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National Conferences



NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL WORK

Solomon Lowenstein, President, New
York; Howard R. Knight, Secretary, 82 N.
High St., Columbus, Ohio. The Conference is
an organization to discuss the principles of
humanitarian effort and to increase the
efficiency of social service agencies. Each
year it holds an annual meeting, publishes
in permanent form the Proceedings of the
meeting, and issues a quarterly Bulletin.
The sixty-fifth annual convention of the
Conference will be held in Seattle, Washing-
ton, June 26 - July 2, 1938. Proceedings
are sent free of charge to all members upon
payment of a membership fee of $5.



NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF JEWISH SOCIAL
WELFARE Harry Greenstein, Baltimore,
President; M. W. Beckelman, Secretary, 67
W. 47th St., New York, N. Y. Organized
to discuss Jewish life and welfare, Jewish
social service programs and programs of
social and economic welfare. The 1938
Annual Meeting will be held in Washington,
D. C., beginning May 28. The Conference
publishes a magazine, Jewish Social Service
Quarterly, a news bulletin, Jewish Confer-
ence, and Proceedings of its Annual Confer-
ence. Minimum Annual Membership Fee $2.



Religious Organizations



COUNCIL OF WOMEN FOR HOME MISSION

105 East 22nd Street, New York City. Th
Inter-Denominational body of 23 women'
home missions boards of the United State
and Canada uniting in program and nnancii
responsibility for enterprises which the
agree to carry cooperatively ; i.e. Christia
social service in Migrant labor camps an
U. S. Indian schools. President, Mrs. Mi
lard L. Robinson ; Executive Secretary, Edit
E. Lowry ; Associate Secretary, Charlotte W
Burnham ; Western Field Secretary, Adel
J. Milliard ; Migrant Supervisor, Gulf 1
Great Lakes Area, Mrs. Kenneth D. Millei

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOME1*
INC. 1819 Broadway, New York City. Mr:
Arthur Brin, President ; Mrs. Maurice I
Goldman, Chairman Ex. Com. ; Mrs. Mario
M. Miller, Executive Director. Organizatio
of Jewish women initiating and developin
programs and activities in service for foi
eign born, peace, social legislation, adul
Jewish education, and social welfare. Con
ducts bureau of international service. Serve
as clearing bureau for local affiliated group
throughout the country.

NATIONAL BOARD, YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRIf
TIAN ASSOCIATIONS, 600 Lexington Ave
New York City. An international Christia:
woman movement devoted to service fo
women and girls and the attempt to hel;
build a society in which the abundant lif
is possible for every individual.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF YOUNG MEN'!
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 347 Madisoi
Avenue, New York City, Eskil C. Carlson
President ; John E. Manley, General Secre
tary. A federation of 1123 local associations
through state and area councils, for Chris
tian character education among youth. Meet
annually to determine service projects am
budget for cooperation with local membe
organizations in program emphasis and in
terpretation, fiscal operations, etc. Empha
sizes lay-professional cooperation, group an<
club activity, and self-governing program
of physical, social and religious education
public affairs, international education am
special cooperative projects, citizenship, etc
Specialized work among transportation, arm;
and navy, student, colored, rural, and certaii
other groups.



Racial Adjustment



NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE, INC., with it
44 branches improves social conditions o:
Negroes seeking "not alms, but opportunity'
for them. Secures and trains social workers
Investigates conditions of city life as basei
for practical work. Publishes OPPOR
TUNITY, Journal of Negro Life. Solicit;
gifts. 1133 Broadway, New York, N. Y.



Negro Education



TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE, Tuskegee Institute
Alabama. Founded by Booker T. Washing'
ton. High school and college both ac-
credited. Curricula designed to prepari
Negro students to meet the vocational anc
social needs of successful living. F. D
Patterson, President.



Recreation



NATIONAL RECREATION ASSOCIATION

315 Fourth Ave., New York City. To bring
to every boy and girl and citizen of America
an adequate opportunity for wholesome,
happy play and recreation.



DIRECTORY RATES

30 Cents a Line

Per Insertion

On a Twelve Time

Contract



'ny advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

126



DIRECTORY OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS



Civic, National, International



National Red Cross



1HK AMKKICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS
Administered through National Headquar-
ters in Washington. D. C.. and three Branch
Offices in San Francisco, St. Louis and
Washington. D. C. There are 3711 local
chapters organized mostly on a county basis.
Services of the Red Cross are: Disaster
Relief. Civilian Relief. First Aid and Life
Saving, Home and Farm Accident Preven-
tion Service. Home Hygiene and Care of the
Sick, Junior Red Cross, Nursing Service,
Nutrition Service, Public Health Nursing,
Volunteer Service and War Service.



