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Chicago, Illinois
J.C. Penney, New York, New York
Jewel Companies, Inc., Chicago,

Illinois
Johnson & Johnson Family of

Companies, New Brunswick,

New Jersey
Kimberly-Clark Foundation,

Neenab. Wisconsin
MONY Financial Services.

New York, New York
MSU System Services. New Orleans,

Louisiana
National Distillers and Chemical

Corporaton, New York, New York
Nordson Corporation, Amherst, Ohio
Pfizer, Inc., New York, New York
Philip Morris, New York, New York
ROLM, Santa Clara, California
Schering-Plough Foundation,

Madison, New Jersey
Security Pacific Corporation,

Los Angeles, California
United Banks of Colorado, Inc.,

Denver. Colorado
Xerox Corporation, Stamford,

Connecticut



Academic Profile: Brother Named a Marshall Scholarship Recipient



t



Philip N. Sabes, Washington-St. Louis
'89. a double major in physics and French at
Washington University, is one of 30 Ameri-
can students to win a Marshall Scholarship
for all-expenses-paid study at a British
university

The Marshall Scholarships have been
awarded annually since 1953 by the British
government as a gesture of thanks for the aid
the United States gave Britain under the
MarBbaJl Plan.

These prestigious scholarships, which are
tenable for two or three years, enable gradu-
ates of United States universities and col-
leges to study for degrees in Britain.

Sabes, who will graduate from Washington
m May, plans to study theoretical physics
and mathematics at Cambridge University.

Approximately 800 students apply for the
30 scholarships yearly. The awards are given
to American students who have distinguished
themselves through scholastic achievement



and other activities, and who display the
potential to make significant contributions to
society,

"I am just delighted that one of the two or
three most prestigious international scholar-
ship awards has come to Phil," said Linda B.
Salmon. Ph,d„ dean of the CoU^e of Arts
and Sciences. "He is an example of the best
kind of student Washington University can
produce in the breadth of his interests and in
his contributions to campus life."

The scholarships cover tuition, travel,
books and a stipend. They currently are
valued at $20,000 a year. Brother Sabes ap-
plied for the scholarship through the Umver-
sity's Study Abroad Program.

AfUr his two years in England, Phil will
return to the United States and enter a doc-
toral program in physics. His career plans
mclude teaching and conducting research at
the college level.

Since his freshman year at Washington,



Brother Sabes has been a member of the
Society of Physics Students, He currently is
president of the society, after serving as vice
president last year. He is one of two student
representatives to the Board of Trustees'
Educational PoLcy Committee.

In his junior year, Phil received the First
Vamey Prize as the best student in introduc-
tory physics, Last year Brother Sabes discov-
ered that a quasicrystal phase exists in
titanium-manganese alloy. He co-authored a
paper about this discovery that appeared in
the Physical Review, and he was elected to
Phi Beta Kappa.

Former Marshall scholarship winners in-
clude Bruce Babbitt, former governor of Ari-
zona; Anthony Quainton, U.S. ambassador
to Kuwait; Ray Dolby, inventor of Dolby
Sound systems; and Tbm Friedman, Jerusa-
lem bureau chief for the New York Times and
Puhtzer Prize winner for inlemational re-
porting in 1983.



Sigma Phi Epsilon Journal



Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation



ANNUAL
REPORT



Because the Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation conducts its annual giving program by mail, many alumni may have questions
about the Foundation. The following is a question and answer conversation the Journal had with Foundation Executive Director Chuck
White. We hope it will serve to answer questions you have about the Foundation's fund-raising programs.

are provided by the Ponndatioii at
Grand Chapter Conclave



JOURNAL ( JNLt-Chuek. why is the
Annual Giving prngram conducted by

CHUCK (CNW)-Direct mail ib pro-
ven, effectivemeans to contact our large
ind widespread body of alumni to corn-



repeat foUoW'Up IS necessary. If alumni

would respond to the first letter of th(

r. they would save us the expense ol



repeat mailings.

a foliow-up tetter soon after he has

CNW-ContributionB are entered to the



CNW-That depends on whei
alumnus responds. Alumni who
contributed in previous years a
ceive up to six appeals if they wail
late December to send m their ai



JNI^Why that many?
CNW-Homan nature! We aU r
too much mail and the nature
dency is to put much of it aside, pc



mail date for iheneil solidtaton letter.
If a contribution is received in that
three-week period the alumnus will still
receive a follow-up. I know it is some-
times irritating, but I have not found a
better way. "We crossed in the mail"
applies for about a 20-day perios of time
with our direct mail system.

