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the current of antagonism and skepticism that is manifest
today between workers and laymen simply did not exist."

Every woman in the group contributed a word of agree-
ment. It was evident that even the board members and
active volunteer workers felt that the case had been fairly
stated.

Prompt to seize the opportunity was a member of the
League of Women Voters with the idea that we should
leave social work, including its financing, to the social
workers, and should devote such time, effort, and money
as we can spare to gaining political strength for promoting
legislation for social betterment. She had some pretty good
arguments too.



In answering advertisements



Oh Come Now, Mrs. Farlow

. . . make her own interests . . .

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT

OF course, some of the things Mrs. Farlow quotes are ludi-
crous, such as the statement by a business woman that she
regarded "organized social work as a racket."

It is perhaps natural that a trained social worker who
has put in some time on her education and is doing an
eight-hour a day job should feel that the volunteer cannot
have as much experience or as good judgment as she has,
even though in age she may be a mere baby in comparison
with that volunteer.

And it is also true that social workers, if they wish to
get the understanding and sympathy of the community
for their work, must give the volunteers things to do which
will put them in actual touch with the people whom they
are trying to help. Here the social worker falls short by
forgetting that her job is not ended when she has done
the best she can about solving some problem. The social
worker must educate her community and there is no way
of educating a community except by showing as many of
its people as possible what conditions are among the under-
privileged and how the conditions are being dealt with.

As Mrs. Farlow points out, this cannot be done by offer-
ing people "busy work." However, volunteer workers can
do something for themselves to give their tasks more con-

(Continued on page 182)
please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY
180



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A "Must" Book for Welfare Workers

THE MENTALLY ILL IN AMERICA

A Hillary of Tktir Cart and Trtotmnt from Colonial Tlmtt

By ALBERT DEUTSCH

With an Introduction by William A. White, M.D.

Presents, for the fine time, the
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Homer Folks, Social Worker, says: To anyone who has
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CHICAGO

through ill

Council of Social Agencies



announces publication
of three books
you will want . . .



Social Service Directory, Chicago, 1938

in clotk bindint at tl.40; by mail, 51. SO
i* paper bindint at Sl.IS; by mail, 11.25

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address orderi to

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In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDIIONTHLY

181



Recommended io social workers
and all others interested in
present-day social problems

MAN'S

COURAGE

A novel by Joseph Vogel



'PHIS story of an American family on relief
" gives us "a vivid and informing picture . . .
There should be such a novel as this in the
record along with all the serious discussions
of emergency relief, and for such a purpose I
do not see how it could be better done,"
says Dr. Edward T. Devine.

Recommended by The Survey
At All Bookstores $2.50



ALFRED A KNOPF Publisher /^
501 MADISON AVE NEW YORK '



GENUINE PROBLEMS OF URGENT
CONTEMPORARY INTEREST

PRACTICAL
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ECONOMICS

By BROADUS MITCHELL

and LOUISE P. MITCHELL

The problems discussed here are the sub-
ject of news items and articles to be found
in every newspaper and weekly magazine
. . . Co-ops . . . housing . . . labor . . . the
power issue . . . population . . . transporta-
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matters. As everyone knows, these authors
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are masters of lively and provocative
discussion.

HENRY HOLT AND COMPANY

257 Fourth Avenue New York



(Continued from page 180)

tent. I know a volunteer who has driven a car in a rural
community for both the public health nurse and the doctoi
making his "free" calls. Her work has become very inter-
esting because of her capacity for taking responsibility and
for being interested in people. She not only has taken people
to hospitals but she has kept in touch with them and fol-
lowed them back into their homes, doing many things which
the social worker could not have done. She has made life
more possible for the nurse and doctor on their rounds.
When she knew that they were tired she managed to bring
along food and coffee or tea to cheer and revive them.

On her driving assignments she has gone into the homes
and talked to members of the family who were not being
interviewed by the social worker, the nurse or the doctor,
She has seen many needs which the professionals could not
fill and she has filled them herself. She has carried back a
hundred suggestions for other volunteers; she has made het
organization itself more useful.

