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of the fore and main mast are fitted above the upper deck gun-ports, an
improvement which was not generally adopted in the English Navy till a
-century later. The shape of the mast-caps, the circular tops, the use of a
sprit-top mast, and of a lateen yard are also features of the period to which
the model belongs.

The leading dimensions of the vessel would be approximately :
Displacement, 1,000 tons; length, 120 ft.; breadth, 42 ft.; armament,
65 guns.



11

10. Rigged model of an English battleship of the 17th
century. (Scale 1 : 48.) Received 1895. Plate L, No. 6.

N. 2072.

This shows a line -of -battle ship of the first rate, and is believed to
represent H.M.S. ' Royal Charles," a 100-gun ship built at Portsmouth in
1672, to the designs of Sir Anthony Deane.

The model was rigged in the Museum in 1898 from information collected
from several drawings and models of the period. Although shown without
top -gallant yards, it is not to be inferred that such spars were not
then in use ; in fair weather they were commonly fitted, but during the
winter season the usual rig was as here represented.

The chief difference between this rig and that of vessels of the
19th century is in its having a sprit top-mast and jack staff on the bowsprit,
and in the use of a large lateen yard and sail on the mizen mast in place of
a spanker spread by a gaff and boom. The " tops " throughout are circular
in plan and have a raised ledge.

The armament of the " E/oyal Charles " was : Lower deck, 28 42-prs. ;
main deck, 26 40-prs. ; upper deck, 28 18-prs. and four 16-prs, ; quarter deck
and forecastle, 14 6-prs. Her complement was 780 men.

The leading dimensions were : Tonnage, 1,531 tons ; length, 136 ft. ;
breadth, 44 -6 ft. ; depth of hold, 18 25 ft, ; draught, 20-5 ft,

11. Engraving of an English maii-of-war of the 17th century.

(Scale 1 : 60.) Received 1894. N. 2055.

This represents a battleship of the first rate, mounting 100 guns,- and
having a complement of 710 men. It probably belongs to the period
1660-80. Details of the lower transverse framing are shown, and the
names of the various parts are given in English, Dutch, French, and
Italian. The usual elaborate ornamentation of the upper portions of the
hull is carefully represented.

Her armament was : Lower deck, 28 42-prs. ; middle deck, 28 40-prs. ;
main deck, 28 18-prs. ; upper deck, 12 16-prs. ; poop deck, four 6-prs.

Tonnage, 1,672 tons; length, 136 ft.; breadth, 44'5 ft.; draught,
20 -5 ft.

12. Engravings of 17th century war ships of the second rate.
Presented by T. Dyer Edwardes, Esq., 1868. N. 1209.

These four prints from drawings by Yandevelde, illustrate the difference
in the build of English and foreign warships about the year 1670.

The English ship shows a clean run, her outside planking being worked
continuously to the stempost below the gun deck, while the planking of the
foreign vessels terminates in flat transom stems ; the English and Spanish
chain plates are on the main deck, whilst those of the French and Dutch are
on the upper.

13. Built model of H.M.S. " Chester." (Scale 1 : 48.) Lent
by J. J. Dafforne, Esq., 1869. N. 1313.

This model, which has its lower masts and bowsprit stepped and tops
over, is said to represent H.M.S. " Chester," a fourth-rate man-of-war, built
at Woolwich in 1691, by Mr. Laurance. The intricate wood-carving in
the decorations of the vessels have been carefully reproduced. She earned
48 to 54 guns, and her complement was about 230 men.

Her dimensions, taken from the model, were : Tonnage, 618 ; length of
keel, 128 ft. ; breadth, 36 ft. ; depth of hold, 14 ft.

14. Rigged model of English battleship. (Scale 1 : 64.) Lent
by Mrs. Humphry, 1905. N. 2386.

This represents an English line -of -battle ship of the third rate, built on
the "establishment for building ships framed in 1719," and carrying 80 guns



12

on three decks. The class was described as inefficient ; they were bad sea
boats, being three-deckers on the dimensions of two-deckers ; consequently
none were built after 1757.

The model itself is well and accurately rigged, showing snaked fore and
main stays, the method of swiftering in the lower rigging, spritsail yard,
sprit topmast and yard, the introduction of the jib-boom, and top cloths
used for ornamental purposes.

The armament was : Lower deck, 28 24-prs. ; middle deck, 26 12-prs. ;
upper deck, 26 9-prs. Complement, 650 men.