Industrial Democracy



LEACTE FOR INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY
Promotes a better understanding of problems
of democracy in industry through its
pamphlet, research and lecture services and
organization of college and city groups. Ex-
ecutive Directors. Harry W. Laidler and
Norman Thomas, 112 East 19th Street, New
York City.



Foreign Communities



NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF IMMIGRANT
WELFARE 1270 Sixth Avenue, New York.
A league of International Institutes, Citi-
zenship Councils and other local agencies
specializing in the interests of the foreign-
born. Gives consultation, field service, pro-
gram content to agencies engaged in any
form of constructive effort for the foreign-
born in local communities.



1 1 your
organization
lilted in
this

Directory of
Social Agencies?
If not
why not?



Foundations



AMKKICAN FOUNDATION FOR THE BLIND.
INC. 16 West 16th Street. New York. A
national organization for research and field
service. Activities include: assistance to state
and local agencies in organizing activities
and pramoting legislation ; research in legis-
lation, vocations, statistics, and mechanical
appliances for the blind ; maintenance of a
reference lending library. H. C. Migel, Presi-
dent : Robert B. Irwin, Executive Director.



RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION For the Im-
provement of Living Conditions Shelby M.
Harrison. General Director ; ISO E. 22nd St.,
New York. Departments: Charity Organiza-
tion. Consumer Credit Studies. Delinquency
and Penology. Industrial Studies. Library.
Recreation, Social Work Interpretation.
Social Work Year Book. Statistics. Surveys.
The publications of the Russell Sage Found-
ation offer to the public in practical and
inexpensive form some of the most impor-
tant results of its work. Catalogue sent
upon request.



many accompanying charts. The book is
vided into four short but comprehen-
sections. The first points out the
for a sound economic theory under-
lying the process of achieving a proper
balance sheet and operating statement.
The second and third deal with the the-
ory of bookkeeping and its technique and
include an actual bookkeeping set-up and
an explanation of the procedure to be
followed. The fourth defines the terms
in general use in the profession and con-
tains suggestions for taking inventory.

The work as a whole emphasizes the
difference between the capital set-up of
the profit system and that of the coop-
erative method, and fills a long felt need
among cooperatives.

Yort HUGO VAN ARX



examine unemployment, old age, sick-
ness, mental disease and other prob-
lems in terms of the new approaches
being made to them. It is a big job to
keep posted in all these special fields, but
Professor Bossard has gone as far as
anyone in producing a comprehensive
presentation. An important feature of this
hook is the final section which deals with
changes in the field of social work since
1930 and the new role of government.
It is hard to say what is the best book
in this field. It is enough to say that
this is a good one.
ll'l'.l. ll'ashington NELS ANDERSON

Enjoy Your Age

THE MAN TAKES A WIFE, by Ira S. Wile.
.M.I). Grcenberg. 277 pp. Price $2.50 postpaid
f .Viirivv Midmonthly.



slogan could be used to describe his ap-
proach, it would be not the sneering "Be
your age" but a wise and gentle remind-
er, "Enjoy your age," to which are add-
ed principles which increase the likeli-
hood of doing so. Among these is what is
probably one of the most potent tonics
the psychiatrist can offer the assurance
that many of the fears, inadequacies, and
other problems which harry an individual
are not peculiar to him alone but are the
lot of the usual run of human beings;
the assurance, also, that many of them
are not what they seem, and when under-
stood, can be dissipated.

Dr. Wile's professional acumen, hu-
man understanding, and gifts as a writer
make this a book at once readable, sen-
sible and helpful. MARY Ross



Pacing Social Change



-



CIAL CHANGE AM) SOCIAL PROB-
LEMS, by James H. S. Bossard. Harpers.
823 pp. Price $3.50 postpaid of Surrey Mid-
monthly.

\;i7"HOEVER would write about so-
cial problems must expect to be
out-of-date, for no pen can keep pace
with the trend of events in this changing
world. Professor Bossard has been at-



1 tempting this very thing for ten years.

i His first effort in the social problem
field was Problems of Social Well-Being
in 1927. That book was revived in 1934
and appeared as Social Change and So-
cial Problems. This volume is the 1937
revision. As in his previous writings, this
author sees social problems in terms of
well-being in three spheres of equilib-
rium; economics, health of body and bal-
ance of mind. The value of his book is
found in the effort of the author to



DROBABLY because the domesticated
emotions are supposed to be woman's
sphere, most books on the sex aspects of
family life are addressed to wives and
mothers and are devoted in considerable
part to their problems. Dr. Wile takes
a new slant in focusing this volume on
husbands and fathers, their perplexities,
and their contributions and drawbacks in
relation to the family scene. It goes
without saying that these are questions of
vital interest to the distaff side, and I do
not doubt that the book will have at
least as great an interest for the ladies
as for their men.