Granted that social workers may be intolerant, that they
may not do their share to interest the community, still in
the long run it is the job of the volunteer to make her own
interests and to find out how she can be helpful. If ywj
have the intelligence and the proper spirit there always are
ways in which you can make yourself useful both to the
"case" and to the trained social worker.

... a signal of danger . . .

ALLEN T. BURNS, executive vice-president, Community
Chests and Councils, Inc.

WHILE the results of chest campaigns have been stead-
ily growing for the past three years, making Mrs.
Farlow's reference to "mounting deficits" somewhat un-
representative, it is true that the agencies' requirements
and hopes are still ahead of community support. She is on
still more solid ground in pointing out that gifts in the
middle brackets have been shrinking, the most striking
decrease having been in the $100-$249 class. While the
largest ($5000 and over) and the smallest (from $25
down) actually amount to more than they did in 1929, the
amount received in medium-sized gifts has shrunk. Possi-
bly Mrs. Farlow has found one of the reasons.

Of course it is absurd for social agencies to make chauf-
feurs and no more out of intelligent volunteers. Such a
waste is, I believe, only a temporary by-product of the in-
creasing professionalization of social work. In medicine
and public health, the role of the "professional" has been
so much more generally accepted that we do not hear Mrs.
Farlow's friends complaining that hospitals are a racket.
They do not ask to be allowed to diagnose and operate, or
else. . . . They would probably agree that while there is a
definite place for the volunteer in providing hospital care,
it is not in the operating room.

The community chests and councils themselves have so
many jobs for volunteers, both men and women, and use
them so constantly, that none of this potential energy should
go to waste provided the persons are competent and will-
ing to work with others. An interesting outgrowth of vol-
unteer fund raising for the chest is the informational proj-
ect, sometimes called the women's crusade. Volunteers call
on newcomers to the city, address clubs, produce plays, con-
duct tours to agencies, and do a variety of other work.
Committees of women in Cincinnati, for example, made
studies of the thirty-two agencies for the general budget
committee. It is no paradox that the most successful proj-



In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

182



ts have been those which were carried on with profes-
onal cooperation.

The wise use of volunteer interest which is being made
i many cities, stimulated by a good central volunteer
jreau, where there is one, makes the indictment far from
niversally true. As a signal of danger, however, I trust

will be heeded.

. true, but far from hopeless . . .

I\KY B. WHITE, volunteer. Chicago Commons.

IRS. FARLOW'S observations are all too true, but the
tuation seems to me far from hopeless. I have been
3th a volunteer and a professional worker. I feel that
lere is a place for volunteers even in case work agencies,
here they fit less obviously than in group work.

Visits to uncomplicated cases could be made by volun-
ers just as they are made by untrained "aides" in public
:lief agencies. Old age assistance divisions are becoming
jvare of the real service volunteers can give to clients
ho appreciate personal contacts. School reports, where
:tual visits to the teachers are necessary, are good assign-
icnts for former teachers. Sometimes a client's inability
manage her household presents a problem. Why not
ill in a volunteer who has managed her own home effici-
itly, to help with a schedule?

The women Mrs. Farlow mentioned seemed to think
oing to the clinics a waste of time. I have known some
lients who had to be taken to the psychiatric clinic, if
icy went at all. The conversation of such clients is often
cry enlightening. A volunteer with a good memory and

capacity for listening might record much that would
e helpful to the worker and psychiatrist.

This is by no means a complete category of opportuni-
es ; but all of these services seem useful to the agencies and
iteresting to volunteers. In spite of objections which might
e raised, I am sure the results in increased community
iterest justify the efforts of trained workers to use un-

ained assistants.

. . program must be planned . . .

'OOROTHY S. BOWLES, chairman, National Committee on
olunteen in Social Work.

fT is certainly true that as social work has become more

rofessional, the opportunities for volunteer service have

iccome more limited, at least for the beginning or the

rmporary volunteer. For the volunteer who really wants

p give regular and generous amounts of time, the average

gency, it seems to me, still has a place and in most in-

rances its staff is glad to give supervision and teaching.