The dimensions of third-rates on the 1719 establishment were : Burden,.
1,350 tons ; length on gun deck, 158 ft. ; length of keel for tonnage, 128 ft. ;
breadth, 44 '5 ft. ; depth, 18 ft.

15. Oil paintings of H.M.S. " Victory." Presented by H.M.
Queen Victoria, 1864. N. 1018.

This was a first-rate battleship of 100 guns built at Portsmouth in 1737.
She was lost in the English Channel October 5th, 1744, when Admiral
Balchen and her crew of 1,100 men perished.

Armament: Lower deck, 28 42-prs. ; middle deck, 28 24-prs. ; main
deck, 28 12-prs. ; quarter deck, 12 12-prs. ; forecastle, four 12-prs. Her
complement was 1,100 men.

Tonnage, 1,921 tons; length, 174 "75 ft.; breadth, 50 '5 ft.; depth of
hold, 20 -5 ft.

16. Rigged model of English man-of-war, fourth rate (1740-5).
. (Scale 1 : 48.) Received 1909. N. 2525.

This represents an English warship, built in accordance with the 1733
Establishment for 50-gun ships ; eight of these vessels were constructed
between 1740 and 1745 under Sir J. Acworth, Surveyor of the Navy.

During the first half of the 18th century fourth-rates were counted as
ships- of -the-line, capable of taking part in general engagements ; at a
somewhat later date, however, they were more commonly used for convoy
duty, and third-rates or 64-gun ships (see Nos. 26 and 44) were the smallest
officially recognised for line-of -battle.

The following contemporary features are illustrated by the model:
(a) A jib-boom, for use with a fore-and-aft head sail, now first substituted
for the sprit topmast, yard and square sail ; (6) the swiftering, or cross
connection, of each pair of shrouds on the fore and main masts ; (c) the
fitting of crows -foot rigging, from the fore edges of the tops to the lower
stays ; (d) lateen yard, with fittings, on the mizen mast ; (e) spare spars,,
stowed in the waist ; (/) portable fish davit for lifting anchors ; (g) ornamen-
tation of stem and topsides.

The ordinary complement for these ships was 300 men, and the armament
was usually distributed as follows : Lower deck, 22 18-prs. or 24-prs.
9' 5 ft. long; upper deck, 22 9-prs or 12-prs. 8 '5 ft. long; quarter deck,
four 6-prs. 7 ft. long ; forecastle, two 6-prs. 8 ft. long. Provision was often
made for carrying several guns in excess of this number.

The average dimensions of this class were : Tonnage (b.o.m.), 860 tons j
length on gun deck, 134 ft. ; breadth, 38 7 ft. ; depth of hold, 15 75 ft.

17. Whole model of an 18th century line-of-battle ship on
launching ways. (Scale 1 : 60.) Received 1890.

N. 1850.

This is an English warship of the fourth rate, mounting 64 guns ;
H.M.S. "Yarmouth," built at Deptford by Mr. J. Allen in 1745, was a
similar vessel, and her dimensions were : Tonnage, 1,359 tons ; length,.
160 ft. ; breadth, 44 -25 ft. ; depth of hold, 19 ft.

The model shows the method of launching used in the 18th century.
The flags displayed are: the royal standard of the House of Hanover
1714-1801 ; the Union Jack prior to the abolition of the Irish Parliament
in 1801 ; the foul anchor of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty.



13

18. Built and rigged model of an English frigate of the
18th century. (Scale 1 : 48.) Bequeathed by T. S. Robins,
Esq., 1881. Plate II., No. 1. N. 1545.

This 24- gun frigate was built about 1750. Amongst the interesting
details visible are the upper and lower lateen yards on the mizen mast, the
method of stowing bower and sheet anchors, the timbers and upper deck
beams, and the poop and forecastle.

The guns were 9-prs., and the ship's complement 160 men.

The approximate dimensions would be : Tonnage, 511 tons ; length on
gun- deck, 113 ft. ; length of keel, 93 ft. ; breadth, 32 ft. ; depth of hold,
lift.

19. Engravings of English men-of-war of the 18th century.
Received 1892. N. 2010.

These show details of line -of -battle ships of about the period 1750-90.
The upper view represents a full-rigged 64-gun ship at anchor, and is
provided with a marginal key that gives the names of the various ropes,
spars, &c. The lower view is a longitudinal section of the hull of a 90-gun
ship, showing the internal construction and fittings ; this also is provided
with a similar key.