In simple, friendly language, free of
medical jargon and preoccupation with
the pathological, Dr. Wile discusses men
as suitors, husbands, fathers, and as per-
sons who have their own problems of
youth, maturity, and old age. If a single
In answering advertitemenU please mention STHVEY MIDMONTHLY

127



Run of the Shelves

SEARCHLIGHT, by Augusta C. Fischer. Low-
man and Hanford, Seattle, Wash. 233 pp. Price
$2.50 postpaid of Survey MidmonlMy.

THE autobiography of a Seattle woman
committed to the Northern State Hos-
pital, State of Washington, for ma-
nic-depressive psychosis, following her
tragic slaying of her only child while
under the spell of delusions. Home in-
fluences, accumulating strains, abnormal
psychological states, are described with
considerable understanding against the
background of the author's training as a
nurse. Her purpose in recounting so pain-
ful an experience is to call attention to
further need for preventive clinics, for
scientific treatment rather than custodial
care in institutions, and for "laws for
compulsory reporting of suspected serious
mental cases." A.R.I.



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS

Rates: Display: 21 cents a line, 14 agate lines to the inch. Want advertisements
five cents per word or initial, including address or box number. Minimum charge,
first insertion, $1.00. Cash with orders. Discounts: 5% on three insertions; 10% on
six insertions. Address Advertising Department.



TEL.:



ALGONQUIN 4-7490 SURVEY MIDMONTHLY



112 EAST 19th ST.
NEW YORK CITY



WORKERS WANTED



The Children's Center in New Haven, Connecti-
cut, would be interested in the application of
a person trained and experienced as a super-
visor of a child-placing agency. Address com-
munications, including full credentials, to B.
T. Hacker, 1400 Whitney Avenue, New Haven.

CASE WORKER School of Social Work gradu-
ate with experience in children's or family
agency, preferably one having psychiatric pro-
gram. Family Welfare Society, 31 Gibbs Street,
Rochester, N. Y.

WANTED (a) School nurse; degree and public
health training required ; five-day week ; $165 ;
midwest, (b) Social worker ; medical ; large
institution located in one of U. S. possessions ;
$160, including partial maintenance, car allow-
ance, traveling allowance. No. 80-SM, The
Medical Bureau, M. Burneice Larson, Director,
Hittsfield Building, Chicago.

IRENE KAUFMANN SETTLEMENT, PITTS-
BURGH, PA, offers limited number summer
residentships to advanced students, teachers,
etc. Applications for this summer now being
received.

SITUATIONS WANTED

WOMAN, vocational counselor equally interested
in group and individual work, Ph.D., executive
ability, to organize and develop new program
in public or private agency. 7491 Survey.

Woman with M.A. Degree, teaching, social sec-
retary, housekeeping experience, wishes work
in institution for girls or women. 7496 Survey.

Graduate Nurse: Public Health, Social Service
training and experience (at present superin-
tendent of "Home for Aged"), desires change.
Highest references. Protestant. 7497 Survey.



LANGUAGES



SPEAK ANY LANGUAGE

by nur irlf-taught methods
37 Languages
Send for Lilt S



SCHOENHOF BOOK CO.



387 Washington Street



Boston, M.



LITERARY SERVICE



Special articles, theses, speeches, papers. Re-
search, revision, bibliographies, etc. Over
twenty years' experience serving busy pro-
fessional persons. Prompt service extended.
AUTHORS RESEARCH BUREAU, 616
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y.



PAMPHLETS AND PERIODICALS

The American Journal of Nursing shows the part
which professional nurses take in the better-
ment of the world. Put it in your library. $3.00
a year. 50 West 50 Street, New York, N. Y.



SUPPLYING INSTITUTIONAL TRADE



SEEMAN BROS., INC.

Groceries

Hudson and North Moore Streets
New York



Your Own Agency

This is the counseling and placement agency
sponsored jointly by the American Associa-
tion of Social Workers and the National
Organization for Public Health Nursing,
National, Non-Profit making.