JNI^Why don't all donors appear in



January and have it credited with the
previousyear, and then not be listed the
following year. We try hard to make
sure that does not happen, and I apolo-
gize for those times it does. Third,
alumni should be careful to look in the
donors' report under the correct cumu-
lative giving club. The report starts
vrilh Bailey's Brothers, alumni who
have contributed a life-time total of
$10,000 or more to the Foundation, and
goes through the final listing which is

who have not yet reached $100 in total
contributions. An alumnus should be
sure to check each club because he may

JNl^How do these annual gifts help



are(l) funding for Regional Leadership
Academies, which covers about 65% of
the cost of that program: <2) National
Competition Scholarships open to all
undergraduates (this is growing pro-
gram thanks to the increase in Annual
Giving); (31 resident counselors, live-in
graduate students for chapters which

danc«. At some point, each donor's cbap-



they recognized in this report?
CNW-Conlrihutions by alumni i



a Phi Epsilon Educational Four



ible to every chapter for

ligb achieving members of the chapter

ind greatly improving members of the



A Foundation Scholarship Fund
for Every Chapter!



Afl a result of legislation undergraduate
delegates adopted at the 1987 Conclave in
New Orleans, each chapter contributes a
minimuEn of $1 per man each year to its own
scholarship fund set up under the restncted
scholarehip program of the Sigma Phi
Epsilon Educational Foundation.

Alumni are encouraged to cootribute
to enlarge their chapter's program. It's
easy . . , just send your check to the Sigma
Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation at the
Headquarters address and note on it "for
_ chapter scholarship fund."
i.thisisa



The Educational Foundation's chapter
restricted scholarship program provides a
well-managed system for awarding schol-
arships to members of a particular chapter.

Contributions are segregated in a fund
earmarked for the chapter. The funds are
invested in the pooled in vestment program of
the Foundation, which has been managed by
Provident Investment Counsel of Pasadena,
California, for the last seven years. Ibtal



annual return to the fund has been 17%, and
thelhistees have authorized 8% as theretum
available for awards. This provides a schol-
arship of S200 from a S2,500 fund which is the
minimum balance before awards are made.

A working agreement is developed with
each alumni board to set forth the operating
plan for the chapter's scholarships. This
includes the selection criteria, the selection
process, the number and dollar amounts of
the awards, the timingof the awards, and the
disbursement procedures,

Chapt«r& may want to have more than one
restricted fund, naming different scholar-
ships for special alumni. This is easily accom-
plished by adoptmg a supplementary work-
ing agreement. The minimum funding level
to "name" a scholarship is $5,000. which will
provide a $400 annual award.

The $1 per man now added each year,
together with additional chapter contribu-
tions and alumni contributions, assures that
each chapter will have a scholarship pro-
gram of its own.

The Foundation TVustees beUeve strongly
in the potential for this program and wilt
work with each chapter to assure the pro-



Matching Gifts Contribute to
1988's Success!



Many companies recognize the valueof our
Foundation's programs and will match a
contribution you make. The following com-
panies have made matching gifts to the
Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation.
If your comp£my is included, ask for a match-
ing gifts form and send it to Susan Arm-
strong at Fraternity Headquarters. If your
company is not on this list, you may want to
contact your human resources department
(i.e., personnel) and ask about matching
gifts.
Allied Foundation, Morristown,

New Jersey
ARCO Foundation, Los Angeles,

California
Atlantic Richfield Foundation,

Los Angeles, California
Avon Products, New York, New York
Bankers TVust Company, New York,

New York
Beatrice Foods Company, Chicago,

Illinois
Ben Franklin Savings & Loan

Association, Portland, Oregon
Carter-Wallace, Inc., New York.

New York
Ceotel Corporation, Chicago, Illinois
Citizens & Southern National Bank,

Atlanta, Georgia
Dameron Alloy Foundries, Compton,



California
GenRad Foundation, Concord,

Massachusetts
niinois Tbol Works Foundation.