20. Oil paintings of armed cutter " Alert." Presented by
Mrs. Gibbs, 1904. N. 2356.

These two paintings, dated 1755, represent an armed cutter or
sloop-of-war, similar to a class of 8-gun vessels built in 1753-4 from the
designs of Sir J. Acworth.

Many such vessels were built or purchased for tha Navy during the
latter half of the 18th century ; they varied in size from 50 to 200 tons
and were chiefly employed for the suppression of smuggling, which was at
its height at that period.

The vessel shown would have a complement of about 60 men.
Tonnage (b.o.m.), 145 tons ; length, on gun deck, 75 5 ft. ; length on
keel, 62 ft. ; breadth, extreme, 21 ft. ; depth of hold, 9 -5 ft.

21. Oil painting, " Launch at Deptford Dockyard " (about 1750).
Painted by J. Clevely. Received 1867. N. 1096.

This yard, established early in the reign of Henry VIII., was closed
for shipbuilding in April, 1869, and is now used as one o the principal
victualling establishments for the Navy. The picture shows very accurately
the rig of the different ships at anchor, also the uniforms of the period.

22. Oil paintings of H.M.S. " Royal George." Presented by
H.M. Queen Victoria, 1864. N. 1017.

These show bow and stern views of H.M.S. " Royal George," a first-rate
battleship of 100 guns. She was laid down at Woolwich in 1746, launched
in 1756, and foundered at Spithead August 29th, 1782, in consequence of
her "being heeled to come at the pipe that leads to the well." She
remained in the spot where she had sunk until 1839, when by means of the
diving bell many of her guns and stores were recovered, her hull being then
blown up.

Her armament was : Lower deck, 28 42-prs. ; middle deck, 28 24-prs. ;
main deck, 28 12-prs. ; quarter deck, twelve 12-prs. ; forecastle, four 12-prs.
Her complement was 800 men.

Tonnage, 2,041 tons ; length, 178 ft. ; breadth, 51-75 ft. ; depth of hold,
21-5 ft.

23. Rigged model of H.M.S. " Juno." (Scale 1 : 24.) Lent
by S. T. G. Evans, Esq., 1898. Plate II. , No. 2. N. 2167.

This vessel was built on the Thames in 1757 by Mr. Alexander, to
the designs of Sir T. Slade, who then held the post of Constructor to the
Navy.



14

She was one of the first typical frigates, carrying her armament on one
deck and being built for service as a swift independent cruiser. Her arma-
ment was 32 9-prs., and her complement 220 men.

Tonnage, 667 tons; length, 127-83 ft.; breadth, 34 -25 ft.; depth of
hold, 11 -83 ft.

24. Built half-model of 50-gim frigate (1743-63). (Scale
1 : 48). Received 1899. N. 2186.

This shows the above-water form of an English fourth-rate man-of-war
built during the middle of the 18th century.

H.M.S. "Romney" laid down at Woolwich in 1759 and launched in
1762, was typical of the class and had the following principal dimensions :
Length on gun-deck, 146ft. ; length on keel, 120 '7 ft.; breadth, extreme,
40-37 ft. ; tonnage (b.o.m.), 1,046 tons.

Although nominally rated as 50-gun frigates these vessels carried 54 and
occasionally 58 guns. The bulwarks and gun ports to the poop-deck were
probably additions, made during reconstruction at a later date.

25. Built model of H.M.S. " Triumph." (Scale 1 : 48.)
Received 1892. Plate I., No. 7. N. 2009.

This two-decked 74-gun line-of-battle ship was launched at Woolwich
Dockyard in 1764. She was designed by Sir Thomas Slade on the lines of
the " Invincible " captured from the French by Lord Anson and Sir Peter
Warren on the 3rd of May, 1747.

Her armament was : Lower deck, 28 32-prs. ; main deck, 30 18-prs. ;
quarter deck, twelve 9-prs. ; forecastle, four 9-prs. Her complement was
650 officers and men.

Tonnage, 1,825 tons; length, 171-25 ft.; breadth, 49 -75 ft.; depth of
hold, 21 -25 ft.

26. Rigged model of 64-gun ship. (Scale 1 : 48.) Received
1899. Plate II, No. 3. N. 2202.

From 1719 till about 1745 the British ships -of -war were constructed
upon a fixed scale of dimensions, with the result that, through the absence
of development, our ships of each class became inferior in both size and
sailing qualities to those of other powers; several engagements having
demonstrated this result, the regulations were abandoned and new designs
prepared giving larger dimensions and finer lines which were partly obtained
from those of captured vessels.

