills. This may sound silly but it does save
lives.

A comment about the Bond article for a new building: the voters have
spoken their mind which for the short term may be all right but in the
long term may prove to be an unwise vote.

On or about 1982 the Underwriters rating for Engine One will expire,
this means a new rated piece will have to be purchased in order to
continue the reduced fire insurance cost to property owners.

The present building will not have room to house all the vehicles and
equipment. Now comes the problem, two bond issues in one year?

The study committee was looking in the long term needs, not a stop
gap measure. I feel that they found a reasonable approach to the future
needs of the department.

Again my thanks to all that made this a working department.

Respectfully Submitted,

GEORGE NEWTON, Chief
Fire Department

47



A Thought for the new wood burners:

Learn before you burn

So you can

Learn Not to Burn



January


Building


Hampstead Road




House


Odell Road




Car


Round Hill Road




Car


So. Main Street




Flooded Oil Burner


North Road


February


House, stove


North Main Street




Mobile Home, stove


Francis Street




Dryer


Holmeswood Road




Hay in Cellar


Beaver Circle




Gas Stove


Reed Road




Chimney


Little Mill Road


April


Pick-up truck


Wells Village Road


May


Motorcycle


Main Street




Pick-up truck


Stagecoach Road


June


Fireworks


Tenney Road


August


Mutual Aid


Chester




Garage


Holts Point & Birch Dr


September


Chimney


Philipswood Road




Washdown Car


Fremont Road




Washdown Car


South Main Street


November


Car


Odell Road




Chimney


Holmeswood Road


December


House stove


Royal Range Road




House Stove


North Main Street




Chimney


Royal Range Road



BUILDING INSPECTOR'S REPORT



For the year ending December 31, 1979, a total of 103 building



permits were issued.
38-New Homes

4-Mobile Homes
16-Remodeling Permits

4-Barns

7-Garages
17-Additions

9-Chimneys



3-Pools

1-Move existing building

2-Foundations(under existing buildings)

2-Sheds



Respectfully Submitted,

HOWARD S. JOHNSON
48



Building Inspector



SANDOWN CONSERVATION COMMISSION

The Sandown Conservation Commission has met frequently each
month to conduct its business. We have also attended district meetings
and seminars.

We have the privilege of being given the authority and the
responsibility to administer numerous parcels of Town Owned
property.

For the first time positive steps in Conservation have been taken. Our
first managed woodland project is underway (The Currier lot on Reed
Road). There is still more work to be done on this property.

We have received and examined numberous dredge and fill
applications. On sight reviews were conducted and appropriate
recommendations were made to the State Wet Land Board.

We would Uke to give special thanks to the Rockingham County
Southern Regional Planning District Commission and to Forester Tom
Neff for their valuable assistance throughout the year. We also thank
the Selectmen for their show of confidence in the Commission by
allowing us to administer these properties.

Sandown Conservation Commission

HENRY HIGGINS
ROBERT BALDWIN
VINCENT lACOMINO
MELO DICKASON
LUANN ST. GERMAINE
DENNIS ST. GERMAINE
ROBERT O'NEILL

ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT

Permits issued as follows:

34-New Homes 1-Re-wire existing building 1 -Work Shop

3- Additions 3-Wiring of upstairs 1 -Remodel Kitchen

1-GeneratorHookup 1-Pool 1 Wire Cellar

4-Garages 1 -Replace fire damaged home 1 -Mobile Home

8-Service Changes 1 -Replace fire damaged garage
I would like to express my thanks to the voters for their support in the

additions to the present building and electrical code at the polls last

March.

Respectfully Submitted,

WALTER PSKOWSKI, Electrical Inspector
49



RESCUE SQUAD REPORT

Since Jan. 1, 1979 the Rescue Squad has responded to 45 emergency
calls, 1 1 fire calls, and 1 mutual aid call.

The present active membership consists of 13 Nationally Registered
Emergency Medical Technicians and 10 Certified Advanced First
Aiders, bringing the total to 23 members. The Rescue Squad also has 5
Advanced First Aid Instructors and 5 C.P.R. Instructors.