Chicago, llUnois
J.C. Penney, New York, New York
Jewel Companies, Inc., Chicago,

Illinois
Johnson & Johnson Family of

Companies, New Brunswick,

New Jersey
Kimberly-Clark Foundation,

Neenah, Wisconsin
MONY Financial Services.

New York. New York
MSU System Services, New Orleans,

Louisiana
National Distillers and Chemical

Corporaton. New York, New York
Nordson Corporation, Amherst, Ohio
Pfizer, Inc., New York, New York
Philip Morris, New York, New York
ROLM, Santa Clara, California
Schering-Plough Foundation,

Madison, New Jersey
Security Pacific Corporation,

Lob Angeles, California
United Banks of Colorado, Inc.,

Denver. Colorado
Xerox Corporation, Stamford,

Connecticut



Academic Profile: Brother Named a Marshall Scholarship Recipient



I



Philip N. Sabes, Washington-St. Louis
'89. a double major in physics and French at
Washington University, is one of 30 Ameri-
can students to win a Marshall Scholarship
for all-expenses-paid study at a British
university

The Marshall Scholarships have been
awarded annually since 1953 by the British
government as a gesture of thanks for the aid
the United States gave Britain under the
Marshall Plan.

These prestigious scholarships, which are
tenable for two or three years, enable gradu-
ates of United States universities and col-
leges to study for degrees in Britain.

Sabes, who will graduate from Washington
in May, plans to study theoretical physics
and mathematics at Cambridge University.

Approximately 800 students apply tor the
30 scholarships yearly. The awards are given
to American students whohavedistinguiahed
themselves through scholastic achievement



and other activities, and who display the
potential to make significant contributions to
society.

"I am just dehghted that one of the two or
three most prestigious international scholar-
ship awards has come to Phil," said Linda B,
Salmon, Ph.d.. dean of the College of Arts
and Sciences. "He is an example of the best
kind of student Washington University can
produce in the breadth of his interests and in
his contributions to campus life"

The scholarships cover tuition, travel,
books and a stipend, They currently are
valued at $20,000 a year. Brother Sabes ap-
plied for the scholarship through the Univer-
sity's Study Abroad Program-
After his two years in England, Phil will
return to the United States and enter a doc-
toral program in physics. His career plans
include teaching and conducting research at
the college level.
Since his freshman year at Washington,



Brother Sabes has been a member of the
Society of Physics Students. He currently is
president of the society, after serving as vice
president last year. He is one of two student
representatives to the Board of TVustees'
Educational Policy Committee,

In his junior year. Phil received the First
Vamey Prize as the best student in introduc-
tory physics. Lastyear Brother Sabes discov-
ered that a quasicrystal phase exists in
titanium-manganese alloy. He co-authored a
paper about this discovery that appeared in
the Physical Review, and be was elected to
Phi Beta Kappa.

Former Marshall scholarship winners in-
clude Bruce Babbitt, foimer governor of Ari-
zona; Anthony Quainton, U.S. ambassador
to Kuwait, Ray Dolby, inventor of Dolby
Sound systems; and Tbm Friedman, Jerusa-
lem bureau chief for the Neu' VorA rimes and
Pulitzer Prize wmner for inleraahonai re-
porting in 1983.



Foundation Supports Leadership Academy Programs



Senior Leadership Recognized






irthe



1 Edwi



leaden buth in Iheir chapters and on campus.

Each swflitl consiit* of a certificate signed by the Grand President and the district governor. In
addition, itcamts with ilthe/xilhngerLeaderBhipAward.ThiflawardcoiisistsofaSlOO scholarship
pTMcnled to the sophomore brother selected by Uie outstanding seniofB chapter. The sophomores
teleded are men who show the greatest promise for future leadership.

Sigma Phi Epsilon established the ZoUinger Awards to commemorateUieleadershipandinspira
tion J. Edward Zollinger gave to the ftatemity. Brother Zollinger served on the National Board of
Directors from 1963 to 1971 , and was Grand President for two terms, from 1967 to 1971 . He also served
ai the Chairman of the Sigma Phi Epsilon Educational Foundation from 1971 until his death in
November, 1976.

Thr fpcipienta for IHSH wer* namwi at the Regional Academies in Febnjar>' of this year.