(Agency)
122 East 22nd Street. 7th floor, New York



TRAVEL



SEATTLE CONFERENCE

Alaska, Hawaii Mexico

National Parks
Ideal Tour Sweden, Norway, Denmark

TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS
501 Fifth Avenue New York

MH 2-7583



Do You Need



Case Workers
Psychiatric Workers
Relief Workers
Publicity Counselors
Institution

Executives
Superintendents
Housekeepers
Matrons
Nurses
Physicians



Teachers

Tutors

Personnel Managers

Industrial Welfare

Workers

Recreation Workers
Boys' Club Workers
Girls' Club Workers
Social Case Workers
Office Executives



An ad in the SURVEY'S classified de-
partment will bring results. Rates:
5c a word, minimum charge $1.00
an insertion.

SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

112 E. 19th Street New York



En Route to Seattle



YOU pass through green country, with its pano-
rama of rolling plains, broad lakes, rivers, vil-
lages, and cities. Although at the last stop the
platform thermometer catapulted to 100 in the sun,
you sit in comfort, for your train is air-conditioned.

It is June, of course June 1938 and you are on
your way to the National Conference of Social
Work in Seattle.

Never before was there a better chance to com-
bine a holiday with a stimulating professional ex-
perience.

The Conference itself is more significant than
usual this year. Big things are happening in social
welfare in the West, and this is the fourth time in
65 years that thousands of social workers from all
over the country will see at first hand how welfare
activities are going forward in this part of the coun-



try. The meeting is scheduled late to permit you to
use it as an easy stepping stone to the most enjoyable

vacation you have ever had.

For the trip westward we offer for your conve-
nience

THE SURVEY SPECIAL

an entire train reserved for social workers, their
families and their friends, en route to the Seattle
Conference. This train is scheduled to arrive in
Seattle on Sunday morning, June 26. You will
have all day to settle at your hotel and to register
for the conference before the opening meeting Sun-
day night. Included in the itinerary is a day of
sight-seeing at Glacier National Park. And the
round-trip railway ticket permits return from Seat-
tle by any route you may select. For information
regarding The Survey Special write to:



MOLLIE CONDON, THE SURVEY SPECIAL, 112 EAST 19 ST., NEW YORK CITY



In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

128



Announcement

The Neuro-Psychiatric Institute of the Hart-
ford Retreat will consider applications from
Graduate Registered Nurses for admission to
the Postgraduate Course in Psychiatric Nursing,
and from graduates of accredited Colleges and
Universities for admission to the Course for
Psychiatric Aides.

Postgraduate Course in Psychiatric
Nursing

The Postgraduate Course in Psychiatric Nurs-
ing leading to a certificate is designed to enable
Graduate Nurses to pursue advanced study and
at the same time, remain self-sustaining. Stu-
dents accepted for this course receive $50.00 a
month and maintenance during the postgraduate
work. For enrollment students must have com-
pleted two years in an accredited college ot
submit an acceptable equivalent. The twelve
months' advanced course begins in April and
October. Accepted candidates may, however,
be admitted at any time. They will be enrolled
in such classes as will further their preparation
for the graduate work.

Course for Psychiatric Aides

The Course for Psychiatric Aides, leading to
a certificate, extends over a period of twelve
months. Designed primarily for students desir-
ing preparation for Psychiatric Aides, the course
provides a valuable foundation for positions in
other branches of social service. The course is
given twice yearly, applicants being accepted
for the March and September classes. To enable
the student to remain self-supporting while
pursuing the course, the Institute provides an
allowance of $50.00 a month and maintenance.

Applications jor admission should be addressed
to the Consulting Director of Nurses,

The Neuro-Psychiatric Institute

of the

Hartford Retreat
200 Retreat Avenue, Hartford, Connecticut



HANDICRAFT SUPPLIES



Educational Handicrafts



LEATHERCRAFT
BEADCRAFT
CRYSTOL CRAFT
BASKETRY
CLAY MODELING



METALCRAFT
BLOCK PRINTING
WOOD CARVING
SPONGEX
KNOTTING



We have all the necessary tools, materials, and in-
struction booklets for a successful craft program.
Complete material to fit all ages and purses. Only
the finest materials carried at lowest prices consistent
with quality.

Classes to train teachers for all the above crafts are
conducted at our studio afternoons, evenings, and
Saturday mornings. Enrollment fees are nominal.
Complete schedule of classes will be sent upon request.

Send lOe for the new fully illustrated 72 page
catalogue of craft supplies.

AMERICAN HANDICRAFTS CO.

Distributors of Quality Craft Supplies
193 WILLIAM ST. 2124 SO. MAIN ST.

NEW YORK, N. Y. LOS ANGELES, CALIF.