The Rescue Squad will do its best to provide 24 hour coverage as we
have maintained in the past.

The volunteers of the Rescue Squad wish to express their thanks to
everyone who has supported this squad financial and otherwise.

Respectfully Submitted,

DON PARENT
President, Rescue Squad



HEALTH OFFICER'S REPORT

This year of 1979 has been another busy year with no serious
problems as yet. However, there very well could be. We have an ever
increasing problem with residents who feel they have the right to use
their property as a town dump and refuse to do anything about cleaning
it up.

Any property as such becomes a health problem for all. This is
against the law and will be dealt with accordingly. I respectfully request
all concerned to do their part in helping to keep our town clean.

When putting out refuse for collection, please be sure it is securely
fastened so that no animals will be able to get into it. Please, I ask you
all for your help.

I am happy to have Joseph Schank as my assistant and in my absence
he may be called on any health problem.

Respectfully Submitted,

ROBERT K. TOWNE

Health Officer



50



FOREST FIRE WARDEN

Prevention and control of forest fires is handled through a
cooperative effort between town/city fire organizations and the State
Forest Fire Service.

Since 1903, when the first forest fire laws were passed by our
Legislature, the State Forester has appointed someone in each
municipalty as a Forest Fire Warden and charged him with the
responsibility of forest fire prevention and control within his town/city.
This person may ask the State Forester to appoint as many Deputy
Forest Fire Wardens as may be necessary to efficiently carry out his
charge.

The State Forester has divided the State into ten forest fire districts
with a full time District Forest Fire Chief in each district. The State
organization is charged with assisting the municiple forest fire
organization in any way possible.

State personnel conduct fire training schools, assist with forest fire
suppression, fire cause investigation, prosecution of fire law violators
and forest fire prevention programs. Forest fire suppression equipment
is purchased through State bulk purchasing ability and sold to local
forest fire organizations at one-half cost. Excess military property is
obtained and turned over to town/city fire departments at no cost to
local departments for conversion into fire suppression units. This
cooperative arrangement between State and municipality has resulted in
one of the best forest fire records in the United States with less than
one-half acre of woodland burned in each fire reported.



State

District

Town





1979 Forest Fire Statistics


No. of Fires


No. of Acres


1,099




318


342




106


5




1

RAYMOND S. BASSETT

Warden



51



POLICE DEPARTMENT REPORT

The 1979 Police Department Summary of Services shows a marked
increase in the community utilization of the department. With proper
administrative control over personnel, equipment and budget, we were
able to meet the needs of the town and remain within the budget
allowed by the voters.

Random radar patrols of the town have revealed a marked decrease
in the amount of speed violations. Vandalism continues to be a problem
and the department looks to parents for their continued support in this
juvenile crime area.

This year daytime patrols were instituted on a regular basis with
specific officers assigned on call and on duty time during the day. With
a part-time police department and the majority of officers unavailable
during the day, this move has maintained a high visibility factor, a
reduction in response time and has become a valuable part of the overall
police coverage in the town.

The cruiser has been a valuable tool in supplying police service to our
residents. Our present vehicle has needed expensive repairs in 1979 and
again in 1980 to keep it in operating condition. Very little had been
expended in this area until 1979. The replacement of this vehicle at this
time may eliminate possible future expenses for maintenance and allow
a higher trade in or sale price this year as opposed to next year. The use
of the Cruiser Capital Reserve Fund and the Federal Revenue Sharing
Fund monies would not increase the tax burden to the people.

Assistance to the department by residents has enabled us to bring
seven people before the Grand Jury and then to Superior Court in
relation to crimes committed in Sandown in 1979. Residents were
instrumental in providing leads that resulted in arrests of suspects in
connection with the Breaks experienced in October. Residents are the
greatest asset this department has in the prevention of crime. Residents
have instituted the "Neighborhood Watch" techniques discussed at a
pubhc service meeting and are utilizing the "Vacation Check" house
check system when they will be away for long periods of time.