Any volunteer service program must be planned, how-
Iver, and in many instances the disappointment of the vol-
Inteer could be avoided through a more careful selection
If applicants and more suitable assignments.

Complaints about dull routine jobs sometimes are well-
lounded but they would be more constructive if addressed
lo the agency itself. The agency would be wise to put a
Inember of its staff in charge of the volunteer program and
lo encourage meetings for discussion between volunteers
Ind staff.

The private agencies, to survive, must do a good job of
Interpreting their work. It occurs to me that they also
must do a sympathetic job of interpreting the work of the
public agency. The idea that "Uncle Sam is doing it" may
tause individuals to decrease their gifts to private agencies,
(Continued on page 185)

In answering advertisements please

183



See You
In Seattle



Soon after you read this, a delegation of Columbia
University Press books in the field of social work will
be off on a transcontinental trip to take part in the
National Conference of Social Work at Seattle. We
cordially invite you to visit our exhibit and see these
useful books, old and new. Among them will be:



A Social Study of Pittsburgh, by Philip Klein and
collaborators. "The book is extremely well written
... a valuable treatise on social work in any area
in the country," says Walter W. Pettit. ($4.75)

Social Case Recording, by Gordon Hamilton. A
new, revised edition of this standard work. "Every
social worker will want a copy of the book for
study and reference." The Family. ($2.50)

International Documents Service: Final Report oj
the Mixed Committee oj the League oj Nations on
the Relation oj Nutrition to Health, Agriculture
and Economic Policy ($2.00) ; Advisory Commit-
tee on Social Questions, Principles Applicable to
the Functioning oj Juvenile Courts and Similar
Bodies. Auxiliary Services and Institutions
($0.40) ; Social Services and Venereal Disease
($0.30). A few of the important studies made by
the League of Nations.

The Social Component in Medical Care, by Janet
Thornton. "Full of interest and stimulus."
Survey Midmonthly. ($3.00)

Social Work as Cause and Function, by Porter R.
Lee. "As a writer, few social workers of our
generation are Porter Lee's equal." Survey.

($2.50)

Can Delinquency Be Measured?, by Sophia M.
Robison. "No social worker engaged in the treat-
ment or prevention of delinquency can afford to
ignore this book." Social Service Review. ($3.00)



These are only a few of the Columbia social work
books, Publications of the New York School of Social
Work, Studies of the Research Bureau of the Wel-
fare Council of New York City, and League of
Nations Documents. See them at Seattle, or write
to the address below for full information about any
or all of them.

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS

Box B976 2960 Broadway

New York City



mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY



H

/


]


Booklets
Periodicals
Pamphlets


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C


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]



CHILD STUDY

A Journal of Parent Education

Each issue presents a complete discussion
of a vital current problem in child train-
ing and family relationships.

Subscriptions: One Year, $1.00
Two Years, $1.76

PARENTS' QUESTIONS

By the Staff Members of the Child Study

Association of America
A book giving the latest, most expert ad-
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wants to know real questions every
parent asks, with sound, practical sug-
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Harper & Bros. 312 pages. Price, $2.00

Order from the
CHILD STUDY ASSOCIATION

OF AMERICA
221 Went 57th Street, New York. N. Y.



METHODS IN GROUP WORK
Alice H. Collins

Learnings from case work experience for
the practical group worker. $1.00.

THE WOMANS PRESS

600 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y.



American Public Welfare Ass'n

1313 East 60th Street Chicago



PUBLIC WELFARE NEWS

-concise reports, released monthly, on
developments in public welfare



Current publications on:

PERSONNEL

MEDICAL CARE

ADMINISTRATIVE PROBLEMS

All Association publications sent to 55.00
members without charge.



The Eye Route (Visual aids for workers' edu-
cation) 15"

How to Start Classes ISt

Handbook of Trade Union Methods 25e

The Women's Garment Industry (economic ana-
lysis) 25e

Let'j Slnfft (43 labor songs) 5e

Send for publications list, rlctrola records, songs
from "Pins and Needles," filmstrlps, etc. to

Director: Educational Department
International Ladies' Garment Workers'

3 West 16 Street, New York City



SOCIAL ACTION

Dealing with the facts behind the

headlines

12 pamphlets each year, $1.00
Recent issues:
America and the Far East, by Nathaniel

Peffer
How to Read a Newspaper, by Paul Hutch-

inson
The Liquor Traffic: Its Costs, by Gordon

Hopkins
Th Home in Transition, by Grace L.

