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TF this is the end product of the phil-

osophy of science, then science needs

a deal of saving. Here we have from the

hands of a graduate philosopher, a book



intended for critical information. Mr.
Malisoff gives the impression of an arm-
chair secretary who has assiduously col-
lected topical items on old age from
Adam to Carrel, and even including the
latest Sunday supplement. The book>
lacks order or a rational thread of se-
quence in dealing with a subject which,
to the end, the author fails to define.
He offers suggestive references in abun-
dance and much commentary, but never
opinions, critical analysis, or preference
as to one of several obvious deductions.
In 328 pages split into forty-three chap-
ters, innumerable authors are referred
to as familiar personalities and often
quoted extensively, but without discrim-
ination as to the relative worth of con-
tradictory evidence.

Assimilation by the author has appar-
ently been gluttonous but digestion and
elimination faulty. One comes to the con-
clusion that this is a scientist's example
of what no scientist will accept as scien-
tific method. The collecting of items and
distributing them under index cards must
have been good fun, but the value re-
mains the author's rather than the read-
er's. Throughout, he serves his abundant
repast with unction but he seems not to
partake of the feast, nor add a dessert
of his own creation. Dippings into Au-
thors on Old Age would have been a
more revealing title.

Utopian decalogic proposals close the
subject a la Carrel, without a word of
suggestion as to the work or the work-
ers, for the universal front to save human
life. Truly not a book for students, work-
ers, physicians, statisticians, or it seems
to me, for philosophers of sorts, or for
casual readers.
New York HAVEN EMERSON, M.D.

Hope Out of Failure

THE SHARECROPPER, by Charlie May Simon.
Illustrated with woodcuts by Howard Simon.
Dutton. 247 pp. Price $2.50 postpaid of Survey
Midmonthly.

TV/TUCH has been written in recent
'-* years about the southern sharecrop-
pers. Their condition of economic servi-
tude, producing as it does a dismally low
standard of living, is or should be a
national scandal. While the present fed-
eral administration has recognized the
existence of the problem, nothing defin-
ite in the way of a solution has been
offered. Until something is done to alle-
viate these conditions, this country should
not be permitted to forget that a size-
able portion of its population is living in
extreme poverty.

To this end, The Sharecropper, a first
novel by a well-known author of chil-
dren's stories, is particularly welcome.
One should hasten to add that it is not
merely as a preachment that the book has
worth. It has the charm of a moving,
human story, simply and effectively told.

This is the story of Bill Bradley and
his wife Donie, children of sharecrop-
pers and sharecroppers themselves.



60



Theirs is a struggle to lift themselves
above the common level Bill wants a
mule of his own, and Donie a house with
a garden and flowers. Their failure is
the failure common to all of their kind,
caused by devotion to one crop farming,
an iniquitous system of tenantry, and, at
times, the capriciousness of Old Man
River. Failure piles on failure but un-
like many others who become resigned
to their fate and merely endure, Bill
and Donie cling to a hope that in time
their lot will improve.

"And Bill wondered, as he looked at

iiildren, just what the future held

for them . . . Somehow, as he sat there,

he tflt that his own young ones would

.1 better life than he and Donie or

their parents had had. There would come

a change, he knew, though he might not

live to see it himself, and it would be

-le for them to have land of their

own."

It is on this note of hopefulness that
the hook ends. It suggests no solution,
but it does serve a useful purpose by
directing attention to a condition that
desperately needs correction.
Chattanooga, Tenn. CECIL HOLLAND



Dubious Thrift

INDCSTKIAt. ASSITRANX'E: HRITISH Issri-

s. An Historical and Critical Study by Sir

Arnold Wilson, M.P. and Prof. Hermann Levy.

Oxford University Press. 519 pp. Price $7

postpaid of Survey MidmontMy.



*TpHIS scathing indictment of British
* industrial insurance methods and re-
sults surveys the business from its origin
to the present time and conveys the im-
pression that the high lapse rate and
constant pressure of agents for new busi-
ness condemn it as an ill-advised method
of thrift. This, although the number of
policies in the United Kingdom is about
eighty million, representing some eight-
een million persons insured. Attention is
directed to the decline in the industrial
insurance expense ratio from about 50
percent in 1900 to between 25 percent
and 30 percent at present. This is con-
trasted with the ratio of 5.4 percent given
for old age pensions; of 6.8 percent for
unemployment insurance and the aver-
age proportion of 21.8 percent of recent
years, for National Health Insurance.

Part I, concerning the origin and so-
cial development of industrial insurance
in England, shows its major underlying
purpose to be sufficient death benefits to
meet burial and general funeral expenses.
Reference is made to the exclusion of
death benefits in the National Health In-
surance scheme in response to pressure
from the companies and the collecting
Friendly Societies. All the evidence in
this section is drawn from the so-called
Cohen report published in July 1933 and
now practically inaccessible, which con-
cerns a recent parliamentary investiga-
tion of industrial insurance in England.