I would like to take this opportunity to make the residents aware of
the outstanding job done by the volunteers who man the police
telephones providing this town with 24 hour a day coverage at no cost to
the town. A sincere " job well done" is extended to the men and women
who have faithfully fulfilled their commitment to the town and
provided the best trained and most experienced force in recent history.

Respectfully submitted,

JAMES COMERFORD, Chief



52



OFFICERS



HOURS



MILES



James Comer ford, Chief


3623/4


776


Richard Hall, Deputy Chief


245 '/2


79


Richard Haggett, Sargent


258 '/2


590


Robert Johnson


177




Paul Newton


126'/4


53


James Passanisi


1183/4


208


Warren Roberts


95


50


Philip L. Caron Sr.(Term Expired)


77/2


140


Steven Duncanson(Resigned)


78


409


Richard V. Lister(Resigned)


48




John Manni(Resigned)


122/4


749


Thomas Robinson(Resigned)


95/4


10


WiUiam L. Shafer III(Resigned)


813/4


220


Mary Comerford




98


Ann Gagnon


773/4




Mary Haggett


99




Nancy Johnson


88




CRUISER REPORT






Phone Calls




2119


Service miles, private




3284


Service miles, cruiser




11,484


Service hours




2249.25


Arrests




7


Assaults(Deadly weapon)




1


Breaking & Entering




27


Drug Related Offenses




3


DWI Arrests




3


Family Disturbances




13


Fire Dept. Assistance




7


Grand Jury Indictments




7


Juvenile




20


Missing Persons




4


Motor Vehicle Accidents




33


Motor Vehicle Summons




15


Mutual Aid(other towns)




4


Recovered Stolen Property




5


Recovered Stolen Vehicles




5


Stolen Vehicles




3


VandaHsm




25


Theft of Services




4


Theft of Property




13


Property Recovered




5


Deaths




5


MaUcious Mischief




11



53



DOG CONSTABLE

>

Total calls answered 164

Total Hours Incurred 194

Total Miles 2275

Total fines collected 365.00

Total licenses sold 285

Animals placed in Stratham 3 1 dogs

16 cats

Animals placed in adoption 10 dogs

9 cats

Animals trapped with Hav-a-heart and relocated 3 skunks

2 racoons

Check Stratham for fees on dogs and 2 law books.

The above is actual costs and income for animal control in Sandown for
1979.

We as constables are requesting at this time in increase in hourly wage
from $3.00 per hour to $3.50 per hour, an increase in the mileage rate
from .15 per mile to 18.5 per mile and two dog houses for Constable
Casey.

The town at this time now owns two dog houses at the Adams
residence. Two houses are needed at the Casey home as the stray dogs
are destroying her kennel.

Respectfully submitted

JACQUELINE ADAMS
RUTH CASEY



PLANNING BOARD REPORT

The year 1979 has been a very busy and a very difficult year,
requiring many hours of time gathering information for proposed
subdivisions and inspecting roads under construction.

The Attitude Survey Committee has completed their initial
questionnaire. Through the questionnaire a survey was formulated and
again sent out to the townspeople. The Survey Committee is now in the
process of tabulating the results, which is a very lengthy process. When

54



this is completed this information will be given to the Planning Board
and then we can go forward, with the help of the townspeople, and
work further towards a much needed Master Plan. Many volunteers will
be needed as we get further involved in formulating this plan.

Under a new law passed by the 1979 Session of the New Hampshire
Legislature, Planning Boards are now required to regulate all sand and
gravel excavations. The Board will immediately start procedures in
adopting gravel pit rules and regulations governing the same.

The Planning Board meets the 4th Tuesday of the month. As stated in
the past we would welcome the public to attend all of our meetings to
offer their points of view, for or against. Remember our goals are all
the same, to do what we think best for Our Town.