Scouting (or All Boys
Wherever They Are I

Attractive brochure free upon application

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

S Park Avenue New York



In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

131



WANTED:

100 NEW MEMBERS
to help us serve these times



We are pulling in our own belt for a tough row ahead. And may
the buckle hold as it did in earlier stretches of the depression. By

the buckle of that belt we mean the convinced backing of the rank

scribers a majority of them social
workers, board, committee and commis-



and file of reader-members who made
the work of Survey Associates pos-
sible when, with income riddled, unex-
ampled claims pressed in on us with
every down swing of the business cycle.

Such claims press in on our work to-
day as employment bogs and industrial
tension mounts.

Stiff Situation

And again our cooperative society itself
faces a stiff situation, such as was not
anticipated even four months ago, when
we turned into our new quarter century.
Again, we are concerned that the work of
exchange and interpretation carried for-
ward by Survey Midmonthly shall not be
crippled in this fresh crisis. Will you
help?

We are sensitive to what these develop-
ments mean to hard pressed social agencies
themselves to social workers and lay-
men alike. It is our business to know and
to serve them as we can. And, we are
told, we do our job well. That is why
in 1937, our anniversary year, we doubled
the Midmonthly members of Survey
Associates. That is why this year, with
doubled urgency we ask you to join forces
with them for 1938 in sustaining its
service in the face of incessant demands.

Survey Midmonthly carries its budget
of news, experience, ideas and gathered
facts twelve times a year, to every state
in the Union. It reaches 16,655 sub-



sion members, citizens up to their elbows
in community activities. If they were
grocers or milliners or physicians or
plumbers and this were their trade paper,
Survey Midmonthly would be a valuable
property through advertising. As it is, it
brought in $38,828 in publishing receipts
in 1937, covering its publishing main-
tenance. The $9,256 more that it took
to balance our Midmonthly Account meant
that the price was kept within reach of
the low-salaried worker's pocketbook,
meant outlay for its non-commercial ser-
vice, meant investment in securing the
new readers that expand that service.
Something less than half of this sum was
met by memberships and contributions to
our Midmonthly Fund; the rest was
drawn from our sorely beset General
Fund, built up annually by memberships
and contributions to our work as a whole.

We shall need $10,000 in 1938 to keep
the work of Survey Midmonthly intact
and vital under the difficult conditions
faced this year.



Will YOU Help?

This page, quite simply, is a direct
personal appeal to you to chip in one-
thousandth part of that sum to become
a basic $10 Midmonthly Member of Sur-
vey Associates. This will include a
regular $5 joint subscription to Survey



May We Count on YOU? Mail the form Below TODAY!
SURVEY ASSOCIATES, 112 EAST 19 STREET, NEW YORK CITY



I want to share in carrying for-
ward the work of Survey Mid-
monthly, n I enclose $10 for a
Midmonthly Membership in Sur-
vey Associates to be so applied.
OR D I pledge $10 payable when
my subscription expires. It is
understood you will send to me
for one year without further
charge, Survey Midmonthly and
Survey Graphic.



Name
Address



Midmonthly and Survey Graphic. It
carries no obligation for renewal.

We should welcome your check for $10
now, whereupon we will extend your
regular subscription for one year from
its present expiration date. Or your
pledge now, to be paid on the expiration
of your subscription. May we count on
you to mail the form below today?

Endorsements

The Survey Midmonthly attaches itself
to my office routine like the morning
newspaper to my breakfast. PIERCE AT-
WATER, executive secretary Saint Paul
Community Chest.

The Survey Midmonthly ought to be
read by every social worker. It is the best
thing of its kind in existence. RICHARD
C. CABOT, M.D., jounder of Hospital
Social Service.

The Midmonthly is indispensable to
well planned work in any community!
J. E. SPROUL, program executive National
Council oj Young Men's Christian
Associations.

Generous support must be forthcoming
so that the Survey Midmonthly s usefulness
may be continued and so that it may take
full advantage of the opportunities for
leadership and interpretation during the
days of social readjustment just ahead.
C. M. BOOKMAN, executive vice-chairman
Community Chest, Cincinnati.

Information based on thorough-going
research, absolutely accurate interpreta-
tion in a readable form, is made available
through The Survey. SOLOMON LOWEN-
STEIN, executive vice-president Federation
for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic
Societies oj New York City.

For years I have turned to the Survey
Midmonthly for current information about
social work. It has been invaluable to me
as a source both of news and of ideas.
KARL de SCHWEINITZ, director oj Penn-
sylvania School oj Social Work, Phila-
delphia.



132



SURVEY M1DMONTHLY



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