The second section of the book con-
cerns the relationship between the in-



BOOKS FOR THE SOCIAL WORKER



To be published February 25!

THE PUBLIC ASSISTANCE WORKER

Hi- Responsibility to the Applicant, the Community,
and to Himself : : : II u 1 1 H. Kurtz, Editor

"Now comes to join (he must books of social work this nol-so-slim little
volume. . . . Here, in half a dozen chapters, as simple as they are
authoritative, is the clear statement of what public assistance as we know it
is all about, what it grew from, what it encompasses, and what it takes to do

the job of making it effective."

Mia Bailey.

Public Assistance what it is Who shall be granted
public aid? How much? In what form? Dealing with
people in need Problems of health and medical care Tying
in with the community Public Assistance and social work.

224 pages One dollar

RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION



130 East 22d Street



New York



sured and the insurers with extended
observations on funeral benefits, particu-
larly on the issue of illegal policies on
the life of another, or without any in-
surable interest. This practice, for prac-
tical purposes, has no parallel here.

The final section, on organization and
finance, includes amalgamations, financial
power, the relation of industrial insur-
ance to the state and the functions of the
industrial insurance commissioner, a posi-
tion unknown in this country since life in-
surance is not a matter of federal legisla-
tion. The authors strongly favor having
the state assume entire control of indus-
trial insurance, subject to compensation
of stockholders or their proprietary in-
terests. They are also of the opinion that
the weekly cost of industrial insurance
under the state system would be about
half that payable under the system now
in vogue. They conclude that "industrial
assurance, i. e. the payment of burial
money, should be a responsibility of the
state and should be made a statutory
benefit payable in respect of all persons
covered by National Health Insurance
schemes," and that "there is no question
of creating a new organization for the
purpose: the machinery of National
Health Insurance lies ready to hand and
can easily be extended, in Britain as else-
where, to cover funeral benefit, the ad-
ministration of which would involve less
technical difficulties than sickness bene-
fit."

The book omits much which should
have been said in behalf of the compa-
nies who are faced by a situation calling
constantly for a practical understanding
In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

61



of social needs. Attention should have
been drawn, also, to the growth of ordi-
nary insurance on the part of industrial
policyholders, indicating that this is a
valuable lesson in systematic saving hab-
its. However, the book is well written
and contains much interesting matter for
the student of life insurance elsewhere
than in Great Britain.

FREDERICK L. HOFFMAN
Philadelphia, Pa.

The Junior Republic

THE ADULT-MIXOR. by William R. George.
Applcton-Century. 192 pp. Price $2 postpaid of
Sun-cy Midmonthly.

' I *HIS book, completed just before
"Daddy" George's death, reaffirms his
faith in the purposes and methods of the
George Junior Republic which he founded
at Freeville, N.Y. at the turn of the
century, and suggests an adaptation of
its philosophy to groups beyond the con-
fines of an institution.

In brief, he urges that "junior citi-
zens" (between the ages of sixteen and
twenty-one) be given practical responsi-
bilities in the community, notably as
understudies or as assistants to public
officials, and describes how the plan was
worked out on a small scale in two New
York towns some twenty-five years ago.
An up-to-date picture of the Junior Re-
publics of today and some evaluation of
the growth of student government move-
ments would have been a useful inclusion.

With the author's insistence that the
education of youth should include prac-
tical experience in the mechanics of gov-



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five cents per word or initial, including address or box number. Minimum charge,
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WOMAN, vocational counselor equally interested
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ability, to organize and develop new program
in public or private agency. 7491 Survey.



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This is the counseling and placement agency
sponsored jointly by the American Associa-
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Special Train To Seattle!

IN cooperation with several railroads, arrangements have been made
I tor special through trains to carry social workers, their friends and
associated groups to the Seattle Conference in June.

THE first schedule permits a one-day visit to GLACIER NATIONAL
I PARK, arriving at Seattle on the opening day of the Conference.
The second provides special cars for the use of Associate Groups,
scheduled to arrive at the Conference city at 8:00 A.M., Friday,
June 24th.

THESE two services offer an attractive opportunity to friends and

I fellow workers to renew old friendships and make new acquaintances

while traveling through some of America's most fascinating scenery.

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eminent and with most of his philosophy
of student government, there can be
little or no disagreement. When it comes
to how such things can be taught most
effectively, there is ample room for dis-
agreement. Many have objected, for ex-
ample, to what they felt was a too lit-
eral and comprehensive application by
'Daddy" George of this self-govern-
ment philosophy particularly where
children are concerned, they argue, flex-
ibility rather than rigidity must prevail
if a concept is to find a permanent place
in the scheme of things, and the same
practices and procedures cannot apply
successfully to different situations.