The model built by Messrs. Perry & Co., and rigged in the Museum in
1901, represents a man-of-war of the third rate built on the new system in
1764 by John Perry at Blackwall from designs by Sir T. Slade of the
Admiralty. It shows in detail the fittings of the improved vessels, including
the cabin, belfry, riding bitts, galley, capstans, and the glazing of the stern
and quarter galleries, with other details of the period.

The armament would be : Lower deck, 26 18 or 24-prs. ; main deck,
26 9-prs. ; quarter deck, ten 9-prs. ; forecastle, two 9-prs. Ship's complement,
500 men.

The name of the vessel represented is uncertain, but her leading
dimensions were probably: Tonnage, 1,380 tons; length on gun deck,
159 3 ft. ; length on keel, 130 75 ft. ; breadth, 44 5 ft. ; depth, 18 75 ft.

27. Rigged model of H.M.S. "Duke." (Scale 1 : 48.) Lent
by S. T. G. Evans, Esq., 1898. N. 2166.

This second-rate line-of-battle ship of 98 guns is of uncertain origin,
but she is known to have been rebuilt at Plymouth in 1776 by J. Pownall.
She took part in the battle of Belleisle in 1759, and in Rodney's victory
of April 9th, 1762, in the West Indies.



Her armament was : Lower deck, 28 32-prs. ; middle deck, 28 18-prs. ;
main deck, 32 12-prs. ; quarter deck, four 12-prs. ; poop deck, four 6-prs. ;
forecastle, two 12-prs. Her complement was 750 men.

Tonnage, 1,931 tons; length, 177 '5 ft.; breadth, 50 ft.; depth of hold,
21 -16 ft.

28. Oil paintings of H.M.S. " BarEeiir." Presented by KM,
Queen Victoria, 1864. N. 1019.

This was a second-rate battleship of 90 guns, laid down at Chatham
in 1762, launched 1768, and broken up in 1819.

Armament : Lower deck, 28 32-prs. ; main deck, 32 18-prs. ; upper deck,
30 9-prs. Her complement was 750 men.

Tonnage, 1,750 tons ; length, 177 "6 ft. ; breadth, 50 '4 ft. ; depth of hold,
21ft.

29. Oil paintings of H.M.S. "Royal Oak." Presented by
H.M. Queen Victoria, 1864. N. 1020.

This was a third-rate battleship of 74 guns, laid down at Devonport
in 1766, launched 1769, and broken up in 1815.

Armament : Lower deck, 28 32-prs. ; main deck, 28 18-prs. ; quarter
deck, 14 9-prs. ; forecastle, four 9-prs. Her complement was 650 men.

Tonnage, 1,606 tons ; length, 168 5 ft. ; breadth, 46 75 ft. ; depth of hold,
20 ft.

30. Oil paintings of H.M.S. " Intrepid." Presented by H.M.
Queen Victoria, 1864. N. 1021.

This was a third-rate battleship of 64 guns, laid down at Woolwich
in 1767, launched 1770, and sold out of the Service in 1828.

Armament : Lower deck, 26 24-prs. ; main deck, 26 18-prs. ; quarter
deck, ten 9-prs. ; forecastle, two 9-prs. Her complement was 500 men.

Tonnage, 1,374 tons ; length, 159 '5 ft. ; breadth, 44 '4 ft. ; depth of hold,
19ft.

31. Oil paintings of H.M.S. "Kingfisher." Presented by
H.M. Queen Victoria, 1864. N. 1027.

This was a 14-gun sloop-of-war laid down at Chatham in 1769, launched
1770, and burnt at Rhode Island in 1778.

The armament was 14 6-pr. guns, and the complement 125 men.

Tonnage, 302 tons; length, 98 '75 ft. ; breadth, 26 '83 ft. ; depth of hold,
12ft.

32. Oil paintings of H.M.S. "Portland." Presented by H.M.
Queen Victoria, 1864. N. 1022.

This was a fourth-rate battleship of 50 guns, laid down at Sheerness
in 1767, launched 1770, and sold out of the Service in 1807.

Armament: Lower deck, 22 24-prs.; main deck, 24 18-prs.; quarter
deck, four 9-prs. Her complement was 350 men.

Tonnage, 1,044 tons; length, 146 ft.; breadth, 40 -5 ft.; depth of hold,
17 -5 ft.