Respectfully,

HOWARD S. JOHNSON
Chairman

SANDOWN TRA

1979-1980



Money Available

Carried forward from last year
Town share 1979-1980 appropriation
State share 1979-1980 appropriation
TOTAL



$7882.79

626.56

4177.05

12,686.40



Money Spent

Payroll-equipment- W/E 7-14-79
State of N.H. - const, signs
Payroll-equipment- W/E 7-21-79
PayroU-equipment-W/E 7-28-79
PayroU-equipment-W/E 8-1 1-79
Daniel's Drilling-ledge blasting
Payroll-equipment W/E 8- 1 8-79
PayrcU-equipment-W/E 9-1-79
PayroU-equipment-W/E 9-8-79
PayroIl-equipment-W/E 9-15-79
Ralph Drowne-gravel
Mystic-Road asphalt
Barrett Paving-Cold patch
Payroll-equipment-W/E 12-8-79
TOTAL



1327.90
120.18

1481.60

1229.90
830.40
923.10
830.40
968.80
600.30

2541.00
152.25

1006.68

494.13

172.50

12,679.14



Balance in account



55



7.26



90


156


86


156





12


3/14


54/1281/4


211/592


190/4003/4


66


69


17


17


16


24



DERRY VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION

ANNUAL REPORT TO THE TOWN OF SANDOWN

(For Period July 1, 1978 to June 30, 1979)

During the past service year our agency's services provided to
Sandown residents increased overall by 30%. Some individual
programs reflected much higher increases. All programs increased with
the exception of the Home Health Aide visits/hours.

A summary of services provided to Sandown residents over the past
two (2) years is as follows:

1977-'78 1978-'79

Care of the Sick Nursing Visits 1 36 265

Public Health Nursing Visits

Physical Therapy Visits

Occupational Therapy Visits

Homemaker Visits/Hours

Home Health Aide Visits/Hours

Blood Pressure Clinic Visits

Immunization Clinic Visits

Prepared Childbirth Class Sessions

During 1978-79, a separation of our homemaking service from our
certified home health aide service was accomplished, and this is
enabling us to provide homemaking assistance to more of the elderly or
handicapped or chronically or temporarily ill than was true in the past.

As of this writing our agency is also now operating a monthly Well
Child Clinic which is a new service. Young families who are unable to
afford "wellness check-ups" privately are eligible to bring children
from birth to school entry to this clinic after first being enrolled and
getting an appointment. We believe this will provide a valuable resource
to Sandown's young population in the future.

While Sandown comprises 4% of the total population servced by our
agency, it has increased to receiving 9% of our total services, so that
utilization of our agency is excellent and is continuing to grow.
Individuals served include many senior citizens, but also included are
young couples who are starting famihes. All indications are for a
continued growth in the need for Home Health Services of all kinds.

Respectfully submitted,

JOANNE MILLSAPS, RN
Executive Director

56



MENTAL HEALTH CENTER

For Southern New Hampshire

Below you will find a compilation of statistics relating to services
provided for residents of the Town of Sandown during 1979. The
statistics are broken down by month for the fourth quarter of 1979 and
for the full twelve months of calendar year 1979.

October November December Calendar Yr

1979

104

2161/2



Clients Served


8


5


7


Direct Serv.








Hours


22


14


10


Partial








Hospital/








Sustaining








Care Program


19


2





VzDays








Inpatient daysO











Emerg. Cont.


2





2


New Requests








for Service


1


1


4



173

19
26
Sincerely,

STEVE GERSHMAN

Administrative Assistant



57



BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT REPORT

During the year 1979, ten appeals to the Town of Sandown Zoning
Ordinances were received and acted upon at public hearings. Of these
appeals, seven were in the form of a Special Exception and were in
regard to commercial ventures. All seven were granted with
stipulations. A Special Exception is defined as a special allowance,
granted under specific authority of the local ordinance when conditions
stated in the ordinance are found to exist which permits use of land or
buildings in a manner that would otherwise be prohibited. The purpose
of providing for exceptions is to make it possible, within a district, to
allow uses under conditions when desirable and still prohibit them


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