In the nature of things, a man of such
intensive singleness of purpose as the
author, whose whole life was devoted to
the pursuit of a single idea, must have
experienced bitter disappointments. For
the difficulty with a single idea is that
it is a single idea, and we live in a world
where ideas like human beings grow best
in the company of others The world has
yet to discover a combination more pro-
ductive than an able man in possession
of a great idea. But it has also learned,
I believe, that an idea, no matter how
great, when in full possession of a man
may result in frustration and mediocrity
rather than high attainment.

As a general review of the Junior
Republic plan and as the last document
of a unique American, this book is well
worth reading. His intimates and the
thousands who knew him in their youth
will agree that it reflects the warmth
and geniality of "Daddy" George and
his deep concern that young people should
know by experience both the meaning
and the practice of good citizenship.

LEONARD P. MAYO
Welfare Council of New York City

Why People Die

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF HEALTH PROG-
RESS, by Louis I. Dublin and Alfred J. Lotka.
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. 611 pp.
Complimentary to interested organizations.



In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY

62



FROM 1911 to 1935 there were re-
corded deaths of 3,200,000 persons
who were industrial policyholders of the
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company.
This "mortality experience," computed
as deathrates from many diseases, is pre-
sented in this six-hundred-page volume.
Students of vital statistics and everyone
else who has occasion to secure informa-
tion on the recent trends of mortality in
the United States will find herein a great
mass of useful material in usable form.
Chapters on general mortality and on the
lengthening of life during this quarter
century are followed by sections dealing
with particular diseases and with acci-
dents. Appendices describe technical
methods and furnish detailed tables.
Throughout the volume it is implied that
health progress is measured by mortality
rates, an assumption which increasingly
needs qualification. M.M.D.
MIDMONTHLY



THE NEW YORK SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK



Fortieth Summer Session
1898 - 1938



Summer Quarter



Term ^ A

I .Til. B



June 20 -July 26
July 27 -August 31

Among the twenty courses open to experi-
enced students entering for either, or both,
of the summer terms are the following:

Family Case Work Gordon Hamilton

Community Planning for Social Work Walter Pellit

Principles and Practices of Croup Work Clara Kaiser

Public Welfare Problems David .-li/iV

Supervisory Practice Fern Lowry

Probation and Parole Wilton McKerrow

The Child in the Institution Lou-Eva Longan

Administration of Public Welfare Charles Nison

Social Case Recording Gordon Hamilton

Concepts of Human Behavior in Case Work



Five Summer Seminars
August 1-12

Public Welfare Administration. Robert Lansdale

Labor Problems John A. Fitch

Group Work Clara Kaiser

Social Case Work Gordon Hamilton

Philosophy of Supervision Fern Lowry

Conferences on the inter-relation of the seminar
areas will be scheduled in the afternoons.

The seminars are open to experienced social
workers.



Practice Fern Lowry

For full details of the Summer Quarter and the Seminars send for the summer catalogue.
122 East 22nd Street New York, N. Y.



PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL
OF SOCIAL WORK

Affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania
Academic Year 1938-1939

ADVANCED CURRICULUM

Open to graduates of accredited graduate schools of
tocial work who have had at least a year of subsequent
successful professional experience in a field closely related
to that of the curriculum for which they apply. A full
year of class and field work in the following fields:

CASE WORK IN CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
CHILD PLACING

PSYCHOLOGICAL THERAPY WITH CHILDREN
SUPERVISION IN SOCIAL WORK
TEACHING IN SOCIAL WORK

GRADUATE DEPARTMENT

Open to graduates of accredited colleges end universities.
Two years of professional training leading to the degree
of Master of Social Work conferred by the University of
Pennsylvania.

Applications must be filed by May 15, 1938
Catalogs mJ application blawbt lent upon rtqmrst



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DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS



Civic, National, International



National Red Cross



THE AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS

Administered through National Headquar-
ters in Washington, D. C., and three Branch
Offices in San Francisco, St. Louis and
Washington, D. C. There are 3711 local
chapters organized mostly on a county basis.
Services of the Red Cross are: Disaster
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Saving, Home and Farm Accident Preven-
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Sick, Junior Red Cross, Nursing Service,
Nutrition Service, Public Health Nursing,
Volunteer Service and War Service.



Industrial Democracy



LEAGUE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY

Promotes a better understanding of problems
of democracy in industry through its
pamphlet, research and lecture services and
organization of college and city groups. Ex-
ecutive Directors, Harry W. Laidler and
Norman Thomas, 112 East 19th Street, New
York City.