Elliott.
I'ncle Sam and the Farmer, by Ferry L.

Platt
A Primer of Economics, by the staff of the

Council of Social Action

289 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y.



FINDING YOUR WORK

By J. Gustav White
Director, Personnel Counselint Service, Lai

Angeles

Vocational flrst-ild for the puzzled joutn. An
Invaluable aid to both counselors and counseleel,
Tells what vocational counseling Is, where to eel
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Paper, 64 pages, 35c
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BIRTH CONTROL CLINICAL RESEARCH

BUREAU'S

List of Clinics and Centers
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privileged. 356 centers in 43 states.

price We postpaid
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Margaret Sanger, Director
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DR. PARRAN

REPRINTS

for sale

In response to the many requests
for extra copies of Dr. Parran's
article on syphilis and tubercu-
losis which appeared in last
month's Survey Graphic, we
now offer reprints at the follow-
ing low prices: single copies,
lOc each; 100 or more copies,
7c each; 1000 or more copies,
5c each. Send your order and
payment to

SURVEY GRAPHIC

112 East 19 Street, New Yorlt City



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Inescapable Problems of a
Democracy Demand Your Thoughtl

The LI.D. Offers Information and

Social Interpretation on Urgent

Questions

$1.00

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research publication

INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY

Forthcoming Issues:

TOWARD A FARMER LABOR PARTY
by Harry W. Laidler

THE SOVIET UNION AND DEMOC-
RACY by Maxwell Stewart and Nor-
man Thomas

IS HEALTH THE PUBLIC'S BUSINESS by
John Kingsbury



Fifteen Social Group Workers and
Eight Study Groups have contributed to

PROBLEMS IN SOCIAL GROUP WORK
edited by Walter L. Stone

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INFORMAL EDUCATION SERVICE

2622 West Ashwood Ave.. Nashville, Tenn.

Price il.OO postpaid



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112 East 19 Street New York City



ANEWBOOKLETBY

<Miss Bailey

Number 5 in the scries of Bailey
pamphlets is now available. The eight
articles in this booklet were written
for Survey Midmonthly by Gertrude
Springer after visits to local communi-
ties to observe the administration of so-
cial security and public welfare services.
Miss Bailey says Series 5 is a "must"
in reading requirements for public wel-
fare workers and boards of public agen-
cies, as well as for social workers and
laymen connected with private agencies.

Only 25c a copy

Quantity Kates: 10 to 100 20c each;
100 or more 15c each, shipping
charges included. These rates apply also
for the earlier pamphlets in the series.
Order from

SURVEY ASSOCIATES, INC.

112 East 19 Street, New York City



In answering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

184



(Continued from page 183)

: it is the feeling that '"Uncle Sam is taking our money
I doing a bad job of spending it" that most irks the pub-
Private agencies, in an effort to show the value of their
rk, sometimes unconsciously underestimate or frankly
k down the work of the public agency. If contributors
private agencies could be given a little more understand-
of the public agencies and could be convinced that both
ilic and private effort is needed, they would be in a
re sympathetic frame of mind toward giving to private



tncio.



130 East 22d Street



I . . imagination, patience and time . . .

JoKoIHY BROWN, director of volunteer service, Chicago
ouncil of Social Agencies.

FLORENCE NESBI TT, .,.>/.;; general suferintendent. United
t Mantles, Chicago.

WELL, what do you think of it.'"

Mrs. Brown picked up Just an Innocent Bystander as
liiss Nesbitt laid it down.

"Unintelligent and unimaginative," summarized Miss
liesbitt. "Not the article," she hastened to add, "but the
iiare in social work which those agencies assigned to vol-
Inteers."