ZOLLINGER OUTSTANDING SENIORS, 1989



Kevin M. Dolan


ME Alpha


Maine


Steven H. Kibrick


NY Pi


SUNYflswego


Michael L Minaides


NJBeta


Rutgers


John M Nuabaum


VAEla


Virginia


C. David Hagerty


PA Sigma


York


Jeffrey S. Macholz


PANu


Thiel


Michael .J. ZilHgen


SC Alpha


S. Carolina


Carl S Kirkconnell


GA Alpha


Georgia Tech


.lames M Rutledge


FL Epsilon


Flonda State


Malthew W Nowak


MI Eta


Michigan Tech


Steven A. Upp


OH Gamma


Ohio Stale


Kenn D Fielden


TN Gamma


East Tennessee


Michael C, Bourgeois


MS Gamma


Southern Mississippi


Sidney R Welbek


lAEta




JohnJKirkley


IN Beta


Indiana Stale


Bradley C. Nahraladl


IL Gamma


Monmouth


KentT.Porterfield


MO Lambda


Northwest Missouri State


Bernard J. Shondell


OK Alpha


Oklahoma State


Ian P. Cloud


TXTau


Southwest Texas State


Hnan A. Marraynski


TXIota


Texas Tech


Christopher A. Boetlchcr


KSZeta


Fort Havs Slate


Joseph R. Whittinghill


MT Alpha


Montana


KchBd RKfflgr


mtSi® -


Crfomio Mines


KeLp MJ '


OR Alpha


Oregon State


Jeffrey G.Kost


CAEla


Califomia-Da^is


EricW.Lauterbaeh


CA Gamma


California-Santa Barbara




h Sig Ep Chapter Presidents




Commemorative Gifts Made to the Foundation



e made in memory of:



John W. Harlinan, Missouri '61



Alford A. Keckel, Ocorgu Wuhington '36
Gifts made by

James F. Pitt, George Washington '38
Harold U Doreett. George Washington "38
A.G. Weingartner, George Washington 37'
Garl P. Gee. George Washington '42
Bdward C. Stevlingson, George Washington
" 1, George Washington '38



Chules N. White Jr.. Western Mtchi
Susan G. ArmBtrong, Headquarters Slai
Chriilopher L. BilUnan. Colorado 'i
KcUy L. Monkin. Western Michigan
Jcny Gallagher, Head<|uurler« StuS
Houck W. Reasoner Jr.. Arkanaaa S
Shiiwn McKennn. Maine '77
llebra McKenna

Chuck Stegmon, Colorado '81
Joseph W. LiuigellB Jr.. Connt



John K. lyier, T^xas 't



Harold L Hodge Jr.. Floni



t, Davis & Elkin§ '77



George Swartz Jr., Michig



Hugh M. Fuller, Wake Fore



Albert M. Hale Jr. California- Berkeley 'f



Gifts were made o

The wedding of Gina Karri



d Kevin A. Otero, New Mexico



BuckneU Univen
Gift made bv
Raymond W. TWlau. BuckneU 'f



Raymond W. Tkllau. BuckneU '51



r. BuckneU '48 as Die trict



Jon of Joe Langella's, Com



Jem-ey J. Brandli. Waehington 'St



Bar) W. 1VaBl«r. Ohio Wesleyan '37



Douglas Lewis. Michigan 'E



Wendell M. Adamaon, Indiana '



., Washington-St Louis



r. William & Mary "27



d K Montgomery. Oklahoma State '62
im R. "BUI" Mendenhall, Indiana State '(
ide by

1, Georgia '83



Dr. Gerald T.Kei



C. Maynard Turner. Washington '£



"Sandy" Sanderson. S



Charles N. White Jr., Western Hi
Hairy D. KurU. Ohio State '37
Robert C. Stempel. Worcester lb
Raymond C. He Cron, Pennsylvt
Jerald J. Dallas, Connecticut li



Bruce H. Hasenkai



>.Dart



e made in honor of:

ha chapter at Auburn Univeraity-in honor of thei
a chapter Htthe Uni versity of Alabama— in honor (
a fhapiernt Huntingdon CoUcge-inhonorof thei
Jeta chapter al Hisaissippi State Uaivcrsity-i



Gift made by

BUI Davenport. Miseissip



leUni



of Mis



Sigma Phi Epsilon Joiinial



Friends of the Foundation: Annual Giving, 1988








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Online LibrarySigma Phi EpsilonSigma Phi Epsilon Journal (Volume Vol. 85 No. 3) → online text (page 2 of 4)
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