33. Oil paintings of H.M.S. "Ambuscade." Presented by
H.M. Queen Victoria, 1864. N. 1024.

This was a fifth-rate battleship of 32 guns, laid down at Messrs. Adams
& Co.'s yard on the Thames in 1771, and launched in 1773. She was
taken by the "Bayonnaise" in December 1798, and afterwards retaken
and broken up in 1813.

Armament : Main deck, 26 12-prs. ; quarter deck, four 6-prs. ; forecastle,
two 6-prs. Her complement was 215 men.

Tonnage, 684 tons ; length, 126 25 ft, ; breadth, 35 16 ft. ; depth of hold,
12 -16 ft.



16

34. Oil paintings of H.M.S. " Enterprize." Presented by
H.M. Queen Victoria, 1864. N. 1025.

This was a sixth-rate battleship of 28 guns, laid down at Deptford in 1771,
launched in 1774, and broken up in 1807.

Armament : Main deck, 24 12-prs. ; quarter deck, four 6-prs. Her
complement was 200 men.

Tonnage, 594 tons; length, 120 '5 ft.; breadth, 33*5 ft.; depth of hold,
il it.



35.



Oil paintings of H.M.S. " Experiment." Presented by
H.M. Queen Victoria, 1864. N. 1023.

This was a fourth-rate battleship of 50 guns, laid down at Messrs. Adams
& Co.'s yard on the Thames in 1772, and launched in 1774.

She was dismasted in a gale and taken by the French fleet in 1779 on her
passage from New York to Savannah.

Armament : Lower deck, 20 24-prs. ; main deck, 22 18-prs. ; quarter
deck, six 9-prs. ; forecastle, two 9-prs. Her complement was 300 men.

Tonnage, 923 tons ; length, 140 75 ft. ; breadth, 38 : 75 ft. ; depth of hold,
16 -58 ft.

36. Oil paintings of H.M.S. " Sphinx." Presented by H.M.
Queen Victoria, 1864. N. 1026.

This was a sixth-rate battleship of 20 guns, laid down at Portsmouth
in 1773, and launched in 1775. She was taken by the French in 1779,
retaken the same year by H.M.S. " Proserpine," and broken up at Portsmouth
in 1811,

Her armament was 20 6-prs., and complement 160 men.

Tonnage, 429 tons; length, 108 ft.; breadth, 30 ft.; depth of hold,
9-6 ft.

37. Rigged model of " Fair American." (Scale 1 : 32.) Lent
by Sir Frank Short, 1900. N. 2215.

This was a 14-gun brig which under the command of Stephen Decatuv,
senr., became famous as an American privateer during the War of Indepen-
dence, 1775-81. She was ultimately captured, and then sailed as a British
privateer.

Her dimensions, as taken from the model, appear to have been :
Tonnage, b.o.m., 160 tons ; length of gun deck, 69 ft. ; breadth, 23 ft. ;
depth of hold, 11 ft.

38. Whole model of English man-of-war. (Scale 1 : 48.)
Received 1894. N. 2043.

This represents a third-rate 70-gun ship, similar to H.M.S. " Boyne "
built at Plymouth in 1776.

Her armament was : Lower deck, 26 32-prs ; main deck, 26 18-prs. ;
upper deck, 12 9-prs. ; poop, six 6-prs. Her complement was 520 men.

Tonnage, 1,426 tons ; length, 162 ft. ; breadth, 44 66 ft. ; depth of hold,
19 -33 ft.

39. Rigged model of "Le Sceptre." (Scale 1:96.) Received
1871. N. 1330.

This represents a French line-of -battle ship of 74 guns, which took part
in some of the most important actions during the war 1778-82.

Her armament was : Lower deck, 28 36-prs. ; main deck, 30 18-prs. ;
quarter-deck and forecastle, 16 8-prs. Her complement was 690 men.

Tonnage, 1,832 tons; length, 173-6 ft.; breadth, 49 -6 ft.; depth of
hold, 21 -6 ft.



17

40. Built model of H.M.S. " Cleopatra." (1779.) (Scale 1 : 48.)
Received 1907. N. 2441.

This 32-gun frigate was built at Bristol in 1779 from the designs of
Sir J. Williams, Surveyor of the Navy. She was captured near the West
Indies on 17th February, 1805, by the French 40- gun frigate " Yille de
Milan," but was retaken, with her captor, by the British 50-gun frigate
" Leander " six days afterwards.

The model shows all the important structural details and fittings of
lower, main, quarter, and forecastle decks and also the general system of
colouring and decoration adopted at this period.