"Of course it's obvious that Mrs. Farlow is writing
bout case work agencies," said Mrs. Brown. "She isn't
piking about hospitals or settlements, where enormous
lumbers of volunteers are being used so successfully."

"Is that why you brought it to me? Well, speaking for
I family service agency, if we can't make better use of
Hymen than that, we'd better not use them at all. It's true
tut since the development of professional social work the
jlace of the volunteer has shifted . . ."

'"Shifted from what? To what?"

"From the 'friendly visitors' who gave advice on case
.ork, to the advisory committee that is keenly interested
p the broader aspects of our job: housing, recreational
tpportunities and medical care, for example."

"Oh, committees," Mrs. Brown's face fell. "I wasn't
<hinking of your district committees. Isn't that a more or
pss perfunctory service ?"

"I should say not! The 160 men and women who work
p our ten districts are important and busy people. We
louldn't hold their interest a week if they hadn't a real
lob to do. They get out in the neighborhoods and really
Rudy the way our families live. They manage our sewing
looms, visit public hospitals and the courts, and get vacant
lots cleaned up for playgrounds."

"What about the falling off in contributions that Mrs.
rarlow mentions? Have you noticed that?"

"Our budget is bigger than it was before the depres-
jion. Last year we took less from the community fund
Because we received more individual gifts."

"But what about the volunteer who 'wants to work
pith people'? Can she still find a place in the family
ugency?"

"She can, and she does. One of our volunteers has been
Ivorking with the same family for years. It's a family that
jloesn't need a case worker now as much as it needs a
I riend, especially as there are exceptional children for
Ivhom our volunteer has been able to get the opportunities
(Continued on page 186)

In oHTtvering advertisements please mention SURVEY MIDMONTHLY

185



On Press

AMERICAN FOUNDATIONS
FOR SOCIAL WELFARE

Compiled by Bertha F. I lulu-man

THIS useful directory, which hu been out of print for several
yean, hu been revised u of April 19S8. It include*, so far u
available, incorporated name, address, full statement of purpose,
and amount of the established fund of 169 foundations; SO
community trusts are also limed. Ktady loll in May. SO ctmti.

RUSSELL SAGE FOUNDATION



New York



Birth Control Without Contraceptives

THE RHYTHM
OF STERILITY AND FERTILITY IN WOMEN

Discussion of the Physiological, Practical and Ethical Aspects of
the Discoveries of Drs. K. Ogino (Japan) and H. Knaus (Austria)
Regarding the Periods When Conception 1s Impossible and When
Possible.

By LEO J. I. AT/.. M.D.. 1. 1. .U.

I. '111th Thousand 11.01 per copy

at bookstorts or from

LATZ FOUNDATION

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H'ritr your name and address a* a postal card, mall
it to m and mt mill tend yon our FREE PAMPHLET



Two Important Publications

Buffalo Council of Social Agencies

70 W. Chippewa Street

Buffalo, N. Y.

WE AND OUR NEIGHBORS A welfare primer by
Franklin H. Patterson. Illustrated by Hendrik
Willem Van Loon $ -75



CRIME PREVENTION A 22 page summary of ad-
dresses by experts such as Miriam Van Waters,
Sanford Bates, and Commissioner E. P. Mul-
rooney # .60




Notebook



PLANNING A TRIP?

We recommend for your consideration
the special offerings in educational and
study tours presented in the Traveler's
each issue of Survey Graphic.




STICKING to it brings results . . .

I hi. .pfci.l number of SURVEY MID-
MONTHLY contains 17 paces of advsr-
tlslnc especially directed to 20.000 pre-
ferred social workers. Where will you
And a more effective medium for reach-
ing this responsive audience?



Margaret Sanger,
Director

Robert L. Dickinson, M.D.,
Senior Consultant



Hannah M. Stone, M.D.,
Medical Director

Clarence J. Gamble, M.D.,
Medical Field Director



BIRTH CONTROL CLINICAL
RESEARCH BUREAU

17 West 16th Street, New York



District of Columbia
715 E. St., S. W.,
Washington, D.C.



Online LibrarySurvey AssociatesSurvey midmonthly : journal of social work (Volume 74) → online text (page 50 of 109)