Foreign Communities



NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF IMMIGRANT

WELFARE 1270 Sixth Avenue, New York.
A league of International Institutes, Citi-
zenship Councils and other local agencies
specializing in the interests of the foreign-
born. Gives consultation, field service, pro-
gram content to agencies engaged in any
form of constructive effort for the foreign-
born in local communities.



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listed in
this

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Social Agencies?
If not
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Foundations



AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR THE BLIND,

INC. IB West 16th Street, New York. A
national organization for research and field
service. Activities include : assistance to state
and local agencies in organizing activities
and promoting legislation ; research in legis-
lation, vocations, statistics, and mechanical
appliances for the blind ; maintenance of a
reference lending library. M. C. Migel, Presi-
dent ; Robert B. Irwin, Executive Director.



RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION For the Im-
provement of Living Conditions Shelby M.
Harrison, Director; 130 E. 22nd St., New
York. Departments: Charity Organization,
Delinquency and Penology, Industrial Stu-
dies, Library, Recreation, Remedial Loans.
Social Work Interpretation, Social Work
Year Book, Statistics, Surveys. The publica-
tions of the Russell Sage Foundation offer
to the public in practical and inexpensive
form some of the most important results of
its work. Catalogue sent upon request.



Health

BULLETIN OF THE HEALTH ORGANI-
ZATION OF THE LEAGUE OF NA-
TION'S. Vol. 6, No. 3, June 1937. Price 65
cents from Columbia University Press, New
York.

In two sections: a report on popular
nutrition in Chile, by Prof. C. Dragoni
and Dr. Et. Burnet; The Milk Problem,
a critical study of its nutritional, hygienic,
economic and social aspects, by G. J. Blink
and Drs. H. C. Bendixen, J. C. Drum-
mond, A. M. Leroy, G. S. Wilson.

SOCIAL HYGIENE AND THE PUBLIC
MIN'D, by David Resnick. Price 10 cents
from the American Social Hygiene Asso-
ciation, 50 West 50 Street, New York.

Some recent developments in public
education with suggestions for a practical
community program.

GROUP HOSPITALIZATION, A REPORT
OF EXPERIENCES, prepared by the Bureau
of Medical Economics, American Medical
Association. From the association, 535 North
Dearborn Street, Chicago.

Report of a thorough study of the group
hospitalization movement, its development
and experience in administration and prac-
tice, together with some evaluation and
discussion, and a set of principles on the
subject adopted by the association's house
of delegates..

PUBLIC HEALTH ORGANIZATION, by
Mrs. George Howard Hoxie. National League
of Women Voters. 51 pp. Price 25 cents
from the league, 726 Jackson Place, Wash-
ington, D. C.

A pamphlet designed "to outline for the
lay person the simple facts which he must
know about preventive medicine and hfealth
department organization and administra-
tion in order to be able to appraise the
work of his state and local health depart-
ments; and when necessary to use his in-
fluence for their improvement." A mimeo-



THE PAMPHLET SHELF

graphed outline for study of public health
departments also is available.

A NEW DAY DAWNS FOR BIRTH CON-
TROL. CONCLUDING REPORT OF THE NA-
TIONAL COMMITTEE ON FEDERAL LEGISLA-
TION FOR BIRTH CONTROL, 17 West 16
Street, New York.

State of the Nation

DOUBLE TAXATION

OLD AGE SECURITY: IS THE PRESENT

GOVERNMENT PROGRAM ADEQUATE
HIDDEN' VERSUS INCOME TAXES
THE CHAIN STORE TAX: IS IT IN THE

PUBLIC INTEREST?
SALES TAXES: ARE THEY FAIR TO

THE AVERAGE CONSUMER?
Public Policy Bulletins, by the Twentieth

Century Fund. Price 5 cents each from the

fund, 330 West 42 Street, New York.

This series of popular leaflets presents
in brief digest some basic findings and
recommendations of research committees
of the fund.

THE COMMODITY DOLLAR, by Harry
D. Gideonse. University of Chicago Press,
Public Policy Pamphlet No. 26. 22 pp.
Price 25 cents from the press, Chicago, 111.

A discussion of questions and possibili-
ties in internal commodity price stability
by way of a managed currency.

HOW THE NATIONAL INCOME IS DI-
VIDED, by Albert G. Hart. University of
Chicago Press. Public Policy Pamphlet No.
23. Price 25 cents direct from the publisher.

A summary and interpretation for the
general reader of recent statistical studies
cm distribution of the national income.

AMERICA WAR OR PEACE, by Alfred
Schmalz. Council for Social Action of the
Congregational and Christian Churches. 31
pp. Price 10 cents a copy, less in quantity,
from the council, 289 Fourth Avenue, New



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