The ship's complement was 222 men and, at the date of this action, her
armament probably consisted of 26 long 18-prs. on the main deck, two long
9-prs. together with ten 24-prs. (carronades) on the quarter and forecastle
decks.

Tonnage (b.o.m.), 689 tons; length, on gun-deck, 126-4 ft.; length of
keel, 104-5 ft. ; breadth, 35-2 ft. ; depth, 12 -1 ft.

The vessel is represented on a building slip ready for launching. The
launching arrangements consist of (a) A fixed wooden structure or " ground
ways " built up from the floor of the slip-way and forming an inclined
plane, usually with a fall of 625 in. to 1 ft. (i.e., 1 in 19) ; (6) Two movable
structures forming a " cradle," extending over three-fourths of the vessel's
length, by which the whole weight of the hull is carried. Premature sliding
of the cradle down the ways is prevented by short diagonal props or " dog-
shores," shown on each side of the ship at the upper end of the ways ; the
dog shores are knocked away simultaneously when the launching operations
begin. To prevent lateral movement of the cradle during its downward
course, stout battens or " ribbons " are fitted to the upper edge of the
ground-ways and held in position by the series of transverse props or shores
shown on each side of the slipway.

41. Rigged model of English, sloop-of-war, 18th cent. (Scale
1 : 48.) Received 1881. Plate II, No. 4. N. 1564.

This represents a ship-rigged sloop of about 1780, which carried 18 6-pr.
guns and 125 men.

The masting and rigging of the model were added in the Museum in
1904-5.

Approximate dimensions : Tonnage (b.o.m.), 300 tons ; length of gun
deck, 100 ft. ; length of keel, 82 ft. ; breadth, 26 '3 ft. ; depth of hold, 12 ft.

42. Rigged model of English sloop-of-war. (Scale 1 : 48.)
Received 1881. N. 1565.

This represents a schooner-rigged sloop-of-war built about 1780. The
term sloop-of-war was applied to a class of vessel carrying from 4 to 18 guns,
and rigged as schooner, brig, or ship ; they were used to cruise against
privateers or in the prevention of contraband trade. The model was rigged
in the Museum in 1902.

The armament would be about 12 6-prs., and the complement 30 to 50
men.

The approximate dimensions of the schooner represented were : Length
of keel, 56 ft.; breadth, 20-5 ft. ; depth of hold, 8 ft.; tonnage (b.o.m.),
120 tons.

N.B. In the Merchant Service the term sloop was confined to a type of
single-masted vessel resembling a cutter, but having also a square sail.

43. Rigged model of 32-gun frigate. (Scale 1 : 48.) Received
X 1877. N. 1481.

The frigate, a fast vessel of medium size carrying her main armament
on one deck, appears to have been generally introduced into the Royal Navy
about 1756. The original vessels, of 28 to 32 guns and 600 to 700 tons

u 6773 B



18

burden, having proved highly successful for scouting and independent
cruising purposes, the type gradually increased in numbers and dimensions ;
early in the 19th century vessels of 50 to 60 guns and 1,500 tons burden
were built and when steam propulsion was introduced in 1850, the last of
the sailing frigates had reached 2,100 tons burden.

This model was rigged in the Museum hi 1907 ; it agrees in general
dimensions with a class of 32-gun frigates built in 1783-6 from the designs
of Sir J. Williams. These were classed as fifth-rate vessels and the
"Meleager," a typical ship, built in 1785, had the following principal
particulars: Ship's complement, 220 men; armament, 26 12- or 18-prs.
on main deck ; four 6-prs. on quarter-deck ; two 6-prs. on forecastle deck.
Dimensions : Tonnage (b.o.m.), 678 tons ; length on gun deck, 126 ft. ;
breadth, 35 ft. ; depth, 12-15 ft,

44. Rigged model of English 64-guii ship. Period 1780-90.
(Scale 1 : 48.) Received 1881. Plate II. , No. 5.

N. 1562.

The vessel represented is a man-of-war of the third rate at the close of
the 18th century. The model was rigged in the Museum in 1902 ; it differs
chiefly from the similar ship of about 1760 (No. 26) in having a gaff instead
of a mizen or lateen yard.

The lateen yard, inclined at about 45 deg. and used for spreading a
triangular sail, had been employed for centuries for carrying the fore-and-
aft sail on the mizen mast of war ships, but in the 18th century the present
gaff or half -yard began to be adopted. At first the gaff was confined to
ships carrying less than 50 guns, but by the end of the 18th century it had



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